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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: podcast, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 867
1. Podcorn Podcast 1/27/16– Could DC Comics’ “Rebirth” Change the Way You See Relaunches?

PodcornTVLogoCould #Rebirth really, truly, launch a DC Universe that looks like nothing we've ever seen before?

1 Comments on Podcorn Podcast 1/27/16– Could DC Comics’ “Rebirth” Change the Way You See Relaunches?, last added: 1/27/2016
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2. Podcorn Podcast 1/20/16- The DC Marvel Fantasy Draft!

PodcornTVLogoOn this week's show, Brandon and Alex face off to create totally new, totally different Marvel and DC universes, fantasy sports style.

1 Comments on Podcorn Podcast 1/20/16- The DC Marvel Fantasy Draft!, last added: 1/21/2016
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3. Gripping short fiction wanted for new podcast

New podcast No Resemblance (Canada) is looking for stories of lives lived and paths taken that in no way bear any resemblance to everyday life. Seeks authors who want to hear their pieces read aloud in some combination of audiobook and podcast form. Short fiction (max 4,000 words) should be gripping and adventurous, with a taut plotline and compelling, active characters. Any genres welcome. Open to international subs. Deadline: April 30, 2016.

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4. Podcorn Podcast V4.15 — The Hidden Meanings Behind DC’s New Double Shipping Initiative

PodcornTVLogoEvery Wednesday, I talk about comics with Brandon Montclare, writer of the hit Image series Rocket Girl and co-writer of Marvel’s Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur series. We gab about what we’re reading now, what books we consider classics (Brandon loves Dark Knight Strikes Again…), and the hottest gossip of the industry.  Occasionally, the inimitable artist Amy Reeder (Rocket Girl, Batwoman) stops by.  Check out our full […]

6 Comments on Podcorn Podcast V4.15 — The Hidden Meanings Behind DC’s New Double Shipping Initiative, last added: 12/31/2015
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5. Podcorn Podcast V4.14- STAR WARS VII is Kylo Rendiculous!!!

PodcornTVLogoStar Wars VII: The Force Awakens. Have you seen it yet? We bet you have. If you haven't, get off your computer and thee to a cinema immediately, because this week's Podcorn Podcast is all about the latest entry in the Space Opera series.

0 Comments on Podcorn Podcast V4.14- STAR WARS VII is Kylo Rendiculous!!! as of 12/23/2015 11:57:00 PM
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6. Oxford Law Vox: deposit protection and bank resolution

In this episode of the Oxford Law Vox podcast, banking law expert Nikoletta Kleftouri talks to George Miller about banking law issues today. Together they discuss some of the major legal and policy issues that arose from the financial crisis in 2008, including assessing systemic risk and whether the notion of “too big to fail” is on the road to extinction.

The post Oxford Law Vox: deposit protection and bank resolution appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Oxford Law Vox: deposit protection and bank resolution as of 12/22/2015 5:51:00 AM
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7. Podcorn Podcast V4.13- Matt Rosenberg Talks Punk and Teen Angst in WE CAN NEVER GO HOME

PodcornTVLogoWe talk WE CAN NEVER GO HOME with the author himself!

0 Comments on Podcorn Podcast V4.13- Matt Rosenberg Talks Punk and Teen Angst in WE CAN NEVER GO HOME as of 12/17/2015 12:45:00 AM
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8. Podcorn Podcast V4.12 – How Jesse Eisenberg’s Hair Killed Batman & Superman

did-jesse-eisenberg-s-lex-luthor-ruin-the-dawn-of-justice-trailer-517483We're all about Lex Luthor's golden locks this week on Podcorn Podcast. Brandon Montclare and Alex Lu analyze the trailer and talk about the outlook of the movie.

