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26. ALSC Member of the Month – Angela Hubbard

Each month, an ALSC member is profiled and we learn a little about their professional life and a bit about their not-so-serious side. Using just a few questions, we try to keep the profiles fun while highlighting the variety of members in our organization. So, without further ado, welcome to our ALSC profile, ten questions with ALSC member, Angela Hubbard.

Photo courtesy of Angela Hubbard

Photo courtesy of Angela Hubbard

1. What do you do, and how long have you been doing it?

I’ve been with the ALSC office since May, which seems like just yesterday, and I am thrilled to be to go-to person on the ALSC team for projects and partnerships. In addition to sharing information with our partner organizations, I promote our members’ Día activities throughout the year and manage grant opportunities like Curiosity Creates.

2. Why did you join ALSC? Do you belong to any other ALA divisions or roundtables?

My background is in elementary teaching and early childhood advocacy, and I have always been amazed by librarians’ ability to—simply put—do SO much for such a broad range of people. ALSC seemed like the perfect fit because of my passion for education and my desire to make sure that all children have the opportunity to experience the joy of wandering through row upon row of books in the welcoming setting of their local library.

3. Would you rather bring a lunch from home or eat out at lunch?

Oh, from home, hands down. First off, I eat little tidbits of things throughout the day… a yogurt here, a few grapes there… so I pack a lot in my lunch. I also LOVE to garden, so right now everything we make at home is packed with fresh tomatoes or zucchini. There’s nothing tastier than food made fresh from the garden, in my book.

4. E-books or Print?

I am still very much a print person. I don’t knock e-readers for others, but I remember what I read much better when there is actual page turning involved. I also like that I can give (print) books to friends after I’ve read them. Have they added that function to e-readers yet… digital re-gifting?

5. If you could have any superpower, what would it be?

I’m going to go with something completely within the realm of possibility… I would have the superpower of making the subway train run express to and from the station of my choosing. Ahhh what a glorious commute that would be!

6. What’s your favorite season?

Photo courtesy of Angela Hubbard

Photo courtesy of Angela Hubbard

Summer is my favorite, although we really only have two here in Chicago, so that’s not a very difficult choice! Since summer is filled with streetfests, playing sports and gardening, it beats shoveling crusted over snow any day!

Did I mention that I love gardening?

7. What do you love most about working in the ALSC office?

Working in the ASLC office allows me an opportunity to hear about some of the awe-inspiring work our members are doing all over the country. I especially love getting the chance to know our members through their committee work and figuring out ways to amplify their impact.

8. What’s your favorite form of exercise?

I prefer to exercise by playing team sports. Volleyball is my favorite, followed by softball and dodgeball. Yes, we actually have adult dodgeball leagues in Chicago… because Chicago is awesome and you should move here.

9. Favorite age of kids to work with?

This is a tough one because each age has its charm, but I would have to say the three to five year old range is my favorite to work with. I love how quickly they grow and make connections at that age. I haven’t worked with children under three yet, but I’m sure the rapid development is even more amazing in the birth to three range.

10. What do you think libraries will look like fifty years from now?

I’m sure technology will change some content formats and delivery systems, and perhaps the architecture will have entered a new era, but fundamentally I think the library will still look as magical as it always has. There will be an enormous amount of information available and people of all walks and stages of life will be tucked into reading nooks here and there, asking an occasional question to the librarian who probably remembers them from the last time they were in and suggests something else they might find interesting.

*********************************************************************************

Thanks, Angela! What a fun continuation to our monthly profile feature!

Do you know someone who would be a good candidate for our ALSC Monthly Profile? Are YOU brave enough to answer our ten questions? Send your name and email address to alscblog@gmail.com; we’ll see what we can do.

The post ALSC Member of the Month – Angela Hubbard appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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27. Illustration Friday: Work

Alas, his work was not yet done.

I finished reading War and Peace this week, which for me is a big deal.  I don't have much time to read, so it took me several months to get through it.  I'm embarrassed to admit that I have dozens of classic books, but I've never read most of them.  So I challenged myself to give them a little love, starting with the biggest and most daunting one.  I was surprised at how contemporary it felt at times, and the characters were wonderfully complex, never entire good or bad.  Very human.

Any suggestions on a favorite classic for me to read next?


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28. Crazy September Ahead!

Can you believe the calendar says September already? Seems like I say that every month, not that’s it’s September, but you know what I mean. August was a decent month for reading. I didn’t finish a huge number of books but I did start reading a huge number! Yes, yes, there is definitely an imbalance there, but I suspect that even if there were some sort of magic pill or vitamin supplement to right the imbalance, I would refuse to take it. Besides, it all works out in the end anyway and there is no reason to get ruffled about it.

What’s on tap for the month? Should I repeat myself from a few August posts? Sure, why not, you may not have read those, or maybe you have forgotten unless you are creepy weird and keeping diligent track of all the titles I mention that I am reading.

