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26. News and notes: Albuquerque show postponed; Denver draws 100K and more

§ It’s the week of Book Expo/Book Con, the latter of which could possible be called “sitcom co-star with a new book con” but that’s how it goes. Anyway, I’ll be at both events pretty much non stop so may not have as much time as I’d like to be posting, but the Elite Beat Operatives will be around to help out, so keep those cards and letters coming.

Anyway here’s a few little newsy notes:

201505260227.jpg

§ Vulture’s Abraham Riesman has just completed another one of his “hero histories” and this time its The Secret History of Ultimate Marvel, with quotes from just about all the main players.

“When I got hired, I literally thought I was going to be writing one of the last — if not the last — Marvel comics,” says now-legendary comics writer Brian Michael Bendis, who wrote the first comic of the Ultimate line and will be writing the final one, too. When he wrote that first issue in 2000, the once-venerable Marvel was in chaos. “It’s so the opposite now, that people don’t even know.”

Here’s some context to understand the red-alert disaster the comics industry had become by the eve of the Ultimate experiment. In 1993, annual combined comics sales across all publishers had been close to a billion dollars; in 1999, that same number was a microscopic $270 million. In 1989, Batman was the most-talked-about movie in America; by 1999, the disastrous Batman & Robin had squirted a stink on the very idea of a cinematic comic-book adaptation. Marvel especially was feeling the burn: It went through a humiliating Chapter 11 bankruptcy in the late ’90s, saw wave after wave of layoffs, and executive leadership was shuffled every few weeks. In 1999, after years of comics-publishing dominance, the company lost its top spot in industry market share and watched its rival, DC Comics, take the throne.


The Ultimate line kicked off the whole “reboot for a day” or a month or a year or whatever world we live in now. It’s basically kind of what Julius Schwartz did with the Silver Age Flash back in 1958, and we’re having a sort of thing again at both companies. Anyway, get ready for the new day by looking back, because those who do not remember the past are doomed to repeat it and also have to look up what happened on Wikipedia.

§ A little bit more con fatigue? Wizard World Albuquerque, which had been planed for June 19-21, has now been pushed back a year to June 24-26, 2016. The show had only been announced at the beginning of April, bringing an existing Albuquerque event under the Wizard brand, but it was slated for the same weekend as Wizard World Comic Con Sacramento. The double booking for Wizard staff and very late start in promoting the show are the reasons for rescheduling. Refunds will be automatically issued to those who had already purchased admissions, photo ops and autographs, and people who brought tickets for 2015 will be admitted for free to the 2016 event.
201505260208.jpg

§ The Denver Comic Con was held over the holiday weekend, with announced attendance of 101,500, up from 86,500 in 2014. Early reports indicate that the crowd was handled pretty well unlike past years where there were epic waits to get in. Sounds like it was a fun show, except for one tiny kerfuffle:


Janelle Asselin unpacks that here.

§ Some folks analyzed a year of New Yorker cartoons WITH CHARTS AND GRAPHS and found that most of them concern white dudes, the default human for all humor, laughter and storytelling in US society.

Out of 1,810 total characters, 1,277 (about 70.6 percent) were male, and 1,714 (94.7 percent) were white. As Michel notes, this is similar to the under-representation of non-whites in newspaper comics (which have about 2 to 4 percent non-white characters) and worse than children’s books (which have 5 to 10 percent).


While this is no surprise, gender roles were pretty stereotyped in that Henny Youngman, 20th century way. “Women are most often parents, assistants, or spouses.”

§ However this is changing. Deborah Vankin reports for the LA Times that even animation students at CalArts are increasingly female:

Maija Burnett scanned her California Institute of the Arts classroom as nearly 60 new students filtered in, empty notebooks in hand. It was the start of the 2014-15 school year, and Burnett, director of CalArts’ character animation program, was meeting this crop of freshmen for the first time in her largest classroom, nicknamed “the palace.”

Surrounded by walls painted entirely black — more conducive to drawing — the students stood up, one by one, to introduce themselves. That’s when it hit Burnett that almost all of them were women.

“Where are all the guys?” she recalls thinking.

CalArts’ blind admissions process meant administrators had reviewed portfolios without considering names or gender. “We were shocked to see so many women,” Burnett says.


Let’s spell that out in NUMBERS:

When CalArts debuted its character animation program in 1975, it had just two female students. Today women make up 71% of its animation student body, and this month 16 women and 10 men graduated from the program. USC’s John C. Hench Division of Animation & Digital Arts is now 65% women.


Now THAT’S gender blind.

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27. JooHee Yoon’s Beastly Verse (Plus a Sneak-Peek …)



(Click each image to enlarge)


 

I’ve got artwork below today from illustrator and printmaker JooHee Yoon’s first picture book here in the U.S., Beastly Verse, published by Enchanted Lion Books last month. Does anyone else remember when JooHee visited 7-Imp back in 2011 to share some art? It’s exciting to see this book now.

This is a collection of animal poems, many from poets long-gone (Ogden Nash, Hilaire Belloc, Christina Rosetti), with gatefold surprises and Yoon’s distinctive and stylized art, so vivid in its palette that the spreads pop off the page. (You’ll see this below.) Daisy Fried wrote in the New York Times that “[k]ids appreciate the bizarre and off-kilter, and are too often denied it when grown-ups edit for positive messages and sweetness. Hooray for Yoon for countering that.” I love that.

I can also (if you want really detailed reviews) direct you to Betsy Bird’s review of the book here, as well as the post at Brain Pickings (where credit is given to Claudia Zoe Bedrick, founder of Enchanted Lion Books, for being the poetry-lover she is).

Up above, at the very tip-top of this post, is a spread from JooHee’s rendering of James Thurber’s story “The Tiger Who Would Be King,” which Enchanted Lion will publish this September. It’s a sneak-peek at that book today (and its cover), and I thank Claudia for that.

Here are some images from Beastly Verse. Enjoy!

 


– From “Three Young Rats” — without text (Anonymous)
(Click to enlarge)


 


– From “The Eel” by Ogden Nash
(Click to enlarge)


 


– From “The Friendly Hen” by Arthur Waugh
(Click to enlarge)


 


– From “The Happy Hyena” by Carolyn Wells
(Click to enlarge)


 


– From “The Pelican” by Robert Desnos
(Click to enlarge)


 



– From “Eletelephony” by Laura E. Richards
(Click each to enlarge)


 


– From “The Yak” (without text) by Hilaire Belloc
(Click to enlarge)


 


(Click to enlarge cover)


 

* * * * * * *

BEASTLY VERSE. Text and illustration copyright © 2015 by JooHee Yoon. First edition published in 2015 by Enchanted Lion Books, Brooklyn. All images here reproduced by permission of the publisher.

Images from THE TIGER WHO WOULD BE KING reproduced by permission of Enchanted Lion Books.

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28. What Makes a Picture Book Mega-Hit?

It’s not that it’s impossible to predict the “next big thing” in children’s literature, but it’s also not exactly a hard science.  Indeed, whenever a publisher starts spending beaucoup de bucks on a given title (hardcover f&gs, a serious marketing campaign for a debut author, etc.) I cringe a bit.  They’ve made their bets and they’re willing to bank on them.  I, on the other hand, make my own kinds of bets.  As a Materials Specialist it’s my job to figure out how many copies of any given title should be added to my library system.  Sometimes it’s a no brainer.  And sometimes I’m far off the mark.

