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26. Eleanor Catton: What I’m Giving

At Powell's, we feel the holidays are the perfect time to share our love of books with those close to us. For this special blog series, we reached out to authors featured in our Holiday Gift Guide to learn about their own experiences with book giving during this bountiful time of year. Today's featured giver [...]

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27. Festival Call for Entries: Northwest Animation Fest, Future Film Festival, Fest Anca

Our new Animation Festival Guide is a hand-picked list of calls for entries from respected festivals around the globe. This week, we add three new calls for entries from Portland, Oregon; Bologna, Italy; and Žilina, Slovakia.

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28. Just be happy, that's all I want for you


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29. SkADaMo 2014

Attention shoppers! It is now 9:00 and our store is closing.
9:00! Great Scott! The store is gonna close!
Santa can’t wait all night.
Come on up on Santa’s lap.
Get moving, kid. Quit dragging your feet.

santaeyeoutsanta
And what’s your name, little boy?
Hey, kid, hurry up, the store’s closing!
Listen, little boy, we got a lot of people waiting here, so get going!
What do you want for Christmas, little boy?
My mind had gone blank.
Frantically I tried to remember what it was I wanted.
I was blowing it, blowing it.
How about a nice football?
Football. What’s a football?
Without conscious will, my voice squeaked out:
Football.
Okay, get him out of here.
A football!    Oh, no. What was I doing?
Wake up, stupid, wake up!
I want an official Red Ryder carbine-action 200-shot… range model air rifle.

You’ll shoot your eye out, kid.

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30. Connections/ How to Make them in a Story


The connections between characters and plot situation and setting and their relationship to internal and external conflict is what drives a novel forward. I struggle with this all the time. I think this simple way (Use THEREFORE, BUT and not AND THEN) of looking at the relationship between what happens in a story is helpful.

Check out this very short video (about two minutes) by the creators of South Park—their # 1 Rule.

They say that what you’re doing is trying to link what happens in a story by either a “THERFORE” or a “BUT”; what you should avoid is the “AND THEN” because this will just lead to a sequence of unrelated events etc. I think this is a simple way to remember one of those larger guiding principles of propelling your story forward.
THIS HAPPENS Therefore THIS HAPPENS
But
THIS HAPPENS so (therefore) THIS HAPPENS

For example

Boy steals a car/Boy gets caught by police/Boy calls parents to come and get him out/ BUT parents won’t because they decide it will teach him a lesson/therefore-when he’s in jail he gets beat up so badly he gets put in the hospital/ therefore…. And on it and on.


Also giving away another ARC of Utopia, Iowa, at Goodreads—I’m down to one.

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31. How to Survive NaNoWriMo

How to Survive NaNoWriMo


So anyone who is participating in NaNoWriMo is probably sleepless and angst-ridden right now. It's the end of the 50,000 word stretch, and I'm sure most of you are itching at the palms to rest your fingers. Fear not, fellow writers! Here I will share with you a few ways to survive NaNoWriMo with your writer's brain in one piece: 

1. Lots of Sleep 


Yes, writing takes up most of your time and carries on far into the night, (because come on, our characters never take a break, do they?). But getting at least 8 hours of sleep a night can help you to focus when you're writing, and better you're dialogue. 

2. Eat Regularly 


Of course, when you're writing you don't want to stop. But brain food is writing food! If you eat regularly while you're writing, instead of forgetting, you may find you have more energy to finish that last chapter. 

3. Read


Read as much as you can in your down time. Reading in between writing spurts can help inspire you and spark your imagination, not to mention help the words flow freely from your brain to your screen. 

4. Channel Your Character


Sometimes all you need to create that perfect character is to spend a few moments channeling them. Take a breath and ask yourself, "how would he/she react to this" without thinking too hard about it. Whatever pops into your head may be the truth. 


5. Set your Space

Set your writing space up every time you sit down at your computer. Whether that means good-smelling candles, pretty curtains, or calming music, everything around you helps to relax you and further your writing. 


And there it is! A few quick (hopefully helpful) tips to surviving this last week of NaNoWriMo! So kick back, relax, and let the words flow.