Ok, so this is what’s going on:

  • Rare and Commonplace Flowers: The Story of Elizabeth Bishop and Lota de Macedo Soares by Carmen L. Oliveira. Thank goodness I got this one from the university library so I don’t have to rush through it! The book goes along with my study of Elizabeth Bishop. I am also reading the Complete Poems and have made it through the first two books she published. In addition, I am reading her letters, One Art. So very good!
  • The Rider by Tim Krabbé. A classic in the realm of cycling memoirs. The opening is fabulous. It begins just before a race and you can really feel the tension and excitement.
  • The Republic of the Imagination by Azar Nafisi. I am about to begin on her close reading of Huckleberry Finn and I expect it will be good. Even if it isn’t, the introduction of this book is fantastic and is alone worth the price of admission. I plan on writing about that introduction soon because its themes have popped up in a few other places recently.
  • Still Time by Jean Hegland. I am enjoying this one very much. It is about a Shakespeare professor who has Alzheimer’s and is slowly losing his memory. Rich with Shakespeare quotes and references, celebratory, yet sad.
  • I am sorry to say I failed to finish reading The Architect’s Apprentice by Elif Shafak. I have not intentionally dragged this one out so long. Hopefully September will see me getting to the end of it!
  • Karen Memory by Elizabeth Bear. I am loving this book so much right now. I am reading it on my commute and at lunch and I have almost missed my stop a couple times and have been a tad late returning from lunch once or twice.
  • Oscar Wilde’s Women by Eleanor Fitzsimons. This is for a Library Journal review and is about the women in Wilde’s life who influenced him.

Phew, got all that?

Now, just arrived and about to arrive from the library, a number of books that I placed hold requests on at the beginning of the summer!

And speaking of the RIP Challenge, it’s on! This year it is being hosted by The Estella Society. And it is the ten-year anniversary of what has become an annual event for a good many people. Given that pile of in progress books I just listed, I am not certain how much creepy reading I will get in this year, but I will manage at least one book. It runs until October 31st, so maybe I will be able to slip in something else that’s short. You just never know!


Filed under: In Progress

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29. Discussion Points: Line-Wide Crossovers are Great for Sales, Awful for New Readers

On my lunch break today, I decided to catch up on a few books I had fallen behind on.  Among them was Silk.  I picked up the latest issue, branded with the “Last Days of…” banner given to all Marvel mainline Secret Wars tie-ins, and while I missed the cleanliness of regular artist Stacy Lee’s lines, I found […]

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30. Bring Out Your Dead (Reviews!): Today’s Feature – Wings by William Loizeaux

Leaving one library system to enter another can give one a sense of
déjà vu.  At least when it comes to weeding the books.

Back when the Donnell Central Children’s Room across the street from the MOMA had to weed down its books to fit in the new location on 42nd Street, we did some EXTREME WEEDING (I’m using capital letters to emphasize the extremity of the situation).  A lot of oldies but goodies fell by the wayside.  Then I moved to the Evanston Public Library system.  They are undergoing a big weeding project in their children’s room and lo and behold many of the titles I weeded back in the day were there on the carts, ready to be weeded yet again.

They are the same books because they were well reviewed in their time, maybe even garnering a couple awards here and there, but they didn’t have staying power. The elusive art of writing a book that stays in hearts and minds not just for a couple years but for decades on end is impossible to teach.

With these thoughts tooling about my brain I went over to my wiki of reviews (I need to update it with my recent reviews, but that’s neither here nor there) and looked at some of the old titles there.  I started posting my reviews when I started my blog way back in 2006, though I’d been writing them on Amazon for a couple years before that point.  And the books that were the cream of the crop since ’06 . . . well, some of them just don’t get mentioned by much of anyone anymore.  Remember Fortune Cookies by A. Bitterman or The Mailbox by Audrey Shafer?  Some of you do.  Others, not so much.

So here’s a bizarre idea for a series. I’m going to revisit an old review of an out-of-print book once in a while.  Not with any real hope of getting it republished.  More, just to shine a light on the fact that the sheer number of titles published in a given year often leads to hidden gems that stay that way.  Hidden.  And today’s lucky little number is . . .

Wings by William Loizeaux

Originally published in 2006, the book got a nice round roster of favorable reviews.

  • Booklist said of the art, “Shaded pencil drawings illustrate this graceful story with sensitivity and subtlety.”
  • SLJ said, “the story is both realistic and tender.”
  • Said Horn Book Guide, “The writing is deft, and the bird lore authentic.”
  • PW Annex said, “Bowman’s pleasing halftone illustrations augment the narrative’s emotional impact. “

It didn’t garner any stars but everyone seemed to really enjoy it.  It was author William Loizeaux’s first novel for children and he would later go on to write the also charming Clarence Cochran, A Human Boy.  I liked it very much and it would appear on NYPL’s 100 Titles for Reading and Sharing list.  And so, just because I enjoyed it, here is my old review for Wings, by William Loizeaux.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51TF6EZJ1AL.jpg

In a February 8, 2006 edition of Christian Science Monitor, author William Loizeaux offered these thoughts on the “elastic” nature of the personal memoir: “memoir is the creation of a mind remembering. The writer recalls and reflects on the past and evidence gathered about that past. Usually, the more evidence the better, but as any memoirist will tell you, remembering is always a tricky business.” With memory such a tricky beast and literary scapegoats like James Frey to draw attention to the facts surrounding a person’s past, it’s seems safest to do as William Loizeaux has done and fictionalize an important moment in one’s past instead. You cannot be held responsible for what is and is not true when you produce fiction. Instead, if you happen to mention after the fact that such n’ so in the book really did happen to you, you’ll meet someone delighted with this startling piece of evidence. And that certainly beats the complete stranger that may take you to task over whether or not you really did, say, comb your hair counterclockwise on the 15th of November. Loizeaux, however, has gone even farther and has turned a small moment from his childhood into a children’s book. It could have been awful or patronizing or puffed up with self-regard. It could have been, but it isn’t. Instead, it’s a misleadingly simple tale of a boy and his mockingbird. A tale worth remembering.

