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26. Introverts and Conferences

With careful preparation, introverts can attend and benefit from conferences.

http://groggorg.blogspot.com/2016/06/introverts-attending-conferences-words.html

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27. Summer Things


Some bits of summer, right now.

The past few weeks have been full. I turned in final art for Fort Building Time (I'll post more about that as the months go by). Aside from work, most weekends I've been helping to clean and pack up my grandparent's home of sixty plus years. Add in a badly wrenched neck and a mini-blogging hiatus made reasonable sense.

But aside from all that:

*I'm just finishing up this Tommy and Tuppence mystery. The opening is a bit uneven, but if you stick with it, the pace picks up brilliantly and makes for a fun summer read. Speaking of which, any summer book recomendations?

*A trip to Tandem Coffee for my birthday was splendid.

*And I'm getting ready for a shop update, mostly small watercolor originals (like the above), a few tea towels and an embroidery. I'll post here once that's all ready to go. I've also just sent off for a proof of some new designs and will have those available in my Spoonflower shop next month.

Happy weekend!

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28. First Day of School Jitters? Try Splat the Cat

First Day of School Jitters? Try Splat the Cat | Storytime Standouts

Storytime Standouts reviews Splat the Cat by Rob ScottonSplat the Cat by Rob Scotton
Picture book about starting school published by Harper Collins Publishers

There’s no doubt about it, going to school for the very first time can be nerve-wracking. It is no wonder that Splat is wide awake bright and early.

When mom opens his bedroom door, his first instinct is to pull the covers over his head. When that doesn’t work, Splat tries all sorts of tactics to delay leaving for school. He can’t find socks and his hair is a mess. One thing he knows for sure, having a friend in his lunchbox is certain to help. Splat pops Seymour the Mouse into his lunchbox and sets out to meet his new teacher and classmates.Splat the Cat spread

Mrs. Wimpydimple and Splat’s new classmates are very welcoming and soon Splat is full of questions. He is especially curious to know why cats chase mice! (A definite opportunity to introduce the concept of foreshadowing) When it is finally lunchtime, Splat opens his lunchbox and his small rodent friend, Seymour is suddenly the centre of attention – and not in a good way. Splat’s new classmates do exactly what readers will predict – the chase is on!

Engaging, playful illustrations provide many details for young children to notice and enjoy. A mostly grey and black color palette is highlighted with vibrant yellow and red details that pop off the page. Those who are able to read will love the signs in the storefront windows and Mrs. Wimpydimple’s blackboard illustrations.


Harper Collins has some terrific Splat the Cat printables for children to enjoy.

Splat the Cat at Amazon.com

Splat the Cat at Amazon.ca



Storytime Standouts - Raising Children Who Love to Read

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29. Interesting blog posts about writing – w/e July 22nd, 2016



Here’s my selection of interesting (and sometimes amusing) posts about writing from the last week:

Creating voice in the query (The Intern)
https://intheinbox.wordpress.com/2016/07/20/creating-voice-in-the-query/

Making Clichés Work for You (Janice Hardy)
http://blog.janicehardy.com/2011/10/you-spin-me-round-making-cliches-work.html

When in doubt, bury someone alive (Joe Moore)
https://killzoneblog.com/2016/07/when-in-doubt-bury-someone-alive.html

5 Ways to Develop Your Writer’s Voice (Jennifer Louden)
https://janefriedman.com/5-ways-develop-writers-voice/

10 Questions for Outlining a Scene smack-dab-in-the-middle (Marcia Thornton Jones)
http://blogspot.com/2016/06/marcias-10-questions-for-outlining.html

Saving the Sagging Middle (Clare Langly-Thorne)
https://killzoneblog.com/2016/07/saving-the-sagging-middle.html

4 Ways to Verify Your Story Concept Is Strong Enough (K. M. Weiland)
www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com/story-concept-2/

First Line Winners and Losers (Janet Kobobel Grant)
www.booksandsuch.com/blog/first-line-winners-losers/

So Your Self-Published Novel is Just Sitting There (James Scott Bell)
https://killzoneblog.com/2016/07/so-your-self-published-novel-is-just-sitting-there.html

Is Your Query Letter Ready (The Intern)
https://intheinbox.wordpress.com/2016/05/20/is-my-query-letter-ready-for-submission/
by way of Laurie Wallmark



If you found these useful, you may also like my personal selection of the most interesting blog posts from 2015, and last week’s list.