Now picture book blockbuster hits, for whatever the reason, are where I fall down the hardest.  It’s not just that I can’t see them coming.  It’s often that I’m blind to whatever esoteric elements are in play, making those books big time hits.  With that in mind, today I’m going to talk about some of the top picture book blockbusters to come out in the last ten years.  Please note that I’m avoiding picture books with TV or other media tie-ins.  These are the folks who got where they are on their own merits.

BookWithNoPictures

The Book With No Pictures by B.J. Novak – It’s not the first time someone did this idea (the Elephant and Piggie title We Are In a Book does something very similar to what Novak does here) but I’ll admit that I haven’t ever seen anything exactly, precisely like this. With that in mind I bought a reasonable number of copies for my library system.  Then it took off like gangbusters.  Folks who’ve never even heard of Novak were pulling it from the shelves.  I’m not going to say it’s the most successful celebrity picture book of all time, but it sure comes close.  Wowzah.

DayCrayonsQuit

The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt, illustrated by Oliver Jeffers – Though it’s by no means as pro-union as Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type, one does wonder what the anti-union folks out there think about Daywalt’s smash success.  Definitely didn’t see this one coming.  I figured it was a bit wordy and long for total and complete New York Times bestseller domination but about the time it was on the list for 4+ months I knew we had a genuine blockbuster on our hands.

FancyNancy

Fancy Nancy by Jane O’Connor, illustrated by Robin Preiss Glaser – You know, it’s very cool in some circles to disparage FN, but as crazy huge hits go, I’m a fan.  It’s a lot smarter than folks give it credit for.  You can trace its initial popularity to its sheer untold gobs of pink fanciness, but it sustains its hold on the marketplace in large part because of the writing.

GoodnightGoodnight

Good Night, Good Night, Construction Site by Sherri Duskey Rinker, illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld – No idea.  None.  We see fun construction equipment picture books all the time.  And we see popular subjects mixed with the bedtime book genre all the time too.  Robots go to bed.  Dinosaurs.  But for whatever reason, this hit all the right buttons.  I can’t account for it.  Consider me broadsided by its success.

LittleBlueTruck

Little Blue Truck by Alice Schertle, illustrated by Jill McElmurry – I don’t think I realized, until this very moment, that the illustrator of the book is the same woman behind Kathi Appelt’s lovely 2015 title When Otis Courted Mama.  Huh!  In any case, this is a case of a book that’s a huge hit everywhere in the country except NYC.  I only know about it because it’s always on the Publishers Weekly bestseller list.

PeteCat1

Pete the Cat by Eric Litwin, illustrated by James Dean – This is one picture book that can credit its massive success to its creators’ self-promotion.  It’s also one of the rare self-published books to go mainstream and then blockbuster success.  Doesn’t hurt matters any that there’s a catchy little YouTube song that goes with it.  Other books have tried to replicate its success.  So far, no takers.

Pinkalicious

Pinkalicious by Victoria & Elizabeth Kann – According to legend, this book came about when an editor heard the song “Fergilicious” and thought it would make sense (post-Fancy Nancy‘s success) to do a book called “Pinkalicious”.  So the Kanns were hired and that was that.  Like Pete the Cat, subsequent sequels have only been credited to one of the original creators.  So there’s that.

PressHere

Press Here by Herve Tullet – Rarer than the self-published picture book that becomes a massive success?  The imported picture book.  Translations don’t usually yield the kind of crazy popularity enjoyed by Tullet’s best known title.  Still, the King of Preschool Books managed to make his sense of humor, style, and originality work here in the States.  No small feat.

Now what did I miss?

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29. Review for Blue Ocean Bob by Brooks Olbrys



Join Blue Ocean Bob on his journey to protect all life in the Sea of Kerchoo

Blue Ocean Bob loves the sea and wants to dedicate his life to protecting it. He begins a new job as assistant to Mary Marine, the Island of Roses's leading marine biologist, and with his hummingbird guardian, Xena, by his side, works hard to carry out his duties to the sea creatures both on and off the shore.

When the challenges mount, Bob seeks advice from Doc the turtle, Earl the clam, and Wallace the walrus, who each help him to develop the positive attitude he needs to succeed.

The Adventures of Blue Ocean Bob: A Challenging Job is the second installment in this colorful and inspiring early chapter book series that provides young readers with an introduction to timeless principles of achievement.





About the Author

A graduate of Stanford University, the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts, and the University of California at Berkeley School of Law, Brooks Olbrys is the founder of Children's Success Unlimited and a managing director at investment bank Ion Partners. He lives with his wife and son in New York City.

From a young age, Kevin Keele has enjoyed creating artwork in many forms: drawing, oil painting, digital painting, even stained glass. His work has been featured in numerous picture books, magazines, board games, and video games. Though he lives far from any coastline, he has always been fascinated by the ocean and enjoys illustrating its various creatures. Kevin is currently an artist for Disney Interactive Studios. He lives in Utah with his wife and two sons. They are the caretakers of one cat, three chickens, and thousands of Italian honeybees.

Review:
This chapter picture book contains 5 different chapters. The first is Helping Hand where Bob must help a seal learn to feed in the deep. When he succeeds in his goal the short chapter is over and it flows into the next day where Bob must now help a pelican stuck in a net. In the third chapter Bob must warn the sea life that a storm is coming to the island. Chapter 4 is a Simple Reminder of why Bob wanted to become a marine assistant when he has a bad day and nothing goes right. Chapter 5 is Diving Deep, Bob must help a stingray thats stuck deep in the ocean.

The story is written in rhyme and runs smoothly throughout the story.  Each chapter teaches a good lesson to the reader. The reader learns about confidence, responsibility, communication, gratitude, and success. The illustrations by Kevin Keele are amazing. He does a fabulous job that will immediately engage the reader. His illustrations are realistic, colorful, and true. Readers will feel like they are apart of the story along with the characters.

The characters are from the original book in the series. They carry over into book 2 to help Bob along with his journey. The characters are supportive and encouraging, except for one. Xena is Bob's guardian, and though guardians are meant to keep us safe and and be our reasoning, Xena is constantly negative. She is everyone's subconscious, the thing that holds us back from doing what we really want by showing us the reality, the dangers, and the difficulty of our dreams. Bob has to not only overcome his fears and doubts but overcome Xena's negativity. She tarnishes the lessons being learned. The stories are embedded with her negativity and existence so it would be hard for the author to leave her out as a character without rewriting the whole story, though she is really not needed. Bob has much to deal while solving the problems at hand, discovering what his true destiny and purpose is.

The great things about this story is that it teaches life lessons. Bob learns to overcome his fears while helping other animals overcome theirs. He listens to the wise animals and to Miss Marine and helps the animals on the island live happily. He follows his dreams. Overall, children who love animals and the ocean are going to love this 50 page picture book.

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30. Finnish revivals

       The modern Finnish classics suddenly appear to be hot: Dedalus are working on a new translation of Aleksis Kivi's Seven Brothers, and Penguin Classics have just brought out (in the UK) a new translation of Väinö Linna's Unknown Soldiers in Liesl Yamaguchi's translation.
       Linna's classic novel was previously translated in 1957, as The Unknown Soldier, by Alex Matson -- a notorious translation-disaster, perpetrated by the English-language publishers. As Pekka Tarkka writes in his overview of the novel at Books from Finland:

The German and English translations were total losses. Initially, The Unknown Soldier was Englished by Alex Matson, known as an excellent interpreter of the works of Aino Kallas and the Nobelist F.E. Sillanpää. Collins of London and Putnam of New York, however, did not find his translation satisfactory: they decided to have it revised by an editor, unidentified to this day, who then proceeded to falsify and rewrite -- one can say, forge -- the text in an outrageous manner.
       In his Translation and the Problem of Sway Douglas Robinson relates that:
Matson was so angry at the American publisher for radically abridging and otherwise revising his translation that he refused to allow his name to appear as the book's translator, and never translated literature again.
       So now there's this new translation -- see the Penguin publicity page, or get your copy at Amazon.co.uk -- and the opinions seem to be all over the place:
  • It's: "A Finnish War and Peace -- without the interesting bits" suggests Max Liu in The Independent. And: "A Finnish classic this may be but, as in war, you're better off with the Russians." Ouch.

