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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: television, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 26 - 50 of 555
26. Remember live TV?

Dwight and Mamie enjoying live TV. Courtesy Library of Congress.Every summer, one of the networks used to show Wizard of Oz on a Friday night. My mother would pull out the good old air popper and we'd settle in front of the TV. I liked picturing all of our neighbors doing the same thing. Maybe some people had carrots and others had potato chips, but we were all watching the same thing at the same time. If we opened our windows, we'd hear other people's television sets, on the same movie.

It felt cozy. My whole world had stopped to take a breath, relax, and lose themselves in a story. 

Now that only happens for special events. The Super Bowl. The Oscars. And in DC, at least, the White House Correspondents Dinner (OK, that last one might just be on CSPAN in the background). 

I appreciate the networks' attempts to bring back live TV. Scandal's cast live-tweeted last season. I tried it once. I felt like my brain was going to explode from keeping up with six cast members' twitter streams, plus the show--it's not a show you can tear you eyes away from easily. But it felt a little bit like community again.

You can often catch "live" Facebook conversations going on during a show, too (American Idol on Elizabeth Law's Facebook page, anyone?). That's fun... if you have the right chatty friend at the right time. 

Some people campaign for everyone to unplug their TVs for a week. Admirable. But I'd like to go a little smaller. What if we could all kill our DVRs and swear off TV episodes on Amazon, Hulu, etc for a week? What if we could all watch TV together?

Even if we're in different houses, I bet we'd still feel like something a little magical was happening. 

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27. Dynamite Launch ‘Grimm’ Miniseries With Jai Nitz and José Malaga

Continuing on with Baltimore Comic-Con announcements, Dynamite have announced yet another new series, building up what is rapidly becoming a huge list of new projects from the company. This weekend saw the company reveal that Jai Nitz and José Malaga will be the creative team for a five issue miniseries called Grimm: The Warlock, based on the TV show.

This follows previous Grimm comics at Dynamite which were planned out by show creators Jim Kouf and David Greenwalt, and released for Free Comic Book Day. Grimm is a police procedural show with heavy elements of fantasy – the main characters have to deal with crimes committed by supernatural monsters and fairytale creatures, known on the show as Wesen.

The miniseries will see the Grimm team looking into allegations of match-fixing at a basketball which keeps Portland’s team out of the playoffs. Whilst looking into it, they encounter small-town hostility building up, which then ultimately will probably lead them to a tangle with some kind of monster. If I’d have to guess, I’d wager perhaps a warlock?

Nitz, speaking on the news, quoth:

I wanted to show parts of Portland that would be impossible to film for the show for logistical reasons, but would be amazing in the comic and the mythos in general.  I wanted to capture some of the dark grandeur of the show along with the humor of the actors in particular.  That’s the fun of comics.  We don’t have a special effects budget or limit.  We can do anything you can imagine with pencil and paper.  It’s fun to push the limits of an already established show on the page.

The first issue of Grimm: The Warlock is solicited for December. Dynamite released some of Malaga’s art in preview:

gtw1 gtw2 gtw3

0 Comments on Dynamite Launch ‘Grimm’ Miniseries With Jai Nitz and José Malaga as of 1/1/1900
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28. This is Not a Romance Novel: Thoughts on Scandal

Up until a few days ago, Shonda Rhimes was someone I admired greatly without really liking anything she did.  One of the few women (and people of color) to gain entry to the small and exclusive group of superstar TV producers, what sets Rhimes's series--juggernaut Grey's Anatomy, its less successful but still long-running spinoff Private Practice, and also-ran Off the Map--apart from the crowd is

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29. History, Repeated: Two Views on The Wars of the Roses

We all know that history is written by the victors, but the matter doesn't end there.  History is also written by the powerful, the educated, the privileged.  By people who toe--and sometimes the ones who shape--the party line.  People of the wrong gender, race, class, or nationality not only don't get to write history, they often don't even get to appear in it.  It's one of the tasks of

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30. The Girl in the Video Epilogue: I Want My MTN!


Or rather, MTN wanted his MTV, so I tracked down the 20 people who kindly agreed to be interviewed for the first-ever oral history of the music video from the POV of the stars. No, not the bands—the stars. The ones who shine in the distance, unnamed. In other words, the love interests.

I am profoundly happy about the enthusiastic response the series has gotten. 


Sherrie Swafford said Steve Perry liked her interview. 

Lysette Anthony said Bryan Adams thought her interview was good.

Michael Jacksons nephew Taj tweeted that the Kelley Parker interview was wonderful.

I’ll let the Internet elaborate on the rest:

 

 Yahoo! Music 7/18/13 (4.3K shares on Facebook!):

Swafford, who has long shied away from the spotlight, was recently found by Marc Tyler Nobleman, author of the Noblemania blog, while he was working on a piece about all the lovely ladies who appeared in the Separate Ways video [MTN: Actually the project, as you have seen, is about lovely ladies from 13 videos; there was only one in Separate Ways]. She declined to be interviewed or photographed, but gave him a short statement acknowledging that his detective work was spot on and giving him the low down on her current activities.

a-ha Facebook post 7/20/13; 
more than 4,800 likes, 680 shares, 210 comments

a-ha retweet 7/19/13

Huey Lewis and the News Facebook post 7/22/13; 
more than 320 likes, 30 shares


7/16/13
 
Huey Lewis and the News liked on Facebook 7/20/13

 
 Huey Lewis and the News Facebook post 7/30/13


Martha Quinn (VJ) 7/19/13

 

7/19/13

7/24/13

7/29/13

Kurt Loder (VJ) 7/15/13

More than 700 likes, 100 shares, 60 comments. 
Journey fans = every way they want it.

Peter Lenkov (husband of Audie Lenkov) 7/17/13

Julie Anne Rhodes (ex-wife of Nick Rhodes of Duran Duran) 7/14/13


MTV Hive favorited tweet 7/19/13

Yahoo Music favorited tweet 7/19/13

Alan Hunter (VJ) 7/12/13



 It even made an app.
(And a fun app—it’s right there in the name:
Guess What? Its Fun.)

More reactions:

“Total score for Nobleman! (Steve Spears, Stuck in the 80s)

…big shout out to author Marc Tyler Nobleman, who’s been tracking down and interviewing a lot of the video babes of MTV’s classic era. … They’re pretty entertaining. (SPOILERS: When music videos first became a thing, nobody knew what the hell they were doing!) Check it out!” (Popdose)

“[Marc] was able to...get Kym [Herrin] to spill her guts, to agree to a feature story…who is this dude? Hugh Hefner? Marquis de Sade?” (Santa Barbara News Press Blog)

“Thanks, Huey, for sharing this from noted geek historian Marc Tyler Nobleman. :) Also, saw where MTN interviewed the girl from ZZ Tops ‘Legs’ video...AWESOME!” (Facebook share by John D. Nole via Huey Lewis and the News)

“This is the greatest! I’ve wished for a long time that someone would cover this topic in detail and you have come to the rescue.” (wuenchdog, in a blog comment)

“I guess if I had just made one video, it would have led to fame of some kind. Should have tried out rather than just sitting home watching them.” (friend Tammy, on Facebook)

I heard from Greg Kihn’s people.


And I even heard from one of the guys who sang na-na-na-nas in the 1968 “music video” for “Hey Jude” (wearing glasses and tie and appears in close-up starting at 3:19).

4 Comments on The Girl in the Video Epilogue: I Want My MTN!, last added: 8/1/2013
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31. The Girl in the Video: “Free Fallin’” (1989)

Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video” (including list of interviewees).

The video: “Free Fallin’” by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.

The girl-now-woman: Devon Kidd (Devon Jenkin).





How old were you when you appeared in the “Free Fallin’” video? 

Hmm…old enough to skate a half-pipe that led to professional downhill skateboarding—first female against 200+ men, many with tattoos everywhere and longer hair than me. Where are your manners, young man (LOL!)—never ask a girl her age, silly. Wink wink.

Where were you living at the time? 

Manhattan Beach, CA. Great place! Ever been there?

What music videos, shows, or movies had you appeared in prior to that? 

I was the Wienerschnitzel girl for several years during the Lakers’ three-year championship sweep. I didn’t do too much before, but certainly after. The “California skateboarder/surfer girl” type wasn’t in the limelight, of course, except for Malibu Gidget.

How were you cast?

This is the fun part. I was doing a modeling shoot with gold medalist Cathy Rigby for a water ad. I was a gymnast. While I was in the middle of the shoot, I received a call from my agent saying “There’s a music video audition. I don’t know if you want to do it. It’s a small job.” I asked who the artist was and what the song was. When she said, “Tom Petty, ‘Free Fallin,’” I jumped! I asked the photographer of the shoot what time we’d be done, and he said in an hour or so. I asked my agent if they could change my audition time to later. As I waited quite anxiously, had a hard time sitting still for the shoot—but the enthusiastic energy I felt inspired a great shot! I was able to be let go early.

I drove from Sherman Oaks to Melrose Boulevard, West Hollywood, and went to Aardvark’s second-hand store. Two men who loved to dress women helped me find the perfect outfit. Then they directed me to a Wal-Mart-type store to buy cheap fifties-style peg shoes. (The hairstylist on the shoot [had done] my hair fifties style.)



I had more fun getting to the audition. When I arrived, I saw a huge line of ladies looking similar to myself out the door and around the building. I ran in to sign in. I was full of smiles while everyone [looked bored] waiting for their turn. I was like, “Are you kidding me? This is amazing! How can you not be excited!” When it was my turn, I auditioned with two other ladies. One of them starred as Priscilla in [a] TV movie about Elvis Presley, the other was an old friend of mine from high school—a boarding school in Arizona. We hadn’t seen each other in years, so you can imagine how much fun we were having.

I was asked back to meet the director, Julian Temple. He asked if I could skateboard and made his hands go up and down. I had been skateboarding nearly every day after school since I was 3-4 years old. I responded, “You mean a half-pipe?” He said, “Yes, that thing.”

My enthusiastic passion came prior to the audition. I was living on the north shore of Oahu, listening to “Free Fallin’” over and over on top of the mountain while gazing into the most stunning sunset wondering what I was going to do with my life. The lyrics captured the essence of my attention inspiring me in a direction that took hold of my dreams.

Do you remember what happened next? 

How can I forget! After the audition, I went home, cancelled all of my plans, and just stared at the phone. My agent called me and asked, “Are you sitting down?” I said, “No, I can’t. Okay, I will. What happened?” She said, “You got it!” I said, “I got what?” She said, “You got the lead.” I screamed, I danced like the movie with Tom Cruise in his underwear, and I said, “Thank you to Jesus!” Yes, I really do love Jesus of Nazareth! I couldn’t have done anything or got through anything without Him. He is my hero, my savior!

Where was the video filmed?

Hollywood Hills, Sherman Oaks.

How long was the shoot?

Surprisingly—two days.

How did you feel making the video? 

As you can see, I felt great! I [did] wish I had more time to prepare. During the last audition the director said that we were filming that next day. Not much time to brush up on skills. No worries—it all came back and it was good! Amazing how fast childhood experiences flash forward to the greatest moments! The best part of the video was standing on the half-pipe—there was [that] awe-inspiring look that many people remember. I was capturing the freeze-frame miracle moment—the most incredible, super-huge full moon—directly in front of me, I’m skating with cute guys, Tom Petty is singing my favorite song of all time to as if I was his love interest (I’m such a fan!), and an awesome sunset behind me. It doesn’t get any better than that!



What was the hardest part of the shoot? 

Reading the directions wrong! Long story left behind :)

I’m madly curious. Can we bring it back?

On the second day of the shoot, I [allowed] several hours—4+ hours [to be precise]—[to get to] the shooting location. It takes only 45 minutes to 1½  hours to get from Manhattan Beach to Sherman Oaks—so I thought. Mind you, here was no traffic! I would have been a minimum two hours early. 

I realized [in] my nervous enthusiasm, I read the directions on the wrong side of the paper. I began to panic when I couldn’t find the location of the shoot. I’m thinking, “Was the shoot private and I missed the signs?” Overwhelming fear began to [transform] into devastation. [I finally get] my absolute dream job—and I couldn’t find it!

I parked on the side of the road, took a deep breath as my head fell on my steering wheel, and prayed. Then I noticed there were directions on the other side of the paper. How could I not see this? I felt so incredibly discouraged and, more importantly, I felt devastated for everyone waiting for me on the video shoot. I freaked! I quickly drove to the correct location on Ventura Boulevard. I hit one stop light after another. The sun was behind me—directly in my rear view mirror. Squinting from the bright sun, I looked to my right and there was the shoot…and then, right in front of me [was a light turning] red—along with a car passing right in front of me. Yep, I hit the car—right in front of everyone on the shoot.

I felt broken! The people in the car that I had hit were startled but fine; I was scared to death and worried if they were okay. The awesome crew noticed it was me and ran over to get me out of the chaos while a tow truck took my Jeep to a car shop down the street—a whole other story.

The crew immediately put me in makeup and we shot the hot dog scene.



How was it to work with Tom Petty? Or did you not meet him?

We didn’t talk much, but when we did, we were just shooting the breeze while he was playing tag with his daughter. I wish I got to know him better. We certainly have a lot in common.

What did you think of the video? 

I absolutely love it! Julian Temple created a masterpiece of time-traveling into the future, kind of like Back to the Future.

What did your parents think of it? 

My dad thought it was great, but thought I was nutty when racing professionally. I was like, “But dad, you built me a skateboard when I was 3-4 years old and said, “See what this thing can do and get back to me.” So I did, there you go. Everything has a greater purpose than what we can see in that time.



What about your mom?

My mother passed away when I was 11. I’m sure she would have been very proud of me. When we were kids, my mother would make us pick out a present on Christmas Day to give to a sick child at St. John’s Hospital in Redondo Beach. Not a fun thing to do as a young child considering we appeared to be quite financially challenged growing up; my mom worked three jobs to make ends meet. Skateboarding was a way to get around without having to put any pressure on her.

What did your friends think of it?

They thought it was awesome! Most of my friends were guys. They skated and they would take the credit for my skating abilities. Riiiggggghhhhttt. Actually, they did give me pointers and encouraged me to keep going, so I do give my friends a lot of the credit. My girlfriends were excited and a bit jealous. I hate jealousy—it just doesn’t make sense! Everybody has a purpose in life…find it, love it, and live it! Don’t rain on someone else’s parade because you haven’t found yours. Be inspired instead—life is just too short! Live it well while you can.

Did the video ever affect your dating life in any way (i.e. when you first told boyfriends you were the woman in it)? 

Yes and no. I was always a California skater/surfer girl so I was just being myself, and the men I attracted also skated and surfed. The bummer part was when they took my life for granted and used it to their advantage to excel in their own lives—boasting more about the girl in the video versus appreciating me a person. You can see why many people in the limelight would create an alias—just so people can be themselves around you or treat you as a human being. Whatever the case, it was me, it was my life, and I chose something that came with challenges like any other chosen vocation/career. It is what it is…and I love it either way.

Did you receive fan mail? If so, do you still have any of it?

Shockingly, I received a lot of fan mail. I never saw myself as famous. I just saw myself doing what I love to do and it led to things I never dreamed of. A lot of people dream of being famous—that wasn’t me. I dreamed of rising to the top to make a difference that inspired people to have faith in themselves, and if fame can do that, then I did my job!

Did the video generate any controversy that you know of? 

Ya know, there’s controversy in everything, which is why I prefer to move on and not dwell on the things have no meaning for today. Sure, I would love to set a lot of records straight, but I [more] prefer to let it go. Thanks for your understanding. Life is good—let’s keep it that way.

Willing for any kind of elaboration? Are you referring to public controversy or private, interpersonal controversy?

Devastatingly (sigh), one of the girls in the video was murdered. People thought it was me. I would prefer to focus on her life-legacy. 

There were many controversies. Let’s just say I’ve never felt more misunderstood while understanding (without blame) why people see the way they do.

To give you an idea, for many years, I volunteered at a shelter for at-risk, underprivileged teens. On Christmas Eve, one of the teens I worked with wore the most perfect shirt; it said it all: “I’m not evil, just misunderstood.” I asked him what his shirt meant to him. His humbling response: he just wished someone cared enough to see his side of the story. My heart sank understanding exactly what he meant.

Then he said, “Why are you down here with us? Looking all rich and stuff?” To him, my simple attire was rich. He added, “Shouldn’t you be with your family tonight?” I responded, “I am with my family.”

The teens and I all hugged and said our goodbye for the evening; I headed for a midnight Christmas Eve church service at the Rock Church in San Diego. Miles McPherson, pro baseball player turned pastor, was preaching. He said, “As a gift to Jesus for the gift of life He’s given you, turn to the person directly behind you and tell them what you are most thankful for.” I turned around to share the experience of the teen shelter.

I reached out to shake a young man’s hand behind me, and he said, “Devon! It’s me, Michael, from TTC!” TTC is the teen shelter I had just come from. I’m so not kidding. I had worked with this young adult for over a year, mentoring him through fitness to go after his dream to enroll in the Marines. Then one day, he was gone. It was his time to go, but no goodbye. I’d wondered if he was on the street again.

The world stopped before me with a miracle moment that doesn’t get any better than this! Tom Petty [was] singing my favorite song over loudspeakers again!

What were you paid?

Yep. :)

Given that it was so long ago, I thought you either wouldn’t remember or would be fine sharing. Do you remember? 

Oh, yes, I remember. Let’s just say seven is a good number. If we made the video according to entertainment industry standards today, I probably could retire early. ;)

Did you watch the MTV World Premiere of the video, and if so, where and how did that feel? 

I was really excited! I was literally watching a dream come true on TV. Growing up skating finally made sense. I didn’t think about it; I just did it by faith for [a] reason I wasn’t aware of until that point.

Were you ever recognized in public? How often and when last? Any stories about that? 

For a while, it was tough to accept fame from it. I was focused on doing my job and having a blast doing it. I never really thought about people actually coming up to me and asking for an autograph. It was always the other way around. I loved hearing how inspired people were; hearing their stories really humbled me. I remember driving in Manhattan Beach, looking to my right at sunset, and seeing a little girl trying to learn how to skateboard. It was quite surreal. [In] the “Free Fallin’” video, the girl is going through time discovering her identity and the identity of the times.

Speaking of which, the part of the video [with the] “hippie rocker” character—where the guys get into a brawl while I was crossing my legs reading a magazine in a chair—this seemed to happen quite often after the video in real life. It felt like I was living in a matrix where people [had] made a video of my life before it even started. I was surprised that people have recognized me—even today.



Did you appear in other music videos after that?

Yes, and many commercials, TV shows, and motion pictures (professional stunts).

If you ever met other women who were female leads in a mainstream ‘80s rock video, who?

Not really. I wish I would have; that would have been a blast to meet women who shared similar experiences. Would love to hear their stories. I’m sure they are quite profound and inspiring.

If you went to college, where and what did you study?

Biola University. Degree in organization leadership, minor in theology with an emphasis in eschatology. Yep, I have a passion for truth—Biblical prophecy. My dad was a NASA aerospace engineer who was a key inventor of XM radio. The universe had to be created, it could not exist; otherwise, the physics of cause and effect just wouldn’t make sense.

What are you doing these days? 

I am a fitness specialist, ski conditioning coach, etc. All the fun stuff. My passion is inspiring people to have faith regardless of their circumstances. Go big with passion of heart!



Where do you live?

California is always my home, [but] I live in Colorado—next best thing to Cali. I miss the beach but love the change of seasons with snow.

If you are/were married, what was your future husband’s reaction when he learned you were in this video? 