0 Comments on Podcorn Podcast V4.12 – How Jesse Eisenberg’s Hair Killed Batman & Superman as of 1/1/1900
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9. Podcorn Podcast V4.11 – BATMAN VS. SUPERMAN is SO Nineties

Batman-v-SupermanEvery Wednesday, I talk about comics with Brandon Montclare, writer of the hit Image series Rocket Girl and co-writer of Marvel’s Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur series. We gab about what we’re reading now, what books we consider classics (Brandon loves Dark Knight Strikes Again…), and the hottest gossip of the industry.  Occasionally, the inimitable artist Amy Reeder (Rocket Girl, Batwoman) stops by.  Check out our full […]

2 Comments on Podcorn Podcast V4.11 – BATMAN VS. SUPERMAN is SO Nineties, last added: 12/4/2015
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10. The Beat Podcasts! More to Come: iTunes – The Graphic Novel

Recorded live in New York, it’s More To Come, the weekly podcast of comics news, interviews and discussion with Calvin Reid, Kate Fitzsimons and The Beat’s own Heidi MacDonald! This week, the More to Come Crew – Heidi “The Beat” MacDonald, Calvin Reid and Kate Fitzsimons – discuss digital comics news from Archie, Hoopla, Google […]

1 Comments on The Beat Podcasts! More to Come: iTunes – The Graphic Novel, last added: 11/23/2015
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11. Podcorn Podcast V4.07- The Importance of Disclosure

Brandon and Alex have a frank discussion about the state of comics journalism.

0 Comments on Podcorn Podcast V4.07- The Importance of Disclosure as of 11/4/2015 6:03:00 PM
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12. Paul Pate Podcast #16 interview with Jim Luhan and Ken Lamug

I took some time to guest podcast with a good buddy and award-winning animators Paul Pate & Jim Luhan. Check out part 1 of the podcast as we talk about our current projects, our inspirations and aspirations. I had a blast and I should really do this more often…

Let us know your thoughts if there’s anything specific you want to ask!

https://paulpate.wordpress.com/2015/11/04/17-ken-lamug/

paul-pate-podcast-16

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13. Podcorn Podcast V4.06- Stupid Sexy Data and How it Affects You

Every Wednesday, I talk about comics with Brandon Montclare, writer of the hit Image series Rocket Girl and co-writer of Marvel’s upcoming Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur series. We gab about what we’re reading now, what books we consider classics (Brandon loves Dark Knight Strikes Again…), and the hottest gossip of the industry.  Occasionally, the inimitable artist Amy Reeder (Rocket Girl, Batwoman) stops by.  Check out our […]

0 Comments on Podcorn Podcast V4.06- Stupid Sexy Data and How it Affects You as of 10/29/2015 11:27:00 AM
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14. The Beat Podcasts! New York Comic Con coverage from More To Come

Brought to you by Publishers Weekly, it’s More To Come, the weekly podcast of comics news, interviews and discussion with Calvin Reid, Kate Fitzsimons and The Beat’s own Heidi MacDonald. This week, we have a wide array of interviews from and about 2015’s New York Comic Con! More To Come 174: An Interview with NYCC […]

0 Comments on The Beat Podcasts! New York Comic Con coverage from More To Come as of 10/16/2015 8:49:00 PM
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15. Podcorn Podcast V4.03- Death of the Direct Market?!

Every Wednesday, I sit down with Brandon Montclare, writer of the hit Image series Rocket Girl and co-writer of Marvel’s upcoming Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur series.  We gab about what we’re reading now, what books we consider classics (Brandon loves Dark Knight Strikes Again…), and the hottest gossip of the industry.  Oh, and sometimes the inimitable artist Amy Reeder (Rocket Girl, Batwoman) stops […]

10 Comments on Podcorn Podcast V4.03- Death of the Direct Market?!, last added: 10/2/2015
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16. Podcast: Jessamyn West, Technology Lady

I spoke to Vermonter Erica Heilman about what I like so much about libraries and technology and why they’re so important. Forty minutes of rural library banter that I think you might like.