  • "The prose is short, direct, and to the point, and Yamaguchi renders it into an English so good it hurts to read" warns (rather dubiously -- it takes a lot for prose to cause actual physical pain) Daniel Goulden at the Asymptote blog.

  • "In places it feels as if Linna set out to depict a war of attrition that would simultaneously grind down his reader. And yet those who last the arduous course will find much to admire in Linna's unsparing prose and gritty realism. Not a comforting novel by many means, but a profound and enriching one." finds Malcolm Forbes in the Sunday Herald
       I knew to avoid the previous translation-edition, but my interest has been piqued.

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31. Happy Memorial Day... and Geek Pride Day!

Happy Memorial Day!  In honour of the day, Amanda, Teresa and I (with Christina on trumpet) have done a video!


It was absolutely gorgeous when we filmed. So many pictures were taken. I don't have them here, but I will share eventually.  You will see most of the footage in the film.

HAPPY MEMORIAL DAY!!


Also... Today is Geek Pride Day! Who's excited? Who's excited?!

So, I usually post lots and lots of gifs with my posts, but as there are an inordinate amount of questions associated with this tag, I'm not going to post AS many.  I will post where I deem it appropriate.

Without further ado... the Geek Day Question Fiasco! (Yep, that's what I'm calling it.)

1.)  Who directed the first Star Trek Movie?
Do we mean MOVIE, or TV show?  If we are talking movie, I haven't the foggiest.  If we're talking TV show, I'm pretty sure it was Gene Roddenberry.


2.)  Where did the Winchester's live before Mary's death?
Lawrence, Kansas.
*shiver

3.)  What do the Druids call Merlin?
Emrys.

4.)  Who was originally casted for Han Solo?
I feel like, once upon a time, I knew, but I don't know anymore.
*It appears that the correct answer is Kurt Russell.

5.)  Who are Arwen's brothers?
Elladan and Elrohir!!!
THESE guys! :-)
 
6.)  Who was the first goblin to guide Harry around Gringotts?
No idea.  I'm guessing Warwick Davis, in one of his innumerable roles in those movies.
*Actually, it wasn't Warwick Davis... he played the bank teller.  It was actually Verne Troyer, who played the role of Griphook the Goblin.

7.)  In what Star Trek episode did the Tribbles FIRST appear?
a.) Trials and Tribble-ations
b.) Amok Time
c.) Trouble with Tribbles.
Wow, this is multiple choice?  The answer is C., Trouble With Tribbles!
*That look. :-)


8.)  Who played the First Doctor?
That white haired gentleman.  Hang on, let me think... Let... me... think...  William.  William something.  I'll come back to this.

9.)  What hits John on his way to see Sherlock in the streets in "The Reichenbach Fall"?
A fella on a bicycle.

Which of the following knights did not betray Arthur?
A.) Lancelot
B.) Gwaine (Which, by the way, is spelled WRONG!  I don't care if it IS a TV show... that name is spelled GAWAINE.)
C.) Leon
D.) Mordred
E.) Elyan.
And I would have to say, since this TV show is apparently pro Lancelot and NOT Gawaine, it was Lancelot who did not betray him.  As I cannot find what the proper answer is to this, I'm afraid you'll have to discover the truth of it yourself.

10.)  What was Bones' first name?
I think Leonard. Or wait. Sylvester?

11.)  The Tesseract is one of six powerful "Infinity Stones." What are the other five?
Ta Da!

12.)  John Watson goes on a date with a girl in "The Blind Banker." What is her name?
Sarah, but don't ask me her last name.  I dinna ken it.

13.)  What does TARDIS stand for?
Time And Relative Dimension In Space.

14.)  Who killed Darth Vader?
I *think* the Emperor guy?  I'm not hugely into Star Wars, so my trivia on this point is a bit foggy.

15.)  What does the inscription on the Colt say?
All I know is Samuel Colt made it.  I don't know the inscription.
*Apparently the inscription reads, Non Timebo Mala,  which is Latin for I Will Fear No Evil.

16.)  What words did Moriarty carve into an apple as a message for Sherlock?
I O U. 
"I owe you a fall, Sherlock."

17.)  What episode of TNG were the Borg originally introduced?
*I dunno*

18.)  How does Sherlock Holmes like his coffee?
Black, two sugars?

19.)  Who finally kills Morgana?
Merlin, I believe.

20.)  Who is older, Fred or George?
Fred.

21.)  What kind of plane does Han Solo fly?
A Millennium Falcon!!!

22.)  Where do Eowyn and Faramir settle (and rule) after the War of the Ring?
 I *think*.... Ithilien?

23.)  What does the T stand for in James T. Kirk?
Tiberius.

24.)  What is John Watson's middle name?
Hamish.  :-)
*Source

25.)  Who is the most famous Doctor?
I'm thinking it was Tom Baker.

26.)  What is Chewbacca?
*I always wanted a Wookie, but I found out they weren't real.*

27.)  What is the color of Gallifrey's sky?
Red. Which seemed like a bad idea. Red is such an angry color.

28.)  What does SHIELD stand for?
Strategic Homeland Intervention and Enforcement Logistics Division
*Epic Music

29.)  In Iron Man 2 what element saved Tony Stark from blood poisoning?
I am Vi-braaaaa-niiiii-uuuuuum!
:-)

30.)  Name the seven horcruxes.
1.  Tom Riddle's Diary.
2.  The Ring in Dumbledore's drawer.
3.  The Locket in that weird cave.
4.  The Goblet in Gringotts.
5.  Rowena Ravenclaw's diadem.
6.  Nagini the weird snake.
7.  Harry Potter.
That last answer sounded a bit weird, didn't it. :-)

31.)  Name the movie that goes with this famous exchange: "I love you." "I know."
Star Wars, the original second movie, I believe - what's it called? "The Empire Strikes Back"? - Anyway, it's that scene right before Han goes into the deep freeze thingy.  Carbonite.

32.)  In which episode did the sonic screwdriver first appear?
Heh.  It was with the second doctor, I think, but I'm not totally sure, y'all.

33.)  Where was the HOUND group located?
Liberty, Indiana.

34.) What is the Secret Word that opened the Gates of Moria?
Mellon.
*Source

35.)  Which college did Sam Winchester attend?
*Oh yeah.  Stanford.  Duh.

36.)  Who does Lavender give Ron for Christmas?
I'm not really sure what to take from that question.  Does she really give him someone?  Who?  Who?  Not the Doctor, that's for sure!
*That answer, apparently, isn't WHO, but WHAT.  And it was a necklace that said "My Sweetheart."

37.)  In Doctor Who, who is Davros?
*Seems he was the Chief Scientist of the Kaleds.  Now you know. :-)

38.)  In "The Blind Banker" which book does Sherlock use to crack the coded messages?
Some sort of A-Z atlas of London.
*A-Z London Street Atlas

39.)  What action made Thor worthy of Mjölnir?
He faced the Destroyer and sacrificed himself in exchange for the safety of the earth.

40.)  In what episode was Arthur crowned King?
Somewhere in the fifth season?
* Nope, apparently it was season 4, episode 3, "The Wicked Day."

