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Results 26 - 50 of 621,743
26. Cactus Hotel Project Finished

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27. Good and Bad News: Your Work Is Never Done

via Art Biz Blog « Art Biz Blog http://ift.tt/1Fo1Bpp

Newsflash! You’re just getting started.

Whether you think this is good news or bad news depends on your disposition.

Some people feel fulfilled and complete every day. I envy them.

I want more. Not more "stuff," but more out of life. More experiences, more love, more friends, more cats. (Only kidding about that last one!)

I know it’s not fashionable these days to want more. They say I should be content where I am and live in the moment. Can’t I want more and appreciate the present?

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28. GJ Book Club: Chapter 4: "Line Drawing"

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29. Revisiting Scarlet (2012)

Scarlet. A.C. Gaughen. 2012. Walker. 292 pages. [Source: Library]

I first read Scarlet last year. I really enjoyed it, but, not as much as I ended up enjoying the second book in the series, Lady Thief.

So. Scarlet is a retelling of Robin Hood. The narrator is "Will Scarlet" a young woman posing as one of Robin's men. All of the gang know her secret, though they didn't all learn at once. But most of the villagers don't. Scarlet is a thief with a past, a past that will catch up with her by the end of the novel. Through Scarlet's perspective, readers get to know Rob (Robin Hood), John Little, Much, and Tuck. Readers also get to know about the dangerous and cruel Guy Gisbourne. He's been hired to find Robin Hood and his gang and kill them...

How did I feel about Scarlet the second time I read it? I enjoyed it so much more! I think one of the reasons I love rereading is because I can relax and enjoy how everything comes together. The first time I was focused on the potential of the premise, on the mystery--who was this Scarlet?--and on the action--will The Hood and his gang be able to save everyone?! The second time I was able to focus on the development of characters and relationships. I already had a connection with the characters, a LOVE for them, so that helped this reading experience tremendously.

I'll be rereading Lady Thief before I read the third in the series, Lion Heart, which releases in May.

© 2015 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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30. Death If This Be My Day...

I shoulda been writing comics.

Anyhow, not able to do much of anything today but a CBO policy decision was made as I clashed with death above the planet Earth (I really aint all here).

I am going back through all the events I publicised in 2014/2015 and those I never got a follow up press release or event photos from -blacklisted.

Seriously, I give up hours of my time and lots of CBO space to these events and NEVER get any follow ups, even when I ask, so let the cull begin (drawn by Erik Larsen).

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31. Children's Books that Mock Native Names, Paving the Way for Adam Sandler's Satire

On Thursday (April 23, 2015), Vince Shilling, writing at Indian Country Today, broke a news story that was quickly picked up by social media sites (like Gawker) and then news media, too (like CNN, and in the UK, the Guardian).

Shilling's story is about Native actors walking off the set of Adam Sandler's new movie, The Ridiculous Six, because of the ways the script denigrates Native women and mocks Native culture via the names created for Native characters and in the dialogue: Never Wears Bra (in an earlier version of the script, her name was Sits on Face), Strawberry Tits, Stiff In Pants.

People are outraged. I am, too.

Though not as crude as the ones in the script, I've seen that same sort of thing in children's books. Here's some examples:

In Russell Hoban's Soonchild, a couple is expecting their first child. The man's name is "Sixteen Face John" because he has sixteen different faces, all with their own names. They are described in the first chapter. His first face is his (p. 3):

Hi face, the one he said hello with. Face Two was What? Face Three was Really? Face Four was Well, Well. Face Five was Go On! Face Six was You Don't Mean It. Face Seven was You Mean it? Face Eight was That'll Be The Day. Face Nine was What Day Will That Be? Face Ten was It Can't Be That Bad. Face Eleven was Can It Be That Bad? Face Twelve was I Don't Believe It. Face Thirteen was I Believe It. Face Fourteen was This Is Serious. Face Fifteen was What I'm Seeing Is What It Is. Face Sixteen was What It's Seeing Is What I Am.
He's a shaman from a long line of shamans (p. 6):
His mother was Stay With It and his father was Go Anywhere. His mother's mother was Never Give Up and her father was Try Anything. His father's mother was Do It Now and his father's father was Whatever Works. His mother's grandmother was Where Is It? and his father's grandmother was Don't Miss Anything. His mother's grandfather was Everything Matters and his father's grandfather was Go All The Way. 
And... his wife's name is No Problem. Her mother's name is Take It Easy. Her friend is Way To Go. Soonchild was published in 2012 by Candlewick Press.