1 Comments on Podcast: Jessamyn West, Technology Lady, last added: 9/28/2015
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17. Oxford Law Vox: The evolution of international arbitration

As part of the launch of the sixth edition of 'Redfern and Hunter on International Arbitration', one half of the book’s authorial team Nigel Blackaby and Constantine Partasides QC met up with Law Vox podcast host George Miller. Together they discussed the evolution of international arbitration and the influential role Redfern and Hunter have played in the field.

The post Oxford Law Vox: The evolution of international arbitration appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Oxford Law Vox: The evolution of international arbitration as of 9/22/2015 5:00:00 AM
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18. Serving Latino Teens: Podcast with Ady Huertas

YALSA’s Cultural Competencies Task Force interviews Ady Huertas, Manager of the Pauline Foster Teen Center at San Diego Central Library. Ady has worked with teens for over a decade: from providing instruments and lessons for a library rock band, to providing free summer lunches, to organizing a thriving teen council, Ady continually strives to provide resources and services for teens. She currently leads and contributes to several projects serving Latino teens, such as the REFORMA Children in Crisis Task Force, and the California State Library/Southern California Library Cooperative STeP (Skills for Teen Parents) Project. This podcast gives an overview of how best to reach out and serve Latino teens and provides advice to librarians new to serving Latino young adults and their families.

Resources:

REFORMA: The National Association to Promote Library & Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish Speaking: http://www.reforma.org/.

REFORMA Children in Crisis Project: http://refugeechildren.wix.com/refugee-children.

Webinar about the STeP Project: https://infopeople.org/civicrm/event/info?reset=1&id=485.

University of California, EAOP: http://www.eaop.org/.

National Council of La Raza: http://www.nclr.org/.

National Council of La Raza | STEM: http://www.nclr.org/index.php/issues_and_programs/education/k12_education/stem/.

Summer Fun Cafe: http://www.sandi.net/site/default.aspx?PageType=3&ModuleInstanceID=19400&ViewID=047E6BE3-6D87-4130-8424-D8E4E9ED6C2A&RenderLoc=0&FlexDataID=49011&PageID=1.

Follow us on Twitter:
Ady Huertas: @adyhuertas
Monnee Tong: @librarianmo

Intro and Closing Music: Summer’s Coming from Dexter Britain’s Creative Commons Volume 2. https://soundcloud.com/dexterbritain/sets/creative-commons-vol2

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19. Creative Pep Talk Podcast – Episode 024

Creative Pep Talk

A podcast of quick casual thoughts on finding your thing in the design and illustration world by illustrator and designer Andy J. Miller.

Episode 024 – DO LESS MORE BETTER. I get it, this be bad grammars! I just felt like this title held this theme best.

Here are 20 points to help you “do less more better” and work smarter, not harder.

Ironically my longest episode yet is about doing less!

Listen to more episodes:

IllustrationAge.com/creativepeptalk

Andy J. Miller’s Website

iTunes


Filed under: Podcast

5 Comments on Creative Pep Talk Podcast – Episode 024, last added: 2/12/2015
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20. Creative Pep Talk Episode 025 – Nothing Can Stop You!

Creative Pep Talk

A podcast of quick casual thoughts on finding your thing in the design and illustration world by illustrator and designer Andy J. Miller.

Focusing on what you have no power to change is a recipe for depression!

In this episode we talk about 8 things you can do that will push your art career forward, that no one can stop you from doing!

 

Listen to more episodes:

IllustrationAge.com/creativepeptalk

Andy J. Miller’s Website

iTunes


Filed under: Podcast

0 Comments on Creative Pep Talk Episode 025 – Nothing Can Stop You! as of 2/19/2015 9:53:00 AM
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21. ‘A Cast of Kings’ Podcast: KICKSTARTER

Cast of Kings PodcastDavid Chen and Joanna Robinson have raised more than $1,900 on Kickstarter for the “A Cast of Kings” podcast. With the money, they will be able to continue producing a podcast to re-cap the forthcoming new episodes of the Game of Thrones HBO series.