41.)  How many kids are in the Weasley family?
Seven.
*source

42.)  When did Bruce Banner "Hulk" for the first time?
In Harlem?
*Per the comic books, he first hulked after being caught in the blast of a gamma bomb.

43.)  What is Ron's boggart?
Spyiiiiiders!!!
*source


44.)  What is the name of the remote and uninhabited planet that was destroyed by the first test of the Death Star's laser cannon?


45.)  Who saved Frodo from the barrow wights?
"Hey, Tom Bombadil, Tom Bombadillo!"

46.)  What is the name of the Gentlemen's Club that Mycroft Holmes attends?
The Diogenes Club.

47.)  What iconic word is the Ninth Doctor known by?
Fantastic!

48.)  A character from Captain America: The First Avenger reappears in a later movie as a villain. Who is it?
James "Bucky" Buchanan Barnes.  He reappears as the Winter Soldier.
*Source


49.)  In which classic episode did Sarah Jane leave the TARDIS?
*Appears to be Season 14, Episode 5, The Hand of Fear.


50.)  What did Hagrid give Harry the first time they met?
A rather messy birthday cake.

51.)  Who was the father of Legolas?
Thranduil.

52.)  Which three people does Moriarty have snipers set on in "The Reichenbach fall"?
John, Mrs. Hudson, Lestrade.

53.)  "Every life is a pile of good things and bad things...." complete this quote.
"The good things don't always soften the bad things, but vice versa the bad things don't always spoil the good things or make them unimportant."

54.)  What kind of car does Dean Winchester drive?
DIS ONE!!
A '67 Chevy Impala :-)

55.)  What team played in the Quiddich World Cup that Harry attended?
All I know is that Viktor Krum was fabulous.
*He played for the Bulgarian National Quidditch Team, but I can't find the name of the team.

56.)  When was Agent Phil Coulson first introduced? What were his first lines?
He was introduced in the very first Iron Man.  I'm pretty sure his first lines were, "I'm Agent Phil Coulson" or "I'm Agent Phil Coulson with the Strategic Homeland Intervention and Enforcement Logistics Division."

57.)  In Merlin, what is the name of the evil spirits that attack Camelot at the beginning of Season Four?
Sorry, haven't seen the show.  Only the first season, and I got caught up in a multitude of other shows since.

58.)  The despised character Jar Jar Binks (who first appears in "The Phantom Menace"), hails from what underwater society found on planet Naboo?
He is despised.  Why do we care?  And I'm not looking it up.  It's late. :)

And HARTNELLWilliam Hartnell was the name of the man who played the first doctor! :-)  I REMEMBERED! :)

59.)  What political office did Pippin have in Gondor after the War of the Ring?
Thane, I believe.

60.)  When was Lancelot first introduced?
Somewhere in the first season.  Like the fourth or fifth episode?  It felt early on.  I remember thinking I didn't despise him, for a change.

61.)  What does Harry want to be after he Graduates from Hogwarts?
An Auror.

62.)  Which Avenger has no personalized/superhero weapon?
This one is tricky, since neither Black Widow NOR the Hulk really have personalized weapons.  The Hulk IS a weapon, and the Black Widow MAKES weapons out of anything.

63.)  Which Supernatural character shares Dean's birthday? (hint: it's a girl.)
Charlie?
*Oh, Jess!  That's cool. :-)

64.)  What three items does Sherlock steal to impersonate a waiter for his clever surprise “reveal” to John Watson at the restaurant?
A.) A comb, a fountain pen, and a boutonniere.
B.) A monocle, sharpie, and a silk cravat.
C.) A bowtie, glasses, and eyebrow pencil.
I'm going to say C., a bowtie, glasses, and eyebrow pencil.
*source


65.)  What are some other names used for Gandalf the Grey?
Mithrandir, Gandalf Greyhame, Gandalf Stormcrow.  The Dwarves also called him something, and he was also called something like Olorin, somewhere, I think.


66.)  What is the the licence plate number on the Winchester's car currently? (NO LOOKING IT UP!)
CNK 80Q3?
Whoa, I was RIGHT!!

67.)  Which Avenger movie did Hawkeye first appear in?
Thor, God of Thunder.

68.)  What was the name of the waltz Sherlock played at John and Mary's wedding?
The Blue Danube?
*I think actually the Blue Danube was the one playing when he was practicing his dancing, but he played a song he composed for John and Mary.

69.)  When was the One Ring destroyed?
In the Third Age somewhere in the year 3000, I believe. March 25th.

70.)  How many years had the Great Dragon been imprisoned when Merlin first entered Camelot?
A huge amount of time!
*About 20 years, I guess.  I asked a sister who has seen it. 



71.)  Where is the Stark tower located?
New York City.  Manhattan area?

72.)  Who voiced the computer in the TNG?
Oh, wasn't it the nurse in the Original Series?  What was her name... Nurse Chapel?
*source



73.)  There are five ranks of Wizards. What are they?
White, Grey, Brown, Red, Blue. Or possibly two blue, no reds.

74.)  How did Mary accidentally reveal her true identity to John? (This is for Sherlock, BTW)
Didn't she shoot a coin or something that Sherlock threw in the air? And John, who was hiding in the house, saw and realized she was an assassin.

75.)  Who is K-9?
A mechanical dog belonging originally to the Fourth Doctor, I believe.

76,)  What is the Name of Aragorn's ring?
The Ring of Barahir!!!
*Source

77.)  What is inscribed upon each side of the sword Excalibur?
A Just Question, My Liege.  Possibly a variation of "Whosoever pulls this sword from the stone is rightful king of England."

78.)  What is Bucky Barnes' full name?
James Buchanan Barnes.

79.)  What was the gift given to Boromir in Rivendell?
In Rivendell?  Or Lothlorien?  'Cause I don't recall him getting a gift in Rivendell, but in Lothlorien he received a gold belt and an Elven cloak.

80.)  "You were right, okay? I see light at the end of this tunnel..." Finish this quote.
"And I'm sorry you don't."  If there's more, I don't know it. :-P

81.)  Where did "The Last Battle for Camelot" take place?

82.)  What were the names of the Eagles who rescued Sam and Frodo from Mount Doom?
A.) Orcrist, Sting and Glamdring.
B.) Narsil, Glamdring and Hadhafang.
C.) Sting, Anduril and the white Knife of Legolas.
D.) Aeglos, Orcrist and Sting.
None of the above.  I know one was Gwaihir, but the others were Landroval and Meneldor.

AND LAST BUT NOT LEAST:
How did Sherlock fake his death?
Don't we wish we knew?! 

And that's the end of the tag, folks.  Thanks for stopping by and giving it a read!

God bless!

Cat


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32. Review: Girl At War by Sara Nović

This book has been compared to two of my favourite novels of recent years; The Tiger’s Wife by Téa Obreht and A Constellation of Vital Phenomena by Anthony Marra, so I had to read it straight away. Firstly the comparison is completely justified while at the same time telling a completely different kind of story to those two wonderful […]

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33. An interview with D. D. Everest – author of Archie Greene and the Magician’s Secret

Archie Greene and the Magician’s Secret by D. D. Everest takes you into a world where bookshelves are enchanted, librarians have magical powers, and spells aren’t just something to read about in dusty tomes. It’s ideal for kids around the age of 10 who perhaps enjoyed the magic of Harry Potter, but it can also can be enjoyed as a family read with younger children who’ll be excited by mysterious apparitions and strange goings-on.