Nick found the bird standing in the center of the street looking like nothing so much as a circular ball of feathers. As it turned out, it was a baby mockingbird, alone and abandoned by its parents. After naming the little creature Marcy, Nick comes to care for the bird with a little help from his mother and his best friend Mate. Once she has thrived under his care, Marcy is able to offer Nick a great deal of comfort. She listens to his problems, whether they involve how his father died in the Korean War or the man who’s currently courting his mother. The book follows the two friends as they experience a whole summer together. But when a family trip means that Marcy and Nick must separate, the boy must learn how to let go of something he loves, even if that means losing it along the way.

Children’s librarians tend to eye adult authors that have crossed over into the world of kiddie lit with a wary skeptical eye. Adult novelists, after all, have proved time and time again that they are not always able to produce a believable title for children. Such writing often requires an entirely different set of muscles, and too often you’ll see these authors either going too far and creating something faux-childish or not far enough, creating a book of laughable complexity. Allow me to set your mind at rest in the case of Mr. Loizeaux. With an ease that is sure to infuriate his frustrated adult-authorial brethren, Loizeaux’s “Wings” reads as if it was written by a man who has been penning children’s books for years. He doesn’t speak down to his readers or insult their intelligence. His adult books have been described as having a “luminous clarity” and that same clarity is what makes him such a perfect children’s book writer. Nothing in “Wings” feels simplified. Just simple.

Nostalgia, should anyone ask, is very big right now. Peruse your local bookstore and you’ll see title after title set in 1950s or early 60s American. Sometimes this is because the author looks back on the political situation of the U.S. at that time and can draw parallels to the current administration. Sometimes it’s because they see the post-war era as a “simpler” time and they want to return to that moment, warts and all. But the impetus for Loizeaux to set his book then is neither of these. Rather, this is his story of what happened to him, personally, when he was growing up in the early 60s. The time period is not the focus here. It’s important to the story, sure, but it’s also incidental. Throw in some iPods and this book could just as easily take place today. But it didn’t. It took place in 1960, so that’s when it’s set.

A reviewer would be amiss if they did not happen to mention illustrator Leslie Bowman’s work on this book as well. With a title of this length (138 pages) the question of whether or not to even have an illustrator would have been difficult to figure out in the first place. You don’t want to drive off the older readership that would eschew “baby” books with pictures. On the other hand, if the artist is able to add something to the experience of reading the book, wouldn’t that person be an asset rather than a drain on the book’s reception by children and adults alike? It doesn’t hurt matters any that Ms. Bowman was undoubtedly the perfect artist to place alongside Loizeaux’s prose. Bowman’s work in the children’s book field has been sparse over the years, though not without praise (as with her work on “The Canadian Geese Quilt” by Natalie Kinsey-Warnock). Now, however, it feels as though she’s found the perfect fit. Images that look as if they were done in graphite are drawn in a realistic style. Marcy looks like a real mockingbird, white patched wings and all. The boys who raise and love her are crewcutted and haven’t a trace of cartoonishness to them. For this book, that was essential. I don’t like to consider what the alternatives could have been.

In his Christian Science Monitor article, Mr. Loizeaux had this to say, “At its best, a memoir combines hard research, an engaging narrative, the intimacy of lyric poetry, and the thoughtfulness of an essay.” He was, of course, referring to adult memoirs, but it’s not stretching the truth to say that this applies perfectly to “Wings” as well. You’ve facts on real mockingbirds provided in the back of the book in Loizeaux’s, “A Note On Mockingbirds” (though a source of some sort would not have been out of place). You’ve an interesting story that kids will want to know more about. You’ve the lyric poetry of lines like, “It’s hard to describe just how good this felt: to call something wild from out of the sky, and then to see her with her wings so wide.” And finally you have a sense of the thoughtfulness that went into the creation of the tale. “Wings” also performs the one act a book must fulfill to truly become a classic. It touches adults just as closely as it does children. Anything that can affect a person, regardless of age, is a thing worth remembering. A memorable children’s novel.

Notes On the Cover: Brilliant. Bowman’s a smart cookie and this is exactly the kind of picture that’s going to pull on children’s hands with the force of a strong animal-centric magnet. It also makes it perfectly clear that this is a “boy book”, or at least has a boy in it. Reluctant readers may prefer it for that reason. However you care to look at it, this is how a cover should be done. A nod of the head to Melanie Kroupa.

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31. Iowa Children’s Barber Exchanges Cuts For Stories

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32. Beauty is a Wound review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Eka Kurniawan's Beauty is a Wound.