Here’s more from the Kickstarter page: “It’s only because of your generosity and support in the past that we’ve grown this podcast to the point where people are interested in sponsoring us on a large-scale level. We are eternally grateful to you, our listeners, for getting us here and look forward to an awesome season of Game of Thrones discussion ahead!”

Welcome to our Kickstarter Publishing Project of the Week, a feature exploring how authors and publishers are using the fundraising site to raise money for book projects. If you want to start your own project, check out How To Use Kickstarter to Fund Your Publishing Project.

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22. Creative Juice Podcast

I was on the Creative Juice podcast that was just aired this week on Practice and how long it takes to be good at something. We talk about drawing and obsessions and unused talents.


It was a lot of fun! Listen here: http://thejuicecast.com/practice-practice-practice-part-1/

While you are on the site, check out some of their other topics. The Juice Cast is a podcast for creative entrepreneurs.

0 Comments on Creative Juice Podcast as of 4/24/2015 9:21:00 AM
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23. Twitch.tv Partners with Rocket Girl’s Brandon Montclare and Amy Reeder to Launch First Livestream Comics Podcast

Over the course of the past four years, Twitch.tv has built a digital empire where gamers gather to watch popular online personalities play games such as League of LegendsCounter-Strike: Global Offensive, and DOTA 2.  The site attracts an average of 43 million viewers per month and now, Twitch.tv looks to expand their territory further by partnering with Amy Reeder and Brandon Montclare, the creators of Image Comics’ Rocket Girl, to bring Brandon and Amy’s topical comics industry radio show, Podcorn Podcast, to a livestream near you.

podcorn

As the current production intern for Amy and Brandon, I can testify that they are some of the most enterprising creators working in comics today.  For almost a decade, Brandon lent his editing skills to DC Comics on titles such as Daytripper and Sweet Tooth.  Amy’s art has appeared in groundbreaking books like Madame Xanadu and Batwoman.  Together, they have been working on Podcorn Podcast for the past two years, providing experienced insight into what it means to be a freelancer in the comics industry and the challenges that come with producing a creator owned book like Rocket Girl, which recently began its second arc.  Their partnership with Twitch.tv will allow them to interact with fans in real time, answering burning questions like: “what does DaYoung’s chest symbol mean?” and”why teenage cops?” and “why male models?”

The show premieres this Thursday, June 11th, at 7:30 PM EST, with new episodes to begin at the same time each week on Twitch.tv.  With a guest host line-up of prolific creators including Paul PopeSean MurphyStacey LeeShane DavisAmy ChuFrank Barbiere, and Michael Kaluta, Podcorn seems set to bring Twitch.tv; Brandon and Amy; and the comics industry into a new era of unprecedented audience-creator collaboration.  I recently sat down with Brandon, Amy, and Marcus ‘djWHEAT’ Graham, Director of Programming at Twitch, to discuss what they each hope to gain through their partnership.


 

Alex Lu: Marcus, Twitch has developed its audience by centralizing its content around video games.  Why do you want to be involved in comics?

Marcus Graham: In 2013 we partnered with ReedPOP, the world’s largest producer of pop culture events, to become their exclusive live streaming platform. This relationship enabled us to have a presence at a number of conventions where gaming was the sole or secondary offering, such as the various PAX events, New York Comic Con and C2E2. At the broader pop culture events, our programming would feature both gaming and comic-related content, and our community really took a shine to comic culture. In many cases, the genres overlapped, since a lot of games are based on comics, so there was already a very strong connective tissue. Another way to look at this is that at the core of Twitch is video games, but the interests and passions of gamers go well beyond that.  Comics is just one of the many things that are widely accepted in the culture of gaming.  As a comic book fan, I’m excited that this kind of unique content is available on Twitch.

RG05Both

Lu: What led you to Amy, Brandon, and Podcorn specifically?  