Various Archie Green covers - from L-R: UK paperback, UK hardback, US

Various Archie Green covers – from L-R: UK paperback, UK hardback, US

Archie Greene receives a curious birthday present; an old wooden box containing a book written in a language he can’t read, along with the command to return this book to its rightful place on the shelves in the Secret Library. This is the first step on Archie’s journey to meet the family he never knew he had and a band of people dedicated to finding and saving magic books.

Atmospheric and exciting, I enjoyed this book so much I’ve since recommended it to several children in my 8-12 bookgroup. With a paperback edition hitting bookshelves early in June I took the opportunity to interview D.D. Everest about this book.

Playing by the book: Archie Greene and the Magician’s Secret is a wonderful fantasy novel. What is it about fantasy as a genre that appeals to you? I’m especially curious because of your background as a journalist and non-fiction writer, both of which seem to be about as distant as you can get from fantasy… which is maybe part of the answer?

D. D. Everest

D. D. Everest

D. D. Everest: You’re right. One of the (many) reasons I love the fantasy genre is that it is so far removed from my other work as a journalist. When you deal with dry facts all day it is such a treat to escape to another world of magic and adventure.

But I have always loved magical fantasy. My favourite books growing up were the Hobbit and Lord of the Rings. What I love most about those books is the depth and detail that Tolkien gives to the world he creates, the layering of the stories and the myths and the cultures that he describes.

Playing by the book: I love books where true facts coincide with the story and this very much happens in Archie Greene and the Magician’s Secret; John Dee really did exist and was Elizabeth 1’s adviser, and there was indeed a Library of Alexandria which was destroyed by fire. What other truths have you smuggled in to your story? (What other truths did you discover during your research which you would like to have included in your story)

D. D. Everest: I think including real facts and places grounds a story. It connects it to the real world so it feels like you can almost touch it. It’s something I really wanted to do with the Archie books. Using history is a great way to give the story some of that depth that I mentioned before.

John Dee, who is in the first Archie book, was a real person. He was described as Queen Elizabeth I’s court magician. He really did collect books about magic and he did think he could talk to angels. The Great Library of Alexandria is also historically accurate, although the part about Alexander the Great’s magical book collection being kept there is just wishful thinking!

Another historical detail I included in the book is the Great Fire of London. In Archie’s world, the fire was started by a magical experiment that went wrong. That plays a big part in the second book Archie Greene and the Alchemists’ Secret.

Playing by the book: With another hat on you’ve written several non-fiction books. How has writing fiction compared? What’s been more difficult about writing fiction? And what has been more enjoyable? Do you still write non-fiction?

D. D. Everest: Writing fiction is much harder, especially fantasy because you are creating a whole world from your imagination. That world has to be plausible enough for people to believe in it and exciting enough for them to want to read about it.

Writing children’s books is the most challenging of all. Having said that, I don’t write for children as such. I write what I’d like to read. But I hope children will enjoy it.

The best thing about writing for children is that they have such rich imaginations that you have lots of licence to be creative. So, you have a big canvas. But the other side of that is they have very high expectations. They question everything in a way that adults don’t, which means they could get ahead of the plot or find holes in the logic. So you have to work really hard at that.

Playing by the book: Can you share a little of the research you did for Archie Greene and the Magician’s Secret – I imagine you spent time exploring the back streets of Oxford and visiting atmospheric libraries, perhaps even learning some bookbinding skills?

D. D. Everest: Luckily, I was doing some work at the university when I was writing the first book so I was in Oxford quite a lot. I wandered around at night taking lots of photos with my phone. I sometimes show the pictures when I do school events. Again, it grounds the story and makes it feel real.

Oxford

Oxford

For example, there is a description of when Archie first goes to the magical bookshop and he crosses a cobbled square and goes into some narrow lanes. If you go to Oxford it is very easy to find that cobbled square!

Playing by the book: Libraries play an important role in Archie Greene and the Magician’s Secret. Can you share a memory/experience of libraries and the role they’ve played in your life?

D. D. Everest: Most of my memories of libraries are of being told to be quiet because I was talking too loudly! That’s probably why I wanted the Museum of Magical Miscellany to be a noisy place, full of children laughing. Books should be exciting and fun. And magical books should be even more exciting and fun, so that’s how I imagined the Museum.

I have been lucky to see some famous libraries like the British Library, which are fabulous places. I’ve always wanted to have my own library – with revolving bookcases and secret passages. Perhaps I will one day!

Playing by the book: Did you always want to be a writer? If you weren’t a writer, would you rather be? (A professional football coach, perhaps?)

D. D. Everest: I have always wanted to be a writer ever since I was very young. I didn’t really know it at the time but looking back I can see it now. I was the kid who wrote pages and pages when the teacher asked us to write a story. My stories were always too long and complicated to finish in the lesson time. I still do that!

When I’m not writing I manage a junior football team. Most of them have been with me since they were about six – they are now 17. They are a great bunch. I’m not sure how good a manager I would be but I do enjoy it, especially on match days.

Playing by the book: What’s the most magical (in any sense) book you’ve read recently?

D. D. Everest: I really enjoyed Rooftoppers by Katherine Rundell. It is very imaginative and beautifully written. The Graveyard Book, by Neil Gaiman, is so original. The other really clever book I’ve just read is Lockwood & Co. The Screaming Staircase by Jonathan Stroud. He’s a great writer – I loved his Bartimaeus series.

One of many interior illustrations by  James de la Rue for the hardback edition of Archie Greene and the Magician's Secret

One of many interior illustrations by James de la Rue ffor the hardback edition of Archie Greene and the Magician’s Secret

Playing by the book: What magic trick would you most like to be able to perform?

D. D. Everest: I’d like to be able to vanish, so I could avoid people I don’t want to talk to. I’d love to have a permission wall around my study, too, like the one that protects the Museum of Magical Miscellany so that only people with the secret mark could come in. But best of all I’d love to be able to talk to magical books like Archie!

Playing by the book: Oh, yes I’m with you on that one! Here’s keeping our fingers crossed that such magic comes our way!

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34. प्लास्टिक बोतल में पानी

प्लास्टिक बोतल में पानी कितना खतरनाक हो सकता है कभी सोचा न था.

कुछ देर पहले मेरी सहेली मणि का फोन आया कि उसकी तबियत ठीक नही पेट दर्द है बहुत तेज. मैं तुरंत उसके घर पंहुची. बहुत ज्यादा दर्द हो रहा था. दवाई ले चुकी थी. मैने पूछा कि आज दिन भर क्या क्या खाया तो उसने बताया कि वो दोपहर तक  बिल्कुल ठीक थी. शाम को शहर से बाहर जाना था जल्दबाजी में कार मे पानी की बोतल रखना भूल गई. रास्ते में प्यास लगी तो कार मे एक  प्लास्टिक बोतल में पानी  रखा मिल गया  शायद दस बारह दिन पहले रखी होगी . वही पानी पी लिया. बस उसी के बाद से …

बस , अब मैं समझ गई थी. मैने कही पढा था कि कार में रखी प्लास्टिक की बोतल जब धूप या तापमान की वजह से गर्म होती है तो प्लास्टिक में मौजूद नुकसानदेह डाइऑक्सिन का रिसाव शुरू हो जाता है। ये डाइऑक्सिन पानी में घुलकर हमारे शरीर में पहुंचता है डाइऑक्सिन कोशिकाओं पर बुरा असर डालता है. वैसे उसे तो मैने ज्यादा कुछ नही कहा पर सचेत जरुर कर दिया कि आगे से वो कभी कार मे रखे  पुराने पानी को कभी न पीए… इस बार तो मात्र दर्द ही हुआ था पर इससे भी बुरा और  खतरनाक कुछ भी हो सकता है…