       With Indonesia the 'guest of honour' at the Frankfurt Book Fair this year we're seeing a couple of Indonesian works getting translated into English (a celebration-worthy rarity !), and the one-two punch of Kurniawans -- this one, and Man Tiger, also due out this month, from Verso; see their publicity page, or pre-order your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk -- is probably the most anticipated of these (though don't forget Leila S. Chudori's Home, coming from Deep Vellum ... pre-order your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk).
       Beauty is a Wound lives up to the hype; I hope to see Man Tiger soon, too.

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33. Australia Children’s Book Week 2015 YA Short List

I didn’t even realise the Australian Children’s Book Week awards were happening until I strolled into my library and ran face-to-face with the display. And better yet?! I’d read 5 out of 6 of the Young Adult short listed books! GO ME. (Clearly I’ve got monstrously good taste in books.) So obviously we need to have […]

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34. Poetry Seven Write Found Poems

I haven't quite decided how I feel about found poems. I did a lot of reading while trying to find just the right source. I tried mining historical documents, but the language was already embellished in many ways and while I tried to create something new, using such beautiful language felt like a bit of a cheat. Ultimately I decided to look for plainer language and perused cookbooks, travel brochures, and classic educational works.

The pieces I'm sharing today are made from highly redacted text. After retyping and justifying each excerpt, I blacked out sections until I had my poems. You will need to click on the images to enlarge and read them. (Just in case you are wondering how to read these, scan from left to right, top to bottom.)

When I posted the poems to the Padlet that Laura created for this month's efforts, I realized that together they actually told a story, so that's the way I'm sharing them here. The first two poems were created from excerpts of the book How We Think, written in 1933 by John Dewey. (Poem 1 from p. 10-11. Poem 2 from p. 109.) The third poem was created from the introduction and directions found in a recipe by Jamie Oliver. That recipe is Monkfish Wrapped In Banana Leaves With Ginger, Cilantro, Chile, And Coconut Milk

WHEN KINDRED SPIRITS MEET
(a short story told in found poems)

A man ...
finds his love ... 
 and sparks fly.
Poems ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2015. All rights reserved.

You can read the found poems written by my Poetry Seven compatriots at the links below. 

I do hope you'll take some time to check out all the wonderful poetic things being shared and collected today by Linda at Teacher Dance. Happy poetry Friday friends! 

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35. Scholastic Education Hires Three New Executives

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36. Inari Konkon Review

Title: Inari Konkon Genre: Slice of Life, Magical Girl, Romance Publisher: Kodokawa Shoten (JP, US) Artist/Writer: Morohe Yoshida Translation: Andrew Gibler & Jenn Forsyth Serialized in: Young Ace Review copy provided by the publisher. I was a big fan of the Inari Kon Kon anime in 2014 and I always hoped that the manga would be licensed as well since ... Read more

The post Inari Konkon Review appeared first on Organization Anti-Social Geniuses.

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37. BOOK LINKS: The Past through Poetry and Picture Books

You probably know that I'm a big fan of ALA's Book Links magazine and have been writing a poetry column for that publication for over a decade now. And now they're celebrating their 25th anniversary. Very cool! Here is a link to the September 2015 issue of Book Links. Click here.

My column this month focuses on poetry and poetic picture books that depict history and biography. I include an annotated list of two dozen wonderful books that are not-to-be-missed. You can read the entire thing here. If you'd just like a taste, here's an excerpt. 

The Past through Poetry and Picture Books
by Sylvia Vardell
A lovely picture book can take us back to special childhood memories, but it is also a carefully crafted work of art with drama in every page turn. And when a picture book melds history and poetry, something unique emerges—a visual glimpse of people and times of the past, shared in powerful images and spare or lyrical language. Here we examine picture books that feature stories or people from history in poems and poetic language. These books offer a dual opportunity: introducing young children to touchstone moments of our human story, as well as invigorating that study of history for older students by using the visuals of the accessible picture book alongside the distilled language of poetry to heighten interest and understanding. The best historical and biographical picture books tend to be focused on one person or specific event; a story that can be told in the span of a few pages with illustrations that provide a visual window into history, portrayed authentically and accurately.
And here are some of the activities I suggest to accompany the books that are cited. (The link provides the Common Core State Standards for each activity, too.)
In the Classroom: Read the poems or story aloud first without illustrations to savor the language. Then, on the second reading, show the illustrations and discuss the differences in the experiences, such as how the poem looks, how it makes readers feel, and how the illustrator visualized each line, stanza, or the entire verse. Invite students to create a homemade book of original illustrations to accompany a favorite poem (one line per page) or the lyrics of a favorite song, or alongside found poems they create based on researching facts and details. This can help introduce young readers to longer, narrative poems or classic works available in picture-book format, such as Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”; “The Owl and the Pussycat,” by Edward Lear; “Casey at the Bat,” by Ernest Lawrence Thayer; and “A Visit from St. Nicholas” (or “’Twas the Night before Christmas”), by Clement Clarke Moore; and others in the Visions in Poetry series.