Well, some things are better left personal. Anyone who embarks on a journey in the entertainment industry [has] to expect [that] people will see them [how] they want them to be, not as they really are.

Do you have kids, and if so, how old are they?

Reread [my answer to] question #1; they are old enough to live their life’s dreams.

Would you be able to share anything more—how many you have, what they are doing generally? 

Yes, I have two absolutely gorgeous daughters, Kirra and Elise. They are my special “little big” girls—who are taller than me. I’m trying to renegotiate my life contract with God. It’s not working very well. I had them soon after the video was made. I am very protective of them. Kirra (Angel Kirra) is an aspiring gifted artist/fashion designer and Elise (Weesypooh) is an aspiring chef/businesswoman.

What do they think of the video?

They love it and so do their friends. Raising them was a blast—skating down the streets. Neighbors didn’t like me very much at first, but as they got to know me, they were inspired to want to skate themselves. Skating is not a crime. It is an outlet like any other sport. It is a way of life that takes you places. It’s a legacy of love on a stick that rolls with the times—something the video touched on from one scene to the next.

What did you think when you first heard from me? 

I was hoping you would. ;) I got “the memo from above.” Seriously, I think it’s awesome you have a passion for something like this. I hope you are excited about all you hear and are inspired to accomplish great things in your life! It’s nice to know I can help in some way.

“Memo from above”—does that mean you knew you would hear from someone about this, or even knew you would hear from me specifically? If so, when did you get that message, and how, and what exactly did it say?

LOL! Be careful what you pray for right? I mean this in a good way. I had a sense someone was going to contact me sometime in the future, then in the near future. It’s not a prediction or intuition; it’s something much more than that. It’s a gift of understanding the power of prayers and believing they are answered. It’s not religious; it’s a just a special personal relationship between me and Jesus.



Has anyone else ever interviewed about this? If so, who, when, and for what publication?

Many publications have interviewed me, but the most memorable was Rolling Stone (#576, 4/19/90). Awesome!



Have you appeared at any fan conventions to sign autographs? If not, would you? 

I have and yes I would; any opportunity to inspire people to go for it is humbling success!

Did you stay in touch with anyone from the shoot? 

No.

When was the last time you were in touch with them?

Good question…brain freeze.

How do you look back on the experience?

The video had more purpose than I could have ever imagined. It set the stage for reaching out to kids from all walks of life with respect, faith, and inspiration.

Anything you’d like to add?

The video allowed me the respectful opportunity to speak to hundreds of kids from all walks of life about believing in their dreams, trusting their life has a greater purpose that’s worth the painful work to get there, and how to use fitness as a tool for their success (with skateboarding in particular as an outlet for their frustrations).

Tweet about this interview to @tompetty, @benchten, and
@devonkidd!

Copy and tweet to help me find more 1980s music video girls:

Real research question: if you know the Annie Hubbard who was in 1984 Night Ranger video “Sister Christian,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Real research question: if you know the womaneven just her name—in 1986 Cinderella video “Shake Me,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Real research question: if you know woman—even just her name—in ‘87 Richard Marx video “Should’ve Known Better,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

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32. The Girl in the Video: “Smooth Criminal” (1988)

Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video” (including list of interviewees).

The video: “Smooth Criminal” by Michael Jackson.

The girl-now-woman: Kelley Parker.






How old were you when you appeared in the “Smooth Criminal” video?

We filmed the “Smooth Criminal” video for over one month and then the rest of the film for about eight months. I was 10-11 years old when we shot the film, and 12 when it finally came out. We had such an extended time filming because we kept adding to the script. It was just going to be an extended video, and then it grew to be a full-length feature, and finally ended up somewhere in between at about 40 minutes.

Where were you living at the time?

I was living in Huntington Beach with my family.

What music videos, shows, or movies had you appeared in prior to that?

I was a working actress at the time. I had been on Highway to Heaven, Superior Court, multiple national commercials.

How were you cast?

I had auditioned and then heard nothing back for over six months, so I assumed that someone else had been cast. I found out later that they had done a nationwide casting and that was why it took so long before getting the call for the callback. After that, I had to come in for a screen test with some of the boy actors that were up for the Zeke role.


The look that I have in the video, tomboy with the messy braids, was exactly how I went in for the audition. I was never a girly-girl, and it was sort of my niche that set me apart from at the other girls. I was a toughie, always wanting to be one of the boys. I think that is maybe what caught Michael’s eye. I was fairly raw, not very polished. I remember being in hair and makeup and they were putting two other girls into braids and putting freckles on them. I remember being upset that they were all being made up to look like me! Now I see what a compliment that was.


Do you remember what your reaction was when you were cast?

I was not really all that excited about it. When Thriller came out I was only five years old. So [while I knew Michael’s music,] I was not a fan and really had no concept of who he was! Honestly that probably is part of the reason why I got [the part]—I was so instantly at ease around him because I did not seem him as the megastar that he was. I saw him just as a fellow actor. Gotta love kids!

Where was the video filmed?

We shot the video, which was originally called “Chicago Nights,” on the Culver soundstages. Then for the film we moved over to Universal backlot and soundstages. We shot all the outside field shots at a ranch north of Los Angeles called Disney Ranch.



How did you feel making the video?

It was the most incredible experience of my life! Without a doubt, it changed the course of my life. Michael and I became great friends. He was always pushing me to be better and teaching me about the artistic process. To have someone of his creative genius take the time to teach you at the age of 10 is like getting the winning lotto ticket, and I have always known how fortunate I was to have had that experience. Michael never once treated me as a kid, always as an equal, and as a professional. I imagine it was because he was in the business as a kid so he knew what it felt like to be on set with huge expectations for you to deliver a performance. The pressure is the same whether you are an adult or a kid, and Michael always respected that.




What was the hardest part of the shoot?

I don’t remember any hard parts of the shoot, but I was once sent to the emergency room for an accident that occurred. It was the scene in the caves when Mr. Big (Joe Pesci) pushes me to the ground. One time he pushed a bit harder and I tripped as I fell backwards and was not able to catch myself. I landed on the big mic pack on my spine. I went down hard! Michael was so concerned about me. It was really sweet.

How was it to work with Michael Jackson? What was he like?

Michael was the kindest man I have ever met. I was so lucky to have not just worked with him, but worked with him for months and [go on to be] friends with him for years. He took the time to really get to know me. He was lighting in a bottle; the air was different when he was around. It’s hard to explain, but you could feel him before you saw him.



He was also so much fun on set, pulling pranks and laughing with us. The best example was when we had been filming out at the ranch, and they had been long, hard days in the sun, and I was doing the last shot of the day. I had thought that we were done for the day, and the director said he needed another take. I could see something moving in the reflection of the camera lens; I looked back to see Michael, Sean, and Brandon running at me with water guns and water balloons. They soaked me!

Then there was the first time I walked on the set and saw Michael dancing. My jaw literally dropped. The power he had as a performer was truly one-of-a-kind, and the electricity in the room was overwhelming.

What did you think of the video?

I loved it, and still do. It really is one of the all-time best videos. It has absolutely stood the test of time.



What did your parents think of it?

My parents were proud of me.

What did your friends think of it?

I’m not sure how impressed my friends were at the time, but since then it has definitely given me cool factor points! When it first came out I was working a lot so many of my closest friends were also in the business, and thus they were probably less impressed than the average kids. It was actually many years later when I realized the affect that the film and video had on people.

“Smooth Criminal” and the longer film were part of Moonwalker. It was supposed to be released in theaters in the US, but for legal reasons, it never was. Many kids my age and younger had the
Moonwalker DVD and would play it over and over. Since it was family-friendly, there is a whole generation that was raised on the DVD, kids who probably never saw the actual video on MTV until years later.

When you were of dating age, did the video ever affect your love life in any way?

It had no effect on my love life when I was younger, and as I got older I would not tell people until after they knew me fairly well. I always tried to keep my friendship with Michael private; I was never one to exploit that for my own personal gain. Once a guy would find out, it usually would gain me a few points; many of them had crushes on me growing up.

Did you receive fan mail? If so, do you still have any of it?

I did get a few letters. They are in some box at my parents’ house.

Did the video generate any controversy that you know of?

I was not aware of any controversy surrounding the video.

What were you paid?

I believe I was paid a SAG daily rate. Originally I was supposed to work for only about a month, but it ended up being so much more than that. They ended up making a lot of merchandise that I was also in: picture books, coloring books, video and arcade games, posters.

Did you watch the MTV World Premiere of the video, and if so, where and how did that feel?

We had a big screening for the film that I went to. It was really fun to see all the videos on the big screen. I did also watch the premiere on MTV. I remember being with my family at home and getting to stay up past my bedtime to watch it. It was surreal to see it, and it was great because then I had an excuse to watch MTV!

Were you ever recognized in public? How often and when last? Any stories about that?

I was never recognized in public except when I was with Michael. When I was in public with him, people would say “You’re the little girl from the video!” It was always fun to be recognized. When people find out today, it is always fun to watch their faces because I see them scan my face for a moment and then the usual response is “You look the same!”

Did you appear in other music videos after that?

Years later, as an adult, I did several videos as a dancer and actress.

If you went to college, where and what did you study?

I studied business and film in school, graduating from CSUN after many years of stopping and starting the process. It was hard for me to get through it in one four-year stretch because I was still working in the entertainment business and would book tours that would take me out of the country for extended periods of time. As I got older the teachers began to trust me more; as long as I was able to get things done and do well on tests, they were willing to work with my crazy schedule. I never gave up on it because it was something that I wanted to accomplish for myself.

What are you doing these days?

I am still in the entertainment business, though these days mostly behind the scenes. I am lucky—because of my varied background I get to work in both live and filmed entertainment. I am a producer for television, a choreographer, and an associate director for large-scale live shows. I love my life; it never feels like work because I love what I do. I started working on the creative behind-the-scenes side of things early in my twenties because I had already been performing for so long, and I was looking to express myself more fully as a creative mind. I owe a lot of that to Michael; the confidence in my own creative and artistic thought came from the time I spent with him.



I recently finished working with Kenny Ortega, who, of course, directed for Michael for many years, and he and I would have great conversations about Michael. It was nice to reminisce with someone else who knew Michael the person and friend, not just Michael the star.



Where do you live?

California.

What did you think when you first heard from me?

I was excited to talk about this very special moment in my life. As I have mentioned, I have always stayed very quiet about times with Michael, but it is nice to have the opportunity to tell people what it was like to be there when this iconic video was made. So many incredible memories of the late-night shoots, hanging with the dancers on set, and watching the process and evolution of the work. I had been dancing since I was three years old and on the mornings I could I would [join] the dancers’ warm-up with the choreographer, Vincent Paterson. They were the most incredible dancers. That cast had such a strong bond and you can feel it when you watch the video; they were like family.

Has anyone else ever interviewed about this? If so, who, when, and for what publication?

A few years ago I did do a panel in Las Vegas for a screening of the film and video, and a few other interviews here and there over the years.

Have you appeared at any fan conventions to sign autographs? If not, would you?

I never have been asked; might consider it depending on the circumstances. There is so much love surrounding Michael and I know how much the video and film meant to so many people.

Did you stay in touch with Michael? If so, how often?

Michael and I remained friends for years.

When was the last time you were in touch with him, and what was that conversation about?

I saw Michael a couple weeks before he passed. [Before that,] I had not seen him in years. I am so happy that I was able to say hello to him and look in his eyes one last time.

How did that come about? Did he call you, you call him, someone email you? Where did you see him?

I work as a choreographer now and have done many shows and a couple films for Disney. He came to one of the shows a couple weeks before he died and I happened to be there that day. He did not know I would be there. It was brief, but I did get the opportunity to see him, and for that, I will be forever thankful.

How and where did you learn Michael died? How did the news affect you?

I was in a rehearsal when the news came that Michael had been rushed to the hospital. I found out in a text from my brother Eric, who had spent much time with me on the set when I was working with Michael.


When I heard he had passed, my mind went blank and my eyes filled with tears. The first person that put [a] hand on me, I collapsed in shock. It was surreal, to say the least, and I was just so sad because he still had so much to give. But thankfully his legacy will always live on, and there was such beauty, love, and outpouring following his death. I think he is looking down from somewhere else and smiling. We were so lucky to have had him here for the time that we did, and he accomplished what was so close to his heart—for people to love one another, to feel joy in their lives, and to believe in magic. And anywhere you go in the world, when his music comes on, that is exactly what happens…people dance, sing, smile, and their spirits are lifted. What a beautiful gift he gave us.

What is your take on the allegations made against Michael Jackson by families of children he befriended?

I can’t speak about nor judge anybody else’s relationship or experience with Michael because I was not there with them. All I can do is say that in all the time I spent with him, he was nothing but the most caring and gentle human being. He was always like a father looking out for me. I spent time with him at his ranch, Neverland, and always had so much fun with him.

I know that people don’t understand why Michael always had kids around, and as an adult I can see why that may look unusual. But all you have to do is look at any kids you know and the fact that they have no filter; they are just honest. Now put yourself in Michael’s shoes: surrounded all day by people who constantly filter what they say to you. How refreshing the honesty [of children] would be.

Michael was always questioning me so that I would grow in my reasoning. We would dream out loud together, make up stories together, and be creative in so many ways. I think he was maybe trying to be for me what he had hoped someone would have done for him as a kid in the industry.


He was the kindest man with the most generous heart. From my experience with him, I can’t imagine that he would harm anyone.



Lastly, were you Annie?

Nope, I was not Annie. I was just “Katy.” :-) We never knew who “Annie” was.

Tweet about this interview to @michaeljackson and @Kellie_Parker!

Copy and tweet to help me find more 1980s music video girls:

Real research question: if you know the Annie Hubbard who was in 1984 Night Ranger video “Sister Christian,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Real research question: if you know the womaneven just her name—in 1986 Cinderella video “Shake Me,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Real research question: if you know woman—even just her name—in ‘87 Richard Marx video “Should’ve Known Better,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Next: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Free Fallin’” (1989).

11 Comments on The Girl in the Video: “Smooth Criminal” (1988), last added: 8/14/2013
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33. The Girl in the Video: “Midnight Blue” (1987)

Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video” (including list of interviewees).

The video: “Midnight Blue” by Lou Gramm.

The girl-now-woman: Traci Lind.






How old were you when you appeared in the “Midnight Blue” video? 

Not sure. I was born in April ‘68 and do not remember what year it was shot. I am fairly certain it came out within a month or two of shooting it, so if you know the year you can do the math. ;)

Where were you living at the time? 

Los Angeles.

What music videos, shows, or movies had you appeared in prior to that? 

Not sure. You could check IMDB if you know the year.

How were you cast? 

I honestly do not remember… The actor who was in it with me was a dear friend of mine, Joe Holland, AKA Tim Carson. We had the same agent at the time, but I think it was random that they cast us…or maybe Joe asked me to do it with him so I agreed to meet the director or whoever decided.

Joe died a few years later of complications due to AIDS…tragically just before the protease cocktails were made available. So when I saw the video on YouTube a couple of years ago (I had completely forgotten about it, which you will see as I do not have answers for most of the questions below), I was really glad that I did it, just to have footage of him young and beautiful and of the two of us together.

Do you remember what your reaction was when you were cast? 

No…

Where was the video filmed? 

Ummm…in L.A. on a few locations.

How long was the shoot? 

Two nights? I think…

How did you feel making the video? 

Nothing unusual. I was working actress and had been for some time, so being on location and night shoots were no big deal.



What was the hardest part of the shoot? 

Don’t recall anything being difficult.

How was it to work with Lou Gramm? Or did you not meet him? 

I remember him being in the makeup trailer at one point when the shoots overlapped. I think they shot footage of him in one of the outside locations Joe and I shot at later in the night.  Someone introduced us and he seemed perfectly pleasant, but I did not really know him or his music from the band he was in.

What did you think of the video? 

It was artfully shot for that period. I’ve seen it only a few times, and don’t think I ever saw it when it was airing. I didn’t watch much TV or MTV.

What did your parents think of it? 

I don’t think my mother ever saw it. If she did we never discussed it. As I said, I was working a lot at the time and this was just something I did with Joe.

What did your friends think of it? 

Ditto…

Did the video ever affect your dating life in any way (i.e. when you first told boyfriends you were the woman in it)?

No.

Did you receive fan mail? If so, do you still have any of it? 

I don’t know if there was fan mail. I do not answer fan mail, and my agents knew that, so if there was [any], they kept [it], most likely.

Did the video generate any controversy that you know of? 

Nope.

What were you paid? 

Don’t remember…

Did you watch the MTV World Premiere of the video, and if so, where and how did that feel? 

Nope.

Were you ever recognized in public? How often and when last? Any stories about that? 

Nope.



Did you appear in other music videos after that? 

Nope.

If you ever met other women who were female leads in a mainstream ‘80s rock video, who? 

Won’t say.

If you went to college, where and what did you study? 

Ditto.

What are you doing these days? 

Ditto.



 Traci in 1997

Where do you live? 

Ditto.

If you are/were married, what was your future husband’s reaction when he learned you were in this video? 

Ditto.

Kids?

Nope.

What did you think when you first heard from me? 

That I never respond to these types of inquiries, but my husband thought you asked in a nice way and that it was a low-key thing. So decided I would answer as best as I could since it I don’t remember much about it and had almost forgotten that I even did it (someone searched my name on YouTube and told me they saw it, jogging my memory…so I looked for it to see Joe). Honestly the only reason I did this was for Joe. He was a wonderful person and I loved him dearly and that video may be some of the only film footage of him…

Has anyone else ever interviewed about this? If so, who, when, and for what publication?

Nope.

Have you appeared at any fan conventions to sign autographs? If not, would you? 

Nope. And no.

Did you stay in touch with anyone from the shoot? 

The only person I kept up with was Joe and he died in late 1994 or early 1995.

Anything you’d like to add?

Good luck with your project! Sorry I could not be of more help, and while I would be perfectly happy if you don’t use any of this, I did not glibly answer. It just didn’t mean that much to me to appear in a video. I barely watched the movies I was in. I am an intensely private person, so the whole acting thing was just the wrong path for me, and as soon as I figured out how to segue out of it, I did.

Tweet about this interview to @LouGramm!

Copy and tweet to help me find more 1980s music video girls:

Real research question: if you know the Annie Hubbard who was in 1984 Night Ranger video “Sister Christian,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Real research question: if you know the womaneven just her name—in 1986 Cinderella video “Shake Me,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Real research question: if you know woman—even just her name—in ‘87 Richard Marx video “Should’ve Known Better,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Next: Michael Jackson, “Smooth Criminal” (1988).

1 Comments on The Girl in the Video: “Midnight Blue” (1987), last added: 8/3/2013
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34. The Girl in the Video: “Your Love” (1986)

Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video” (including list of interviewees).

The video: “Your Love” by the Outfield.

The girl-now-woman: JoAnn Willette.


 


How old were you when you appeared in the “Your Love” video?

21.

Where were you living at the time?

I had an apartment in Sherman Oaks, CA.

What music videos, shows, or movies had you appeared in prior to that?

I had a part in Nightmare on Elm Street Part 2. I was Girl on Bus #2—and the first killed, I believe, in the crazy bus ride through hell with Freddy. In Real Genius I played a teenage girl at the science fair—though I was cut out of the movie. I co-starred with Sharon Stone in an episode of T.J. Hooker that they were using as a pilot for her—I think they were going to call it Mrs. Hooker; I played an abused drug addict and William Shatner gave me mouth to mouth resuscitation—a career highlight for me. I love him.