दवाई के बाद उसे आराम हुआ और वो सो गई तो मैं भी घर लौट आई और नेट चला कर इसी विषय पर खोज की … और बहुत कुछ पढा और आप के साथ भी शेयर कर रही हूं

Drinking water from a plastic water bottle poses serious health risks

http://rajasthanpatrika.patrika.com/story/health/drinking-water-from-a-plastic-water-bottle-poses-serious-health-risks-972113.htmlप्लास्टिक की बोतल में कई नुकसानदेह केमिकल होते हैं, जो गर्म होने पर रिसकर पानी में मिल जाते हैं। ये खतरनाक केमिकल सेहत को नुकसान पहुंचाते हैं। कैंसर, कब्ज और पेट संंबंधी कई बीमारियों के अलावा कई अन्य नुकसान हैं इन बोतलों के।

एक रिसर्च में यह सामने आया है कि प्लास्टिक के बोतल और कंटेनर के इस्तेमाल से कैंसर हो सकता है। हवाई के कैंसर हॉस्पिटल के डॉक्टर एडवर्ड फुजीमोटो ने प्लास्टिक और कैंसर पर काफी शोध किया है। उनका कहना है कि प्लास्टिक के बर्तन में खाना गर्म करना और कार में रखे बोतल का पानी कैंसर की वजह हो सकते हैं। उनका कहना है कि कार में रखी प्लास्टिक की बोतल जब धूप या तापमान की वजह से गर्म होती है तो प्लास्टिक में मौजूद नुकसानदेह डाइऑक्सिन का रिसाव शुरू हो जाता है। ये डाइऑक्सिन पानी में घुलकर हमारे शरीर में पहुंचता है। डाइऑक्सिन कोशिकाओं पर बुरा असर डालता है। इसकी वजह से महिलाओं में ब्रेस्ट कैंसर का खतरा बढ़ जाता है। Read more…

मैने तो अपना प्लास्टिक बोतल में पानी का अनुभव शेयर किया।  क्या आप भी मुझे कोई अपना अनुभव बताना चाहेगें … हो सकता है कि आपके अनुभव से किसी को फायदा हो जाए …

The post प्लास्टिक बोतल में पानी appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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35. Meet Kathryn Apel, author of On Track

Meet Kathryn Apel, author of On Track (UQP) Thanks for talking to Boomerang Books, Kathryn. Where are you based? I’m based in Queensland – most often in the Gladstone/Bundaberg Region. What’s your background in books? I haven’t always been a writer – but I’ve always been a reader! As a teacher, books have always been an […]

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36. DINO-MITE! Dinosaur picture books with bite

If dinosaurs had any inkling as to how popular they’d end up, I’m sure they would have stuck around longer to enjoy their fame and fortune. Here are a few more new titles to add to your prehistoric, dino-inspired picture book collection, some serious, some silly. All fun.  Dino-Daddy by Mark Sperring and Sam Lloyd […]

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37. PG LIVE - shirley copperwhite

A week today will see the opening of London's premier greetings card show - Progressive Greetings Live. One of the artists appearing will be Dublin based designer Shirley Copperwhite. Shirley will be unveiling 50 new card designs, a new range of tea towels all printed in the UK along with lots of artwork available to license. Shirley is also known for her silk scarf designs and has a Society6

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38. THE DEVIL YOU KNOW by Trish Doller

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39. PG LIVE - betty ettiquette

These lovely cards and notebooks will also be at the PG Live show next week. The designs are by Betty Etiquette a London based stationery brand and design studio established by husband and wife team, Rebecca & David Cahill Roots. Betty Etiquette stocked around the UK in card, gift shops and department stores and will be launching brand new ranges at PG Live 2015 on stand 679.

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40. Guest Post from Michelle Isenhoff

It’s almost summer! I live in Michigan, so during the few months when the sky is blue, the grass is green, and clouds are fluffy, I pack away my winter projects and hit the outdoors—preferably with a book in hand. Those days are just around the corner, so I’m stocking up my Kindle now. If […]

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41. PG LIVE - highlights

Here are a couple of other highlights that caught my eye from the PG Live preview. They include lovely bright notecards from Jane Ormes from ArtPress. Two designs feature in the pack - a small cat in jelly and a dog called Joseph who has a coat of many colours. This striking geometric coat design then features on the outer packaging. Also looking good is this new range of cards from

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42. #699 – Stella Brings the Family by Miriam B. Schiffer & Holly Clifton-Brown

cover
Stella Brings the Family

Written by Miriam B. Schiffer
Illustrated by Holly Clifton-Brown
Chronicle Books      3/05/2015
32 pages     Age 4—8

“Stella’s class is having a Mother’s Day cerebration but what’s a girl with two daddies to do? It’s not that she doesn’t have someone who helps her with her homework or tucks her in at night. Stella has her Papa and Daddy who take care of her and a whole gaggle of other loved ones who make her feel special and supported every day. She just doesn’t have a mom to invite to the party. Fortunately, Stella finds a unique solution to her party problem in the sweet story about love, acceptance, and the true meaning of family.” [book jacket]
.
Review
Stella’s teacher at Elmwood Elementary School announces a celebration for Mother’s Day and each student can invite a “special guest.” Jonathan, Leon, and Carmen are inviting their mothers. Howie even has two mothers to invite! Stella does not have a mother. Her classmates wonder—without a mother—who reads to her at night, helps her with homework, and kisses her when she gets hurt. Stella has many people who do those things. She has her Papa and Daddy, Nonna, Aunt Gloria, Uncle Bruno, and Cousin Lucy. Jonathan suggests inviting them all, but Stella is not sure. On party day, Howie is there with his two mothers and Jonathan is with his grandmother (mom is away in the army). The party is a big hit and everyone has a great time.

kids table

Stella Brings the Family delves into what a family consists of today. No longer simply mom and dad plus kids, today’s configurations of families can be anything that consists of people loving and caring for each other. That can be mom and dad plus kids, or a mom and child, a grandmother and grandchild, even two dads and a daughter, like Stella’s family. Stella Brings the Family is not a book about homosexuality. It does not try to explain why Stella has two dads or anything about the two dads, except that they love Stella.

invite daddy papa stella

What Stella Brings the Family is, is a celebration of family and a celebration of acceptance. None of the kids—or special guests—care about the kind of family each child is a member of, but rather that each child has someone who reads to them at night, helps them with homework, and kisses them when they get hurt. Kids will recognize themselves and their friends in Stella Brings the Family. Debut author Schiffer keeps the story’s focus on Stella, who stands out thanks to her curly red hair.

sp5

The watercolor illustrations beautifully render the multicultural and multigenerational family members. The kids’ invitations, with their drawings of family members, are terrific. The invites look like how someone Stella’s age (6—8) would write, though just a little better than most that age might draw. Clifton-Brown elicits the emotional story clearly through Stella’s expressions. At day’s end, the worn out teacher rests her head on her desk. Stella tells her things will not be as hectic for Father’s Day . . . she will just bring two dads, not the entire family. While not a huge twist or a big laugh, the ending is sweet, just like the story.

STELLA BRINGS THE FAMILY. Text copyright © 2015 by Miriam B. Schiffer. Illustrations copyright © 2015 by Holly Clifton-Brown. Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Chronicle Books, San Francisco, CA.

Purchase Stella Brings the Family at AmazonBook DepositoryChronicle Books.