In the Classroom: Work with students to understand the setting of the book by looking up images for each locale in an atlas, via Google Maps, or other resources. Then challenge young readers to research what was happening in the world during this time, linking with relevant nonfiction picture books, reference works, and online resources. Using museum resources can add so much to children’s learning of historical content and reading of historical literature. Check to see what local history museums or children’s museums might have available where you live. Do they have personnel who can visit the classroom or library? Exhibits or materials they will loan out? It is also possible to access online resources, such as Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibits, featuring topics such as civil rights and Latino life, and “Today’s Document,” available at the National Archives online, which includes a visual image of an actual historical document. Also useful are the American Memory and Today in History projects, which have links at the Library of Congress online, which offers a wealth of information and visuals to supplement historical study.

In the Classroom: Sharing primary source documents, maps, time lines, and artifacts helps children visualize and conceptualize historical times through hands-on materials. Even audio resources can provide a connection with the voices of the past. For example, the American Rhetoric website offers an online speech bank with audio recordings, transcripts, and visuals for more than 5,000 important speeches. When children can hear, see, or touch the “stuff” of history, it becomes so much more real and memorable for them. Check out Jackdaws Publications, for primary-source materials that support the study of many historical eras. For a model of how to use primary sources and “do history” with kids, check out DoHistory, a website that “shows you how to piece together the past from the fragments that have survived.”

In the Classroom: Bring the historical period of a picture book to life through readers’ theater by inviting children to read bits of dialogue or narration aloud, by having them dress up and speak as the historical subject of the book, or by staging more elaborate dramatic skits. Connecting drama with history makes the people and places real to children through first-hand experience, almost like participating in a living history museum. In fact, Carol Otis Hurst provides helpful guidelines for involving children in creating and participating in their own informal living history museums (follow the links at http://carolhurst.com for more information). Another idea is to look for local reenactors who might want to share their experiences. Even local actors who perform in community or professional theater can be recruited as guests to share their insights on costuming, dialect coaching, and character research for historical dramas. Through one of these several avenues, children will be able to find some spark of personal connection with history and poetry.


Now, don't forget to join the rest of the Poetry Friday bloggers who are gathering at Linda's place, TeacherDance. See you there!






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38. YALSAblog Tweets of the Week - September 4, 2015

A short list of tweets from the past week of interest to teens and the library staff that work with them.

Do you have a favorite Tweet from the past week? If so add it in the comments for this post. Or, if you read a Twitter post between September 4 and September 11 that you think is a must for the next Tweets of the Week send a direct or @ message to lbraun2000 on Twitter.

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39. The Mystery of the Golden Christmas Trees, by Carolyn Snelling | Dedicated Review

The Mystery of the Golden Christmas Trees is a sharply written and compelling tale that places religious themes in an inviting, contemporary setting.

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40. Wild Simplicity Daybook

wild simplicity daybook by small meadow press

As a member of Wisteria & Sunshine, Lesley Austin’s gentle online community for home-and-hearth inspiration, I’ve had the fun of watching behind the scenes as her beautiful new Wild Simplicity Daybook took shape. Today is a day to celebrate, because the Daybook has landed in her Etsy shop!

wild simplicity daybook cover at small meadow press

It’s a Midori-style cover made with the tender eco-friendly consciousness that suffuses all Lesley’s handmade wares, and she has created a selection of inserts to let you customize your Daybook for your own use. I’m particularly fond of Lesley’s monthly calendars (I’ve been using them in one form or another for almost a decade!), and her new weekly diary pages are the loveliest I’ve seen anywhere. She offers them in insert booklets spanning three months at a time, with the Autumn and Winter inserts currently available.

wild simplicity weekly calendar pages from small meadow press

Besides the monthly and weekly calendar inserts, she is also offering blank inserts for notes or journaling and a “Days to Keep” booklet for recording birthdays, anniversaries, and other special dates.

This probably sounds like a sponsored post, but it isn’t! And Lesley didn’t ask me to write it. I am a longtime fan of her paper goods who has had the pleasure of becoming Lesley’s friend as well, and I’m so excited to see her latest venture take flight. Recently I was chatting with another friend about things we love, and I said, “I think my aesthetic is one part Waldorf kindergarten, one part library, and one part Small Meadow Press.” :)

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41. Guest Post Featuring "Rufus and the Flying Carpet"

I haven't written my own children's book yet, so in the meantime, I can highlight the work of others!
~featuring Rufus and the Flying Carpet by Pauli Murphy


     The Series of adventures with "Rufus and The Flying Carpet" are an invitation. An invitation to Children of ALL ages (i.e.humans) to leap into the furthest reaches of imagination and join Rufus and his Friends as they engage in wonderful and exciting experiences with the help of their Magical Flying Carpet.

     The wonder that young children are naturally drawn to is addressed from the start, with Rufus' ability to see Faeries and Angelic Beings and such-like. To Rufus, as to most of the young, this facility is entirely normal and he is surprised to find that not everybody has it. His belief that you can "Be, Do or Have anything that you wish" is what fuels the intentions of the adventurers and "the sky", as you will see, is by no means "the limit"!

     The stories skip along, ever more expansive and imaginative, inviting the reader (or listener) to begin to guess what could happen next. The illustrations, by Sandra Ingham and Ellie Grant of Truro, add a delight and focus, whilst never detracting from the reader's own ability and desire to imagine the amazing scenes for themselves.