In an episode of The Facts of Life, I played a socialite and I had a recurring role on a bad nighttime soap called Rituals. I had a series regular role in an NBC pilot called High School U.S.A., which didn’t get picked up. I played a high school kid and stars from when I was little played teachers and school administrators: Ricky Nelson (his last role before he died, I believe; very nice man), Burt Ward, Barbara Billingsley, Henry Gibson, Julie Newmar, Ken Osmond, Paul Petersen, Jerry Mathers, Harriet Hilliard (Nelson). It was a thrill for me to work with them. Other kids in the cast were Crispin Glover, Anne-Marie Johnson, and Crystal Bernard.

My very first job was an episode of Hill Street Blues. I played a Catholic school girl with Ally Sheedy. Steven Bochco Taft-Hartleyed me into the union. Also at the time I did this video, I had just finished starring in an indie coming-of-age movie with Mariska Hargitay and Courtney Thorne-Smith called Welcome to 18—that’s how I got cast.

How exactly were you cast?

The director of the video—John was his name—came to the set of
Welcome to 18 to watch the filming. He was friends with the cameraman, Julio Macat (who went on to be the cinematographer on films such as Home Alone). John really liked me. He approached me and asked me if I’d be “the girl” in a music video he was directing for the Outfield. I think it was shooting the following weekend. I said sure. Sounded like fun.

Do you remember what your reaction was when you were cast?

I guess my first reaction to being cast was surprise. They usually cast tall, modelly type girls for those things, which I am certainly not. I’m tiny-leggy and drop-dead is not me. But the lead singer, Tony Lewis, who sings to “the girl” and flirts with her, was not super tall so maybe that was a factor. At any rate, I was thrilled—I grew up on MTV videos, a trip to NYC—all sounded fun to me. John also directed all the Hall and Oates videos so I was interested in working with him.

Where was the video filmed?

It was shot at a soundstage in NYC—Brooklyn maybe? I don’t remember the exact location. They had a set which resembled the album cover. The guys sang on a stage and I played an artist offstage finger-painting the cover.

How long was the shoot?

We worked all day, all night, and wrapped the next morning when the sun came up. The last shot is me walking out of the studio on the street. (People think it’s the sun setting—it’s not. It’s dawn.)

How did you feel making the video?

I had a lot of fun. Never worked on something like this—so it was interesting. They blasted the playback for the song at each take—the song was great.

What was the hardest part of the shoot?

Besides staying awake at the end (didn’t think it would go so late!), the hardest part for me were the precise shots John took of my face through the glass as I was finger-painting—which I was really doing. He would try to get just my eyes, etc., and I would have to paint just in the right place where he could still see me. I thought it was very cool what he did.

How was it to work with the band? What were they like?

The band was very nice. When I met them I didn’t think John Spinks, the guitarist, liked me—refer back to the part where I’m not a leggy model—but they all treated me very well. Especially Tony Lewis—very nice guy. We had fun.

The [video] concept was the making of a music video. I was the artist/art director for it. You see me in the beginning when Tony and I meet and have the attraction moment; I’m working with another guy on the set. 



See the T-shirt he’s wearing? I still have mine that the band gave me; it’s gray, not black, but it says “Play Deep” on the back and has the Outfield logo on the front. It’s my daughter Cecilia’s prize possession. She wears it all the time.

JoAnn in the T-shirt!

What did you think of the video?

I thought it turned out great. I thought the band was very talented. I had never heard of them before I shot this with them but I thought the song would be a big hit. I really liked it—went home and couldn’t stop singing hit. Catchy tune for sure—which is why it is still a well-covered song! I certainly never anticipated how popular the video would become, though.

What did your parents think of it?

My mom and dad loved it. My twin brother said he would see it play in bars in my hometown in Maine and he would tell people (I imagine [especially] girls!) that was his sister—they were impressed. It played a lot on MTV. Like I said, I never thought I would be so recognized from it.

What did your friends think of it?

They thought it was very cool I was “the girl.” I got street cred for being a music video girl.

In the video, it looks like a member of the band was blind—was that the case in real life?

I believe he was really blind but you should check with the director. [MTN: Director John Charles Jopson said, “Yes, one band member was actually blind.”] I don’t think he or the blond guitarist were original band members. As far as I know, it was just Tony Lewis, John Spinks, and the drummer, Alan Jackman. Maybe [the other] two were hired just for the video?

At one point, John Spinks comes over to you and says something that makes you laugh and shake your head. Any chance you remember what that was? Was it a planned line that you were supposed to react to, or spontaneous?

The director told me John would come down and flirt with me. Didn’t know what he was going to do but I do remember he said something funny and winked, which made me laugh. I was supposed to be friendly. John’s very cute, but I was supposed to share moments of attraction and flirt with Tony.



Did the video ever affect your dating life in any way (i.e. when you first told boyfriends you were the woman in it)?

That was always funny to me. When dates would find out I was a music video girl, they all wanted to see it—my other work, not so much. I got rock-star-by-proxy status.


I think men are [prone] to fantasize over the girl in videos who is sought out, pined over by singers…the focus of their love or lust. Men were hard-wired to like these women in videos—especially in the beginning of the MTV craze. The women didn’t talk, didn’t have names, but were desired…the “it girl”—gotta have her. Even today, when a date watches this video again—so impressed with me. “You were the girl in ‘Your Love’?” Their head explodes. They all remember this song, where they were in their life—making out to this video with whatever high school girlfriend they had at the time.


Did you receive fan mail? If so, do you still have any of it?

I actually did receive fan mail for this video—they would send it to my agent. I don’t think I still have any though.

Do you know how fans found out how to send you fan mail? Your name was not in the video, let alone your agent’s!

Fans of mine would recognize me in the video, call Screen Actor’s Guild (anyone can call the guild and ask who represents an actor; you can get info on up to three actors in one call), and then send fan letters to the agency and ask them to forward to the actor, which they do.

You may recall the tragic death of Rebecca Schaeffer, who was a friend of mine. We worked together on My Sister Sam, an episode called “If You Knew Susie.” (I played Susie.) I also worked with Rebecca on an episode of Amazing Stories called “Miscalculations.” Rebecca’s address was obtained by a simple inquiry at the DMV. Her murder brought an awareness to the dangers of personal information in the wrong hands. It changed our industry and brought about new stalking laws.

Through my agent, I have gotten fan mail from prisoners. The warden sends them after blackening out inappropriate content (sometimes there is quite a lot of black on the page). They are almost always very polite fan letters—otherwise the state would never forward them, of course. They usually tell you what they are in for and ask for a signed photo…and at times even tell you that they plan on selling it. They send stamped envelopes self-addressed back to the prison.

Sometimes I get fan mail sent directly to my home by a fan. I am always amazed that people are able to find my home address. I never ever respond to those. It’s not safe to confirm to anyone where you live.

Did the video generate any controversy that you know of?

I am unaware of any controversy. The video is actually pretty tame, sweet—a couple of the band members just flirt with me. Partial controversy maybe later in that this song is featured in a rated-M video game, which introduces it to a whole new younger fan base who associate it very differently than when we saw it on MTV or heard it on the radio.

What were you paid?

The production didn’t have much of a budget. The director really wanted me to do it so he personally paid for my flight and gave me a couple hundred bucks out of his pocket—even offered to let me stay with him in NYC—but I stayed with my brother John, who worked in the Twin Towers at the time.

Did you watch the MTV World Premiere of the video, and if so, where and how did that feel?

I did not see the world premiere, but saw it a lot after, play after play.

Were you ever recognized in public? How often and when last? Any stories about that?

I got recognized quite a lot in public after that, which surprised me. It lasted as long as that video was in play. Though now, online, people guess who the girl is. Only once did I see someone identify me.

Did you appear in other music videos after that?


This was the one and only music video I ever appeared in. Later, when I starred in an ABC/Warner Brothers sitcom called Just the Ten of Us (a Growing Pains spinoff), my three sitcom sisters and I formed an all-girl rock band called the Lubbock Babes. We performed ourselves on the show and were offered a record deal with Warner Brothers (which we turned down because two of the girls didn’t want to do it. I wanted to do it, though).

We even sang the national anthem at a Dodgers Game once. Tommy Lasorda was the manager and I still have the baseball that Orel Hershiser signed to me. I was also a lead singer in a rock band called the Imperials when I was 16. We headlined at my local VFW club every Friday and Saturday night. So I was always on the other side—in the band, not “the girl”…

Why didn’t two of the Lubbock Babes want to take the recording contract?

One got advice that doing an album might ruin her career—[cause her to] not be taken seriously, and that convinced another girl. WB really wanted us to do it. A couple of music representatives and my producers met with me and asked me to please talk to the girls about it and try to convince them how important it would be for the show in marketing, etc., and how it would be good for them, too. I was the oldest of the four and they thought I might have influence over them. They stuck to their decision, though. It’s too bad because the episodes that involved us singing at the pizza parlor were the highest rated. Ironically, kids singing in TV shows is a matter of course these days on Disney, Nickelodeon, ABC Family—it’s become a successful formula. I think we were before our time.

If you ever met other women who were female leads in a mainstream ‘80s rock video, who?

I’ve never met anyone else [who did] a video.

If you went to college, where and what did you study?

I went to UCLA and studied theater, film, and television. I started in 1982, left in ‘86 because I was working so much as an actress. I went back to school (while being a cougar was still in!) and finished earning my BA in 2011. Such a rewarding experience.

Do you mean “cougar” as in the popular slang meaning these days? And if so, is it no longer in to be a cougar? (I hadn’t heard!)

I do mean the slang reference—and I do hope it’s not out of fashion yet!

What did you get your BA degree in?

I have a degree from the Theater and Film School. I have a theater degree and I earned a minor in film studies.

What are you doing these days?

I am a single mother of two great teenage kids.
My son Luca is 15 and my daughter Cecilia is 14. I’m still acting, writing (including a one-woman show based on my life), producing, and starting an accessory company with my sister. I was selected as a quarter-finalist for the 2013 Page International Screenwriting Awards for my screenplay Will To Live. Out of 5,682 scripts submitted, my comedy made it as one of the top 10%.


What can you tell me about the one-woman show?

It is still a work in progress. It will be stories of outrageous but normal-for-me stories. I have friends who say “It could only happen to you.” The working title is No Ordinary Jo.

Where do you live?

I live in Beverly Hills, CA.

If you are/were married, what was your future husband’s reaction when he learned you were in this video?

I am divorced but my ex-husband thought it was pretty cool I was in this video.

What do your kids think of the video?

My son says it’s pretty cool I was in that and my daughter thinks it was awesome. She loves [the] Katy Perry [version, “Use Your Love”], too!

What did you think when you first heard from me?

I couldn’t believe you wanted to interview me. I am always surprised at the impact this video had/has.

Has anyone else ever interviewed about this? If so, who, when, and for what publication?

I’ve never been interviewed about this before nor do I know if the guys were.

Have you appeared at any fan conventions to sign autographs? If not, would you?

I have appeared at fan conventions for my other work but not for this video. I might, though, if asked.

Did you stay in touch with the band after the shoot?

I actually dated the director after for a short while after. He was very nice to me. I’ve lost touch with him, though.

When was the last time you were in touch with the band?

I haven’t seen the band since that night we worked together. I’m a big fan of theirs, however.

How do you look back on the experience?

I look back on this experience very fondly. I’m glad I was a small part of something that was a big deal in my generation. The MTV rock video was all the rage then and this song holds a lot of meaning for people who grew up with it. Also, it’s fun to see artists like Katy Perry cover it now.

Anything you’d like to add?

One thing. The hairdresser that night talked me into cutting my hair in this very cool, punk rock haircut after we wrapped. I was tired and didn’t think too hard on the decision. Although I like the cut, the producers of Friday the 13th, Part 6 (I think) did not. When I returned from NYC, I got a screen test for one of the leads and they were pissed I cut my hair off. It cost me the role…



Lastly, were you Josie?

Gosh, I have wondered that, too—am I Josie? Wouldn’t that be romantic! I don’t think I get to be the girlfriend, though. I don’t think I’m Josie. Tony sings, “You know, I like my girls a little bit older”—then they cut to me. I look pretty young in the video! Then he sings, “I just want to use your love tonight.” I think I’m the girl he sings about. The secret girl of the night. I think he wants “my love” [just] for the evening. After all, Josie’s on a vacation far away.

Tweet about this interview to @The_Outfield_ and
@JoAnnWillette!

Copy and tweet to help me find more 1980s music video girls:

Real research question: if you know the Annie Hubbard who was in 1984 Night Ranger video “Sister Christian,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Real research question: if you know the womaneven just her name—in 1986 Cinderella video “Shake Me,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Real research question: if you know woman—even just her name—in ‘87 Richard Marx video “Should’ve Known Better,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Next: Lou Gramm, “Midnight Blue” (1987).

4 Comments on The Girl in the Video: “Your Love” (1986), last added: 7/29/2013
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35. The Girl in the Video: “Addicted to Love” (1986), part 3 of 3

Part 1.

Part 2.

Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video” (including list of interviewees).

This is the first-ever group interview with all five of the women who portrayed the band in Robert Palmer’s “Addicted to Love” video.



What are you doing these days?

Julie: Enjoying work and motherhood. Dabbling with the properties I bought thanks to a lucrative modeling career. I have been retailing Indian leather bound journals in the UK for some years (any excuse to indulge in the culture of that country) but this is now taking a backseat to a business I started after having my son. It’s an online mail order company selling an eclectic mix of children’s gifts—anything from frothy tutus and sparkly shoes to educational science museum kits. Another excuse to travel far and wide to design and source new products.
Patty: I work with landscape designers and architects. I have two children and I [got] married June 22, 2013 in Los Angeles.
Kathy: I am living in Phuket, Thailand, and am involved in various charities. [I asked for elaboration] I am on the board of a charity set up by my late friend, Tom McNamara—the Phuket Has Been Good to Us Foundation, providing English classes to underprivileged. [I’m also on the board of] The Good Shepherd Phuket, an organization that helps school the children of migrant Burmese workers and helps women who have been trafficked for the sex trade.

Mak: A bit of modeling from time to time, but my main focus and energy is on the Edible Bus Stop (@EdibleBusStop), a project I co-founded two years ago. We’ve had some great publicity and last year were invited to 10 Downing Street by the Prime Minister and were nominated for an Observer Ethical Award, the Green Oscars.



Julia: I’m a hair and makeup artist.

 Julie

 Patty

Kathy

 Mak

Julia

Where do the rest of you live?

Julie: Still loving the buzz of London.
Patty: Los Angeles.
Mak: Brixton, [a part of] London.
Julia: London.

Kathy, when did you move to Thailand, and why?

Kathy: About 12 years ago. I fell in love with the people and the country and then my husband started working here.

If you are/were married, what was your future husband’s reaction when he learned you were in this video?

Julie: Quietly impressed and amused by the impact it stirred up. But the video was part and parcel of a long modeling career so in itself did not have much impact on our lives.
Patty: My ex-husband, Jonathan Elias, wrote the original score for the MTV music show [the MTV jingle]. It was a sweet part of our meeting.
Kathy: I am married now, but at the time we were friends [and] he thought it was great.
Mak: ;o)
Julia: He was, I think, a little shocked and probably didn’t entirely believe me!

Patty, fascinating that the man behind the MTV theme married the lead woman of one of the most iconic MTV videos. How did you meet Jonathan—was it via the MTV connection?

Patty: I met Jonathan at a birthday party through mutual friends. We did not connect our MTV experiences until later, maybe on our second or third date. Jonathan is a composer and was living in New York in the ‘80s, working with Duran Duran at the time.

What does your new husband do?

Patty: My new husband, Michael Rosenfeld, is a real estate developer in Los Angeles.


Patty in 2010

Kids?

Julie: An 8-year-old boy.
Patty: Lilli Elias, 17, and Jack Elias, 12.
Kathy: No kids, but nine godchildren who reacted over the years with “Wow, that’s great!” to “How embarrassing!”
Mak: No.
Julia: Two girls, 13 and 7 years.

What do they think of the video?

Julie: [My son] thinks it’s very cool and has recently started telling anyone who will listen that his mum was in a famous video. The low profile is now in jeopardy.
Patty: They think it is hysterical. It is hard for them to believe that Mommy had such a glamorous life!
Julia: They think it’s cool (their word)!

What did you think when you first heard from me?

Julie: “Is he legit?”
Patty: “Hmmmm.”
Kathy: “Oh God, it was such a long time ago.”
Mak: “Gosh, that video will never leave me!” LOL!
Julia: “Another interview!”

What other interviews have you done on the video?

Julie: I’m flaky with who/what/when. Ask Mak…
Patty: I have had offers to be interviewed a lot. I don’t take it very serious. I did a show back in ‘94…not sure what it was. Lame interview.
Kathy: News of the World did “where are they now” article a while ago.
Mak: Loads! Can’t even begin to name them all!
Julia: We have done a few over the years, the I Want My MTV book, and a video for VH1 called
“Video Vixens.”
 
Patty, I had a hard time finding you and I’ve done this a lot. How have others tracked you down?

Patty: People have tracked me down through my old agency in London, Models 1. Or through word of mouth. I never answer!

When you say you don’t take interview requests very seriously, does that mean you said no to most (or all) of them? If so, what made you say yes to this one?

Patty: Throughout the last 20 years, I have heard many people reference the “Addicted to Love” video and talk about who the girls are or were. It is always so funny to hear people talk as if they know! Most people really have no clue who the original girls were…including me! I think it was me, Julie Pankhurst, Julie [Julia], Mak, and who? So you can see that I don’t take this very seriously… But it was so nice to hear from Julie Pankhurst! How can anyone say no to Julie? I would love to see her!

Have you appeared at any fan conventions to sign autographs? If not, would you?

Julie: I haven’t done so. Never say never.
Patty: No, I have not. I would do it just to see all of the girls!
Kathy: No and no.
Mak: No.
Julia: No, but maybe…

Did you stay in touch with Robert Palmer or any of the other women after the shoot?

Julie: Not with RP but I worked many times with Donovan. We girls often saw each other through work (Mak and Patty were also with Models 1). Patty became a good friend when we both spent time in Australia at the end of the ‘80s. We lost touch when she moved back to the States but I’m hoping you can track her down so that we can get back in touch! Julia and I are great friends. I haven’t seen Kathy for years. I became a photographic agent when I stopped modeling and last saw her at a fantastic exhibition she organized for Fashion Acts Aids charity. Our photographers donated some photos to help raise money for it.
Patty: I was lucky to stay in touch with Robert and his management team for a few years since we were still working together. Then, we all carried on…I moved back to America in 1991 and stopped modeling soon after.
Kathy: No contact with Robert, but I stayed in touch with Julia.
Mak: Not Mr. Palmer, but occasionally me and a couple of the girls get brought together for a shoot or interview.
Julia: I saw Robert on a shoot a few years before he sadly died. I am good friends with Julie and see her once a month.

When was the last time you were in touch with each other?

Julie: Mak, 2006—VH1 feature; Patty, early ‘90s; Kathy, mid-
90s—Fashion Acts exhibition; Julia, weekly.
Patty: I really haven’t been in touch with any of them. I always ask about Mak and Julie—both such loves!
Kathy: Not for a long time…until a week ago [April 2013], when Julia sent me a message about you.
Mak: Last year.
Julia: I’m Facebook friends with Mak and Kathy, but don’t seem to have enough time to see them. Would love to though.


Mak, Julie, Julia in 2006
 
How did you find out that Robert Palmer had died?