Learn more about Stella Brings the Family HERE.
Meet the author, Miriam B. Schiffer, at her Young Children column:  http://bit.ly/ReadingChair
Meet the illustrator, Holly Clifton-Brown, at her website:  http://www.hollycliftonbrown.co.uk/
Find more picture books at the Chronicle Books website:  http://www.chroniclebooks.com/
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Copyright © 2015 by Sue Morris/Kid Lit Reviews. All Rights Reserved

Review section word count = 384

stella brings the family


Filed under: 5stars, Children's Books, Debut Author, Favorites, Library Donated Books, Picture Book Tagged: 2 dads, 2 moms, Chronicle Books, family composition, Holly Clifton-Brown, Miriam B. Schiffer, multicultural, multigenerational, Stella Brings the Family

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43. Shooter, Beatty, and Zeck Reunite for a Secret Wars 30th Anniversary Tour

secret-wars-heroes

Reading about the original Secret Wars from 1984 is fascinating on many levels. Between Sean Howe’s excellent retelling of the story behind the story (of Secret Wars) in Marvel Comics: The Untold Story and Marvel’s massive reboot of the saga, there’s a lot to be curious about. Thankfully, former Marvel Comics Editor-in-Chief and Secret Wars writer Jim Shooter is joining the series penciller Mike Zeck and inker John Beatty for an upcoming convention convention circuit. Their tour was announced on the sly via Zeck’s website, here’s a look at Beatty’s website as well. With the imminent 30 Year Anniversary of Marvel Superheroes Secret Wars fast approaching, uncovering more news about the behind-the-scenes info that the panel may announce is going to be a must for comics historians. Here’s Zeck on the tour and a list of shows that the group will be attending:

It’s been about 30 years since I last appeared at a convention with Jim Shooter. Starting this summer we’re going to be tour buddies again! Once Shooter, Beatty, and I committed to appear at the Florida SuperCon, other organizers saw the benefit of bringing the Secret Wars team together again. This being the 30th anniversary of the original Secret Wars and this being the year that Marvel is publishing a new Secret Wars series, it only makes sense. So something of a “Secret Wars Tour” is forming!

For further reading start with Tom Spurgeon’s interview piece with Sean Howe, then go purchase Marvel Comics: The Untold Story.

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44. Super Animals!

Look! In the library! Is it a librarian? Is it a book? Faster than a reading turtle! Able to carry books taller than a giraffe’s neck! Wilder than a monkey checking out library materials! It’s SUPER ANIMALS!

photo by Paige Bentley-Flannery

photo by Paige Bentley-Flannery

Imagine if all of your favorite Super Animals from picture books, chapter books and graphic novels arrived at the library to…Save the Day!  HeroBear and the Kid by Mike Kunkel, Ready Rabbit Gets Ready by Brenna Maloney, Extraordinary Warren, A Super Chicken by Sarah Dillard, Superworm by Julia Donaldson, Fashion Kitty and the Unlikely Hero by Charise Mericle Harper, Super Fly Guy by Tedd Arnold, Superfab Saves the Day by Berengere Delaporte, Turbo the Hamster in Captain Awesome Takes a Dive by Stan Kirby, all of the Super-Pets in the DC Super-Pets series, and a brand new book, Super Fly: The World’s Smallest Superhero! by Todd H. Doodler.  Picture it!  Now we are ready to create comics at the Super Animals! summer reading program at the library.

Read Superworm by Julia Donaldson (or one of your favorite super animal books.)

Create your own comic book:

  • Draw a Super Animal. Supplies for each table include colored 8 x 11 paper, white paper, pencils, markers, glue sticks, and scissors.
  • Draw Big! Draw one Super Animal in action with your group of kids. (If you have more time, have everyone draw one BIG Super Animal and display them around the room. Supplies: colored pencils and butcher paper.
  • Talk about your Super Animal.
  • Describe your super animal. A Super Frog? A Super Flamingo?

    Super Flamingo! by JC and P.  Photo by Paige Bentley-Flannery

    Super Flamingo! by JC and P. Photo by Paige Bentley-Flannery

  • What is their super power? Check out the Big Book of Superheroes by Bart King for super ideas.

    photo by Paige Bentley-Flannery

    photo by Paige Bentley-Flannery

  • Share a story idea.
    One story idea:  The children’s chapter books are disappearing from the library! They start to re-appear a month later in the outside reading garden in the shape of animals.  First, a HUGE penguin book sculpture appears, the following week, a HUGE zebra.  Every Saturday after Book Buzz, another new chapter book disappears.  Who is taking the books out of the library?   Is it Sneaky Snake?  Or Master Mouse?  And why are they making animal sculptures out of children’s chapter books?
  • Who will save the day?
  • Continue to share Super Animal powers around the room.
  • Create a comic with six frames and dialog bubbles so kids can tell their animal’s story: intro to your super animal, where? what? how? and an ending.  (You can always add more.)
  • ZAP! Act out your Super Animal comic book.  (If you have time.)

    photo by Paige Bentley-Flannery

    photo by Paige Bentley-Flannery

Explore more Summer Reading programs at Deschutes Public Library.

Check out some of the other SUPER animal summer reading programs:
Wildlife Superheroes at NYPL
Be a Hero, Save a Butterfly at Arnolds Park Library
Great Stuffed Animal Superhero Sleepover & Storytime at Belvedere Tiburon Library
Animal Superhero Show at Mason Public Library

Comic Book Websites:
www.makebeliefscomix.com/Comix/
artroche.com
www.mykidsadventures.com/create-comic-strip-kids/
http://www.toon-books.com

The fabulous Dana Horrocks and Lindsey Krabbenhoft share four Superhero and Hero songs to get us ready for Summer Reading at the library! Thank you, Dana and Lindsey. 

Are you ready for Every Hero Has a Story at your library? My library cape is on…SHAZAM! 

Happy Summer Reading!

Super Animals! by JC and PF photo by Paige Bentley-Flannery and the ComicBook! app.

Super Animals! by JC and PF photo by Paige Bentley-Flannery and the ComicBook! app.

Please share your comic book and super animal ideas or photos in the comments below.

Paige Bentley-Flannery is a Community Librarian at Deschutes Public Library. For over fifteen years–from Seattle Art Museum to the New York Public Library to the Deschutes Public Library-Paige’s passion and creative style for art, poetry and literature have been combined with instructing, planning, and providing information. Paige is currently serving on the ALSC Notable Children’s Book Committee, 2015 – 2017. She is a former Chair of the ALSC Digital Content Task Force and member of the ALSC Great Websites Committee.

The post Super Animals! appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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45. Write, Share, and Give

Share your story today!

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46. Summer Personality Quiz

Hi!

PurpleWizard50 created a quiz to help you answer the question: What Should You Do This Summer?

1. Yay! It’s finally summer! What do you want to do? a) Check out some sunny beaches. b) Stay at home and read. c) Go to a new and exotic city. d) Visit your friends and relatives.

2. Wow! It’s burning out there! What do you do to cool off? a) Take a dive in an outdoor swimming pool. b) Sit in front of the A/C until your teeth freeze. c) Run through the sprinkler with a home-made paper fan. d) Head to your bestie’s place for a movie marathon in her air-conditioned basement.

3. What’s your favorite summer treat? a) Ice cream sundaes. b) Fresh fruit juice smoothies. c) Icy cold “mocktails.” d) Those twin Popsicles.

4. How would you describe yourself? a) Sporty and fun. b) Bookworm-y and quiet. c) Unique and artsy. d) Social and a great BFF.

5. What is your favorite hobby? a) Playing sports and swimming. b) Reading and being alone. c) Painting or drawing. d) Hanging with your bestie.

Results!

Mostly A’s: Sports are totally your thing. You would rather run around the neighborhood to warm up than sit in a warm woolen blanket — not that that has anything to do with summer. Hit up some beaches and maybe the local pool.