Graham: I mentioned that we attended NYCC, and it was there where I got a chance to interview Brandon and Amy about Rocket Girl.  During the interview, I discovered that they did a comic book podcast.  I asked them if they had ever thought about turning that podcast into a video program so they could expand their audience and take advantage of the ability to showcase comic art, guests, etc.  After many months of keeping in touch, the Podcorn group put together the exact show we had envisioned and are now making the transition.

I was drawn to Podcorn not only because Brandon and Amy are both great and well spoken, but because it’s fantastic these comic creators can offer an insight we rarely get to see.  I see a strong parallel between video game developers who use Twitch and what Podcorn is doing. Game developers discovered that Twitch was a unique way to get in front of their fans and people who love video games, while building a stronger community through social video.  Podcorn is doing the same thing with comics!

popcornLu: Amy and Brandon, one of the unique things about Podcorn is that the both of you are working comics professionals as well as hosts.  You both provide unique insight into the industry that most podcasts can’t offer.  What inspired you two to start a podcast?

Brandon Montclare: The inspiration was pretty simple: I very much like listening to comics podcasts. Our Rocket Girl collaboration started on Kickstarter, and as a fun way to connect with backers we did things like audio Q&A. From there we eased into what became the regular Podcorn show. That connection with fans is still the biggest draw–but we’re also not jaded on talking comics: creation, the business, our personal likes and dislikes. At first I don’t think we connected-the-dots to realize we were the only professional creators doing a show. Creators are on podcasts all the time, but of course that’s usually just as the guest. It’s safe to say we’re comics professionals first, and podcasting is an ancillary interest. But even though we’ve preserved the informality, we’re proud of the show and try to do our best with it.

Amy Reeder: The impetus was all Brandon.  It must be his radio voice!  And maybe something about being a wordsmith writer and having more to say.  I’ve been along for the ride and it’s been an interesting experience…I am not often opinionated online and this is the one place you’ll hear me get semi-bold.

But it was pretty easy to get started because the things we talk about on the podcast are the sorts of things we talk about in person, anyway.  Industry gossip, creating comics, and what we thought of the stuff we watched and read.



Lu: You’ve been running Podcorn as an audio show for a long time.  What made you want to make the jump to video?

Reeder: Video actually intimidates us a little!  It’s not an easy process.  However, when Twitch offered to feature us on their website, who could say no?  It’s a great opportunity, and Brandon and I are always looking for ways to reach out to potential fans outside the general comics channels.  Get it?  Channels?

Montclare: As Amy said, it’s really the opportunity. Twitch asked us to try doing what we do on their platform. It’s a very exciting partnership–we hope to grow our regular audience while giving them more with the video aspect… but we also want to reach/recruit new comics readers. Twitch users are definitely the right demographic, so hopefully some of them will tune in and start down the path of a deeper appreciation for comics.

However, we needed technical help! So we conscripted Mike Furth, who does comics content on YouTube as The Comic Archive. I’m sure it’ll take time for us to get our footing with the video (and the bigger challenge, live broadcasting!), but we’ve been doing some practice runs and are excited for the official launch.

RocketGirl-01-nycc

Lu: How has the development process been?  Run into any interesting problems along the way?

Graham: Turning any show from audio to video can be difficult. As content creators, we tend to fall into habits, and sometimes those can be very hard to break. However, I’ve been incredibly happy to see the Podcorn team work hard to transition from one form of traditional media to this new form of live streamed media that’s taking the world by storm.  The Podcorn team has been running tests and tweaking their broadcasts to ensure they can satisfy their existing fans, while attracting new ones.

Reeder: It’s actually taken longer for us to put together than we had thought originally–we started talking about this way back in October, and we’ve slowly improved our act so we could have a really solid launch.  There’s all the logistics–not just doing video, but making it LIVE; adding visual elements, so people can actually SEE the comics we’re talking about; getting all sorts of equipment and programs to support doing live video.  We’ve gotten help from some stand-up people–including Chris Robinson, who moved on to be an editor at Marvel; Mike Furth, the video guy behind The Comic Archive.