If you have a particular favorite among these, please let the author know (and me too, if you have time).  Also, if you've a link to a great post that isn't here, feel free to share.
 

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30. Win Autographed Copies of Rocket-Bye and Can a Princess Be a Firefighter?

Enter to win autographed copies of Rocket-Bye and Can a Princess Be a Firefighter?, written by award-winning author Carole P. Roman and illustrated by Mateya Arkova. Giveaway begins July 23, 2016, at 12:01 A.M. PST and ends August 23, 2016, at 11:59 P.M. PST.

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31. Blowin’ Up at Pop Matters

9780226348896

 

From a recent review of Jooyoung Lee’s Blowin’ Up: Rap Dreams in South Central, at Pop Matters:

One of the many powers of hip-hop, of course, is the intimacy it offers. Spend enough time listening to a certain rapper, and you begin to feel like you know that person as well as you do your own friends. Chuck D’s famous pronouncement that hip-hop is “CNN for black people”, pointed though it is, seems to miss part of the story. Hip-hop is CNN for white people, too, if you acknowledge the media’s systematic neglect of America’s black population. Through hip-hop, rappers are telling the stories that many journalists, and their publications, couldn’t be bothered to cover.

As a white hip-hop fan, there’s a seductive tendency to congratulate one’s self for gaining cultural competencies in African American culture, as if memorizing Tupac lyrics and attending Wu-Tang concerts confers a master’s degree in black studies. But the truth is that even in its rawest, most detailed form, hip-hop gives only what is at best a keyhole-sized view of the African American experience.

Jooyoung Lee’s Blowin’ Up: Rap Dreams in South Central represents a jump through the keyhole into the world of hip-hop as it is lived by some of the art form’s most dedicated practitioners.

To read more about Blowin’ Up, click here.

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32. चुनावी वादे और आप

चुनावी वादे और आप फिर बज उठा चुनावी बिगुल…चुनाव में चाहे आम आदमी शब्द का इस्तेमाल करना हो या “आप ” शब्द का …बहुत दिक्कत आती है क्योकि आम आदमी पार्टी जहन में आती है.. आज कांग्रेस ने भी बस यात्रा आरम्भ की और पढने में आया कि कांग्रेस की यात्रा “बस” अपने बडबोले बयानो […]

The post चुनावी वादे और आप appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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33. Not just dots on a map: life histories alleviate spatial amnesia in San Francisco

For Manissa Maharawal, the struggle for housing justice is personal. When her own father got displaced from his apartment in Prospect Heights—his home since moving from India to the States some thirty years before, in which he raised his family—she was struck by his unstoppable urge to tell the story over and over again.

The post Not just dots on a map: life histories alleviate spatial amnesia in San Francisco appeared first on OUPblog.

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34. Jim and Ted 15: The picnic

JimTed15

I figured that Jim and Ted needed a longer break from the insanity that has been their life. So here they are enjoying a nice happy, picnic.

 

The post Jim and Ted 15: The picnic appeared first on rob-peters.com.

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35. ‘The Unlikely Hero’ by Guilherme Marcondes

Brazilian studio Lobo knocks it out of the park with this advertising short for textile maker Interface.

The post ‘The Unlikely Hero’ by Guilherme Marcondes appeared first on Cartoon Brew.

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36. remember the raspberries

wall.alphacoders.com

"I want my word to be the thing itself,
 created by my soul a second time."
                    --Juan Ramon Jimenez

"A poem should not mean, but be."
                   --Archibald MacLeish



This week I presented at the Millersville University Poetry in the Classroom Institute, directed by Dr. Lesley Colabucci.  Along with Jacqueline Jules, Marjorie Maddox, Sylvia Vardell and Janet Wong, I "worked" poetry with a great group of Pennsylvania educators.  There was talk of the many ways to read poetry, write poetry, share poetry, collect poetry, teach poetry, learn poetry, and my particular contribution was a look at the nuts & bolts of establishing a workable poetry routine in the classroom. Meanwhile, I created my own writer's retreat here in Lancaster, PA, and excavated a whole crate of writing from as far back as 1992--not notebooks, but drafts of stories and memoir and poems and manuscripts, some with my notes, some with critique group notes--tons of material remembered and yes (I have a really faulty memory), forgotten.

