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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: noticings, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 14 of 14
1. A Mini-Crash-Course on Oral Storytelling

It’s been several months since I’ve written for Two Writing Teachers. In December my son was born, and I was on maternity leave until a few weeks ago. Then, in March I pushed aside all excuses… Continue reading

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2. The Book Stack

An eclectic little stack today. Click on the images to go to a link about the book. I’ve been enjoying books I can read a little here and a little there. This book,… Read More

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3. The Book Stack

An eclectic little stack today. Click on the images to go to a link about the book. I’ve been enjoying books I can read a little here and a little there. This book,… Read More

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4. I’ve been studying sentence structure…

I was watching or listening or reading something this week — I don’t remember what — but the message was: You can’t be a writer if you’re not a reader. True. (And probably the reason I don’t remember who said it since this little tid-bit is fairly common knowledge.) The person went on to say: [...]

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5. Literacy Festivals Around the World

In preparation for Kane/Miller's upcoming participation in publishing events such as IRA, BEA, and ALA (among many others) it occurred to me that I'm not aware of all of the international literary events that take place.

After some quick research (What would we do without Google?), I found a link and listing of Six of the Best Literary Festivals (according to Harper's Bazaar). I won't be attending any of them - at least not this year - but it's good to know what's happening in the literary world, nonetheless.
  1. Galle Literary Festival, Sri Lanka
  2. Hay Festival Cartagena de Indias, Columbia
  3. Wexford Book Festival, Ireland
  4. Festa Literaria Internacional de Parati, Brazil
  5. Ubud Writers & Readers Festival, Bali
  6. Hay Festival Segovia, Spain

Don't miss FLIGHT 001 - for all your travel needs.

Bon Voyage!

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6. One More Story


One More Story is an online library of the best of children's classic and contemporary literature. Through a simple point and click process, children can choose a book, see the illustrations and have the book read to them whenever they want.

They've just created a blog which is a great place to learn more, add suggested titles and discover different ways to use the site, whether you're a parent, teacher, or librarian.

Kane/Miller is pleased to have a growing list of titles available at One More Story:

From France
Tibili
Written by Marie Léonard

Illustrated by Andée Prigent

From England


This is the Tree

Written by Miriam Moss

Illustrated by Adrienne Kennaway

From South Korea

While We Were Out

by Ho Baek Lee

From Taiwan

Guji Guji

by Chih-Yuan Chen


From France

The Costume Party
by Victoria Chess


From Australia

Fox

Written by Margaret Wild

Illustrated by Ron Brooks


From Spain

Sebastian's Roller Skates

Written by Joan de Déu Prats

Illustrated by Francesc Rovira


(Coming Soon)

From Japan

Singing Shijimi Clams

by Naomi Kojima

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7. Spanish modern graphic design

spanish mid century modern graphic design

Flickr user ex.novo has posted some amazing examples of spanish modern design in advertising from the 1950s, 60s and 70s. The ads are taken from magazines/ journals titled “Clínica Rural” and “Glosa”. Anyone know anything about these journals? Most of the advertisements seem to be related to pharmaceutical products so it’s a great follow up to my previous post on Swiss modern design in the chemical industry.

Big ups to Mike from Burlesque for dropping this gem on me.

, , , , , ,

©2007 -Visit us at Grain Edit.com for more goodies.

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8. What's Your Favorite K/M Book?

People often ask what my favorite Kane/Miller book is. That's an impossible question to answer since - as a small company - all of our office staff has a chance (and plenty of time) to fall in love with every book we release.

I've thought long and hard about this question and have finally decided to select one title per catalog section just so I cover all the bases. It's only fair that I answer the question.
Selecting favorites from these sections was not easy but I'll explain my reasoning behind each choice.

All of my "favorites" are great books for readers of any age in that they speak to both children and adults in very different ways (the mark of a great illustrated book, in my mind).

Frontlist Titles (March 2008)
From France

Jukebox
by David Merveille

For anyone who loves music (don't all children?) this book is wonderful! It covers over a dozen different musical genres which means that there is - most likely - something for everyone. But what it also highlights is that music is something that inspires people, allows us to reach into our imagination (very child-like), reminds us of times past, or enables the listener to reach outside of their (ordinary) every day life.

For young children who may not be familiar with each type of music mentioned, this book will give them the opportunity to perhaps pick their favorites and be introduced to new and different ways to enjoy active listening.
Libros del Mundo
From Japan

¿Quién se esconde?
by Satoru Onishi

From the Spanish language edtions of fourteen K/M titles, I chose the translation of Who's Hiding? based on the fact that it is an excellent book for beginning Spanish readers - of any age - to use as a way to learn colors, animals, and questions that may be useful (Who's crying?, Who's hiding?, Who's backwards?) or not.