Best and happy writing,

-Ashley Dawson 

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32. Ilonka Karasz

Ilonka Karasz created this lovely artwork in 1938. We're trying to find out what it was made for. Does anyone know? 





...thanks for sharing your images, Jeff!... 

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33. ‘The Beach Boys’ Singer Mike Love Inks Memoir Deal

Blue-Rider-Logo_200Mike Love, best known as one of the founding members of The Beach Boys, has inked a memoir deal with Blue Rider Press.

James S. Hirsch, a journalist and biographer, will help Love with writing this project. The publisher plans to release the book in the Summer 2016.

Here’s more from The Associated Press: “According to Blue Rider, the 73-year-old Love will discuss his ‘complex’ relationship with Brian Wilson, his cousin and the Beach Boys’ leader during their peak years in the 1960s. Love and Wilson have fought over songwriting credits and creative control of the group.” (via Entertainment Weekly)

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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34. P.D. James Has Died

P.D. JamesP. D. James (full name Phyllis Dorothy James White) has died. She was 94-years-old.

James (pictured, via) became well-known for her crime novels. Throughout her career, she wrote and published almost two dozen books.

Here’s more from The New York Times: “Many critics and many of her peers have said that by virtue of the complexity of her plots, the psychological density of her characters and the moral context in which she viewed criminal violence, Ms. James even surpassed her classic models and elevated the literary status of the modern detective novel. She is often cited, in particular, for the cerebral depth and emotional sensibilities of Adam Dalgliesh, the introspective Scotland Yard detective and published poet who functions as the hero of virtually all of her novels.” (via BuzzFeed)

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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35. Star Wars: The Force Awakens Official Teaser

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36. Sledding without a cell phone

Yesterday we went to Thanksgiving dinner at my wife’s parents’ house. There is, in their spacious backyard, a perfect hill for sledding. There was, in the garage, a perfect sheet of plastic to fashion into a toboggan. We slid and spun down the hill again and again, me and my pink-cheeked boy, until the sun set behind the distant trees.

It occurred to me many times that this experience was perfect for Facebook — to make a short video of the boy sliding and whooping his way downhill, or at least to transmit the important status: “Sledding with son on makeshift sled! #blessed.”

But when my cell phone broke two months ago, I didn’t bother replacing it. I canceled my service instead, sick of the way the phone made me less present in any moment. Out with my wife, at the park with my son, whatever. I’d check the phone every few minutes for nothing-that-important. Occasionally it’s inconvenient to not have the phone (calling the wife, for example, to remind me what exactly she’d asked me to pick up the store I am now wandering aimlessly through), but I don’t miss it much. I think it makes me less annoying to be phoneless. The shame I used to feel when seeing those thought-pieces about people and their smart phones as turned to smug self-satisfaction. “Don’t even have a cell phone, anymore,” I remember.

But does it really matter if I have a phone with me, if I am mentally framing the moment, crafting the image, composing the status? Thirty years ago Annie Dillard wrote of the “running description of the present,” that took place in her head on hikes, the “talking too much,” even when she was alone. I definitely know this feeling, though I wonder what genre these thoughts mimicked in the days before Twitter, what imaginary medium and audience gave shape to her interior monologue?

I still have the cell phone in the hand of my imagination. Even if I want to believe that my own shutter opened and the moment imprinted itself on the silver of my soul, I was actually composing a blog entry in my head about how such a thing happened, and applying the “Rockwell Filter” to my mental Instagram.

But that’s not completely fair to myself. Flying down the hill there was nothing but speed and cold and the squeals of a happy child. It was so perfect I have no memory of it — I didn’t jot one down in my mind for later.

Makeshift Sled

(Photo taken by my wife from the living room window.)


Filed under: Miscellaneous

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37. NaNoWriMo Tip #19: Keep The Reader’s Perspective in Mind

Some writers feel that they must create the story that they themselves want to read. Does that mean you should disregard your potential audience?