It’s weird to think about.  Because I remember when we put our Kickstarter video together, we just had no idea what we were doing, and it was actually the most stressful part of the process.

Montclare: It did take us a while. Looking back, we probably could have started this a few month sooner. But at the time, it was all unexplored territory. One of our fears has been whether or not we’d be accepted by the Twitch core users. They have an amazing, unique community with rules and customs and Amy and I are truly outsiders. That’s a little intimidating.  However, we are invited guests; more importantly, we’re coming with good intentions and genuine respect! Plus, comics gets the same rap: that the fandom is intimidating when a new reader goes to a local comic shop, walks a convention floor, or immerses himself or herself into superhero continuities.

RocketGirl_06_cvr

Lu: What do you hope to gain from this unique partnership?

Montclare: Personally, I just want to keep having fun, but I think there are some big, global elements that are intriguing. Podcorn definitely doesn’t represent all comics–but our medium has a much smaller audience than stuff like video games, not to mention TV and movies. That being said: comics is second-to-none in content creation. The Batman: Arkham Asylum and Lego Batman video games; the Marvel movies; and The Walking DeadFlash and Arrow TV shows… comics creations have dominated the top brands in all media for a loooong time. When a platform like Twitch gets behind a show like Podcorn, it’s a great opportunity for comics themselves to re-connect with fans who came to these characters through ancillary media.

Graham: As a fan of both gaming and comic books, it’s fantastic that we can bring these two communities even closer.  Some of my favorite broadcasters on Twitch are huge comic fans, and we find ourselves throwing in comic book talk on our streams and while we’re together at events.  I hope that other fans of comics on Twitch get a chance to discover new content and maybe we’ll open the world of comics to others who aren’t even aware of how engaging comics can be.  Additionally, Amazon, who owns the digital comic book site, Comixology, recently acquired Twitch. There is a natural synergy being explored which can benefit both gamers and comic fans around the world by strengthening the partnership between communities.

Reeder: Honestly, I just want to have a good time, connect with fans, and collaborate with the cool people at Twitch. Everything else is gravy!


Check out the Podcorn archives at podcornpodcast.com and tune in on Thursday at 7:30 PM EST for Podcorn’s debut episode at twitch.tv!

1 Comments on Twitch.tv Partners with Rocket Girl’s Brandon Montclare and Amy Reeder to Launch First Livestream Comics Podcast, last added: 6/10/2015
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24. Closing Time: Anthony Desiato’s ‘My Comic Shop History’ Chronicles the Life, Death, and Legacy of His Local Comic Shop

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In the end, memories are what make us who we are.  Although they slip away so easily, these small fragments of past inform our future decisions and influence us every moment we’re alive.  For most of us comic book readers, a formative moment in our personal histories is the first time we step into a comic shop.  The pulpy smell of fresh floppies stacked in Diamond stamped boxes.  The glistening translucent cases filled with TCG singles at exorbitant prices.  The stern and booming voices of people arguing Batman chronology in the back by the trades.

The places individual comics fans make these universal memories shape their lives.  For Director and Comics Historian Anthony Desiato and many other comics luminaries from upstate New York such as Rocket Girl writer Brandon Montclare, these formative experiences took place at Alternate Realities, which is going out of business after nearly a quarter of a century.

Desiato has made it his mission to chronicle the store’s final days through his podcast, My Comic Shop History.  The last episode of this audio series comes out today, and in honor of his intriguing work and Alternate Realities’ storied history, we sat down with him to talk about the legacy of the store.


 

Alex Lu: So for those unfamiliar with Alternate Realities, can you give us a brief overview of your store’s history and what makes it special?

Anthony Desiato: Alternate Realities is (soon-to-be “was,” sadly) a comic book store in Scarsdale, NY, that is closing up shop for good after 23 years.

The store is the subject of my independent film, My Comic Shop DocumentARy, and my current podcast, My Comic Shop History.