This has given me the impression of eating, sleeping and breathing poetry all week, and yet for me there has hardly been a moment of letting a poem "be the thing itself," of letting it "not mean, but be."  These words are the epigraph to a double collection of poems by my youngest cousin Meredith, which I rediscovered in my trove of writing.  So to conclude my week, I'm going to let these two poems by Meredith be the thing itself, created a second time out of her college experience of brain cancer and long recovery

from Roots: Living With(Out) Cancer
    
grass || Meredith Tracy
       Part I: Another Voice in the Darkness, 1999

Dad wheels me along
the paved pathways, careful not
to tip me sideways
I remember how the familiar feel of
each individual blade
on my bare feet
stunned me as I stood up
out of my wheelchair.

Taking in the fresh air,
an unexpected treasure--
raspberry bushes:
ruby fruit
that melts on my tongue.

A respite from hospital air,
nutrients/food.  A reminder of life.

I am alive.

remember the raspberries|| Meredith Tracy
     Part II: Remember the Raspberries, 2009
 
i need to remember that
unexpected pleasure of
the rubyfruit melting on
my tongue.

that moment when I was
outside, no longer a
patient, but an outsider
seeing the unexpectedness
of life, the surprises that
appear so suddenly, th
pieces of a light-full life
to be lived, even if only
day by day.

i need to forget the
dark half of the room
i shared with a stranger.
the dark half that seems
to follow me, not
letting me go
until i can shed this
darkness and walk out
into the light.

****************************

The roundup today is with  Chelanne at Books4Learning.  Let the poems be.


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37. Millersville Poetry Institute

Our whole group-- with everyone holding a book of poetry!
Janet (Wong) and I just wrapped up a wonderful week at the Millersville University Poetry Institute (in Pennsylvania) led, planned, and coordinated by Dr. Lesley Colabucci. (Intro and info here.) 


What a fun week-- and what a great opportunity to work with 23 teachers (K-12) in helping them get comfortable and confident with sharing poetry in all kinds of creative ways. Lesley had several "celebrity" readers start each day by sharing a poem (including the University President), invited local experts who lead various poetry projects and initiatives, and had several other poet speakers too-- like Jacqueline Jules, Heidi Mordhorst, Marjorie Maddox, Sandy Asher, and Linda Oatman High. Teacger Maggie Bokelman spoke about teaching with poetry and Karla Schmit presented the Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Award. (Sorry I missed you, Karla!) And I'm probably missing other awesome speakers. 
Janet has the group in the palm of her hand!

It was so fun to watch my good friend Janet (Wong) do her thing, presenting an awesome day of activities and challenges. She even had us collaborate to create a poetry suitcase-- which turned out amazingly well! Plus, Janet and I were able to take time outside the Institute to work together on our next project-- more on that soon. Hope you enjoy a few photos and feel inspired to try some of the things we saw here too. 

My focus was on modeling the "Take 5" approach to sharing poetry and showing how we can bridge oral and written language, involve kids actively, integrate skill instruction, and make text-to-text connections, among other things. I had a ton of slides, examples, and handouts, so I'll just share one nugget here below.