Mostly B’s: You like being lonely. You would rather make a fort out of pillows and sit in there, reading a book for hours. Stay at home this summer and read your favorite books. Or if you’re going out of town, pack an extra suitcase for books!

Mostly C’s: You’re different and artsy. You would rather make your Mother’s Day gifts and cards than buy them from the mall. Check out an exotic country or head to art school. Or art school in an exotic country.

Mostly D’s: You and your BFF are inseparable. You would rather shop with her than shop alone, no contest. This summer, hang with her. Have sleepovers, playdates, shopping sprees, gossip sessions, whatever. Just have fun!

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47. Musical Book Beats for Little Ones

Music and books have many benefits in common for a baby’s long-term development. Learning about patterns and sequencing, counting, memory, expressing language and emotions are all powerful advantages to being exposed to these experiences. And when combined, this makes for a most engaging, dynamic and instrumental union. Here we explore a few upbeat and rhythmic […]

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48. George MacDonald Fraser debut

       George MacDonald Fraser had grand success with his Flashman-novels, and others, like his Quartered Safe Out Here, also continue to enjoy great popularity (the latter is, somewhat bafflingly, one of the most consistently bought-via-the-Amazon-links titles at this site), and now Caroline Davies reports in The Guardian that Lost novel of Flashman Papers creator to be published for first time, as Fraser's first effort, Captain in Calico, will be published for the first time this fall; see the Mysterious Press publicity page, or pre-order your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk.

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49. My Take On An Open Letter From GRRM


A friend sent me a certain link, thinking it might amuse me. It did, sort of.

Here it is, so you can read it too. 


It seems people have been noticing how many characters you like get killed in Game Of Thrones. Some must have been complaining about it, because his response is rather grumpy. But I did chuckle when he pointed out that, among other things, Ned Stark is an idiot who warned his enemy - and then that they had cast Sean Bean in the role, what did people expect? Because, of course, he does  tend to play roles in which he is killed off. I can think of two off the top of my head - Boromir in LOTR and a man who got on the wrong side of Henry VIII in the miniseries with Ray Winstone(I forget the character's name, but he was real, and Mr Bean got to use his Yorkshire accent). Though he also played Odysseus in Troy and Odysseus survived, didn't he, and came home to a faithful wife and a loyal son, unlike the other Greek heroes. 

Then he went on to call William Shakespeare a psycho and argue that there are piles of bodies on the stage in Shakespeare tragedies. Well, yes. Though one play he describes with gruesome relish is Titus Andronicus, which was probably Shakespeare's first play, certainly early in his career. I must admit, that's one I can't watch. I had to read it at university and haven't read it since then and I didn't go to see the movie(what were they thinking, choosing that one?). It's too awful. There's even a scene where this man is standing making a beautiful, lyrical speech about his niece when she has just been raped and mutilated! But the thing is, it wasn't the only one of its kind. It was part of a very popular genre, the revenge tragedy. I guess he and his company must have decided to cash in on the craze,

And Shakespeare, like a certain American spec fic writer complaining about him, was a writer of popular stuff that everyone went to see. He was a commercial writer. If he was alive today he would probably be writing sensationalist stuff for TV. He wouldn't be getting invited to writers' festivals to talk about the deep and meaningful symbolism in his work. The fact that he wrote stuff that makes you laugh and cry and says for you things that you can't express yourself and has something to say about everything  is beside the point. He would probably be shocked to find people running courses in his work. I had a very faint taste of that once, when I found an online review of a short story I had forgotten I'd written, reading into it all sorts of things that had never occurred to me when I wrote it. 

Shakespeare was the sort of guy you could have a beer with at the pub. And he wrote plays that are still performed, not because they're great literature(though they are)but because they still have things to say to us. 

Then Mr Martin goes on about that dreadful, violent book, the Bible. Well, I can't deny that. I have always liked the Bible for that very reason, all the sex and violence ...;-) 

I read The Game Of Thrones when it first came out. I liked it for the believable mediaeval stink and discomfort and for the fascinating weather conditions on whichever planet it is, oh, and for all the eating that goes on. Some fans wrote a wonderful cookbook, which I have at home. I have since read more, though I'm not sure I'll finish the series, not because of the violence and killing off your favourite characters, but because, IMO, it has turned into a soap opera. I'm not a fan of the soaps.  I'm also not a fan, in general, of fat fantasy series, however good they might be. Terry Pratchett was another matter. His books weren't thick and it mostly didn't matter if you hadn't read the earlier ones, though you'd probably rush off to find them anyway.

To be honest, there are other books of his that I prefer. Tuf Voyaging, the space-based story of a man and his cats and their adventures in a seed ship. Fevre Dream, the story of vampires in the Old South and a vampire who is sick of killing people and wants to find another way of getting his nutrition, is my favourite. That was about to come out when he was in Melbourne for a very small convention at a tiny hotel in St Kilda, a suburb of Melbourne - the population is small here, so even US minicons would be huge compared to our conventions. I remember him saying that he chose that setting because it was a time and place where slaves could disappear and nobody would ask questions. He was working on the TV series Beauty And The Beast at the time. And I enjoyed his work. Fortunately, the early ones are still in print, no doubt because of the success of his later ones. Read them if you can. 

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50. Fish in a Tree, by Lynda Mullaly Hunt: a powerful favorite of 2015 (ages 9-12)

Many of my students turn to books to sink into someone's world, to understand someone else's struggles and gain perspectives on their own lives. Fish in a Tree has been a favorite at Emerson all spring precisely because of this. Lynda Mullaly Hunt draws readers into Ally's world and helps them understand how hard school is for her. My students keep recommending this to one another, especially to friends who like stories that really reach your heart.
Fish in a Tree
by Lynda Mullaly Hunt
Nancy Paulsen / Penguin, 2015
Your local library
Amazon
ages 9-12
*best new book*
Ally Nickerson knows how to survive a day at school, but each day is an ordeal. In 6th grade and at her seventh school, Ally does everything she can to cover up the fact that reading and writing are nearly impossible for her. "I wonder what it would be like to be able to relax at school and not have to worry every second of every minute." Her teachers and her principal say that it's up to her, but Ally knows that it isn't. She just feels broken -- except when she's drawing in her Sketchbook of Impossible Things.

When Ally's teacher goes out on maternity leave, a new young teacher takes her place. For the first time, a teacher really sees Ally for who she is, for what her real strengths are as well as her profound struggles. He helps diagnose her dyslexia and starts giving her extra reading support after school. At the same time, Ally starts developing friendships with two other kids who also don't fit the typical mold. These friendships and her new reading skills help Ally believe in herself and her own gifts.

My students would absolutely agree with this starred review from Booklist:
"Filled with a delightful range of quirky characters and told with tons of heart, the story also explores themes of family, friendship, and courage in its many forms. And while a girl with dyslexia may be the center of the book, it has something to offer for a wide-ranging audience, making this an excellent class read-aloud. A hopeful and meaningful choice for those who struggle academically, this is as unique as its heroine."
Share this book trailer with kids to give them a feel for the story, and then head over to the Mr. Schu's blog Watch.Connect.Read for Lynda's wonderful essay about how she approaches her writing, starting with character and what she sees in her head.

When the literacy coaches at Berkeley Unified School District asked me to recommend a book that lends itself to talking about multiple perspectives, I recommended Fish in a Tree. They loved how you could pause to think about the story from the principal's point of view, Ally's mother's, or her brother Travis's perspective. Teachers will want to check out this educator's guide for more ideas.

The review copy was kindly sent by the publisher, Nancy Paulsen/Penguin Random House. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.

©2015 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books

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