     Mentored, with regard to structure, flow and direction, by Tomos Turtle (15, who won the Barefoot Books, nationwide First Prize for story-telling at the age of 8) Pauli Murphy's series picks the reader up and puts you right there on the Carpet, with the adventurous little rabbits, to travel to places so unknown, peopled by beings of astounding contrast that you will find yourself holding your breath from time to time !

     This 'benevolent' series will not dismay as it builds upon the wonderful inter-relationships of the main characters, each with their delightful humour, strengths, weaknesses and their courage as well as vulnerabilities clearly evident. Beautiful, carefully embedded life lessons pop up and are clarified by the characters and the circumstances, but never "saccharine" or imposing, with choice and free will being paramount.

     The mark of good fiction, leaving the reader very much wanting more, is distinctive in Pauli Murphy's writing. You can tell from the start that he truly enjoys creating these books.We suggest ($3.08 on Kindle) that you might enjoy reading them, perhaps even more so when reading them to children.

     "Rufus and The Flying Carpet - The Beginning" is the 1st in the series. Pauli is currently at work on the 2nd (outer space is mentioned !) and there is a ($1.53) on Kindle, soon to be in print) lovely little booklet, "Rufus' Lessons for Children of ALL ages - How to tie a Bowline" (pronounced "Bo-Lin") The MOST important knot in the World ! Could be a life-saver, while the Flying Carpet Series is a "Life Savour !"


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42. Pick of the Week for WORK and This Week’s Topic

tumblr_nlo402qfi51rf4y7fo2_1280

Happy Illustration Friday!

We’re ready to announce this week’s topic, but first please enjoy the wonderful illustration above by Eunbi, our Pick of the Week for last week’s topic of WORK. Thanks to everyone who participated with drawings, paintings, sculptures, and more. We love seeing it all!

You can see a gallery of ALL the entries here.

And of course, you can now participate in this week’s topic:

OLD

Here’s how:

Step 1: Illustrate your interpretation of the current week’s topic (always viewable on the homepage).

Step 2: Post your image onto your blog / flickr / facebook, etc.

Step 3: Come back to Illustration Friday and submit your illustration (see big “Submit your illustration” button on the homepage).

Step 4: Your illustration will then be added to the public Gallery where it will be viewable along with everyone else’s from the IF community!

Also be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter and subscribe to our weekly email newsletter to keep up with our exciting community updates!

HAPPY ILLUSTRATING!

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43. Shelves Filled with Books of All Sizes And Colors

Today’s Guest Blogger is Susan Brunecz, an Instructional Coach at Paul L. Dunbar Academy in Cleveland, Ohio.

IMG_3764When our students entered their classes on the first day of school two weeks ago, a roar of excitement erupted! They had just laid eyes on their new classroom libraries. Their shelves were filled with brand-new books of all sizes and colors. What a way to start the year!

But books weren’t always so plentiful. Last year, many shelves were bare. Only a few classes had established libraries.

Being new to this school, my goal was to get as many books as I could into our classrooms. Thanks to generous supporters, every class now has a library of its own.

Many of the children who attend our school move frequently, living with a friend or a relative. Others live in shelters or temporary housing. Our school is the most stable place our kids have and the best way for them to access books. Here they are encouraged to read all that they can.

IMG_9419-editNow, when you peek into a classroom, you’ll find students exploring the pages of books at their reading level. And when they finish, they’ll find a new book waiting to be read.

There are still schools out there whose shelves are bare. They need your help.

Please donate today to help kids start the school year with classrooms full of books. Your gift will be matched.

 

First Book was able to provide books to the students at Paul L. Dunbar Academy thanks to the support of JetBlue.

The post Shelves Filled with Books of All Sizes And Colors appeared first on First Book Blog.

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44. Dear Totally Clueless Nonfiction Author Me

In this series of posts, my fellow TeachingAuthors and I are writing letters to our earlier selves a la Dear Teen Me.  As I’ve thought about what to write, it is clear to me that the contents of such a letter would vary greatly depending on the phase of life I considered.   A letter to my teen self would be very different from a letter to my newlywed self, or to my busy young mother self, or my empty nester self, or my newly-divorced-after-being-married-my-whole-adult-life self. 


So the best approach for this assignment is to write a letter to the young woman I was years ago that decided to write a nonfiction book.  I had no idea what I was doing.  I had no idea where to start doing it.  And I had no idea how to finish doing it.   

But that didn't stop me.  

And I succeeded. 

So a letter to myself back then as I began what would become a long journey would go something like this:

Dear Carla,

You might not know what you are doing right now, but you will figure it out as you go. 

Trust your instincts as a researcher and as a storyteller. 

Think outside the box. 

Be fearless.

Don’t expect so much of yourself. 


From Your future self.


As I read back over this letter, I realize things haven’t changed all that much after all.  I still need to remember these things today.   

So maybe this is a letter to my past self, my present self, and my future self. 


Carla Killough McClafferty

Book cover of my first nonfiction book for young readers.
THE HEAD BONE'S CONNECTED TO THE NECK BONE: THE WEIRD, WACKY AND WONDERFUL X-RAY.
Published by FSG.


See the Dear Me letters of JoAnn Early Macken and Esther Hershenhorn. 