The podcast is a 12-episode exploration of the store & its closing from the perspective of past and present owners, customers, and employees. We’ve been peeling back the curtain on the retail side of the comic book industry as we discuss the store’s inner-workings and comic shop culture generally.

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What makes the store special—and the reason I’ve found it such a source of inspiration—is the community.

We count among our ranks a customer who worked at T.G.I. Friday’s but claimed to have killed 25 people in the line of duty as a secret agent; our resident curmudgeon, a former flea market vendor who condemns modern society with language that would make a sailor blush; and the store’s owner, Steve Oto, who traded his legal career for a life behind the counter and a very love-hate relationship with his clientele.

Lu: What’s your role in the store and how long have you been involved?

Desiato: Heroes World (a long-defunct store in White Plains) was my first comic shop, and when it abruptly closed on me during elementary school, Alternate Realities became my new go-to place. For the first few years of my patronage there, I was just the shy kid who would pick up my books every week while my mother waited in the car.

In high school, Steve offered me a summer job, and that was my entry into a whole new world. Throughout high school and college, both my level of responsibility at the store as well as my friendships with the guys who shopped & worked there would grow.

It wasn’t until the end of my employment there (during law school) that I began to take on my current role of—for lack of a better term—“store chronicler.” That new path gave birth to my film about the store, its spinoff (By Spoon! The Jay Meisel Story), and now the podcast.

Lu: What do you think drove the decision to close the store?

Desiato: If you believe Steve’s closing announcement, he’s closing in large part “because of those customers who have left me in the lurch” by not buying the items they ordered. However, if you truly analyze the situation, as we’ve been doing over the course of My Comic Shop History, it becomes clear that the stated reason for closing is perhaps a bit disingenuous.

If customers are reneging on their orders, there are steps a store can take to at least try to remedy the situation first. Closing the store is the nuclear option! It’s not really a proportionate response to address what’s ultimately a small group of delinquent customers.

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What we all realize is that Steve’s complaints are really just symptomatic of a growing frustration and fatigue with running the business.

In Episode 7 (“Comic Shop Business School”), I spoke with the owner of The Spider’s Web, a relatively new comic shop in Yonkers. That owner is two years in and still has his passion for the business and the hobby.

After 23 years of the grind of running a small business, Steve simply doesn’t have that anymore. As he has said many, many times over the years—in person, on Facebook, in My Comic Shop DocumentARy, and in My Comic Shop History—he’s tired. And I don’t think anyone would dispute that he’s earned his rest.

Lu: How has the community responded to the store’s closing?

Desiato: That’s really what the podcast is all about and why I wanted to do it in the first place.

Aside from the friendship we share, what I hope listeners take away from this show is how much we all care about “The Store.”

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Everyone who has participated in the podcast has worked, owned, or volunteered at Alternate Realities at some point. We’ve all invested time and effort and wanted the store to be as strong as possible.

To see the store end in this way has been very bittersweet. Not to speak for the entire community, but for myself and many of the people I spoke to on the podcast, I feel there’s a sense of sadness that it came to this, acceptance that it’s the right move for Steve, and, most importantly, appreciation for everything the store has meant to us. It’s been our clubhouse, truly.

Lu: Given that Alternate Realities has such a long and storied history, those who have been there have had the unique perspective of having seen the comics reading audience grow exponentially and the industry dramatically change. How would you compare comics at the store’s opening to comics now, at the store’s close?

Desiato: Well, seeing as how I was 5 when the store opened, I’m not sure I can really give a full answer to that question! Interestingly, though, the store opened the same year that “The Death of Superman” (my first comic) came out. That was arguably the beginning of “event” storytelling as we know it today, and the store is closing amidst Convergence and Secret Wars, two huge events from the Big Two. So, in a way, maybe not that much has changed!

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To answer your question more specifically: Based on the time that I’ve been affiliated with Alternate Realities, I would argue that we have not seen huge shifts the way you might expect. For example, the rise of comic book movies didn’t necessarily drive hordes of new customers to the store. At the same time, the advent of digital comics did not erode our customer base too much, either.