In Me Oh Maya, Jon Scieszka makes fun of Mayan names. His much-loved Time Warp Trio travels to the midst of a Mayan ball court where an "evil high priest" named Kakapupahed stands over them. They try not to laugh aloud at his name, which they hear as Cacapoopoohead. Me Oh Maya was published in 2003 by Viking.

None of this is new to children's literature. Some of you may recall titles from your childhood like Indian Two Feet and Little Indian and Little Runner of the Longhouse.  

I find these attempts to come up with Native names troubling and problematic in so many ways. Equally troubling are the ways they are described. Hoban's book, for example, got starred reviews from Publisher's Weekly who noted his use of "slapstick" in tackling "the big questions" about life. Booklist, meanwhile, called it profound and offhandedly glib.

Sandler has, thus far, issued no response to Native people regarding his script and reaction to it. The film Sandler is making is slated to air on Netflix. A spokesperson for Netflix did reply (as reported by Vulture) by saying:
"The movie has ridiculous in the title for a reason: because it is ridiculous. It is a broad satire of Western movies and the stereotypes they popularized, featuring a diverse cast that is not only part of — but in on — the joke."

In other words, they're telling the world that Native people are in on the joke. Rather than listen to Native voices, they defend what they're doing.

Sandler's satire is not "ridiculous" at all! 
It is derogatory and offensive. 

I contend that children's books are part of the problem. Things given to young people matter. Giving them books that poke fun of Native names pave the way for the creation and defense of what we see in Sandler's movie.

I'll be back with an update if Sandler or Netflix issue any statements, but carry this with you as you select--or weed--books in your library: Names matter. Nobody's names ought to be fodder for satire or humor, whether it is by Adam Sandler or Jon Sciezka.




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32. Five Questions with Kids Comics Authors

KidsComicQuestions TourBanner

It’s not every day that you get to do a Q&A with some of the best creators of kids content out there. In celebration of Children’s Book Week, Rafael and I were thrilled to get to pose 5 questions to some folks who are working at the top of their game and doing some amazing work. It’s the blog tour of all blog tours.

So check out the tour dates and postings throughout April and May. Right HERE

KidsComicSponsored BlogTourBanner.


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33. Glade Watcher

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34. Red Berries, White Clouds, Blue Sky by Sandra Dallas

American bornTomi Itano, 12, her younger brother Hiro and older brother Roy, 17, have been raised by their Japanese-born parents to love the United States and to be the best Americans they can be.  Every morning, the family solemnly raises the American flag to fly over their rented strawberry farm in California.  The Itanos, Osamu called Sam and his wife Sumiko, had made a pretty good life for their family.

But in January 1942, shortly after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, it all changed.  Suddenly signs reading "No Japs" appeared in store windows, Tomi was no longer welcomed in her Girl Scout troop, and worse than anything, Pop was arrested as a spy by the FBI.

Then came the notice that the family had two weeks to get ready to go to a "relocation camp" taking only what they could carry in suitcases.  Everything they owned was sold for a few dollars each, prized momentos from Japan were burned and the family found themselves living in a smelly horse stall at the Santa Anita Racetrack for the first months of internment, eventually being transfered to Colorado and a camp called Tallgrass.

Throughout their ordeal, Mom, Tomi, Hiro and Roy keep their spirits up, trying to make the most of the situation they are in, even though they hear very little from Pop, and really have no idea what is going on with him.  Tomi meets a girl at Tallgrass named Ruth and the two girls become best friends.  Roy, who had a band called the Jivin Five in California, decides to form a jazz band at Tallgrass, playing at Saturday night dances.  Mom, who had always been a perfect Japanese wife, doing only what her husband said she could do, suddenly blossomed, teaching a quilting class and making her own decisions.  Hiro and his new best friend Wilson start playing on the camp's baseball team.  All the Itanos seem to have adjusted, believing that living in the internment camp is only a temporary situation and they will eventually be able to return to their old life once the war ends.

But when Pop shows up at the door unexpectedly, everything changes.  He looks almost unrecognizable - gray haired, stooped and walking with a cane.  And he is angry and bitter at what has happened to him, and has turned on his adopted country.  Suddenly, happy, optimistic Tomi begins to behave with the same bitterness and anger towards the country she had always loved.  Tomi has become so inflamed, even Ruth doesn't want to hang around with her anymore.

So, when when a newpaper runs a essay contest, Tomi's teacher wants her class to participate, answering the question Why I am an American, Tomi is faced with quite a dilemma  - how should she honestly write the essay.

Red Berries, White Clouds, Blue Sky is the middle grade version of Sandra Dallas's adult novel Tallgrass, which I have not read.  I've read a lot of books about Japanese internment, and while I do believe it is a shameful period of American history, I can't say I was terribly inspired by this particular book.