In the video embedded above, The Fault in Our Stars novelist John Green advises that one should remember the reader’s perspective while writing. By putting yourself in the reader’s shoes, you will be able to figure out what are the most interesting parts about your story.

This is our nineteenth NaNoWriMo Tip of the Day. To help GalleyCat readers take on the challenge of writing a draft for a 50,000-word novel in 30 days, we will be offering advice throughout the entire month.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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38. Walk in the Woods Wednesday

We're still not celebrating Black Friday here at Harts Pass, but in honor of the day we'll offer up this retro strip from November 2012. Definitely looking forward to Walk in the Woods Wednesday!

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39. Grant Orchard’s New TV Series ‘Hey Duggee’ Has a Teaser

Studio AKA has posted a first look at its ridiculously appealing new preschool series "Hey Duggee" created by "A Morning Stroll" director Grant Orchard.

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40. Precautions

It’s good to take precautions
When you’re going on a trip –
Umbrella, bug spray, meds will ease
Your mind when in your grip.

Yet even if you’re more prepared
Than someone would advise,
There always is the chance that you’ll
Encounter a surprise.

For who can really tell you what
The future has in store?
And health or weather may act up
In ways not seen before.

So pack your suitcase to the brim
In full anticipation
That all your efforts cannot
Guarantee a smooth vacation.

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41. Faster went the van, faster still, until, until, UNTIL ...

Mr. Man & The New Red Van written by Richard Forbes and published in 1963 by the Friday Press. Edgar Norfield provides the delightful illustrations using primary colours for extra impact.

While not written especially as a beginning-to-read book, the vocabulary is simple, and the few difficult words are repeated to give children practice.



Mister Man lives in a house with a dog, a cat and a small brown mouse. Now one wet day said Mister Man, "I think I will buy a new red van." A new red van, said the cat with a purr, "What fun we will have. It will make such a stir." "A van," growled the dog, "I like to walk."

The mouse had a cold, and could not talk. 

So Mister Man went into town with the cat, the dog and the mouse who was brown. 
The rain came down and the wind it blew. The cat grew cold, and the mouse did too.
"As you make such a fuss we will catch a bus. It will be dry inside, and we will have a nice ride."



The story follows Mister Man, the cat, the dog and the mouse into town and out into the countryside in their new red van.

The dog said, "Now we can go nice and fast," the van sped along. 

But the mouse was sad.
He knew it was bad, to speed when there is no need.


Faster went the van, faster still,
Until, until, UNTIL...

Out of the lorry got a great big man and he came across to the new red van.
And he said, "Am I Cross?"  "Yes, I am."

"It is wrong to go fast, do you see?"
"You'll be sorry you bumped into me."
And with that he gave an enormous sneeze
which blew the van right into the trees!

(This illustration reminds of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets where the flying car ended up in the whomping willow!)

At the top of the tree stood a big black bird,
he stared at the van, and said, "MyWord"



Poor Mister Man!

His lovely new van, red paint chipped, a new lamp ripped - pushed out of a tree, 
Oh, my goodness me!

But the black bird and his friends were eager to help, and it wasn't long before Mr. Man, the dog, the cat and the small brown mouse were on their way. 


A scarce vintage book with a moral tale and beautiful illustrations.  


This and many other vintage story books can be found at March House Books.

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42. Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

The nominees in the four juried categories of the FIBD 42 have been announced, 35 “Official Sleections”, 12 in the “comics for young readers” category, 10 in the “best reprint” category and 5 in the “mystery novel” aka Polar category (all descriptions are my own.) “Polar” which you see so often in various listing at Angoulême, as best I can make out, tarnslates as a “light mystery” or thriller category….kind of the popular genre in Franco-Belgian comics, as opposed to say, superheroes. If I’m wrong, please someone correct me.

The  nominees include many international cartoonists including Chris Ware, Charles Burns, Lynda Barry, David Petersen, Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples, Taiyo Matsumoto, Asaf Hanuka and so on. I think there are many French cartoonists who are a bit better known in the US here listed as well, including Loisel, Brecht Evans, Hussenot and  Blutch. It’s all an indication of how even local comics scenes have gone global in the last few years.