Julie: In the news.
Patty: I was sitting in my kitchen listening to the news. I was still so sad that Johnny Cash had just died a week or so before. It really isn’t fair. Robert was way too young.
Kathy: On the radio. It was incredibly sad.
Mak: A friend texted me. Was very sad to hear it.
Julia: National television.

How do you look back on the experience?

Julie: With a smile.
Patty: The experience is and was just fantastic. It is such a funny little detail to have about oneself. Not everyone can say that they were lucky enough to participate in a piece of music history. I feel blessed!
Kathy: With pride to be part of video history.
Mak: I had no idea at the time it was to become so iconic or such a pivotal moment in music videos. I was very successful at the time and it didn’t register for me, as I was more focused on getting high-end magazine covers and big campaigns. In hindsight, of course, I acknowledge it. It is a legacy I am proud to be a part of.
Julia: Now that I’m older I think it was an amazing thing to have been part of and I’m so glad I got to work with Terence Donovan and four of the coolest girls I have met.

Anything you’d like to add?

Julie: A few years ago, a student from Australia asked for help with his college project about iconic women of the
80s. I don’t have his questions but [here are excerpts from my] reply:
I did this video at the beginning of my modeling career and it was a great introduction for other work. I got jobs directly as a result of the video but also because of working with Donovan. I was the keyboard player in the video.

At the time of filming, nobody had any idea that it would be so iconic. RP had apparently released the song previously without a video, and it had bombed, so they were taking a big financial risk by re-releasing it.

The director Terence Donovan came up with the concept for the video and his intention was to portray strong and confident women—hence the black dresses, slicked hair, and red lips—known at that time as “power dressing.”

But there were two issues of protest. Firstly there was a feminist uproar. They felt we were portrayed as sexual objects and as such, exploited. We didn’t feel we were doing womanhood an injustice! From our perspective, the image of us Donovan had hoped to portray in the video was indicative of the assertiveness of women in the UK during the 80s. We had a very strong female Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher, who was an inspiration for many women.
Secondly, the musicians union initially banned the video from mainstream television because we were models, not musicians, playing instruments. From what I understood at the time, we were not allowed to imitate playing instruments.

Donovan (now deceased) was a very successful photographer/director since the 60s. He tended to select models that were both good looking and confident, and that criteria was applicable to this video.

The song is about addictions. Due to the nature of the lyrics, we were directed to show little expression. RP sang of obsessive emotions and in contrast we reciprocated with little emotion.

RP shot the video with us and was quite shy!

RP did not want to be remembered for the “Addicted to Love” girls. He had a successful career prior to the video, but this video (and the subsequent videos) definitely revived his career and brought with it a whole new audience. But the videos tended to eclipse him, and for that reason he did not appreciate the attention we were getting. Rather ungracious considering he made millions from the songs to these videos!

We were asked to do a show with RP in Spain but all declined due to work commitments. We have done occasional TV appearances/press.

On the whole we have not outwardly sought publicity. Tons of girls have claimed to be in the video. Generally this doesn’t bother us but we did complain to a UK press for publishing high-profile articles about Susie Verrico, a contestant on the UK Big Brother program. They printed an image of me alongside her claim to be the keyboard player. The British press also published that she was a stripper, so naturally we didn’t want to be associated with her!
Patty: Good luck! Let’s get all of the girls together. I have a feeling you could do it!

Tweet about this interview to @_ms_mak and @Juliabolinoslap!

Copy and tweet to help me find more 1980s music video girls:

Real research question: if you know the Annie Hubbard who was in 1984 Night Ranger video “Sister Christian,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Real research question: if you know the womaneven just her name—in 1986 Cinderella video “Shake Me,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Real research question: if you know woman—even just her name—in ‘87 Richard Marx video “Should’ve Known Better,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Next: The Outfield, “Your Love” (1986).

0 Comments on The Girl in the Video: “Addicted to Love” (1986), part 3 of 3 as of 7/26/2013 7:16:00 AM
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36. The Girl in the Video: “Addicted to Love” (1986), part 2 of 3

Part 1. 

Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video” (including list of interviewees).

This is the first-ever group interview with all five of the women who portrayed the band in Robert Palmer’s “Addicted to Love” video.


What did you think of the video?

Julie: Loved it! I thought it was totally original and I loved the passion it evoked from many walks of life (it appealed to the male population for obvious reasons; many women felt empowered by it; some musicians resented it; and there was an outcry in the feminist camp). It did and still does appeal across the generations.
Patty: I think that the video is fantastic. It is an icon in the world of music videos!
Kathy: I thought it was great, very ‘80s.
Mak: At the time I was so embarrassed. I didn’t really do that kind of overtly sexy modeling. I did more sophisticated stuff or fresh-faced smiley shoots. This was really vampy and the reactions I got from people when they realized I was one of the girls started to freak me out. I couldn’t understand why that video was getting so much attention. Why we were considered so sexy…?
Julia: I hated it at the time as it was me up there but now as I’m older I can be more objective and I think it’s great.


Mak opening mouth, which was startling 
since all had been close-lipped up till that point

Patty opening mouth, the second and last 
of the women to do so in the video

What did your parents think of it?

Julie: Of it, or of me in it? Interestingly, I’ve never asked them but I sensed pride (and relief that this gave an indication of good things to come).
Patty: My parents could not believe it. They saw it way before I did and most likely did not even know it was me. I never told them anything I was doing. They lived in America and we did not have cell phones back then, so we did not speak that frequently. When I spoke to them, I rarely spoke to them about work!
Kathy: I think they were just happy I was getting work!
Mak: Thought it was great, didn’t have a problem with it at all. Not that either of them saw it for a while because they didn’t watch music videos. So they only saw it once it had started to get loads of attention.
Julia: Difficult to tell as they weren’t into that kind of music. But overall pretty proud.

What did your friends think of it?

Julie: Friends in the modeling world were very gracious about it. Friends outside the modeling world thought it very cool, but made sure I kept my feet firmly on the ground!
Patty: I have no idea. We did not see it much in England.
Kathy: I think they thought it was quite cool to be a part of such a talked-about video.
Mak: They were the ones who were telling me, “Mak, you have no idea how massive the video is and how impressed or infatuated people are with your appearance in it.” I was so busy traveling I hadn’t really cottoned on to how huge it had become. I’d get really shy (still do to an extent!) if they’d tell people in front of me that I was the “bass player” because all of a sudden people get all “No! Really? Wow!” or sometimes get a weird look on their faces, especially boys…ahem…
Julia: My friends thought it was great although I was overseas when it first came out so some of the impact was lost.

Did the video ever affect your dating life in any way (i.e. when you first told boyfriends you were in it)?

Julie: Ha…I can’t imagine any of us bragging to our boyfriends about being in the video but one way or another they seemed to find out.
Patty: I never really mentioned the video to anyone, mostly because I stayed in Europe until the early ‘90s. If anyone knew, though, it always led to a fun conversation. People were pretty taken by how popular it was. In hindsight, I feel like the video may have been more popular than the song itself.
Kathy: I’d love to say yes, but I don’t think so. I had an ex who was a drummer—he loved it.
Mak: Ummm…well, I was in a long-term relationship at the time, but since then, it’s not something I’d introduce myself as. But when I tell whoever, they tend to be quite impressed…
Julia: I have never been proactive in telling people (too English!) and have let people know only when I know them a little better, but when they have found out, they have been pretty amazed!


Julie then
 
 
Julia then 

Did you receive fan mail? If so, do you still have any of it?

Julie: Not that I remember. Google wasn’t invented [yet] (!) so it wasn’t easy to track us down. Maybe [the] Julie Pankhurst [who founded UK social networking site] Friends Reunited has been inundated with “Addicted to Love” fan mail!
Patty: I am sure I did, but I did not take it very serious!
Kathy: No, definitely not…but the agency [got] a lot of calls…
Mak: I still receive fan mail, but via email or people following me on Twitter @_ms_mak.
Julia: I used to get some sent to my agent when I was modeling, but I haven’t kept anything. Some guy on the Internet set up a fan page of me.

Julie, you sent two versions of the sleeve/cover to the single—is that you on both of them?

Julie: Yes.




Do you know why they chose you, and did the others say anything about that?

Julie: I haven’t a clue why I got to grace the cover[s]. I haven’t really thought about it before but I’m sure the girls didn’t lose any sleep over it. It was shot by a photographer called Ashworth and designed by Island Art. I’m assuming they are connected to Island Records.

Did the video generate any controversy that you know of?

Julie: It did. Ironically I imagine that is partly why it became such a cult video of the
80s. (More on this below.)
Patty: Not that I know of.
Kathy: Not that I know of, although as it was copied so much, it can only be good…
Mak: I think there were discussions at the time at the objectification of women. I think that missed the point, though. The brief from Terence Donovan was to look like shop window mannequins. I guess his reasoning was that in so many videos women were being blatantly objectified so why not poke fun at that and offer something they’ll never be able to get hold of. We didn’t have a come-hither look in our eyes. It was a look but you can’t touch. We were dangerous ornaments. Out of reach and perfect accessories to Mr. Palmer’s bespoke tailored suit.
Julia: Yes, it had the feminists up-in-arms. They felt it was a bad portrayal of women. I always thought it was a great video with very powerful images of women looking in control.

What were you paid?

Julie: We were paid £500, which was the standard rate for pop videos back then. [But] bearing in mind the mega-bucks it generated…peanuts!
Patty: I think we were paid 250 pounds a day. I don’t really remember but I remember thinking that it was very little. Now that I look back, I know that it was very little!
Kathy: A few hundred pounds.
Mak: ;o)
Julia: I can’t remember. I know it was good as I was more excited with the fee than the fact that I had got the video!

Did you watch the MTV World Premiere of the video, and if so, where and how did that feel?

Julie: I didn’t see it. But we quickly became aware that it was one of MTV’s most popular videos at the time.
Patty: No.
Kathy: No, I missed it as I was working in Japan at the time.
Mak: No, didn’t even know they had one. I was so busy working.
Julia: I missed it! I was modeling in Japan at the time.

Were you ever recognized in public? How often and when last? Any stories about that?

Julie: It’s funny that we have been recognized in public, considering slicked-back hair and pouty red lips isn’t the usual morning makeup routine, but occasionally it has happened. Apparently they guess from the eyes. The school playground was one of the more recent times (prior to my son’s knowledge of it so can’t hold him responsible!). That spread like wildfire!
Patty: I was never recognized, and I think that this was quite on purpose. Terence wanted all of the women to be unrecognizable…ambiguous, vague, obscure…that was the point. Beautiful sexy women…but they could have been anyone.
Kathy: No, sorry!
Mak: Never. The makeup and hair made me look completely different than how I do in real life.
Julia: I have a lot of people say they recognize me from something but they can’t put their finger on what. It’s an easy video to go incognito.


 Julie then

 This article about I Didnt Mean to Turn You On mentions Kathy.

Did you appear in other music videos after that?

Julie: With Harry Connick, Jr. in “Recipe for Love.” Patty and I were in the Robert Palmer “Simply Irresistible” U.S. Pepsi commercial in 1989.
Patty: Yes, I did—again with Robert Palmer in “I Didn’t Mean to Turn You On.” And then again in the Pepsi commercial with Robert singing “Simply Irresistible.”
Mak: There was a Bryan Ferry one, but you can’t really see me in it.
Kathy and Julia: (see earlier in interview)

If you ever met other women who were female leads in a mainstream ‘80s rock video, who?

Julie: Yes, but foggy memory cells = forgotten whom.
Patty: I know that there are many, but I no longer know them.
Kathy: No, I didn’t.
Mak: Can’t think of any off the top of my head, but there must be models I know who have done some.
Julia: Debra Lang was with my agency and a friend. She was in a Queen video and ended up marrying Roger Taylor.

If you went to college, where and what did you study?

Julie: I trained in childcare and launched into modeling after a few years as a nanny for a photographic agent and commercials director.
Patty: I went to UCLA in the ‘90s and studied art history. I did my internship at a photography gallery named G. Ray Hawkins, which specialized in the sale of vintage photographs. Fifteen years later, I went back to the extension program at UCLA and studied horticulture.
Kathy: No, I left school at 16 having been scouted by a model agent.
Mak: London College of Printing, Graphics and Design.
Julia: I didn’t go to university. I was modeling from 16.

Tweet about this interview to @_ms_mak and @Juliabolinoslap!

Part 3.

1 Comments on The Girl in the Video: “Addicted to Love” (1986), part 2 of 3, last added: 8/6/2013
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37. The Girl in the Video: “Addicted to Love” (1986), part 1 of 3

Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video” (including list of interviewees).

The video: “Addicted to Love” by Robert Palmer.

The girls-now-women: see below.




I’m gonna have to face it. I’m addicted to finding and interviewing pop culture fixtures who have rarely if ever been interviewed before.

And I’m particularly pumped about this entry in the 1980s music video series because it includes all five original Robert Palmer women from “Addicted to Love”:

  • Julia Bolino
  • Kathy Davies
  • Patty Elias (Patty Kelly)
  • Mak Gilchrist
  • Julie Pankhurst

Let’s do that again, but from left to right when watching the video:

  • Julie Pankhurst (keyboard)
  • Patty Elias (guitar)
  • Kathy Davies (drums)
  • Mak Gilchrist (bass)
  • Julia Bolino (guitar)

[In some online postings the order is different, but both Mak and Julie confirmed that the above is correct.]


Julie

 Patty

 Mak

Julia

Unfortunately, due to logistics (addressed below), Kathy did not get a close-up.

Not one but two of them (Patty and Julia) got married the summer of 2013.

Patty was the hardest to find and, to be precise, I did not find her. Julie had not been in recent touch but had a lead, and luckily, it panned out. Thank you again, Julie, for enabling us to complete the set and achieve the first virtual reunion of what many would consider the most visually memorable “band” in music video history.


Hopefully an in-person reunion will follow…

How old were you when you appeared in the “Addicted to Love” video?

Julie: 21.
Patty: I believe that the video was shot in 1985. Could have been ‘84. You can confirm. I was 18 in 1984. [MTN: The video came out in 1986.]
Kathy: 24.
Mak: 21.
Julia: 19.


 Julie then

 
Kathy then

Mak then

Julia then

Where were you living at the time?

Julie: London.
Patty: I was living in London, a model with Models 1 on Kings Road.
Kathy: I was living in Hampstead with another model friend. I grew up in South Kensington.
Mak: Paris and London.
Julia: London.

Patty, you were the only American of the five. Where did you grow up?

Patty: I grew up [through] my pre-teens in Deer Park, Long Island. Then my family moved to Longmont, CO to try “ranching.” I left home for Tokyo at 17, the day after I graduated high school.

What music videos, shows, or movies had you appeared in prior to that?

Julie: None (eeks, what was that about “not one-line answers”…?) [MTN: I asked participants to be as forthcoming as possible and avoid single-line answers.]
Patty: This was [the] early period in music video history. Truth be told, I didn’t know what a music video was. I had been living in Europe, not watching much television, so I did not know about MTV or music videos.
Kathy: I was in the video for “Figures” by Zaine Griff [the woman who walks straight at the camera close to the beginning of the video] and also one directed by Paul McCartney, a Jamaican reggae group called the Simeons; I honestly don’t remember [the name]. I was also in Octopussy, just another Bond girl.




Mak: I’d done plenty of commercials.

1987

Julia: A Rod Stewart video and one (“All the Love in the World”) for a band called The Outfield.



Kathy, what was it like to work with Paul McCartney?

Kathy: Great. It was a family affair as Linda came to the studio with the kids. He was incredibly charming and kind. He was very relaxed and made everyone feel comfortable.

How were you cast?

Julie: I had just joined Models 1 model agency and Terence Donovan (a photographer and the director of the video) held a casting at his studio. He based his decision on looks and persona.
Patty: I was cast by Terence Donovan and I believe that I was the prototype for the casting. Terence and I had shot several ads for Neutrogena and he was familiar with me and the way I looked on film.
Kathy: Strangely, I didn’t go to any casting. I was just booked direct at the agency.
Mak: I didn’t go to a casting. I was known to the director, Terence Donovan, and he booked me direct via my agent.
Julia: A normal casting with the director Terence Donovan; they looked at my portfolio and took a Polaroid pic.

Do you remember what your reaction was when you were cast?

Julie: Being a model was very new to me so every booking was a great adventure. To work with one of our legendary photographers so soon gave positive vibes for the potential of my career.
Patty: My reaction was total bliss. I was young and game for anything—especially anything that Terence Donovan was working on. Everything he did at the time was magic.
Kathy: I was very excited when I heard I [would be] working with Terence Donovan again and doing a video.
Mak: I had no idea then what this video would become. It was just another booking, except this one was with someone whose music I liked. I wasn’t easily starstruck.
Julia: I had never heard of Robert Palmer at the time as I think I was more into funk bands, so not overly excited!

Kathy, why were you assigned to be the drummer?

Kathy: I guess the naughty ones always get sent to the back!

Did it bother you that you were blocked by Robert Palmer for most of the video?

Kathy: Not really. He had a good bum.

Where was the video filmed? How long was the shoot?

Julie: It was a very small production in the depths of Holborn Studios, in central London. The shoot took one day and Donovan liked to work in a relaxed manner so it was a very chilled day. Prep in the morning (hair, makeup, and styling) followed by a long lazy lunch and then RP arrived for the filming.
Patty: The video was filmed in a studio in London. I don’t remember where, but I remember that the tea cart always rolled in about 3 in the afternoon. Union, I think! I believe that the shoot was either three days or five…probably three.
Mak: Holborn Studios in Back Hill [London], in a basement. One day.
Julia: It was filmed in Holborn Studios (sadly now closed). It took one day. We started at 8:00 a.m. (?) and finished around 7:00 (?).

Was this shoot the first time you met the others, or did you already know them?

Julie: I may have met Patty and Mak at Models 1 but most probably at the casting because the shoot was just after I joined the agency. I met Julia and Kathy at the shoot.

How did you feel making the video?

Julie: It wasn’t every day we got to be involved in a pop video so the whole experience was great fun.
Patty: Since I had never seen a music video before, I was unsure of what was going on. We spent many hours in makeup and then we would come out and the music would start. It really felt quite experimental.
Kathy: It was a great day. We all had a lot of fun and there was a terrific atmosphere.
Mak: Hmmm, well, the makeup was transforming, I barely recognized myself. The other girls and creative team were all lovely so there was a great vibe. I didn’t feel nervous. I was working hard at that stage so took it in my stride.
Julia: It was a really fun day. I got to pretend to be a stroppy [bad-tempered or hostile] lead guitarist!

What was the hardest part of the shoot?

Julie: Keyboards…playing to cue! Not such a tough shoot.
Patty: The hardest part may have been the makeup. It took a long time and it was quite heavy.
Kathy: Leaving! We all got on well.
Mak: There wasn’t a hardest part. It was an easy day.
Julia: Having lip gloss applied every three seconds!

How was it to work with Robert Palmer?

Julie: He was polite and the ultimate professional…and of course he was exceptional at performing on cue!

We had very little interaction with him because…

1. He clinched the song in a few takes so the group filming was very fast.
2. He seemed rather intimidated by five ladies towering above him.
3. His wife was present…!

Clearly if Robert Palmer had been a heartthrob of my generation, I would have been less blasé about his presence!
Patty: Robert Palmer was always a professional and a gentleman. He took great care of us always.
Kathy: It was great and he was very friendly and happy with the shoot.
Mak: Well, he’s a legend…and was a humble guy with it. You could tell he was a hardworking man who took his music seriously. I had a conversation with him about his using Sly and Robbie, a Jamaican drum and bass duo, on his album. I asked him about what it was like to work with them.
Julia: He was very polite and a little remote (his wife was there!).