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45. A rough book cover- Over is out

Its a book idea I've started working on. Its existed in thumbnail form for a while and I've started trying to nail it  down. So here is one of the cover ideas:-

Publishers feel free to shower me with money and offers.....
cheep..cheep...cheep

Bah!
I carry on regardless!

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46. #728-9 Busy Baby Friends & Busy Baby Trucks by Sara Gillingham

combo covers
Busy Baby: Friends & Busy Baby: Trucks
(Touch Think Learn)
Written & Illustrated by Sara Gillingham
Chronicle Books      9/15/2015
978-1-4521-4188-6
978-1-4521-4187-9
10 pages      7” x 7”      Age 0—2

“Baby is a little nervous to see so many new faces, but with a turn of the swivel headpiece and a reassuring word, baby can smile and make friends! In the new Busy Baby series, busy babies can play and share with friends, or ride in a fire truck and cement mixer and meet each new adventure with a smile.” [press release]

Review
In Busy Baby: Friends Baby meets many new friends and must learn to smile. By turning the swivel headpiece from a frowning baby to a smiling baby, young children can determine how well the Busy Baby makes friends. In the second spread, someone wants to play the tambourine but Baby has a hold of it. Busy Baby: Friends asks young children to help the other kids and in the process make new friends. From sharing the tambourine to helping a new friend stand up, Baby is busy making new friends and learning to smile her way through the day.

1Busy Baby: Trucks may be the first introduction of trucks to a young child’s world. Baby is asked to fix a crack in the sidewalk using a cement mixer; help the community recycle, race the fire truck to a fire and rescue the injured; and tow a disabled car. Not all is work for Baby. There is also an ice cream truck in need of customers. Young children, especially boys, will love th is introduction into the world of work vehicles.

Busy Baby Friends_Int 1Each book is made of thick cardboard that will withstand falls and the occasional throw. Tearing a page is nearly impossible. The thicker pages also make it easier for little hands to turn pages. The easily cleaned glossy pages will take care of spills and blobs of peanut butter and jelly wipe off with a quick swipe, getting the book back to your child in a jiffy (no pun intended). The swivel headpiece—smiling on one side and frowning on the other—is also made of thick material and spills with ease. At first, spinning the head may be the most fun part of the Busy Baby Series (it was for me).

Busy Baby Trucks_Int 1I think young children and parents will adore the Busy Baby Series (Friends and Trucks). These books are a great way to help a young child learn how a smile can help one make new friends or turn a situation from grim to happy. The illustrations are made of geometric shapes and bright colors that will delight young readers. In addition to other children, animals add a nice touch of whimsy. Young children can learn as they listen to the story and play along.

BUSY BABY:  FRIENDS. BUSY BABY:  TRUCKS. Text and illustrations copyright © 2015 by Sara Gillingham. Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Chronicle Books, San Francisco, CA.

Purchase Busy Baby:  Friends at AmazonBook DepositoryIndieBound BooksChronicle Books.
Purchase Busy Baby:  Trucks at AmazonBook DepositoryIndieBound BooksChronicle Books.

Learn more about Busy Baby:  Friends HERE & Trucks HERE.

Meet the author/illustrator, Sara Gillingham, at her website:  http://www.saragillingham.com/
Find more board books at the Chronicle Books website:  http://www.chroniclebooks.com/

Also by Sara Gillingham

Love Is a Tutu - 2016

Love Is a Tutu – 2016

How to Grow a Friend - 2015

How to Grow a Friend – 2015

Felt Finger Puppet Board Books: On My Beach

Felt Finger Puppet Board Books: On My Beach

 

 

 

(reviewed here)

.

.

How to Mend a Heart - 2015

How to Mend a Heart – 2015

Snuggle the Baby - 2014

Snuggle the Baby – 2014

I Am So Brave - 2014

I Am So Brave – 2014

Highlights of Your Life: A Journal That Glows as Your Child Grows - 2014

Highlights of Your Life: A Journal That Glows as Your Child Grows – 2014

—and many more

.
.

.

.

.

.

Copyright © 2015 by Sue Morris/Kid Lit Reviews. All Rights Reserved

.
Full Disclosure: title by author & illustrator, and received from Publisher, is in exchange NOT for a positive review, but for an HONEST review. The opinions expressed are my own and no one else’s. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”


Filed under: 4stars, Board Books, Books for Boys, Children's Books, Library Donated Books Tagged: Busy Baby: Friends, Busy Baby: Trucks, Chronicle Books, frowns, infants to age two, making friends, relationships, Sara Gillingham, smiles, spinning heads, Touch Think Learn

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47. Talk it Up: Promo Power


Pixabay image
I've been thinking lately about how promotion of our services can really make a difference in the public's response to our efforts.

There are traditional methods of promotion in getting the word out: flyers, handouts, posters, press releases to the media and youth serving organizations, online newsletters, social media, email blasts and so on.

Then there is the more subtle - and I might suggest more successful - methods of simple word-of-mouth advocacy.  The information we relay while on the desk working with patrons AND wherever we see our community members - at the grocery store, place of worship, gym, bar, 5K, trail or across the fence - becomes a personal invitation that's hard to turn down.