I’ve included the the French titles from the press release, but the covers will help sort out some of these for non French speakers.

La Sélection Officielle

SO 01 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

L’arabe Du Futur Tome 1
Riad Sattouf / Allary

SO 02 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Autel California – Tome 1 Face A – Treat Me Nice
Nine Antico / L’association

SO 04 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Beta… Civilisations (Volume 1)
Jens Harder / Actes Sud – L’an 2

SO 03 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Barthélémy L’enfant Sans Âge
Simon Roussin / Cornélius

SO 06 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Building Stories
Chris Ware / Delcourt

SO 05 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Blast Tome 4 Pourvu Que Les Bouddhistes Se Trompent
Manu Larcenet / Dargaud

SO 07 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Calavera
Charles Burns / Cornélius

SO 08 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Cet Été Là
Mariko Tamaki, Jillian Tamaki / Rue De Sèvres

SO 09 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Le Chef De Nobunaga Tome 4

Takurô Kajikawa, Mitsuru Nishimura / Komikku

SO 10 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

L’enfer En Bouteille

Suehiro Maruo / Casterman

SO 11 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Hommes À La Mer
Riff Reb’s / Soleil

SO 14 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Lastman Tome 6
Balak, Mickaël Sanlaville Et Bastien Vivès / Casterman

SO 12 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Julio
Gilbert Hernandez / Atrabile

SO 13 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

K.O. À Tel-Aviv Tome 2
Asaf Hanuka / Steinkis

SO 15 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Little Tulip
François Boucq, Jérôme Charyn / Le Lombard

SO 16 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Locke & Key Tome 6 – Alpha Et Oméga
Gabriel Rodriguez, Joe Hill / Milady

SO 18 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Lune L’envers
Blutch / Dargaud

SO 17 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Love In Vain
Mezzo Et Jean-Michel Dupont / Glénat

SO 20 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Max Winson Tome 1 – La Tyrannie
Jérémie Moreau / Delcourt

SO 19 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Magasin Général Tome 9 – Notre-Dame-Des-Lacs
Régis Loisel, Jean-Louis Tripp / Casterman

SO 21 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Mes Cent Démons!
Lynda Barry / Çà Et Là

SO 22 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Moderne Olympia
Catherine Meurisse / Futuropolis – Musée D’orsay

SO 23 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Un Océan D’amour
Grégory Panaccione Et Wilfrid Lupano / Delcourt

SO 24 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

L’or Et Le Sang Tome 4 – Khalil
Merwan, Fabien Bedouel, Maurin Defrance Et Fabien Nury / Glénat

SO 26 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Que La Bête
Fleurisse Donatien Mary / Cornélius

SO 25 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

PANTHÈRE
Brecht Evens / Actes Sud BD

SO 28 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Sukkwan Island
Ugo Bienvenu / Denoël Graphic

SO 27 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Saga Tome 3
Fiona Staples, Brian K. Vaughan / Urban Comics

SO 30 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Ulysse, Les Chants
Du Retour Jean Harambat / Actes Sud Bd

SO 29 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Sunny Tome 1
Taiyô Matsumoto / Kana

SO 31 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Vermines Tome 1 – Le Retour De Pénélope
Guillaume Guerse, Marc Pichelin / Les Requins Marteaux

SO 33 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Voir Des Baleines
Javier De Isusi / Rackham

SO 34 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Vous Êtes Tous Jaloux De Mon Jetpack
Tom Gauld / Éditions 2024

SO 32 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Les Vieux Fourneaux Tome 1 – Ceux Qui Restent
Paul Cauuet Et Wilfrid Lupano / Dargaud

SO 35 couv 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Yekini, Le Roi
Des Arènes Lisa Lugrin Et Clément Xavier / Éditions Flblb

La Sélection Jeunesse

 

S JEU 02 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Boule À Zéro Tome 3 – Docteur Zita
Ernst Et Zidrou / Bamboo

S JEU 01 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Au Pays Des Lignes
Victor Hussenot / La Joie De Lire