Lu: What do you think is the next big thing for the industry?

On the retail side, one of the things we talk about on the podcast (we do a “Comic Shop Business School” series-within-a-series across a number of episodes) is how comic shops need to be a “destination” in order to survive these days. Areas to hang out, events, signings–things like that.

Lu: What new projects are the Alternate Realities crew heading off to pursue?

To find out what the store’s owner, Steve Oto, is up to next, I encourage folks to listen to the finale of the podcast, out today! Up next for me is a new documentary and, hopefully, more podcasting in the future! As for our group, we plan to continue the friendships we forged at Alternate Realities. The store may be gone, but the community lives on.


RENT My Comic Shop DocumentARy and By Spoon! The Jay Meisel Story on Vimeo!

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25. The Yarn


If you have not had a chance to check out Colby Sharp's and Travis Jonker's new podcast series, The Yarn, you must check it out!!!

I am not a good listener so I have never paid a whole lot of attention to podcasts.  I have tried a few but never got that interested in anything. I liked to SEE things while I listened. I have several friends who have recommended podcast series but I just didn't get it. They all seemed a little long and boring to me.

But then last week, Colby Sharp and Travis Jonker released their first season of their new podcast series THE YARN.  If you go to their Twitter page (@theyarnpodcast), this is described as: "A narrative of adventures. Travis and Colby go behind the scenes of children's literature in this narrative style audio show." The podcasts are produced by BkPk.Media, a site that shares narrative style podcasts centered around education.

I have to admit, I only listened to the podcast because Colby is my friend.  I knew it would be good, but remember,  I didn't like podcasts. And I had to learn how to subscribe to and play podcasts on my phone. It was big work.  But SOOO worth it.  I was expecting to like it because Colby and Travis are incredible,  but I wasn't expecting to LOVE LOVE LOVE it! The podcasts are GENIUS. I had no idea what was possible in a podcast until I listened to the first episode. Not only are they packed with fascinating information--the story behind the book told in such a distinct and brilliant way--but these podcasts are entertaining and powerful all at once.

The first season of The Yarn focuses on the new graphic novel, Sunny Side Up by Jennifer Holm and Matt Holm. I was lucky enough to pick up a copy of this at the Scholastic Reading Summit and it is an incredible read. The podcasts add more to the story, give the reader more to think about and are just really fun to listen to.  It's like you are hanging out with Travis and Colby and all the cool people they talk to.

I had to listen to the first podcast twice because I was blown away by the way that it was crafted. I kept thinking it was a genre or something that was totally new to me--a type of story I have never experienced and one that I am totally hooked on now.  After I listened to it twice, I made my husband listen to it. He loved it. Then we went to dinner with friends (Tony Keefer, Julie Keefer and Katie DiCesare) and we spent the first 15 minutes of dinner talking about how amazing the podcast was! 

Not only did I enjoy the podcasts as a listener, but as a literacy teacher, the whole digital creation piece was fascinating to me. I couldn't help but think about what an amazing mentor this would be for young writers.  And I can imagine the power of sharing these episodes after reading Sunny Side Up. 

So, you've heard enough from me! Now, if you haven't already started listening, you'll want to do that right away! You can access/subscribe to the podcasts on iTunesStitcher and Travis's Blog.
And if you get totally obsessed with these podcasts like I did, you can read a bit about the launch of the series and learn about the episodes in this season at School Library Journal's blog.  You can also get lots more information about the series by listening to the podcast on Let's Get Busy where Colby and Travis talk about the origins of The Yarn (another amazing site filled with brilliant podcasts by Matthew Winner at The Busy Librarian blog that you'll also want to check out.)

And I just found out that we, as listeners,  have the chance to support more seasons of The Yarn by donating at their Kickstarter site. Check out what Colby has to say about the podcasts and the Kickstarter and think about giving a bit for them to continue this great venture! 



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