Reading Poetry Aloud

    Rachel created a poem poster
For each poem, we provide suggestions for how to invite students to participate in reading the poem aloud. Often the poem itself will “show” you how to perform it if you study the lines and their arrangement on the page. And when you invite students to participate in poem performance, you will find that they will have ideas about how to try a poem this way or that way. Follow their lead! Here are some general guidelines for involving students in reading poetry out loud.
  • Take the lead, be the first to read the poem, and don’t be afraid to “ham it up.” Take the pressure off students by showing how the poem sounds, how words should be pronounced, how the meaning and emotion might be conveyed. Don’t ask them to do anything you wouldn’t do yourself.
Poetry suitcase with props
  • Use props whenever possible to make a concrete connection to the poem, focus attention, and add a bit of fun. Choose something suggested by the poem. It’s even worth planning ahead to have a good prop ready beforehand. Students can then use the props too as they volunteer to join in on reading the poem, taking the focus off of them and giving the audience something specific to look at while listening—the poetry prop.
  • Try using media to add another dimension to the poetry experience. Look for digital images or videos relevant to the poem to display without sound as a backdrop while reading the poem aloud, or find music or sound effects suggested by the poem to underscore the meaning or mood as you read the poem aloud. 
    Poems on the sidewalk
  • Offer choices as you invite students to join in on reading the poem aloud with you. They can choose a favorite line to chime in on or volunteer to read a line or stanza of their choice or ask a friend to join them in reading a portion aloud. The more say they have about how they participate in the poem reading, the more eager and comfortable they will be about volunteering.
  • Make connections between the poems and their lives and experiences, between one poem and another, and between poems and other genres like nonfiction, short stories, newspaper articles, and songs). We provide example questions and poem connections for each poem, but once you have established that pattern, be open to the connections the students themselves make first. 
    Creating a "found" poem
  • Be creative and use art, drama, and technology to present the poem and to engage students in participating in that presentation. Find relevant photos, draw quick Pictionary-style sketches, make word clouds, create graphic “novel” comic panels for poem lines, use American Sign Language for key words, pose in a dramatic “frozen” tableau, collaborate on a PowerPoint slide show, and so on. Look to share the poem in a way that is particularly meaningful for students. Or better yet, let them show you!

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38. Oskar Cox Jensen's Research Secrets

In the July issue of Writers' Forum I interviewed Oskar Cox Jensen about the research he did for his novels, The Stones of Winter and The Wild Hunt, which are set in Scandinavia. He explained how fieldwork inspired him and helped him to solve specific issues with the series.



The books are Viking tales of myth and magic. All is not well at the Viking court of Jelling. Home to the mysterious Yelling Stones (three witches turned into stone). It has always been a place of power and a haven for 'the old ways'. Troubling news has reached King Gorm's court - but fourteen-year-old princess Astrid isn't concerned. She's far more worried her family prefers her inside sewing, or planning her marriage, rather than letting her explore the forest, or ride Hestur, her beautiful snow-white horse.

Astrid finds herself at the heart of a battle that will change her life forever. Leif, an ambitious and talented young poet, arrives at King Gorm's court and announces he has been sent visions from the witches of the Yelling Stones, saying a dangerous and powerful force is coming - one that will change the face of Denmark -and only Astrid and Leif can stop it. With danger all around them, including trolls, witches and a terrifying creature called 'The Beast', can they tell who the real enemy is in time to stop them?

To find out more about Oskar Cox Jensen you can visit his website at: www.oskarjensen.com

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39. Season 2 Renewals: ‘Powerpuff Girls,’ ‘Voltron,’ ‘Supermansion,’ and ‘Legends of Chamberlain Heights’

Recent announcements for four animated series that will be returning for second seasons.

The post Season 2 Renewals: ‘Powerpuff Girls,’ ‘Voltron,’ ‘Supermansion,’ and ‘Legends of Chamberlain Heights’ appeared first on Cartoon Brew.

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40. The Krakens

image

My Doodle-a-day project is featured today on The Krakens. It is a web gallery featuring work by LDS artists. Take a peek I am sure you will enjoy it. http://www.thekrakens.com/2016/…/scott-franson-doodle-a-day/

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41.

With second cousin living in England.

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42. Come to School with Me on Youth Management!


Pixabay image
I'm happy to say I have the opportunity to once again present "How Do You Manage THAT?!? Issues in Youth Services Management Part 1", October 17-November 11 for UW-Madison SLIS CE. This course was originally offered in fall 2014 so I'm pumped to examine the issues in this first version of the course.

What are we covering?
  •  Collection Development Mojo – savvy selection, weeding, confounding conundrums (bindings, salespeople, cold calls, awards, earning a place on the shelf)
  • Strategic Planning Power – big picture visioning; outcomes and goals; balancing services; statistics power
  • Room Management and Space Issues- from chaos to calm; involving your public; creative space-making; managing behaviors
  • Leadership from Within – fostering  relationships with other library staff; dealing with reluctant administration/board/patrons/co-workers/employees;
  • Zen Balance and Creative Engagement – partnerships/collaboration; PLNs

Active participation in discussion, a short paper that helps you identify a goal to work on and presto! You've earned CEUs and valuable insight from this crowd-sourced course where we all help each other examine these issues. Problem-solving and sharing are hallmarks of this learning opportunity.