S JEU 03 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Caterina Tome 1 – Le Gang Des Chevelus
Alessandro Tota / Dargaud

S JEU 04 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Emile Et Margot Tome 4 – Merci Les Monstres !
Olivier Deloye, Anne Didier Et Oiivier Muller / Bd Kids – Bayard

S JEU 05 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Hilda Et Le Chien Noir
Luke Pearson / Casterman

S JEU 06 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Karton Tome 1 – Taméus Trognebarde
Uwe Heidschötter Et Patrick Wirbeleit / Bd Kids – Bayard

S JEU 07 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Légendes De La Garde Tome 3 – La Hache Noire
David Petersen / Gallimard

s jeu 08 couv cmjn Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Passe
Passe Dawid Et Delphine Cuveele / Éditions De La Gouttière

S JEU 10 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Les Royaumes Du Nord Tome 1
Clément Oubrerie Et Stéphane Melchior / Gallimard

S JEU 09 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Quatre Sœurs Tome 2 – Hortense
Cati Baur Et Malika Ferdjoukh / Rue De Sèvres

S JEU 12 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Le Temps Des Mitaines

Anne Montel Et Loïc Clément / Didier Jeunesse

S JEU 11 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Seven Deadly Sins Tome 5
Nakaba Suzuki / Pika

 

La Sélection Patrimoine

S PATR 02 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Daredevil Par Frank Miller Tome 1
Frank Miller, Klaus Janson / Panini

S PATR 01 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Capitaine Albator
Intégrale Leiji Matsumoto / Kana

S PATR 04 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Green Lantern & Green Arrow
Neal Adams, Dennis O’neil / Urban Comics

S PATR 06 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

La Malédiction De Rascar Capac Tome 1
Hergé Et Philippe Goddin / Casterman

S PATR 03 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Gilles La Jungle
Claude Cloutier / La Pastèque

S PATR 05 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

2001 Night Stories
Histoire De La Sainte-Russie, Gustave Doré / Éditions 2024

S PATR 07 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Pogo Tome 1
Walt Kelly / Akileos

S PATR 08 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

San Mao, Le Petit Vagabond
Zhang Leping / Fei

S PATR 09 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Sandman Tome 4
Collectif Et Neil Gaiman / Urban Comics

S PATR 10 couv CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Sex & Fury
Bonten Tarô / Le Lézard Noir

La Sélection Polar

SP0 2015 COUV 02 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Gotham Central Tome 1
Michael Lark, Ed Brubaker, Greg Rucka / Urban Comics

SP0 2015 COUV 01 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Fatale
Max Cabanes, Doug Headline / Dupuis

SP0 2015 COUV 03 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Moi, Assassin
Keko, Antonio Altarriba / Denoël Graphic

SP0 2015 COUV 04 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

À Shioguni
Florent Chavouet / Philippe Picquier

SP0 2015 COUV 05 300 CMJN Angoulême Festival Prize nominees announced

Wet Moon Tome 1
Atsushi Kaneko / Casterman

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43. Overheard

(down the hall, top of the lungs) “I’m going to go see Mom!”

(thundering footsteps drawing nearer)

(cheerful bellow) “MOMMOMMOMMOMMOM!”

(in the doorway, casual everyday voice) “Hi, Mommy! Did I surprise you?”

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44. Chapter

Question: Is there a set amount of words needed in a chapter of a book? Answer: No. The length of chapters can vary both within a book and according to

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45. Being Professional

What writing mistakes will signal to an agent or editor you're not professional? 

http://fromsarahwithjoy.blogspot.com/2014/09/top-7-mistakes-that-make-your-writing.html

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46.

Dig Here! is a bunch of familiar elements — teenage girl best friends, missing treasure, a cranky aunt, and abandoned house, etc. — assembled in a way that didn’t feel familiar. I found myself wondering a lot whether this was the book Gladys Allen set out to write.