Factually, this was a good novel, although a bit too didactic at times.  It is meant for young readers who may not know much about how the Japanese were treated in this country during WWII, and I realize that inserting factual information is a tricky business.  Still, that could have gone more smoothly, or put into notes at the end of the novel.

But I found Red Berries, White Clouds, Blue Sky forced and emotionally cold.  I never really formed a clear picture of Tomi, Roy or Hiro, though I felt their mom was a better drawn character, and it wasn't until Pop arrived at Tallgrass that there was any real feeling.  I kept wondering how and why the Itano family didn't get angry, bitter, depressed at having their lives disrupted, when everything they worked for was lost, and people who were friends suddenly turning on them, at least for a while.  That's a lot of emotional stuff to handle for anyone, but they just easily assimilated throughout their whole ordeal.

In the end, Red Berries, White Clouds, Blue Sky is an OK novel at will give readers some insight to what life was life in the internment camps.  I am, however, now curious to read Tallgrass and see what that novel has to offer.

This book is recommended for readers age 9+
This book was borrowed from the NYPL

The Library of Congress has a Teaching Guide using Primary Sources to learn more about Japanese American Internment During World War II HERE,

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35. en medias res???

Hello, I first want to say that I appreciate all of your brilliant advice to you give on this site. I find them all extremely helpful. My question this

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36. To Attack the Stack . . .

To Attack the Stack . . .

puppy stack booksMonths of health problems, of which rehabilitation and recovery have finally begun—”YEAH!”—a knee  injury, and now gout in the large (large and red) knuckle of my big toe—yep, all on the same leg—(conservatively) stopped 130 book reviews, not that the current TBR stack has anywhere near that number of books.

kids-sitting-on-booksNeeding—wanting—to get these books to local school kids, honor my commitments to several wonderful publicity/marketing directors, and give myself a smidge of breathing room, most non-publisher review and tour requests—meaning predominantly self-published authors—have been turned down or asked to request again at a later date. This means not helping deserving writers, and robbing my loyal readers—yes, you—of some excellent stories from these creative, on-their-own writers. Even though reviews are Robot_Dog-33currently free, I feel increasing guilt with each “request denied” reply written.

That said, whenever themes emerge or similar genres can be grouped, one post may contain two or, less often (except the next post), three reviews. My lower word count* goal is still my goal. The shared post, really a summary of my thoughts, will not devalue any title’s review simply because it must share the
stars. Each title will have its own post and you can choose which complete review(s) to read.

I hope you will also choose to leave your own thoughts, opinions, and humorously crazy comments. puppy pencilEach one is much appreciated, read, and will receive a reply. Mr. This-Kid-Reviews-Books is fantastic at replying that same day (a goal I cannot seem to reach), but honestly, each comment is read and I promise, each will receive a reply . . . though not at the speed of James Patterson’s pen.

Therefore, please, I beg you, er, don’t make me beg!? Leave your legacy! Write thy witty words. Post perplexing prose. Rooaar, hisssss, or SNAP if dis-grrrrunt-tled. Like everyone who writes, I wait with baited breath for your comments; your review of my work; your words of wisdom; your ona . . . onomate . . . onomatopeaa . . . onomatopoeia.

Tank you and take care,

concentradoestudiosox

Sue

x
(Dang it! I know, this salutation needs twicked; dare I admit, needin you’re assistance. Many of you wonderfully loyal and precise, uh, preshous—oh heck, you, reader are a much better writers than I, I meant, me? . . . I? . . . . wee? . . . . . (Ugh, does I need a superhero!)

Cute_Dog_Robot-13Copyright © 2015 by Sue Morris/Kid Lit Reviews. All Rights Reserved

*Word count = 392.


Filed under: Guest Post, HELP!, Review Blogs Tagged: appreciation, children's book reviews, commenting, Erik from ThisKidReviewsBooks, Kid Lit Reviews, reviews, Sue Morris, TBR, You the Loyal Reader

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37. Groundhog Day - Groundhog Day - Groundhog Day - Groundhog Day - Groundhog Day

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38. Dazzle Camouflage


Dazzle camouflage was a form of disruptive coloration painted on ships during World War I, using bold contrasting shapes that had no relation to the forms of the ship. 

The idea was not so much to make the ship disappear as it was confuse the observer about the vessel's shape, range, and heading.

Norman Wilkinson, "HMS Malaya" oil

Some Cubists, notably Picasso, claimed to have invented dazzle, but it was credited to Norman Wilkinson, who was both an artist and a lieutenant commander in the Royal Navy. 

He promoted the idea that ships' paint schemes should be designed "not for low visibility, but in such a way as to break up her form and thus confuse a submarine officer as to the course on which she was heading." 