Registration is now open (with a 10% discount before Oct 2). But don't delay; the course tends to fill fast!

And please check out the other UW-Madison SLIS fall CE courses. My colleagues are knocking it out of the park and each class is dynamite!!!


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43. Waiting for Augusta by Jessica Lawson: Book Review

Book received at no charge in exchange review.

It's been a month since Benjamin Putter's father passed away. It's hard for an eleven-year-old to describe what it feels like to lose a loved one but Benjamin is convinced the lump he feels in his throat is a golf ball caused by his loss. If that isn't enough, he hears his father's voice coming from his urn imploring him to scatter his ashes on the 18th hole of the famous Augusta National golf course. He has no idea how he's going to get there but he knows he must.

As he begins his journey, Benjamin meets up with a spunky girl named Noni who is determined to travel with him. Together they face obstacles that seem insurmountable. They also face the ugly inner demons of lingering racism and have to come to terms with what they see and hear as opposed to how they feel.

Strong writing and plot pacing make for a poignant and heart warming story. However, young readers may be turned off by the heart breaking subject matter. While it's written for middle grade, it may be too deep and unsettling for the younger end age group.


Rating ★★★★☆

Publishing Information:

Publisher: Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers (May 10, 2016)
Pages: 336 hardcover
ISBN-13: 978-1481448390
Ages: 8-12

This book can be purchase from the following retailer:






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44. That Time Vice-Presidential Candidate Mike Pence Reviewed Disney’s ‘Mulan’

This is what happens when a politician reviews an animated feature.

The post That Time Vice-Presidential Candidate Mike Pence Reviewed Disney’s ‘Mulan’ appeared first on Cartoon Brew.

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45. Chocolate-Covered Strawberries

The chocolate-covered strawberries 
Were free, as a promotion.
My friend gave me a coupon - "Use it
If you've got the notion."

I brought them home and ate a few
Then stuck them in the freezer.
I didn't love them but I said I did,
So it would please her.

That was a year ago and I'd
Forgotten they existed,
But when I found them, tossing them
Was something I resisted.

You see, my friend who'd coupon-shared
No longer is alive.
It seems ironic that these treats, though,
Managed to survive.

They hardly take up any room
Behind the ice cube tray
So that is where, at least for now,
Those strawberries will stay.




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46. Toads and Summer


Recently, I came across a delightful new book  -- The Toad by Elise Gravel.  I exclaimed to my coworker – “I love toads!  Toads are my childhood!”  This was met with much merriment.  But, it is true.  Tadpoles and toads were a big part of my life when I was growing up in Massapequa Park.  We lived near a storm basin, filled with water, and we would look for and easily find tadpoles and baby toads and grown-up toads.  At night, we would hear them sing.  It is one of my favorite sounds.  These days, I rarely see toads anymore.  Sadly, they are disappearing due to pollution and loss of habitat.  But when I am lucky enough to come across one or if I hear them sing, it always makes me happy.  It evokes wonderful memories of summers past.

Toad booklist (this is a very short list --- these are not all the books the library has on toads; for more titles, please ask one of the librarians.  Preferably one that has an appreciation for toads.  Probably not Miss Amy):
The book that inspired me -- The Toad by Elise Gravel (it is part of a series called Disgusting Critters but toads are NOT disgusting. At all).  It is filled with interesting information about these creatures and is very entertaining:



This beautiful book, Gem by Hollie Hobbie, is aptly titled:





Posted by Miss Sue Ann, certified toad lover.


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47. Trapped


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48. Paris in July Playlist

Maurice Jarre
I have definitely enjoyed participating in the Paris in July blog event. Today, I thought I would share my top three French composers.

3. Maurice Jarre (1924-2009) was a composer who did a LOT of movie scores. Most likely, you are familiar with his scores for Lawrence of Arabia, Doctor Zhivago, Witness, Dead Poets Society, and Ghost. Also he did Passage to India, Is Paris Burning?, The Man Who Would Be King, Jesus of Nazareth, and A Walk in the Clouds.

His biggest hit, of course, was "Lara's Theme."

2. Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921) is a popular choice for figure skaters. I'll be honest. That's how I came to know his music.