Tweet about this interview to @_ms_mak and @Juliabolinoslap!

Part 2.

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38. The Girl in the Video: “Summer of ‘69” (1985) and others

Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video” (including list of interviewees).

The video: “Summer of ‘69” by Bryan Adams.

The girl-now-woman: Lysette Anthony.





What Bryan Adams videos did you appear in, and which was first?

I’m the girl in the [videos for the] entire Reckless album. Apart from one shot of a close-up of a woman’s legs in “Summer of ’69.” [Director] Steve Barron shot that before I arrived in Vancouver. Big mistake. Mine are better!

How old were you when you appeared in the first one?

I take the 5th. Seriously, I have no clue—you’ll have to do the maths. [She was born in 1963 and the video came out in 1985. Readers, you’ll have to do the maths.] I’m still friends with Bryan. No matter how decrepit we all become I’ll always be his
Reckless girl. That’s kinda cool!



Where were you living at the time?

London. We shot “Run to You” first in a studio, Pinewood perhaps, outside London. Bryan was simply a skinny boy in a white T-shirt with the most incredible voice I’d ever heard. He was cool, so confident; I was shy, convent school-fresh…hopeless! But it wasn’t until we arrived in Canada that I realized he was already a Rock God! There were crowds queuing for days simply to be extras in the concert scenes. He insisted on giving them a free show. That’s so Bryan—the People’s Rock Star.

What music videos, shows, or movies had you appeared in prior to that?

I’d already shot Krull. Ivanhoe. Oliver Twist (the TV movie and the BBC series), Dombey and Son, and more. My first 10 years were incredibly busy.
Reckless was my first video. My year as a model I’d made a ton of commercials. Worked with everyone [i.e. photographers] from [David] Bailey [who called her the “Face of the Eighties”], [Clive] Arrowsmith, [John] Swannell.


How were you cast?

A general.

Do you remember what your reaction was when you were cast?

It was just a job. With some Canadian. I was intensely interested in proper theater. It didn’t register other than a nice trip to Vancouver, to be honest.

How long was the shoot?

Can’t remember.

How did you feel making the video?

I had fun apart from a massive silent crush on Bryan. I’d never met anyone like him. But I suffered in silence! I was soooo young.



What was the hardest part of the shoot?

Leaving.

How was it to work with Bryan Adams?

He wasn’t Bryan Adams—he was a singer in a band to me. I loved it. The boys were sweet to me. I was one of them…sorta!



Are you hinting that there was some romance with any of them?

Oh lordy no. No romance ever, [with] any of them. No. I think the best way to describe it was they treated me rather like a kid sister. A little carefully. It was sweet.

What did you think of the video?

Cool! Though I was too plump. So young—ghastly! Now I think, “Bryan…those glasses [in “Run to You”]…why?”

What did your parents think of it?

It barely registered.

What did you friends think of it?

We were theater groupies. Jonathon Pryce’s Hamlet got us hot & bothered.

Did the video generate any controversy that you know of?

Nope. Not as much as Bailey’s picture of my rope-tied legs.

Do you have a copy of that image?

Bailey’s poster was banned. I don’t have a copy.

Which Bryan Adams video that you were in was your favorite?

I love them all. It was so fresh—pounding with energy. But in truth it was super-cool being #1 on Top of the Pops. You kinda had to have been here, in Blighty [the UK], with our three little channels…Top was massive.

Did any video you did affect your dating life in any way (i.e. when you first told boyfriends you were in it)?

Well, Depeche Mode “I Feel You” certainly made me quite popular. But I was married by then. It was a different era. Rock videos were what other people did. Not serious actors—darling!




Did you receive fan mail? If so, do you still have any of it?

Er, yes. Still do. I think you need to google me.

What were you paid per video?

Not much!

Did you watch the MTV World Premiere of the video, and if so, where and how did that feel?

No clue.

Were you ever recognized in public? How often and when last? Any stories about that?

Still am, bizarrely. From a Tel Aviv supermarket to Willesden Green bus stop.

The best story: at a concert in Hyde Park, [with] over 50,000 people [in attendance], myself and my two young stepsons were passed from the back of the crowd, over all their heads, carried on high, hand after hand, to the front. It was amazing! My youngest, Dylan, said that night, “Oh, you are the coolest stepmum.”

Bryan has always stayed in touch. A postcard from here, a random call from there, tea at least every 10 years. He once played me a few bars of “When a Man Loves a Woman” [MTN: she may mean “Have You Ever Really Loved a Woman?”] over the phone, asked me what I thought. I replied that I was sure most women would grip their steering wheels tight hearing that one.

When in New York shooting Woody Allen’s Husbands and Wives, I went to watch Bryan record the Spanish version of another beautiful song. I forget now. We’ve been in each other’s lives for a long time. Not every day, just in the periphery. I love that.


If you ever met other women who were female leads in a mainstream ‘80s rock video, who?

We
ve all done so much. You need to do a little homework!

If you went to university, where and what did you study?

Nope. Started work at 16 and 33 years later I
m still learning.

What are you doing these days?

Busy on a yearlong tour with the Agatha Christie Theatre Company. [NOTE: Lysette has extensive theater/film/TV credits, easily searchable.]



Where do you live?

My son and I have homes in London and seaside Norfolk.

If you are/were married, what was your future husband
s reaction when he learned you were in this video?

It simply was a fun gig.

How old is your son?

Jimi (after Hendrix) is 9 (going on 16)!

What does he think of the video?

He thinks Bryan rocks!

What did you think when you first heard from me?

“Oh f***—what a lot of questions!

 
Has anyone else ever interviewed about this? If so, who, when, and for what publication?

Nope.

Have you appeared at any fan conventions to sign autographs?

Sci-fi, not rock.

When was the last time you were in touch with Bryan?


Were in touch.

How did that start on a purely logistical level? After the last Reckless shoot, did you two simply exchange phone numbers?

In all honesty I can
t remember. I guess we must have exchanged numbers—but these days were streamed out! So much insta-choice!

How do you look back on the experience?

Proudly.

Anything you’d like to add?

Only the Greats stand the ultimate test of Time. Bryan has a gift from the Gods
quarry. He is a tireless pro and Im proud I am his Reckless Chick.


I wrote [the following] after Bryan’s Bare Bones [2010 show] at the Royal Albert Hall. (He always gets me seats [to his shows] no matter how late I leave it. This was a tough one as the entire place was packed.)

In 1984 (or was it ‘85?) one miserable, rainy morning, I stepped up into a trailer outside some stage, at some studio outside of some bit of London, and there met a skinny Canadian in a white T-shirt and jeans.

I was plump and shy with convent school teeth and a head stuffed too full of Lawrence and Keats. He oozed confidence and cool, with a voice distilled by years he had yet to live, graveled in honey. Honestly, I was the least equipped to Run to Him, let alone all the “You’s” I was yet to recklessly hurl myself at. Yet 28 years later it could be argued that my life has been more reckless, his clever and in control…and I’m still running, through the bloody rain, as I’ve done tonight. For here I am, rather like in that video, [sitting] at the back and still proud, watching Bryan rock.

The Royal Albert Hall is packed, up to gilded rafters, and he truly is the People’s Rock Star. I like my job.

A heartfelt extra thank you to Lysette for being so gracious as to complete this interview during an especially difficult and exhausting time. She sent the last of her answers the day after an emotional life passage moment, which was also the night before this was set to post.

Tweet about this interview to @bryanadams and @chezLysette!

Copy and tweet to help me find more 1980s music video girls:

Real research question: if you know the Annie Hubbard who was in 1984 Night Ranger video “Sister Christian,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Real research question: if you know the woman—even just her name—in 1986 Cinderella video “Shake Me,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Real research question: if you know woman—even just her name—in ‘87 Richard Marx video “Should’ve Known Better,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Next: Robert Palmer, “Addicted to Love” (1986).

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39. The Girl in the Video: “Don’t Come Around Here No More” (1985), part 3 of 3

Part 1.

Part 2.

Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video” (including list of interviewees).

The video: “Don’t Come Around Here No More” by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.

The girl-now-woman: Wish Cohen (Louise “Wish” Foley).



Did the video generate any controversy that you know of?

It did indeed. After the video was released there was a great big uproar about how the video promoted violence against women and the use of drugs.

After the Alice in Wonderland video, I was invited to do another video for the song “Forget about me, forget about these eyes” [“Make It Better”]. While filming the video, someone was doing a documentary about the band’s roots in Gainesville, Florida. While I was in the makeup chair, the crew came in and asked if I would respond to some questions. One of the questions was “How do you feel about the women’s group rallying against the video due to its violence against women?” Another was “Do you think that the fact that Dave Stewart gives you a mushroom in the beginning to start the hallucination was promoting drug use?”

I was too young to articulate what I was thinking at the time, but my thought on violence against women was “It’s just a video!” It doesn’t have any deeper meaning. It is a fantastical, funny, imaginative concept, committed to film. It is not a statement video with a hidden message.

When they asked about the drug use, my first thought was “Drugs? Huh? What are they talking about?” I guess I was naïve to drugs at the time, though I had dabbled quite a bit, but I never made the connection at the time.

I don’t think the whole interview made it to the documentary, but after the fact I was surprised that anyone would have been offended by it in any way because it was rock and roll. What’re you, new? If the music industry didn’t have sex and drugs, they quite possibly wouldn’t have true rock and roll.


By the way, the second video sucked. Terribly. In fact it is very hard to find on the Internet.


The concept (again Jeff Stein) was that the band was playing the song in my head and in the end Tom swings out on a Q-tip. There were midgets (or little people) involved and guitars hanging from the top of the set. If you looks closely at the video you can almost read on Mike Campbell’s face the embarrassment of being a part of the debacle. He was dodging the guitars that were dropping from overhead. In one shot, Tom’s microphone, which was on a swivel and spun around as he sang, hit him in the mouth and they were afraid it had chipped his tooth. The video also involved a 25-foot [tall] ear that the guys climb out of. Look closely and you can see where, before [the shot of Tom exiting the ear], Benmont, who had swung out of control, slammed into the ear and damaged it. I think we all decided to wipe that video from memory.






What were you paid?

I got the one-time payment of, I think, $2,500. Since I was a starving actress, I managed to make it last about two months. I didn’t even get to keep the costume because it was ruined by the tea and frosting. But hey, I got to keep the spare torso cake and bring it home for family and friends.

Wait, I did get to keep the wonky glasses that Petty wore in the video. Petty gave me his and said, “It’s okay, they got me two pairs.” And being a wordy person, I remember being disappointed that he would say two “pairs” instead of “pair.” (Talk about stupid stuff that we remember.)



The payoff was the short term and long term fame it got me. In fact, I was [recently] in a credentialing class in Omaha and they went around the room and each person (maybe 15 attendees) had to give some info about themselves. When they got to me I gave a spiel about human resource onboarding and recruiting systems I had consulted on, [said] that I was originally from California… They asked me to tell an interesting thing about myself. I really hemmed and hawed trying to think of something interesting like…I have four kids? I love the beach? I have two chinchillas?


[Then] one of the girls from my company, Linda, who was next in the interrogation, said loudly, “Seriously, Wish? I’ll handle this: she is Alice from the Tom Petty video.” Every single head turned! All of a sudden there were conversations sprouting and people asking “Oh my god, seriously?” By the time they had finished the uncomfortable introductions, they had the video cued up and played it for everyone in the class.

I still have a great pride in that video, even these 28 years later (just round it to 20, Marc. K?). I was riding pretty high after that, feeling pretty good that even the younger people in the room remembered the video, until…a young, pretty blond girl said, “I can’t wait to tell my mom. She really loved that video.” Yep…her mom.

No matter, I’ll be talking about it to anyone who will listen (and still make sense of the words) in the convalescent home.

If you ever met other women who were female leads in a mainstream ‘80s rock video, who?

I never met another woman from the rock video world because I was not a model. I was an actress through and through. My agent at the time recommended that I open up to the option of modeling and print work but I didn’t have any interest.

If you went to college, where and what did you study?

No, nowhere, and nothing! But if I could do it all again…I’d be…an actress.

What are you doing these days?

I’ll go back as far as 1992. I worked for five years at Walt Disney Feature Animation. I started as a production assistant on Hunchback of Notre Dame. I moved up to assistant to the production manager on Hercules. And my last year or two was as the coordinator for the camera department.


My claim to fame there was this: I had film returned to me from Technicolor for the new release of Beauty and the Beast, and I spliced [a] new scene into the old film for the two directors to approve. As we watched, I noticed that in two frames, Belle’s legs are missing. So we rolled it back and I showed them. After a private powwow in the theater, they said, “That is the original footage from the movie, and nobody ever caught it.” [It] didn’t get me fame around the globe, oddly enough.

In 1997, I married a fabulous musician/salesman (very much the same as actress/waitress), Yigal Cohen. (My maiden name was Foley so my name in the credits of Hercules was Wish Foley, which everyone at Disney thought was hysterical even though they had a guy named Geefwee Boedoe.)

About a year ago I began learning computer stuff (thoroughly boring, but pays really well). Specifically, recruiting and onboarding systems. So I help a client personalize the company’s optimum applicant tracking system. So I guess I make human resources departments’ dreams come true!



Where do you live?

I am born and raised in the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles. I lived in the Bay Area from 2002 through 2010. Moved to the godforsaken state of New Mexico and existed in their waterless, freezing, zero-scaped dirt farm until 12/31/11. I played Powerball on our way out of Albuquerque. On New Year’s night we pulled into Texas. On January 1st, on our drive from Dallas to Houston, I checked my Powerball numbers and found I’d won $10,000. My husband and I still feel that was the only fond memory of New Mexico. I now live in a suburb of Houston.



What was your future husband’s reaction when he learned you were in this video?

Oh, he milks it like everyone else. It is a conversation piece for a salesman. I don’t mean to sound jaded in any way, because I still get a kick out of it. I just know that it comes up quite a bit in his and all my friends’ conversations. My sister-in-law has (or had) a Facebook page named “I know that chick from the Tom Petty video.” Love it!


  Wish described this photo as "Alice-y." 

Tell me about your kids.

I have four kids. I didn’t start my family until I was 33 because I didn’t take being a mother and wife lightly. I knew that the decision would be life-altering and had to really search myself to make sure I had what it takes. I knew I would be giving up a lot when I had kids.

Had in vitro, had a boy in 1998. His name is Mickey Cohen; didn’t know there had been a gangster with that name until two weeks before delivery. He is 14 years old and he and his best friend are planning on going to MIT; thus, I am back to work. Mickey is a straight-A student. He has always been a responsible, sweet boy, and is already a fabulous guitar player. He is already getting invites from colleges to check out their schools online. Mickey was so easy to care for, right from birth, that we were lured into having another child.

Next go-round we ordered a girl, paid $800 extra for sex selection, but got twin boys, Buster and Clyde (now 12 years old). Buster sings and does photography and Clyde is an amazing dancer and drummer. Buster has a slightly raspy voice and loves singing in the school choir. I think he’ll make a great lead singer someday. Clyde, who was born three minutes after Buster, has the most incredible sense of timing and ingenuity with percussion instruments. And though they say that drummers can’t dance, he is a great breakdancer. His goal, at this point, is to be famous.

I credit my dad for naming them because, while I was hugely pregnant, sluggish, and [as-yet unaware of] their sexes, my dad said, “In keeping with your nomenclature, you should name them Bonnie and Clyde if it’s a boy and girl.” We were actually going to christen them with those names until we found out it was two boys. We kept “Clyde” and chose “Buster” for the other, in admiration for Buster Keaton (me) and Buster Poindexter (Yigal).

We were happy to quit after three boys, but nature kicked in, we got pregnant naturally. We found out I was pregnant on my birthday, October 16. When they did the ultrasound, the woman thought I was weeping with joy. I was not. I was freaking out because I already had three children under three years.

We had our daughter Charlie (as in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory). Mickey named her. I was an at-home mom and homeschooler for the next 11 years.

Charlie is 11 and all-girl; she can’t wait to wear makeup, the more sparkles the better, and she loves anything pink. She is already doing some acting and I am actively looking for an agent here in Texas. She and Buster were in a recent rock video. We did the 48 Hour Film Project here in Houston in November 2012.




After she did that video, they called her back on three occasions to take on more roles. Perhaps being a stage mother is in my future.

Buster didn’t really enjoy the filming. He couldn’t stop giggling and grinning so some of his work ended up on the cutting room floor.

What do your kids think of the video?

The kids didn’t really understand how popular the video was in its time. So [they] have only recently discovered that their teachers or their friends’ moms would be impressed by the revelation of who their mother is/was. After they let word out, the video has been shown in their classrooms.

What did you think when you first heard from me?

I was delighted. You have been so forgiving of my nightmare schedule and I thank you for sticking with me and roping me back in when I get too caught up with the everyday necessary work. Sending you my responses has been sweet, and sometimes bittersweet. I liken it to walking through the garden that is my life and enjoying not only the beautiful and plentiful flowers around me but also enjoying the dirt that surrounds them and made them grow.

Recounting to you my time with Stan made me a little sad (and almost angry) because I was so malleable at that time and I gave everything up to be with him. I get upset about how much time I innocently invested in him and then how stupid I was to have stayed on so long after I knew it was unhealthy. I try to never look back with a negative eye, so I have been contemplating the wonderful, positive changes and lessons that were brought on by that experience.

Also, I lost my mother last August and I am still struggling with her passing. She was my greatest supporter throughout my life and was the most positive loving person I have ever known (and I have known many people from many walks of life). One of her greatest messages was to always look for the positive in very circumstance. But I still cannot find anything positive about her death.

In recounting her devotion I have written some of this through tears. But I thank you for that as well.



Has anyone else ever interviewed about this? If so, who, when, and for what publication?

Yes. I was contacted by Rob Tannenbaum to give him a blurb about working on the video for a book he co-authored, I Want My MTV. Even though it was just a short blurb that got into the book, it was great talking to him because he was familiar with all the players I talked about. I gave him a lot of dirt off the record. For [you], I didn’t hold back, much.

Have you appeared at any fan conventions to sign autographs? If not, would you?

I have never done anything like that. I didn’t even know that there was such a thing. Yes, I’d love to do that. I just can’t imagine who would be interested.

Did you stay in touch with Tom Petty? Are you still in touch? If not, when were you last in touch?

I didn’t keep in touch with Tom after Stan and I split up. I think that because Tom and Stan had such ugly relations at [one point], I would be considered the enemy to a certain degree. (I did keep in touch with a friend of Stan’s, Marty Jourard—he was the sax player for the Motels. He still gigs around in Seattle and sits in with different bands that come through town.)

I did go to a Petty concert in 2011 and two of the people I was with asked if they could send a note backstage to Tom telling him I was there. I told them I didn’t mind but it had been close to 25 years since I had hung out with the band. So the notes both went back separately and we never heard anything from anyone.

I am not sure how I feel about that. At first I thought that they’ve probably heard from tons of people with their own “remember me?” notes and why should I be any different? But then it kind of bothered me that they (if the whole band had known about the note) were so very disinterested. If not nostalgia, then perhaps curiosity on their part. But I finally got over myself and remembered that I am just some chick who was in their video a long time ago. So I got over it and moved on.

Anything you’d like to add?

I am proud of being in such a popular video and flattered that people remember me and my performance. I had my three minutes and they were fabulous!

Tweet about this interview to @tompetty and @benchten!