I've seen some great examples of this over the years:

  • An early literacy librarian who inevitably found her way to each new parent she saw (whether at the library or outside in her civilian life), cooed over their baby and personally invited them to baby storytime. She always carried a business card with the days and times of our storytimes to leave with the family. Our storytimes never lacked for attendees.
  • Desk assistants who, while checking people out, always mentioned upcoming programs of interest to their various children. They relayed excitement and a hint of the fun to come. Our programs were always full of eager kids.
  • Storytime presenters who, when interest in 1000 Books initiative started to falter, promoted the program in their sessions. Sign-ups and participation perked up again.
  • Librarians attending community meetings chatting about our programs and services with tablemates and putting our literacy efforts out front for people to discover. Amazing opportunities resulted.

Like any kind of advocacy, these personal conversations and invites work best if they are ongoing and consistent. Once word-of-mouth promotion becomes a habit for staff, it's as easy as falling off a log to promote services, programs and initiatives. And the results can be amazing!






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48. Just One Big Sun

Just one big sun is in the sky
To shower us with light
And like things on which we rely,
We undermine its might.

Unless we see it rise and set,
Its beauty’s often missed.
To many people, I would bet,
It hardly does exist.

But when you see it first appear,
A’glow in neon pink,
It beats the finest chandelier
And makes you stop and think…

That Nature has the upper hand
When majesty’s close by
And sunrise really does demand
The awe we should supply.

So yes, the sun is still the same
No matter where you roam,
But catching it in morning’s flame
We rarely do at home.

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49. Friday Feature: Next Door to a Star by Krysten Lindsay Hager


NEXT DOOR TO A STAR by Krysten Lindsay Hager
Genre: Young Adult



★ SYNOPSIS ★

Hadley Daniels is tired of feeling invisible.

After Hadley’s best friend moves away and she gets on the bad side of some girls at school, she goes to spend the summer with her grandparents in the Lake Michigan resort town of Grand Haven. Her next door neighbor is none other than teen TV star Simone Hendrickson, who is everything Hadley longs to be—pretty, popular, and famous—and she’s thrilled when Simone treats her like a friend.

Being popular is a lot harder than it looks.

It’s fun and flattering when Simone includes her in her circle, though Hadley is puzzled about why her new friend refuses to discuss her former Hollywood life. Caught up with Simone, Hadley finds herself ignoring her quiet, steadfast friend, Charlotte.

To make things even more complicated, along comes Nick Jenkins…

He’s sweet, good-looking, and Hadley can be herself around him without all the fake drama. However, the mean girls have other ideas and they fill Nick’s head with lies about Hadley, sending him running back to his ex-girlfriend and leaving Hadley heartbroken.

So when her parents decide to relocate to Grand Haven, Hadley hopes things will change when school starts…only to be disappointed once again.
Cliques. Back-stabbing. Love gone bad.

Is this really what it’s like to live…Next Door To A Star?


Excerpt:
The school year should end right after spring break, because all anyone can focus on is summer vacation. You can’t learn anything new, because all you can think about is all the fun stuff you’re going to do once you don’t have to get up at the butt crack of dawn. Summer always seems full of possibilities.

Nothing exciting ever happens during the school year, but maybe, during summer vacation, you could run into a hot celebrity and he’d decide to put you in his next music video. Okay, it wasn’t like I knew anybody that happened to, but my grandparents did live next door to a former TV star, Simone Hendrickson, and Simone was discovered in an ice cream parlor one summer. Of course, she lived in L.A. at the time and was already doing plays and commercials, so the guy who discovered her had already seen her perform. But hey, it was summer, she got discovered, and that was all that mattered.

Amazing stuff didn’t happen to me. You know what happened to me last summer? I stepped on a bee and had to go to the emergency room. They’re not going to make an E! True Hollywood Story out of my life. I didn’t go on exotic vacations—like today, I was being dragged along with my parents to my cousin’s graduation party. Most people waited until at least the end of May before having a grad party, but Charisma was having hers early because she was leaving on a trip to Spain. I was dreading this party because I didn’t want to listen to everybody talk about how smart and talented Charisma was—making me feel like a blob in comparison—but my mom RSVP’d even though I said I’d rather die than go. My death threats meant nothing. But still, for some strange reason, I had a feeling this summer was going to be different.


Krysten Lindsay Hager is an obsessive reader and has never met a bookstore she didn’t like. She’s worked as a journalist and humor essayist, and writes for teens, tweens, and adults. She is the author of the Landry’s True Colors Series and her work has been featured in USA Today and named as Amazon’s #1 Hot New Releases in Teen & Young Adult Values and Virtues Fiction and Amazon’s #1 Hot New Releases in Children’s Books on Values. She’s originally from Michigan and has lived in South Dakota, Portugal, and southwestern Ohio. She received her master’s degree from the University of Michigan-Flint.

Buy links:


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50. SPX 2015 programming is here, with new curators

The SPX programming went live today, with a plethora of great programs and a bit of news: Bill Kartalopoulos, programming director for the last nine years, is stepping into an advisory capacity, mostly with international guests. This year's programming was handled by a committee led by Esther Kim of Fantom Comics that includes Michael Cavna and Jen Vaughn, with Kartalopoulos continuing in a consulting capacity with a focus on international guests. 

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