I'm sharing with you today:
Danse Macabre
Carnival of Animals
From the Carnival, but for the impatient sort, The Swan
Samson and Delilah, and, for the impatient sort, Bacchanale
Introduction & Rondo Capriccioso
Piano Concerto No 2 in G minor

1.  Georges Bizet (1838-1875) is definitely my FAVORITE, FAVORITE French composer. He is perhaps best known for Carmen, the opera. And I do love that. Though I prefer instrumental versions for easy-listening. But I really ADORE L'Arlésienne.

I'm curious if anyone will see the connection between these pieces of music and a certain children's television program. Bizet must be a big favorite of the LITTLE EINSTEIN folks.


Carmen Suite #1 and #2 Playlist



L'Arlésienne Suite No. 1 & Suite No. 2



© 2016 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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49. The Leaky Cauldron at San Diego Comic-Con’s ‘Fantastic Beasts’ Q&A!

Tomorrow, The Leaky Cauldron will join the Fantastic Beasts team at San Diego Comic-Con and Warner Bros’ special event at Leavesden Studios in London. Leaky will be involved with an exclusive Q&A with the cast and crew of the film, so listen out for us!

The Fantastic Beasts Facebook page also shared some new movie art celebrating their appearance at Comic-Con, and gave the username of the new Harry Potter Snapshat account (wizarding_world), which will be shared by Pottermore, Harry Potter and Fantastic Beasts teams. A special message will be delivered via the app tomorrow, so be sure to add them and check it!

Be sure to add wizarding_world on snapchat and watch the Q&A at 10:10pm BST/ 2:10pm PT/5:10pm ET tomorrow via the Fantastic Beasts Facebook page (here) and Twitter (here), and listen out for Leaky’s question!

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50. Stirring the Plot: Internal Conflict

#writingfiction, #writingtips, #fiction, #critiquegroup, #genre, #novel, #storybuildingblocks, #screenplay, @Diana_Hurwitz,  #temperament, #storybuildingblocks
In addition to the problems the story world, antagonist, friends, and foes cause for our protagonist, there are internal obstacles that prevent him from achieving his overall story or scene goals.

Internal obstacles are supplied by the protagonist’s own mind. They are difficult to overcome because most characters lack objectivity and insight into their subconscious motivations. Rarely are characters self-aware enough to know their strengths, weaknesses, and triggers. 

Friends and foes and the antagonist can hold up mirrors so the character can see himself better. Most people lack self-awareness. Have other characters point out their faulty thinking.

Other characters reinforce these obstacles or help him overcome them. All characters have emotional triggers and cause explosions by pulling other people’s emotional triggers.

Internal obstacles can take several forms:

[ Internal resistance based on temperament to things that go against his natural inclinations.

This is where you can utilize their core traits (introversion/extraversion, intuition/sensing, feeling/thinking,  perception/judging) for or against them. If they are introverted, make them go public. If they are an on the fly guy, make them have to come up with a plan and stick with it. If they don't, the plan goes to hell and creates further conflict. If they hate being in the limelight, shine it on them. If they struggle with commitment, give them no choice.

[ Fears and phobias that keep him from going where he needs to go or taking the action he needs to take.

You can make this a crippling phobia (though a lot of these have been overused). You can make it more subtle, but equally effective if they overcome an unreasonable fear to solve a problem.

[ Desire for a personal currency that tempts him to do the wrong thing or sidelines his efforts.

We covered the sixteen currencies in earlier posts. It is hard to encourage someone by promising them something they don't want or threatening to take away something they don't care about. 

Tapping Your Character's Currency

Character Currency in Action

[ Character flaws such as low self esteem, arrogance, or pride that keeps him from doing what needs to be done or makes him do things that are better left untried.

In SBB II, I talk about ways to bend and twist your character's personality. You can use those emotional wounds and neuroses to create intense conflict at the scene and overall story levels.

[ Psychological barriers, such as conditioning, belief systems, mental illness, anxiety, depression, and addiction keep a character from seeing the situation clearly or keep him from making healthy decisions about what needs to be done or said.

Your characters don't live in a vacuum. There are societal rules, family rules, or organizational rules that they have internalized. Some characters break rules easier than others.

Make it hard. 

For more about how to craft characters, pick up a copy of Story Building Blocks II: Crafting Believable Conflict, available in paperback and E-book and Story Building Blocks: Build A Cast Workbook, available in paperback and E-book.

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