Copy and tweet to help me find more 1980s music video girls:

Real research question: if you know the Annie Hubbard who was in 1984 Night Ranger video “Sister Christian,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Real research question: if you know the womaneven just her name—in 1986 Cinderella video “Shake Me,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Real research question: if you know woman—even just her name—in ‘87 Richard Marx video “Should’ve Known Better,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Next: Bryan Adams, “Summer of ‘69” (1985) and others.

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40. The Girl in the Video: “Don’t Come Around Here No More” (1985), part 2 of 3

Part 1.

Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video” (including list of interviewees).

The video: “Don’t Come Around Here No More” by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.

The girl-now-woman: Wish Cohen (Louise “Wish” Foley).



Did the video affect your dating life at the time?

Yes. Immensely. It changed everything.

Just before I did the video, I had been dating a guy (certainly not a man) who was physically abusive. A few months before I interviewed for the video, the loser I was with knocked me out with one punch. It is not hard to do with a sucker punch. It is not an easy situation to explain except that physical abuse in conjunction with psychological abuse is a “dog chases tail” existence.

I had left the guy, but he was stalking me. The end came when he showed up at my mother’s house on an afternoon when both of my older brothers were visiting. He came to the back gate and my brothers both jumped up and said they needed to talk to him first (they had seen the bruises on my arms before, and the sucker punch was the last straw). After they spoke to him, he just left. It was a year or two later that I found out that my brothers told him that if they ever saw him again or heard that he had been anywhere within a mile of me, they would take care of business.

So when I did the video, I was fresh out of hell.

On the first day of the shoot, I met the drummer Stan Lynch. He was 29 and so attractive to me at the time. I didn’t even consider that he would be attracted to me because he was a cute musician at the height of his fame, and besides, there were three beautiful models on set (in the black and white slinky muse outfits) hanging out with the single band mates most of the time.

There were two occasions on set when I felt that perhaps he had noticed me. When we were [about to do] a camera run-through, the three guys (Benmont Tench, Stan Lynch, and Howie Epstein) were arranged around a very tall and wide chair that I was sitting in (the scene where Howie serves me the cupcakes and then each band member steals them one by one). While we were all making small talk, Stan did a very dramatic sniff in the air and said, “Wow, what is that perfume you are wearing?” I replied, “It’s called Sweet Honesty.” And without skipping a beat, Benmont said, “I think he meant me—it’s called Filthy Liar.” We laughed, me especially, because it was such perfect timing. Though it dashed what I found out to be Stan’s icebreaker line.

Later, Stan approached me and complimented me on the very first shot I had done with the handheld camera guy (who was the first to give me the “always had a fantasy about Alice in Wonderland” line).



So for the rest of that first day, it was a little easier for us to have conversations.

On the last day, he stayed (after 24-hour nonstop filming) even though the band had been dismissed. After that last shot in the teacup, he asked me if I’d like to go to breakfast. As much as I was coming out of my skin with excitement and flattery, I declined because I was exhausted.


So he took my phone number instead.

He called me a day or so later and asked me out. This began our five-year relationship. I went from being a starving actress to the girlfriend of a rock star. When we began dating, I was driving an old, mustard-colored Chrysler Newport (440 engine!) that was truly an eyesore. Stan drove either his Black Jaguar XKE or his restored red 1970s convertible. It was a beautiful, huge, heavy old car. I think he was embarrassed by that car.

We [had] met in March and he had invited me to spend Easter with him at Don Henley’s house on Mulholland Drive in Hollywood. I, of course, accepted. My baptism into this world was unbelievable to me, even to this day. When we entered, we did a lot of introductions and shaking hands. Then after a while, we were sort of sent out to the backyard for cocktails and hors d’oeuvres. But before we walked out I had noticed about three drop-dead gorgeous women sitting on Don’s large curved couch. I said to Stan, “I feel bad for those girls. Nobody is talking to them and they aren’t even talking to each other.” He snickered and said, “Those girls are brought in for anyone who doesn’t have a date. They’re probably Playboy bunnies.”

Reeling from that weirdness, I stepped out to the yard and saw Mary Kay Place and many musicians who were well known. I had a cocktail with Mary Kay Place. That was surreal.

Then it came time to sit down to eat on a beautifully laid out table under a huge old tree. Next thing I know, this woman sits next to me and starts talking to everyone. Like the life of the party had just shown up, the whole table came alive. The man sitting across from her was wearing a checkered suit, a checkered shirt, a checkered tie, checkered shoes, and a checkered hat. It was the most fun outfit I had ever seen. Then I realized that his wife was the woman next to me. When I turned to sneak a glance at her, I was breathless because it was Bette Midler. She told some jokes that day that I tell people to this day, always giving credit for the joke—
Bette Midler told me that one.”

Don stood up and explained that “This ham is from so-and-so’s in Virginia, this one was flown in from so-and-so’s in France...” Then he announced that the dirty rice and gumbo was from his mother and had been flown in fresh that morning.”

It was a long day and Don asked me if I could start the tea kettles (I happened to be in his kitchen with the staff) while the staff began prepping desserts. I agreed easily because I was a little uncomfortable being a small-time actress around some very famously artistic people. I filled about four tea kettles and was standing there in front of the stove when someone says right in my ear, “A watched pot never boils.” I turned and it was Jack Nicholson. All I could manage was a kind of huffing giggle.

The reason I started telling you about the Easter lunch was because when Stan asked me to go, I asked what I should wear. He asked if I had anything “Easter-y.” I told him I would find something appropriate, but he said, “No, let’s go together and find you something.” I was so embarrassed to have to tell him that I couldn’t afford to get a new anything. He said he was going to get it for me.

[The] Saturday [before Easter], I came to his house and he had ordered a limo. We went to the Laura Ashley store in Brentwood where he had made us an appointment to shop. We were escorted to a beautiful dressing room, much like a bridal salon, where two women waited on us hand and foot. I left there with a few new skirts and as many shirts.

The first time I went to Stan’s apartment I thought it odd that his living room had been converted to his bedroom. After touring with him, it dawned on me that, after having spent so much time in hotel rooms, it made sense that the first thing you saw when you entered his apartment was the bed.

During my time with Stan, I met (I’ll probably not remember all but my faves): Timothy Hutton, the Williams Brothers, Warren Zevon (he came over to get his career going again with Stan’s help), Eric Martin (Mr. Big), Maren Jensen (Battlestar Galactica; she was with Don Henley), “Weird Al” Yankovic, Jon Anderson and Chris Squire (the band Yes), double-dated with Mimi Rogers (Tom Cruise’s first wife) and Don Henley, Ric Ocasek and his wife Paulina Porizkova, Bob Dylan, Dave Stewart and Annie Lennox (Eurythmics), Sammy Davis, Jr., Bill Cosby, David Letterman. And was in the same room with David Bowie, George Harrison, Elton John, Paul Simon.

I traveled the continental U.S. constantly to be with him on tour. We never moved in together but I spent the full five years living out of a suitcase. He made room for me in his closet, but I never really felt like we were in sync after the first year or so.

I never really felt that Stan loved me completely. I felt that his emotions didn’t really scratch the surface of what it means to love someone. He was a great guy, but we were worlds apart. Besides, he had no respect for my friends or family, so I didn’t spend much time with either (I always regretted choosing him over them).

What really confused me during my time with him was this: he wanted me to be available to fly anywhere, at any time, to be with him on tour or at the beach house, and I loved him so fiercely that I would go to him anytime at the drop of a hat. But, at times, he would get pissy about small money matters like having to pay my cab fare to get to the airport. There was no way I could hold a job and keep our relationship alive.

The end of us began in a strange way. I remember the very day that I began to pull away from him.

I was at his beach house in Florida, where we spent a lot of time together. He had already left to begin recording in Los Angeles. I stayed on after him. I called a friend of mine in Los Angeles and told her “Come to Florida. I have the beach house to myself and a grocery account and gas account. I’ll have your ticket at the airport...whatever we need. Just come for the month.” And what she said to me threw me back into reality after about four years of this jaded life: “Wish, I have bills to pay. I have a roommate who depends on my half of the rent. I have a job. I’ll get fired if I just get up and leave.”

I had seriously forgotten what it was to support and depend on myself. Worse yet, in the back of my mind, I knew Stan and I were not soulmates.

So I got a menial job at a pharmacy. Stan asked me to come out on tour a couple times, but I stuck to my guns. I began to like being independent.

We drifted apart then back together for about six months. Then one night I tried to talk to him one more time about our relationship, but he didn’t get it. So I never went back and I’ve lived in the real world ever since.

After him, I dated for about six years until I met my husband, Yigal. I dated all kinds. My thought on dating was to never say no to anyone who asked me out unless they gave me the creeps or were too forward. I took it very seriously that you can never judge a book by its cover. With this philosophy, I went on dates with a Foley artist, a really strange and moody poet, a guy who was seriously dumb as a brick, a guy who asked on the first date if I’d ever tied a man up and spanked him, a guy with Tourette’s, a deaf man, two jewelers (both extremely hairy, like even in a dress shirt it flowed out the collar), a reformed alcoholic (that was tough), a hairdresser, a guy who was void of any opinion or the ability to make a choice, an attorney (who felt even murderers deserved the best defense), a guy from Beirut who was the product of first cousins, and other strange men. I didn’t sleep around, just dated around.


1989
 
I met Yigal through a mutual friend, Mike. I had gone to high school with Mike and he invited me to come to his band rehearsal on a Friday night. I could hardly take my eyes off Yigal. I thought he was so handsome. To this day he is the most handsome man I have ever met (except for a guy in an elevator of my apartment building carrying a bike; [he] said “Hello, it’s a gorgeous day out there today,” and I quite literally mumbled and stammered a string of unintelligible sounds while staring at him wide-eyed).

[Yigal] and I eloped to Vegas and were married by an Elvis on 6/8/97. Under pressure from friends (not family), we decided to have an actual wedding (on our one-year anniversary). So we had a Charlie and the Chocolate Factory-themed wedding. With Edward Scissorhands music.

Yigal is of Polish descent and his family still speaks Polish in the home. He was born in Jerusalem, raised in South Africa, and came to the U.S. as a teenager. With Yigal, I broke away from my habit of dating drummers (Stan was the third in a row) and switched to guitar. Yigal writes and records all-original music and I’d say he never goes a day without working on some instrument.

He is still dreamy.

Did you receive fan mail? If so, do you still have any of it?

I didn’t receive any fan mail after the video. If anyone had tried to find me it would have been a little difficult because I was a member of SAG before they joined forces with AFTRA and modeling was not at all my background. If I didn’t already tell you, I was the first SAG actress to do a music video. MTV was [still fairly new] at the time and I was one of the first contracts written for this type of film. I am unsure how it worked but I know it was the first time that I had to sign away any rights to my own image if it was picked up by satellite or any other devices by earth or “any other planet.” It was so funny at the time, but now I get it.

While dating Stan, I was more recognized, especially in his circles.


Tweet about this interview to @tompetty and @benchten!

Part 3.

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41. The Girl in the Video: “Don’t Come Around Here No More” (1985), part 1 of 3

Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video” (including list of interviewees).

The video: “Don’t Come Around Here No More” by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.

The girl-now-woman: Wish Cohen (Louise “Wish” Foley).






This installment is otherwise known as “When you Wish upon a star.”

How old were you when you appeared in the “Don’t Come Around Here No More” video?

I had turned 21 four months prior to the interview for the music video. I had moved back to Los Angeles from central California (lived with my sister for two years while getting over the death of a boyfriend). I moved to L.A. with a physically abusive, rage-aholic boyfriend. My self-esteem was very low and my boyfriend was extremely jealous. After [I hid] the bruises for months, my mother and sister-in-law just showed up one day and moved me out. He stalked me for a while after, but my brothers took care of that (clandestinely).

Where were you living at the time?

Having just left [the] abusive boyfriend, two or three months prior, I was living at my mother’s house in Chatsworth, CA. My mother was the driving force behind my return to acting. She always supported me and was my grounding force [in my] years as a child actress. When I lost roles to the likes of Jodie Foster, Kim Richards, Helen Hunt, she would remind me that I always crossed paths with these blonde “all-American girls” (crazy, huh? that is what we, the blonde, blue-eyed, thin girls, were called) at interviews and that it I should be flattered to be in their echelon. My mother made sure I was never in danger of becoming a drug-addicted Dana Plato or Kim Richards.



What music videos, shows, or movies had you appeared in prior to that?

My very first acting job was a Barbie Beach Bus commercial at 6 years old. I would estimate that as a child I did over fifty commercials, for McDonalds, Hostess, Shakey’s Pizza, Manwich, Bryant air conditioners, Crest. I did one feature film, Harper Valley PTA with Barbara Eden, and was a recurring character on Family with Kristy McNichol. I did many guest-starring roles in other series and a lot of after school specials.

How were you cast in the video?

My agent, Joanie Roba, was contacted and asked to send models to an interview for a Tom Petty music video. She told them that I was one of her clients but they said they were looking for a model, not an actress, and besides, they knew of me and didn’t think I [had] the pretty “Alice In Wonderland look” they wanted. Joanie told them that I had grown up and that they should at least meet me. They agreed. [Joanie then] told me that they weren’t really interested but that I should go nonetheless to get my name out there.

They were looking for a sexy Alice, so my mom and I went shopping and found a tight pink puff sleeve T-shirt, skintight black jeans (at the time they were called peg-leg pants and were basically all spandex), and a pair of kitten heel Mary Janes. I asked my mom to come with me since she had always been with me as a child actress. She chose to wait in the car and I found out later that she didn’t want me to be seen as a child.


When I came into the home where the interviews were being conducted, all I had with me was an actor’s headshot and résumé. I immediately thought my agent had really missed the mark on this call because there were about 10 to 15 girls in the waiting area with skimpy, tight clothes and they had full photo albums of themselves in different outfits and poses. Though I felt really out of place, I was never a quitter, so when called, I did my very best. In the interview room, there was the editor and about four other people. They asked me to mug for the camera and make as many faces as I could. I did surprise, anger, sadness, joy, shy, strong, come hither…etc. When I left, I told my mom that I knew I didn’t get the gig or a callback because I didn’t look as sexy or made-up as the models.


I was really surprised when I got called to come back. I went to three more interviews. The first two were very much like the first except they wanted me to do more specific faces. On the third interview, there was a big dining room table where they had set up a camera at one end and had me sit at the other end. The table was full of people who were going to work on the video (maybe 10 to 15 people).


They told me that they were waiting for Jeff Stein (the director) to return with a part for the camera and would I mind just hanging out and chatting with everyone until he returned. So we chatted for about 20 minutes. They asked me questions and we all talked about all kinds of things. Then, out of the blue, the editor said, “Thank you for coming,” which meant the interview was over. I thought I had completely blown [it] because they didn’t wait for Jeff to return. I said something to the effect of, “I thought they wanted to do more filming.” The editor said, “Oh, we were filming. We just wanted to see how animated you were without knowing you were being filmed.” I found out later that Jeff had been watching me on a screen in the other room.

I left a bit confused because it was very unusual in comparison to acting job interviews. On the same day I got a call from my agent saying they loved me and that I got the job.

Do you remember what your reaction was when you were cast?

I remember distinctly my reaction when I heard I got the part. My brother Patrick was a huge Tom Petty fan and had been constantly calling me to find out if I had heard anything about the music video interview. MTV was very new at the time and it was the coolest channel to be seen on.

I called my brother to tell him and you’d think I had told him that I was going to meet the Queen of England. He and I celebrated together. We got together and he filled me in on everything Tom Petty. He told me to ask Tom how he broke his hand and if he still had some particular guitar. Thank heavens for that because it was a conversation starter for Tom and me.

Where was the video filmed?

It was filmed at SIR Studios on Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood. The set was elaborate and beautiful. The massive black and white checked set was really something to behold.

How long was the shoot?

We started filming the video on a Friday around 10 a.m. It was the latest call time I had ever had. We started with wardrobe and generally took our time because the band members were straggling in on their own time. We shot till after midnight the first day, then Saturday we began at 10 and went nonstop until Sunday morning at about 9 a.m. (23 hours straight). It was grueling, but that is really the fun of acting—the coming together of professionals to make the best piece of work they possibly can. The cast and crew were determined to get the best footage no matter what it took.


Wish: I honestly do not know [who took these photos]. They were given to me 
by a guy on the crew who came to the premiere.
 
What was the hardest part of the shoot?

The hours were long and exhaustion kicked in on the second day of shooting after about the 18th hour.

[One of] the two hardest parts [was] laying under the cake table for an hour and sometimes with my head cocked backward in an effort to make the angle look natural—as if I were actually made of cake.



The other difficult part was the shot in the coffee cup. The crew began filling up the cup with water from the bathroom about an hour or two before we filmed the shot. But within a very short time, the hot water ran out. So the tea cup was filled with freezing cold water. If you look closely at my face, you can see I am having a difficult time breathing normally. I also hated the fact that the costume was going to be ruined by the frosting on the donut/inner tube as well as the tea-stained water.



How was it to work with Tom Petty? What was he like?

Petty didn’t interact much with me. We chatted while on set waiting to get direction and begin filming. While on camera, he came alive and acted. His style was subtle so most of his shots were close-ups. He kept his movements slow and tight, never raising his arms or kicking out, just small, purposeful movement. It was easy to work with him because I was the opposite—grand and sweeping movements. He played his character well and had no advice for me.

Petty was a southern gentleman. He was very soft-spoken and seemed very shy. I was confused by his demeanor because, at the time, rock stars were out-of-control, narcissistic, decadent egomaniacs. Petty didn’t have any of these traits.

I dated the drummer, Stan Lynch, for five years after the video and would see Tom on tours and various band appearances, as well as hanging out with his wife Jane and daughter Adria. Through that time, Tom was always quiet, calm, and easygoing. His wife, on the other hand, was agoraphobic and tended towards drama. At concerts, she would have a hard time going out into the audience to watch and would sometimes stand up and almost run to get away from the crowds.

What did you think of the video?

It always amazes me that a director can keep the big picture in his mind (and stick to it) but then dissect the film and break it down to individual shots, always keeping in mind the desired end result.

I was thoroughly satisfied with the video. I was so proud to be associated with it. At the time, it was right on the money! Petty was already on a course for legendary status due to his musicianship and lack of gimmickry. I would cringe if it had been a formula type video that was typical during that time.



The video was nominated for MTV’s Best Video of the Year and was up against Peter Gabriel’s “Big Time.” [MTN: Memory is imperfect.]

In fact, I really thought everyone would lose to him. Between you and me, Jeff Stein was told that MTV “owed Don Henley a win.” Never knew what that was about, but I honestly think Gabriel blew everyone away.

What did your parents think of it?

My mother was always my biggest fan. She always supported my acting work. My father never said a whole lot to me about my work on TV or the video, but I would hear from his colleagues that he had kept them abreast of everything I was working on and when it was going to air.

What did your friends think of it?

Marc, this one is kinda complex because there was the reaction back then and my then there is my retrospection now.

On the night of the MTV World Premiere, I went to the director’s house to watch it with the crew and a few cast members. I had been looking forward to seeing it. When it came on everyone got silent and stood in front of a big television in the living room. When it was over we yelled and cheered for each other’s hard work. It was like being on a team that won a first place trophy.

My group of friends, maybe 10 or 15, got together at someone’s house and had their own screening. Cell phones at that time were very uncommon, so I had to wait to talk to them until the next day.

While at the house of the director (whom I really didn’t know except from brief interviews and the shoot), someone said I had a phone call. It was bizarre because none of my friends had Jeff’s number; in fact, I don’t even think I had his number. I [got] the phone and it was Stan Lynch (Perry’s drummer) calling from his grandmother’s house in Ohio to ask me for a date. I was so impressed with the fact that he had tracked me down that I said yes. So began our romance.