The paint strategy was used not only on military ships but also on merchant ships and passenger liners. It gradually fell out of favor after the First World War.

Dazzle schemes were not just black and white, but often used bright colors as well.

Arthur Lismer, RMS Olympic in Dazzle at Halifax, Nova Scotia, 1919
Other artists painted pictures of these ships in harbor, giving their canvases an automatic modern look.

Edward WadsworthDazzle-ships in Drydock at Liverpool, 1919
-----
Related post: Disruptive coloration

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39. Uncanny Magazine Cover

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40. Play it again (Uncle) Sam: continuities between the adoption and renewal of Trident

In March 2007 the British government of Tony Blair officially decided to extend the life of the Trident submarine deterrent through a ‘life extension programme’ whilst also placing before parliament the need for a successor system. This essentially began the debate on a successor system.

The post Play it again (Uncle) Sam: continuities between the adoption and renewal of Trident appeared first on OUPblog.

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41. Exhibition: William Joyce

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42. V is for Village

...from Little Boy Good-for-Nothing and the Shongololo - my original African folktale for the very young, illustrated by me and six year old children from a local school


Chapter One - Where is the Rain-Cloud?
In a small thatched hut, in a far away village in Africa, there lived Little Boy Dakarai and his Grandmother.
Grandmother was worried. There had been no rain for days and days. She looked for the Rain-Cloud across the far Chizarira Hills. But all Grandmother could see was the hot scarlet sun digging his fingers in the dry, sandy soil.
‘If the rain does not hiss and burst on the Mealy-Meal-Pods in the vegetable patch, we shall go hungry,’ Grandmother said. ‘Dakarai,’ she said to Little Boy. ‘Go down to the vegetable patch and see if the Mealy-Meal-Pods are ready to eat.’
So Dakarai trotted along the sandy path to the vegetable patch. On the way he met some bigger boys carrying their hunting spears.

‘Hello, Dakarai,’ they said. ‘We’re going hunting, but you can’t come. You’re too small.  You must look after the vegetable patch. Little Boy Good-For-Nothing! Little Boy Good-For-Nothing!’ they shouted. They laughed at him and ran away.
‘I am not Good-For-Nothing,’ Dakarai said fiercely. ‘I sweep the floor and wash the food bowls for Grandmother.’
But he wished he could go hunting too.
      When he reached the vegetable patch, he heard a gruff voice.
‘‘One…two…three….four….that’s right….five…six….bother!’
It was his friend the Shongololo, the millipede with seed bright eyes. He was busy trying to count his feet, but he could never remember what number came after six.
He was so busy counting that he didn’t see Chapungu the eagle, high up in the sky, hunting for his dinner. Chapungu swooped down and snapped up the Shongololo in his beak.
‘Put me down!’ shouted the Shongololo.
‘Let go, let go!’ shouted brave Little Boy Dakarai. He clapped his hands and ran towards
the eagle with the cruel beak.
Chapungu dropped the Shongololo and flew away. The Shongololo fell onto his back in the soft sand, wriggling his feet in the air. Then he turned himself the right way up. ‘Yo
u saved my life, Dakarai, so I shall help you. Ugh! The Mealy-Meal-Pods are too tough to eat. Go to the Rain-Keeper, who lives beyond the Chizarira Hills,’ he said.
‘What must I do when I get there?’ asked Little Boy Dakarai.
‘You must ask the Rain-Keeper to bring the Rain-Cloud. Look for the Rain-Keeper’s hut beside the Zambezi River. Oh, and watch out for the Crocodiles!’ Then the Shongololo scuttled under a stone.


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43. Lady Ninja!

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44. If We Were Having Coffee


 Weekend Coffee Share
Don't mind if you prefer decaf or another beverage, would be great to have company. Next week, all being well, my summerhouse should be in the garden, and given the weather, not too hot, not too cold - sounds like the Three Bears - it will be a lovely place to share.  First I'd want to know how your week has been. Then I would tell you that I'm thankful that the A to Z Challenge is almost at an end, and that soon there will be no excuse I can use as a reason for not finishing and publishing River Dark. After that, I would ask you if you would mind listening to to the first chapter of this sequel, as I'd love to hear what you think. 



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45. Erich Wolfsfeld (1884-1956)

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46. Close to the finish line


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47. I'm A Rocketman


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48. 5 Ways To Kill Your Dreams

I like this TED talk by Entrepreneur Bel Pesce from Brazil. Have a listen, have an inspiration. Click the image to watch the video at TEDGlobal:

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49. Sand & Shore Scenes from Dieppe

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50. Rising Star Award

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