Non-Fiction / Concept Books
From Slovenia

Why?
by Lila Prap

Another book featuring animals and questions, Why? answers many questions that I know my son will eventually be asking me. I am prepared ahead of time and can help him learn more about the specific creatures - typically found in a zoo - such as zebras, lions, giraffes, and monkeys (to name just a few).

Board Books / First Picture Books

From Belgium

The Nights of the World
Written by Corinne Albaut
Illustrated by Arno

This was a tough choice to narrow down this section to just one book, but since young ones like books that "do" things, I selected this one with its picture-changing shutters that show day and night on alternating windows. The fact that it represents children from five different regions aound the world as well as being a comforting, gentle book about bedtime makes it a great pick for all of these reasons combined.

To Be Continued...

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9. Favorites (Continued)

Continued from the Previous Post...

Picture Books

From Spain

Sebastian's Roller Skates
Written by Joan de Deu Prats
Illustrated by Francesc Rovira

This section - with over three dozen titles to choose from - was also a challenge for me to narrow down to just one book. Sebastian's Roller Skates really jumped out at me, however, in that it really can work with just about any reader (of any age, gender, background, etc).

Sebastian not only masters a new skill (roller skating, of course) but he also gets over his fear of public speaking and builds up his confidence to the point of finally being able to speak to Esther - a girl from school - which he never thought he'd be able to do at the beginning of the story.

We all have our little quirks (perhaps it is public speaking) that makes us feel not-so-confident or not as comfortable doing (maybe roller skating is one of them) so this book does really speak to readers of all ages and encourages us to try something new - even if it does require a helmet.

Picture Books for Older Readers
From Australia

Fox
Written by Margaret Wild
Illustrated by Ron Brooks

I need to tred lightly when discussing this title, because it is dark, sad, and ultimately, a tale of deception. I don't want to give away the storyline for those who have not read it, but it is certainly a book that will haunt readers and have you thinking about friendship, temptation and betrayal long after the book has been closed.

Several middle school teachers - upon first reading Fox - mentioned the story's similiarities to Shakespeare's Macbeth and several of these teachers use Fox in their classroom as an introduction to this classic work.

Whether you're dealing with playground disagreements or boardroom arguments, this book is an emotional and startling look at the realities of life and working or dealing with others.


First Fiction
From Australia
Jack Russell: Dog Detective
(Book 4): The Lying Postman

The Lying Postman is - by far - my favorite book from the Jack Russell series. Involving a new postman to Jack's route, and a "he said," "she-said" situation, Book #4 in this canine caper series keeps readers guessing until the end as to whether or not the postman is telling the truth.

Also introduced in this mystery is a new character - Ralf Boxer - a little chihuahua who surprises Jack with his courage and shatters every stereotype that Jack has regarding these small dogs.

Gift Books
From Australia

Could You? Would You?
by Trudy White

Trudy has made a fine book for readers of all ages with Could You? Would You? I've personally used this book as a discussion starter with both my four-year-old son and with adult friends. Others that I know have used this book in writing workshops to help get through writer's block.

Be careful though - many of these questions will bring up childhood memories which may have you longing for the times when you could cuddle in a sheet-made fortress under the stars or thinking about what you'd like to do with the time you have left.

What's your favorite Kane/Miller book?


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10. Immersion Begins Tomorrow

I’ll begin immersing my students in the literary essay genre tomorrow. I’m fortunate to have had some wonderful students last year who graciously allowed me to share their essays with future students to-come. Hence, I have quite a few literary essays copied, ready-to-go for my students to possibly use as mentor texts tomorrow. [...]

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11. In Their Words

Today’s Workshop, in my classroom, was spent immersing my students in the memoir genre (or is it genre of memoir… both sound funny to me!). The kids realized that most memoirs are a combination of exposition and narrative. (I compared memoir to a hybrid car. That definitely helped!) After my kids listened to [...]

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12. I’ve been studying sentence structure…

I was watching or listening or reading something this week — I don’t remember what — but the message was: You can’t be a writer if you’re not a reader. True. (And probably the reason I don’t remember who said it since this little tid-bit is fairly common knowledge.) The person went on to say: [...]

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13. Castrillo de Murcia, Spain

bens-place.jpg

Castrillo de Murcia, Spain

Coordinates: 42 21 N 4 3 W

Population: 246 (2006 est.)

Certainly Pamplona’s running of the bulls and possibly the annual city-wide tomato fight in Buñol are well known outside of Spain, but the number of people aware of this Catholic country’s baby jumping tradition (yes, you read that right), is probably a lot smaller. (more…)

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14. Andorra

bens-place.jpg

Andorra

Coordinates: 42 30 N 1 30 E

Population: 71,822 (2007 est.)

If you’re one of a handful of extant micro-states, lacking in natural resources, arable land, or even a sizable labor force, what do you do for money? Well, in the case of the tiny Principality of Andorra, wedged between Spain and France in the Pyrenees Mountains, building resorts seemed to be the best option available. (more…)

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