As I get older, it still comes up all the time. Usually it’s my friends who ask someone in the room “Do you know who she is?” Without fail, they say, “No.” That is quickly followed by, “Well, do you remember the Tom Petty video with Alice in Wonderland?” When they used to play MTV on TVs in bars, it inevitably came on when I was there. Especially in the first five or six years. Whoever I was with either subtly told people it was me or (depending on the alcohol level) start pointing at me and telling people really loudly, “That’s her! Right there! See, it’s her!” I never really cared either way about the notoriety then; it made me feel like people really appreciated my work.

On the other side of that, I couldn’t count how many men, of all ages, would whisper to me, “You know, I’ve always had a fantasy about Alice in Wonderland.” It was a creepy kind of flattery. I didn’t ever figure out what to say to them. None of them ever interested me enough to try that kind of acting.

Nowadays my friends and husband still tell people, “She’s the chick from the Petty video” and if [a] person is at least 35 years old, s/he immediately recognizes me. If anyone in the same room mentions Tom Petty or if the song comes on in a store, I know one of my friends is gonna say something. That’s not to say I don’t get a thrill anymore, I totally do. It never gets old to hear people say, “OMG! That was my favorite video!” Or when people ask if I did the stunt fall, what Tom was like, or “How did they do that?” Yep, still riding that wave!


Tweet about this interview to @tompetty and @benchten!

Part 2.

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42. The Girl in the Video: “Take On Me” (1985)

Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video” (including list of interviewees).

The video: “Take On Me” by a-ha.

The girl-now-woman: Bunty Bailey.






How old were you when you appeared in the “Take On Me” video?

20ish.

Where were you living at the time?

London.

What music videos, shows, or movies had you appeared in prior to that?

Before that I was a dancer in West End shows in London and in various TV shows, commercials, videos, etc.




How were you cast?

I was in a TV commercial and the costume designer said a director called Steve Barron was looking for a girl to cast in a video with a new band. [MTN: Poignantly, Steve also directed a-ha
s last video, in 2010, and it hearkens back to “Take On Me.”] She asked me if I would like to meet him. I said I would and when I met him he showed me the storyboard and asked me to act out a few things. That was it. I got the job.

Do you remember what your reaction was when you were cast?

At the time I was pleased I got the job but that was it. I had no idea it would be such a huge success or that it would still be popular all these years later.

Where was the video filmed?

In a film studio in Fulham, London.

How long was the shoot?

It was a two-day shoot. But the animation was done in America and took nine months. It was done by Mike Patterson and his wife Candice.
 

Got milk. And milky white hand.

How did you feel making the video?

I enjoyed it very much.

What was the hardest part of the shoot?

Crying at the end.

How was it to work with the band? What were they like?

The band were all extremely nice. Really lovely to work with.


What did you think of the video?

When I saw it nine months after the shoot after the animation was completed, I thought it was amazing. I thought Steve Barron had been very innovative to have thought of the idea and create such a piece of work.



What did your parents think of it?

They were very impressed and proud.

What did your friends think of it?

They thought it was very good.

Did the video ever affect your dating life in any way (i.e. when you first told boyfriends you were the woman in it)?

No, I don’t think so.

Did you receive fan mail? If so, do you still have any of it?

Yes I did. And I still have the letters in my loft. I did not reply to a lot of it at the time as I didn’t think I deserved it.




Did the video generate any controversy that you know of?

No, I don’t think so.

What were you paid?

I can’t remember.

Did you watch the MTV World Premiere of the video, and if so, where and how did that feel?

No, I don’t think so.

Were you ever recognized in public? How often and when last? Any stories about that?

I was recognized when I was out with Morten. But it was mainly girls wanting to chat to him.




Did you appear in other music videos after that?

Yes, many. Billy Idol’s “To Be a Lover”; Duran Duran’s “The Wild Boys”; [ones by] Status Quo, Cliff Richard, David Cassidy, AC/DC, to name a few.

If you ever met other women who were female leads in a mainstream ‘80s rock video, who?

No.

If you went to college, where and what did you study?

I did not go to university.

What are you doing these days?

I work for a company called Eaton Power Quality. I [am] the executive PA—organize flights, hotels, and travel arrangements for some of the managers [and] other admin duties. It’s a big worldwide company and the job is very varied so I enjoy that each day there are different tasks and the people are great fun to work with.



I read that you are currently teaching dance as well—is that so or are you no longer doing that?

I did teach children street dance for a few years but no longer do that.

Do your colleagues know of your history in music videos? If so, any fun stories about that?

Some of them do. It can be quite funny. For instance, I did an interview on a TV program called The Big Fat Quiz of the ‘80s. When I went into work the next day, they were ribbing me about it, making fun of me in a friendly way. They joke with me is that they want to get me on Celebrity Big Brother or Strictly Come Dancing.

Where do you live?

I live near a town called Windsor in England.

If you are/were married, what was your future husband’s reaction when he learned you were in this video?

I was single when I made the video and met Morton whilst shooting it. We then dated for a couple of years. I am not married and never have been. So I’m still on the market if anyone is interested. Ha ha. (smiley)

Kids?

I have two boys aged 16 and 17 years old.

What do they think of the video?

They are very impressed with it.
 

Has anyone else ever interviewed about this? If so, who, when, and for what publication?

I have been interviewed for many publications and TV shows.


What did you think when you first heard from me?

I was flattered to be asked to do another interview.


Have you appeared at any fan conventions to sign autographs? If not, would you?

No, I have not and I’m not sure if I would.

Did you stay in touch with the band after the shoot?

Yes, for quite a while.

When was the last time you were in touch with them?

A long time ago.

How do you look back on the experience?

Very fondly and I feel honored that I was part of such an amazing project.




Anything you’d like to add?

Thank you for your interest. I hope this has helped your task and that you have found this useful.

Tweet about this interview to @aha_com, @mortenharket, and @mfuruholmen!

Copy and tweet to help me find more 1980s music video girls:

Real research question: if you know the Annie Hubbard who was in 1984 Night Ranger video “Sister Christian,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Real research question: if you know the womaneven just her name—in 1986 Cinderella video “Shake Me,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Real research question: if you know woman—even just her name—in ‘87 Richard Marx video “Should’ve Known Better,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Next: Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “Don’t Come Around Here No More” (1985).

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43. The Girl in the Video: “If This Is It” (1984)

Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video” (including list of interviewees).

The video: “If This Is It” by Huey Lewis and the News.

The girls-now-women: Janet Cross, Sandra Wilder.


 
 Janet

Sandra


Nature is rife with classic battles. Fire vs. water. Lion vs. tiger. Earthquake vs. tornado.

Brunette vs. blond.

This last one plays out to comical (and, at times, convincingly heartfelt) effect in Huey Lewis and the News’s “If This Is It.” The two women playing Huey Lewis’s then-and-future girlfriends:

  • Janet Cross (brunette)
  • Sandra Wilder (blond)

Sandra may be Wilder, but in terms of the various ways I tracked down the 20+ people for this series, Janet was the wildest. The method I tried in looking for her may become a new paradigm for research.

How old were you when you appeared in the “If This Is It” video?

Janet: 25.
Sandra: Around 28.

Where were you living at the time?

Janet: Palo Alto, CA.
Sandra: San Francisco, CA—Marina District.

What music videos, shows, or movies had you appeared in prior to that?

Janet: No music videos. One [1978 TV movie called Lady of the House], about (California madam/restaurateur/mayor) Sally Stanford, starring Dyan Cannon as Ms. Stanford.
Sandra: “No One Like You” by the Scorpions and a small part at end of movie The Woman In Red (1984).

How were you cast in the video?

Janet: Through a San Francisco modeling agency.
Sandra: I believe my agent sent me to the audition, which was held in a motel in Sausalito.

Do you remember what your reaction was when you were cast?

Janet: Glad to have the part.
Sandra: Yes! You [would] go to a lot of auditions and get so few parts.

Where was the video filmed?

Sandra: Santa Cruz, CA. A beach near a boardwalk.

How long was the shoot?

Janet: One day, all day, and part of the evening.
Sandra: Two days max. I know we spent the night in a hotel in Santa Cruz.

How did you feel making the video?

Janet: Great. It was a fun shoot.
Sandra: I’m sure I was nervous and extremely excited to be a part [of it].



What was the hardest part of the shoot?

Janet: Looking angry at Huey Lewis was tough.
Sandra: That I waited for a whole day for my part and they shot it in two or three takes. The sun was going down and they wanted it at that time of day. Unfortunately, the sun was directly in my eyes and I could barely keep my eyes open. You can see it in the video. Always hated that part. 



How was it to work with the band?

Janet: Great. They were really nice guys. Very funny and sweet. They had a band camaraderie.
Sandra: They were fun-loving and professional.

Did anything go wrong on the shoot?

Janet: It was boiling hot.

Anything funny happen?

Janet: The whole filming was hilarious, one stunt after another and all the different boyfriends they gave me. When [Huey and I] were pretending to fight it was hard not to laugh.

Did any band members hit on you?

Janet: Not at all, not even one.
Sandra: No.

What did you think of the video?

Janet: I loved it.
Sandra: I loved it, but I was hoping for the bad girl role. They didn’t decide until we arrived, as I remember. Pepper [Janet
’s stage name at the time] made a great “bad girl,” though!

Janet, you went by “Pepper” at the time. Why is that?

Janet
: When my mother was pregnant with me I kicked a lot, so she nicknamed me “Pepper” [as in] “full of pep.” It was my nickname throughout childhood. I kept it until I went back to finish college. By that time I felt I had outgrown it and wanted to use my real name.




What did your parents think of the video?

Janet: My mom loved it.
Sandra: Coming from a very small town in Georgia, they were proud their girl was on TV.


Janet

What did your friends think of it?

Janet: Very positive.
Sandra: They loved it. I got calls from people I hadn’t heard from in years. And many still remember the video. 

Did the video ever affect your dating life in any way (i.e. when you first told boyfriends you were the woman in it)?

Janet: One or two were impressed and maybe a little nervous as I [had played] such a vixen.
Sandra: No, I don’t think so. I don’t think it would have been something I would have brought up.

Did you receive fan mail? If so, do you still have any of it?

Janet: Never. How would they know where to send it—there were no credits?
Sandra: No.

Did the video generate any controversy that you know of?

Janet and Sandra: No.

What were you paid?

Janet: $750 for the day, no overtime.
Sandra: I don’t remember. I’m pretty sure I didn’t get rich off of it, though.

Did you watch the MTV World Premiere of the video, and if so, where and how did that feel?

Janet: Never saw the premiere.
Sandra: No, I did not see it.

Did you have any favorite bands/songs/videos at the time? 

Sandra: I think Pablo Cruz was big at the time and my boyfriend and I were friendly with two of the band members.

Were you ever recognized in public? How often and when last? Any stories about that?

Janet: Never.
Sandra: A couple of times. I remember someone asking me for my autograph but I think it was because I was dating a tennis star at the time. I had to laugh about that.

Did you appear in other music videos after that?

Janet: One more Huey Lewis video (“The Power of Love”). My hair was short and it was not a major role.
Sandra: Maybe the Scorpions one came after filming this one.

If you ever met other women who were female leads in a mainstream ‘80s rock video, who?

Janet: A woman named Signy [Coleman who] starred in “Heart and Soul,” [also] by Huey Lewis and the News. We were friends then but we haven’t kept in touch.
Sandra: No.


Janet and Sandra in an Outdoor Life ad 
shot on Sandra’s boyfriend’s boat; courtesy of Sandra. 

If you went to college, where and what did you study?

Janet: BA Architecture, UC Berkeley 1987; MA Anthropology, Columbia University 2009.
Sandra: No. I did study acting in San Francisco.

What are you doing these days?

Janet: Architecture, exhibition design, and organic farming.
Sandra: I worked as an executive assistant and sales assistant at Goldman Sachs and a startup investment management company for many years. Retired when I married in 1999. Playing lots of golf, traveling, and enjoying life tremendously.


Janet

 
Sandra

Where do you live?

Janet: Dutchess County, NY, and Manhattan.
Sandra: California.

If you are/were married, what was your future husband’s reaction when he learned you were in this video?

Janet: He [architect Stephen Holl] was nervous but impressed.
Sandra: I was not married [when I shot the video] and did not meet my future husband until 1993; [he] was told by friends of my small parts in this and that and he just loved it. He still does. 

Kids?

Janet: None.
Sandra: None, but stepchildren in their forties.

Sandra, what do they think of the video?

Sandra: Don’t know.

Sandra, is your husband also an actor or former actor?

Sandra: No, but he did star in a commercial for General Motors that played on the Super Bowl.

What did you think when you first heard from me?

Sandra: Suspicious! “This has to be some kind of scam.” Almost hung up but kept listening because it was unique. Then I realized you were serious.

Has anyone else ever interviewed about this? If so, who, when, and for what publication?

Janet: No other interviews.
Sandra: No.

Have you appeared at any fan conventions to sign autographs?

Janet and Sandra: No.

Would you?

Janet: Maybe.
Sandra: Probably not.

Did you stay in touch with the band after the shoot?

Janet: I had one other shoot [with the band]; after that, no contact. I moved to Los Angeles [from the San Francisco area] when I was 27.
Sandra: No, but that wasn’t my choice!

How do you look back on the experience?

Janet: It was a lot of fun. I enjoyed working with the Director Edd Griles and with the band. Huey was especially down to earth.
Sandra: Super fun and a great memory of a great time in my life.



meeting Janet in New York 5/15/13
 
Anything you’d like to add?

Janet: It was a long time ago but a good memory and I am happy that YouTube makes it so easy to find vintage videos.
Sandra: No. But thanks for keeping the memories alive. Nothing like the ‘80s!

Tweet about this interview to @Huey_Lewis_News!

Copy and tweet to help me find more 1980s music video girls:

Real research question: if you know the Annie Hubbard who was in 1984 Night Ranger video “Sister Christian,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Real research question: if you know the womaneven just her name—in 1986 Cinderella video “Shake Me,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Real research question: if you know woman—even just her name—in ‘87 Richard Marx video “Should’ve Known Better,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

Next: a-ha, “Take On Me” (1985).

0 Comments on The Girl in the Video: “If This Is It” (1984) as of 7/18/2013 7:32:00 AM
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44. The Girl in the Video: original interviews with icons of 1980s MTV

I can’t sing (well).

I can’t play an instrument. 


And though I can write, I have never written about music.

However, I love music. Especially ‘80s music.


How much?

This much:

1988. Black jean jacket and high school gym shorts. I am sorry.

So I am following up the oral history of superhero entertainment of my formative years with an oral history of music videos of my formative years…which happens to overlap with the formative years of music videos themselves.

born 1981

In other words, “Where Are They Now?: 1980s Video Vixens Edition.”

This blog shares stories behind the stories I write; with this series, it’s more broadly about stories behind stories that have inspired me to write stories. I can’t write with music on, but music injects me with a certain passion—a rhythm, even—I call upon, in silence, when writing. 


(And running. I am still bummed that Nike does not still run its Run Hit Wonder race, which I did in New York in 2004. A Flock of Seagullss “I Ran [So Far Away]” was a highlight...naturally.)


But no one-hit wonders here.

These are the videos, by year, whose famous faces/crushes for countless teens I interviewed (links/posts will become active one per day starting tomorrow):

1983


1984


1985


1986


1987


1988


1989


Most of these former starlets were pretty tough to find and have never been interviewed about their videos. (The VH1 series Where Are They Now? featured two episodes on this subject. None in this feature appeared on “Video Vixens 1” [season 2, episode 8, 7/28/00], and only two here, Signy Coleman and Bunty Bailey, appeared on “Video Vixens II” [season 2, episode 24, 11/28/00]. I made those exceptions because their videos are two personal favorites.)

Similarly, I did not include video stars who are now household names (Courtney Cox, Christie Brinkley, Tawny Kitaen, Helena Christensen) or who have been well-covered elsewhere (Ola Ray,
Jeana Ellen Keough [Jeana Tomasino], Lillian Muller, Betsy Lynn George).

Some of the thirteen videos profiled here were regulars on big-brand “best music videos” lists, back when they used to make “best music videos” lists:

“Take On Me” (almost always in the top 50)

  • #8 VH1 Top 100 Music Videos of All Time (2001)
  • #9 Rolling Stone Top 100 Music Videos (1993)
  • #14 MTV 100 Greatest Music Videos of All Time (1999)
  • #35 MTV 500 Greatest Videos of All Time (1997)
  • All-TIME Best Music Videos (2011; 10 per decade, unranked within each decade)

“Addicted to Love” (almost always in the top 50)

  • #8 MTV (1999)
  • #30 VH1
  • #43 MTV (1997)

“Don’t Come Around Here No More” (sometimes in the top 50)

  • #14 Rolling Stone
  • #43 VH1
  • #79 MTV (1997)
  • #85 MTV (1999)
  • TIME

“The Boys of Summer”

  • #23 Rolling Stone
  • #53 VH1
  • #67 MTV (1999)
  • #94 MTV (1997)

“Legs”

  • #22 MTV (1997)
  • #96 VH1

“Free Fallin’”

  • #56 MTV (1997)

“Summer of ‘69”

  • #161 MTV (1997)

“I Want a New Drug”

  • #166 MTV (1997)

Conversely, “Separate Ways (Worlds Apart)” has been called (unfairly, I say) one of the worst videos ever made.

Curiously, Patty Elias’s ex-husband wrote the MTV theme, which makes them an MTV power (ex-)couple like no other:



Warning as you proceed into the series (and therefore the ‘80s): more mustaches than you remember.

Three of the most pressing questions of the ‘80s music landscape will be answered in this series:


Three of my (many) favorite comments (to find out who said them, stay tuned):

  • “I got rock-star-by-proxy status.”
  • “We were dangerous ornaments.”
  • “Me in a music video in a negligee was not a topic of conversation at the dinner table.”

Three fun facts you get right now:

  • Two “Huey girls” (Janet Cross and Signy Coleman) dated Don Henley.
  • Signy knew both Janet and JoAnn Willette.
  • Janet is the great-great granddaughter and Margaret Olmsted Menendez’s father said she is the great-great niece of Central Park designer Frederick Law Olmsted. What are the chances that FLO would be related to not one but two video vixens?

Bonus fact:

  • The video for “Jessie’s Girl” by Rick Springfield does not have a girl in it.

Three I found who responded to my interview request although they normally don’t:

  • Patty Elias
  • Traci Lind
  • the first person on the next list…

Three I found who chose not to participate:

  • Steve Perry, “Oh Sherrie” (1984) – Sherrie Swafford (she respectfully declined a full interview but did give me permission to share a brief update)
  • The Cars, “You Might Think” (1984) – Susan Gallagher
  • The Moody Blues, “Your Wildest Dreams” (1986) – Janet Spencer-Turner
 
    Sherrie Swafford; “Oh Sherrie”

    Susan Gallagher; “You Might Think”

    Janet Spencer-Turner; “Your Wildest Dreams”

    Three I wanted to find but haven’t…yet:
    • Night Ranger, “Sister Christian” (1984) – Annie Hubbard
    • Cinderella, “Shake Me” (1986) – name unknown
    • Richard Marx, “Should’ve Known Better” (1987) – name unknown
     
       Annie Hubbard; “Sister Christian” 

       name unknown (but not Amanda Peet!); “Shake Me” 

      name unknown; “Should’ve Known Better”

      To quote the Moody Blues, “I know youre out there somewhere.”