The main character, Sandy, is the daughter of missionaries. She’s sent to boarding school during the school year and to various relatives during the summers. When Dig Here! opens, she’s facing the prospect of spending the summer with Aunt Cal, who she’s never met, and who is related to her only by marriage. Aunt Cal says it’s okay for Sandy to bring a friend with her, so she invites her best friend, Eve, and it’s a good thing for her that she does. Eve is a much more forceful personality than Sandy is, and she’s also more adventurous, more sensible, and probably smarter. She’s even better at dealing with Aunt Cal, in part because she’s better at cooking and housework and, I don’t know, getting up on time than Sandy is.

This is one of the things that makes me unsure Allen knows what book she’s writing. Someone — maybe one of Sandy’s parents, in a letter? — talks about how sunny and sweet Sandy is, but all we actually see evidence of is Eve being better at everything. Towards the end you get a little more of a sense of Sandy as a person in her own right, but not much.

It’s an Augusta Huiell Seaman kind of setup. On their arrival at Aunt Cal’s the girls find that Sandy accidentally exchanged suitcases with a fellow bus passenger — a hair tonic salesman, judging by his luggage. A trip to exchange the suitcase for Sandy’s leads them to an old house, and hair tonic guy behaving suspiciously. Then the house turns out to be the one that Aunt Cal should have inherited from her uncle — and would have, if her shiftless cousin hadn’t hidden his will. There also may or may not be an emerald buried somewhere around the property. I’m not sure Eve and Sandy know which of these mysteries they’re investigating, but they investigate with a will, and with the help of cute farmboy Michael, and, eventually, the various hindrances provided by their school friend Hattie May and her brother Hamish. Hamish fancies himself as a detective.

I think what makes Dig Here! feel unusual is that books like these tend to have a very narrow focus. The kids solving the mystery are usually a small, tight-knit group. The crotchety relative exists to have their heart melted by the main character. You get your protagonist, his or her friends, whatever adults they live with, and maybe a villain. But in Dig Here!, everything’s part of a larger picture you don’t see. There are characters you never meet, like Sandy’s parents and Aunt Cal’s cousin. And the characters you do meet have stuff going on that the kids don’t know about. There are subplots that Sandy and Eve don’t find out about until the end, and then only as an afterthought. Aunt Cal is investigating on her own account, and doesn’t tell Sandy anything about it. And she doesn’t need to confide in Sandy — she’s not socially isolated, she’s got friends, and they probably know more about the mystery than Sandy does, too. It gives the book a different feel than you’d get from Seaman, or from any mystery where the kids hide what’s happening from the clueless grownups. And I enjoyed that.

The downside of the kids not having most of the story is that their side of the mystery isn’t that interesting, and the characters I enjoyed most were the ones Allen spent the least time on, but it was fun.I don’t think I need to seek out more books by Gladys Allen, but if I ended up reading another one, I wouldn’t be upset.


Tagged: 1930s, girls, gladys allen, mystery

2 Comments on , last added: 11/29/2014
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47. An Excellent History of Graphics in Videogames

"Pixel Pioneers: A Brief History of Graphics" is a 5-part documentary by Stuart Brown about the evolution of graphics in videogames.

0 Comments on An Excellent History of Graphics in Videogames as of 11/28/2014 2:38:00 PM
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48. Universal Pictures Options 2 Gayle Forman YA Books

Just One DayUniversal Pictures has optioned two of Gayle Forman’s young adult novels, Just One Day and Just One Year.

Josh Schwartz and Stephanie Savage, the creators of The Gossip Girl TV show, will serve as producers for this project. Penguin Young Readers Group released the first book in January 2013 and the second book followed in October 2013.

Here’s more from The Hollywood Reporter: “Just One Day and Just One Year follows the story of a young couple who meet and share one incredible day (and night) together only to be separated, spending the next year looking for each other and finding themselves along the journey…The books have been described as being in the tone of Before Sunrise and 500 Days of Summer.”

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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49. Can I submit with a working title?

Question Pretty much what it sounds like... I'm in the middle of drafting a submission to an agent and realised that I'm not sure if the title I've chosen

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50. magpie

Magpie, drawn for Magpie That picture book blog.

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