      Three matters of housekeeping:
      • I conducted the interviews between January and July 2013.
      • Stills from videos are copyright their respective labels. I got permission to post all previously unpublished images; if you want to repost, please do the same by asking me first. You know the music business does not tolerate piracy.
      • I am crowdsourcing to add to this series. See next...

      THREE REQUESTS (and please lend a hand no matter when you’re reading this):


      • TWEET to help me find the three I didn’t; this can work!; simply copy and paste any or all of these pleas (character count is Twitter-ready, but once pasted, you may need to delete extra spaces):
      Real research question: if you know the Annie Hubbard who was in 1984 Night Ranger video “Sister Christian,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

      Real research question: if you know the woman
      even just her name—in 1986 Cinderella video “Shake Me,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

      Real research question: if you know woman—even just her name—in ‘87 Richard Marx video “Should’ve Known Better,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

      • SHOW LOVE: if you want Susan and/or Janet to reconsider, say so in comments below; perhaps an outpouring of interest will persuade them

      • VOTE: tell me in comments below who you would like me to next find and interview?

      First up: Huey Lewis and the News, “Heart and Soul” (1983) and “I Want a New Drug” (1984).

      32 Comments on The Girl in the Video: original interviews with icons of 1980s MTV, last added: 8/10/2013
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      45. The Girl in the Video: “Heart and Soul” (1983) and “I Want a New Drug” (1984)

      Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video.”

      The videos: “Heart and Soul” and “I Want a New Drug” by Huey Lewis and the News.

      The girl-now-woman: Signy Coleman.


      “Heart and Soul”
       
      “I Want a New Drug”




      How I found Signy:
      • I sent her a message on Facebook.
      • Weeks past and she had still not seen it, so I called SAG for her agent.
      • The one listed is not her agent anymore but gave me the name of Signy’s former manager, who kindly said she’d try to find her.
      • I also reached out to the director of a music video Signy recently shot for a new artist Kattail (who thanks Huey Lewis and the News on her site). 
      • The next day, I heard from Signy, and also from the director.

      How old were you when you appeared in the “Heart and Soul” and “I Want a New Drug” videos?

      22.

      Where were you living at the time?

      I was living in San Francisco, right above Ghirardelli Square. Beautiful apartment—I wish I still had. Big bay windows overlooking the bay.

      Did you know Huey Lewis before the video?

      I didn’t know him on a friendship level. I knew him on more of a “Hi, how are you?” level. Huey used to play with [his former band] Clover in Bolinas, CA, where I grew up—an hour and 20 minutes north of San Francisco. I’d go to dances on Saturday nights and Huey was playing. He did a wicked version of “Johnny B.  Goode.” My older brother and sister Jeffrey and Tiffany knew him better because they were the same age group. They traveled in same circles.

      What music videos, shows, or movies had you appeared in prior to that?

      At that point, none. I was already modeling, spending six months of the year in Paris, six in San Francisco. At that point you couldn’t open up a local paper without seeing me in it. I was really working as a model so consistently that acting hadn’t become a part of my life yet. After “Heart and Soul” in particular started airing, music videos exploded and my agent started getting calls from casting directors in Los Angeles. After getting a guest star part on Mickey Spillane’s Mike Hammer, [lead actor] Stacy Keach said “You have natural talent and you have to move to Los Angeles or New York.”

      How were you cast?

      It was very funny. My agent said, “They’re looking for punk rockers so I want you to put some of that spray stuff in your hair and put on torn fishnet stockings.” I said, “Lynn, I’m not doing that. I don’t look anything like a punk rocker.” I said I’ll put on high heels but that’s about the extent of it. I went to the audition and there were 50 of the most hardcore punk rockers I’ve ever seen. I turned around to leave and the director popped his head out of the room they were casting in and said, “Hey, miniskirt, where are you going?” He pulled me in and said they were also looking for a girl who’s the opposite and stands out in the crowd of these unusual characters. I was asked to pretend to flirt with guy across the room, which I like to believe I had a little experience with at that point. 


      They put on “Heart and Soul” (first time I heard it) and said “Dance to it.” I had been a dancer for many years, starting ballet at seven. At 13 I was on full scholarship for the San Francisco School of Ballet, but quit at 16 because I saw a destructive lifestyle—diet pills, cigarettes. I mean no disrespect to anyone doing it, but the world of dance can be cutthroat. But the discipline I learned in dancing has carried through the rest of my life. By the time I’d gotten home from the “Heart and Soul” audition, I’d already gotten the call that I got the video. No one knew at the time how MTV was going to change the fabric of the music industry.

      Had you even heard of music videos at that point?

      Maybe…such a long time ago! I was a huge Aerosmith, AC/DC, Beatles fan.

      Do you remember what your reaction was when you were cast for the first video (“Heart and Soul”)?

      I was thrilled. They said we’d shoot on location in San Francisco, my home town (with Bolinas).

      Did you have to audition for the second video (“I Want a New Drug”), or were you asked to be in it because of the first video?

      I was just asked. They were filmed about a year apart.

      That one was more difficult. They had me on a boat in the bay when it was cold.



      The concert footage in it was real concert footage. Girls who are Huey fans are hardcore Huey fans. Right before they were about to start they walked me across the stage and put me dead center and there were girls in the front row of the audience who had all kinds of unladylike things to say to me. I won’t repeat them! The crew had to handpick a group of people to surround me so I didn’t get my hair ripped out, particularly when Huey leaned in to kiss me.


      How long were the shoots?

      “Heart and Soul” was about three days. “I Want a New Drug” was probably a little longer because it had different locations. Maybe five days to a week.

      How did you feel making the videos?

      I loved it. “Heart and Soul”—to be in that loft in San Francisco with all of these wonderful, creative people. Huey was incredibly intelligent, a very educated man, a huge Cole Porter fan—he’ll just break out in a Porter song. He knows the history of Porter’s life. He’s a very lighthearted, lovely human being. Funny as hell. The band is the nicest, down-to-earth group of people. Bill Gibson is like the father figure—always calm, grounded, rational. These guys are like family to each other. Huey treats everyone equally.

      What was the hardest part of the shoots?

      The first shoot didn’t wrap till I think 3 or 4 in the morning. But I walked out of there glowing.

      How was it to work with the band? What were they like? Did they hit on you?

      None of the band did. They were incredibly professional. Everyone had a crush on Huey. He was gorgeous. The background people were hitting on me right and left. I was dating a guy at the time. I was always professional. I was very focused on work. A great time to be alive. I didn’t get caught up in the partying scene though.


      “Heart and Soul”

      “I Want a New Drug”

      What did you think of the videos? Do you like one more than the other?

      Both are near and dear to my heart. I can’t say which I like better. Both incredible in the way they were done visually. In “I Want a New Drug,” I love that you see so much of San Francisco in it. The videos launched my career, got my foot in the door in Hollywood. Allowed me to segue from modeling into acting.

      What did your parents think of the videos?

      They were always incredibly proud of my accomplishments. Huey’s mother Magda is a very good friend of my mother’s! Magda and my mom would see each other in town and say about Huey and me, “Wow, those two are really going to go far!” They would giggle about it. Of course with platinum albums, Huey went farther. (laughs)

      What did your friends think of the videos?

      My friends thought I was the coolest thing since sliced bread. My boyfriend was skiing in Tahoe and the video came on and he told the guys in the bar that I was his girlfriend and they didn’t believe him. But when he showed them a photo from his wallet, they started buying him drinks.

      Did the videos ever affect your dating life in any way (i.e. when you first told boyfriends you were the woman in them)?

      I’m very loyal in my relationships. There were guys that came out of the woodwork and said “You’re the Huey Lewis and the News girl.” I would laugh and say, “I am but I have a boyfriend.”

      Did you receive fan mail? If so, do you still have any of it?

      It came to my modeling agency.

      How did people know how to reach you? Your name wasn’t in the video and Google wasn’t around yet.

      My agency Top Models did a lot of advertising in a local newspaper called Pacific Sun. I was on the cover a lot.

      Did the videos generate any controversy that you know of?

      Not that I remember.

      What were you paid each time?

      I imagine it was not much or else it would have been memorable. (laughs)

      Did you watch the MTV World Premiere of the videos, and if so, where and how did that feel?

      Yes. It was phenomenal! I had a national toothpaste commercial running at the time. But other than that and a Macy’s ad, I had never seen myself on the screen bigger than life like that.

      Were you ever recognized in public? How often and when last? Any stories about that?

      Constantly. I still have people comment! I had more of a baby face then but I haven’t changed that much.

      Did you appear in other music videos after that?

      Not in that era. The only other I’ve done is the recent one for Kattail. I think she’s going to do well.



      If you ever met other women who were female leads in a mainstream ‘80s rock video, who?

      I was supposed to do “If This Is It” but I was in Paris and the booking crossed over by one day; they wouldn’t release me from the shoot. I was heartbroken. But my girlfriend Pepper (Janet Cross) did the video and I was happy about that. She and I used to model all the time together—Macy’s.

      If you went to college, where and what did you study?

      I was accepted to UC Berkeley and was going to major in business but before that I had been picked up off the street by a modeling agency in San Francisco and they signed me. Two months later an agency in Paris also signed me. So school was put on hold. I have to say I regret not having the college experience but I was traveling all over Europe, getting more of a life education. I DID graduate from high school, so stay in school, kids! (laughs)

      What are you doing these days?

      In the ‘80s, I was studying at the Loft Studio, an acting studio like the Actors Studio in New York. Peggy Feury, a prominent acting coach, was there. Sean and Chris Penn and Meg Ryan were there, too. We lived at the studio. I supported myself modeling until I got my first contract role on a show called Santa Barbara. I did Human Target with Rick Springfield, X-Files, Charles in Charge. Some feature films thrown in there as well. Most recently I was involved in a web series called River Ridge on SFN Entertainment Network. I was hired as an actress and then asked to be a producer. I took time to think about it because it was a huge commitment and a steep learning curve. I just booked a film called Tempest but can’t say anything more about it yet. I have a busy voiceover career—commercials, some animation.
       


      Where do you live?

      New Jersey.

      If you are/were married, what was your future husband’s reaction when he learned you were in this video?

      I married Vincent Irizarry, a fellow actor from Santa Barbara. I’m not married now.

      Kids?

      Oldest is Siena Sophia, and she’s gearing up to start culinary school in New York. Amazingly talented. Isabella Grace is twelve. When the River Ridge director/writer Tyler Ford met her, he liked her so much that they created a character for her. She played the daughter of a junkie. She’s always been involved with drama at school. It’s like watching myself as a child. Very vivacious. Siena had no interest in acting. She went on one audition for Oreos in Los Angeles when she was eight and never wanted to do it again. She’s a deep, old soul, a prolific writer. Her poetry and short stories have been published since a young age.

      What do your kids think of your Huey videos?

      (Signy asked Isabella directly, right then) “It was cool. My mom was famous. Pretty rocking awesome.”

      Isabella loves Huey’s music. The first concert I took her to was Huey in New York and he gave us backstage passes. It was so sweet. Siena thought it was amazing but as a child, she was often on the set with me. She grew up shuffling back and forth to shoots, so for her it was par for the course.

      What did you think when you first heard from me?

      I thought it was a wonderful idea. I said, “I wish I thought of that!” I am a contributing editor to Commerce, a local magazine. My sister Bethany Atherton and I have written a book, a food memoir with recipes called Love Dish. We’re in talks with a couple of publishers and are deciding if we want to self-publish.

      Has anyone else ever interviewed about the Huey Lewis videos? If so, who, when, and for what publication?

      I think back in the ‘80s, yes. I know Pacific Sun and maybe the Independent Journal did. But not as large scale as what you’re doing.

      Have you appeared at any fan conventions to sign autographs? If not, would you?

      No. But soap opera junkets, yes.

      Did you stay in touch with the band after the shoot?

      Yes. There were gaps but I see them whenever possible.

      On a granular level, how did that work? Did you just exchange phone numbers with Huey and the band after the first video?

      Huey was a married man—you don’t really exchange phone numbers. Our moms were friends so we’d bump into each other that way. And also through Huey’s manager, Bob Brown.

      When was the last time you were in touch with them?

      I contacted him the other day. I was doing an interview for SFN radio so I texted him and asked him the name of the director of our videos. We were also in touch when the 49ers were in the playoffs.



      How do you look back on the experience?

      It was an amazing experience. I have fond memories of the entire experience and am forever grateful because it launched my acting career.

      Anything you’d like to add?

      To this day, the band’s music lives on. It’s timeless.

      Tweet about this interview to @Huey_Lewis_News and @signycoleman!

      Copy and tweet to help me find more 1980s music video girls:

      Real research question: if you know the Annie Hubbard who was in 1984 Night Ranger video “Sister Christian,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

      Real research question: if you know the womaneven just her name—in 1986 Cinderella video “Shake Me,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman


      Real research question: if you know woman—even just her name—in ‘87 Richard Marx video “Should’ve Known Better,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

      Next: Journey, “Separate Ways (Worlds Apart)” (1983) and “Oh Sherrie” (1984).

      4 Comments on The Girl in the Video: “Heart and Soul” (1983) and “I Want a New Drug” (1984), last added: 7/20/2013
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      46. The Girl in the Video: “Separate Ways (Worlds Apart)” (1983) and “Oh Sherrie” (1984)

      Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video.”

      The videos: “Separate Ways (Worlds Apart)” by Journey; “Oh Sherrie” by Steve Perry.

      The girls-now-women: Margaret Oldsted Menendez (“Separate Ways”); Sherrie Swafford (“Oh Sherrie.”).


      “Separate Ways (Worlds Apart)”


      Of the people interviewed for (phase one of) this series, Margaret was the last person I contacted. Her video was not as front-of-mind the others I am including, possibly because it predates when my family got cable. But in any case, I’m so glad I thought to look for her. She reported back: “My children said ‘You have to do this, mom!’”

      And luckily, she took their advice.

      How were you cast in the video for “Separate Ways (Worlds Apart)”?

      I am from New Orleans where music and hospitality is part of our culture. The music scene was new wave and some punk rockers. During my high school and college days, I dated a cute musician, Chuck Menendez. It was his sister, who was in an infamous ‘80s New Orleans band called The Cold, who ultimately led me to the audition for the Journey video.

      She was friends with the makeup artist in the production company. I got a call from Chuck because they hadn’t found anyone to cast for the girl part, and they wanted “his girlfriend” to come and audition. I must have been clueless; had I thought it through I probably wouldn’t have even shown up to the audition. I am relatively shy and quiet.



      I was a college student at Tulane University in uptown New Orleans. I double majored in biology and environmental studies. I was working and paying my way through college so the [notion] of making money for shooting a video was a godsend. It paid $250 a day and I was paid for three days of work. That was a lot of money at the time for a student like me. So I was now the girl in the Journey video, still clueless.


      What was it like making the video?

      The first day on the wharf of the Mississippi River by the French Quarter was freezing. There were two Winnebagos, one for the band and another for production. Lots of people were hanging in the production RV. Everyone was friendly, saying Beverly Hillbillies lines—”Y’all come back nah, ya hear?” But in New Orleans, we have southern—not exactly hillbilly—charm. Still, it was laid back and entertaining.

      The director called for the musicians. Suddenly the RV was empty. The nice, relaxed gentlemen who were so entertaining [turned out to be] the band, Journey. Immediately I was nervous and also thankful for living a life of bliss—it can save a shy person. Oh, one band member, Steve Perry, pretty much stayed to himself in his (the band’s) RV. The rest of the band continued to use our RV. I have pictures from that day and an autographed album and Steve Smith’s drumsticks, which were given to Chuck.



      The second day of the shoot was perfect New Orleans weather. A touch of spring for the Mardi Gras season. I remember the band appearing later than was expected and seemingly confused. They [had gone] out the night before. What they couldn’t understand was why no one ever said “Last call!” Being a New Orleans girl, I couldn’t understand what a last call even was. They explained they were out all night because normal cities close bars and let everyone know that they are closing. But this was New Orleans, and Mardi Gras.


      I couldn’t even imagine wearing my hair that way—the video was the first and last time I did. Makeup artists are just that, artists. I really appreciated her talents to enhance not just my looks but also that great time period, the ‘80s! She picked out the outfit in a local store in the French Quarter.


      My boyfriend (unlike me, not clueless) bought their new album and brought it to the shoot. His brother-in-law (also not clueless) brought a camera, too [which is where these set photos come from].

      How was it to work with Journey?

      Everyone in the band was professional and did a great shoot that day. Steve was still reserved and quiet. I didn’t think anything of it; in fact, I thought I was the same way, so it seemed normal. It wasn’t until many years later that I learned of his girlfriend being upset that a girl was in a Journey video.



      The rest of the band gladly offered their personal stories, shared photos, and enjoyed being in New Orleans. I rarely spoke, but I did talk to Jonathan Cain. Once again, I was oblivious—didn’t realize he was in one of my all-time favorite bands, The Babys, or I might have never gone near him. (I still listen to their music!)

      Were you already familiar with Journey’s music?

      I knew the Journey hits and loved their music. However, videos were new novelties so I didn’t know band members like we do now from videos.

      Any funny anecdotes from the shoot?

      When the shoot went a little longer than expected, I was running late to meet my boyfriend at his sister’s apartment, so I jumped in my car with full makeup and large ‘80s hair. It was important not to be late or I wouldn’t have parking for Endymion, one of the largest parades of the season. Luckily we had ladders set up behind the crowd to be able to see the parade. We had perfect viewing. Then the riders on each float started pointing at us, throwing beads as far as they could, bombing us as each float came by. My hair and makeup were the perfect bead magnets. It was one of the funniest times in my life and one of my best memories.



      What did your parents think of the video?

      My parents, God bless them, were older when the video was made. They weren’t up to date on pop culture—like knowing what MTV was or what music videos were. They didn’t seem surprised that I would be in a music video mainly for that fact. Funny, but my own children are likely to say the same about me.

      What did you friends think of it?

      My friends and family were supportive and, of course, happy to say they knew the “girl in the Journey video.”

      Did the video generate any controversy that you know of?

      If there was any controversy, the band made sure I was not a part.

      Did you watch the MTV World Premiere of the video, and if so, how did that feel?

      I did watch [it]. I was with friends who were in Chuck’s band at the time. We were so excited we even taped it on the Betamax!



      I also watched Marilyn McCoo introduce it on Solid Gold. I have tried and tried to get the tape of when it was on Beavis & Butthead. I think that episode made me really think this video surpasses all others and is a true icon. That was the defining moment.

      Were you ever recognized in public? How often and when last? Any stories about that?

      I haven’t been recognized in public outright. To illustrate, about a year ago, our oldest daughter was presented as a Maid in the court of Neptune. An ‘80s cover band, equipped with videos, played “Separate Ways” at the ball. My daughter and I had the best time dancing and walking and laughing and being in the spotlight during that song! My husband thought the band should know that I was the girl in the video they just played and brought me backstage. For whatever reason, the band lacked enthusiasm. They were, however, polite enough to say that I did look like the girl in the video, especially around the eyes.

      What are you doing these days?

      I’m very proud and happy that Chuck and I married at the ripe age of 21 (about a year after the video was made). I am super thankful to say I am married to my best friend and sweetheart. We met when we were thirteen, then dated through high school and college. When Chuck got down on his knee to propose, he made sure a Journey song was playing.




      I am the proud mother of our four beautiful children. They are Chase (25), who is attending MSU and completing [a degree in] broadcast meteorology; Madeline (21), who is attending Belmont University and studying music business/math while songwriting and recording music; Laina (14), who is entering 9th grade at St. Patrick Catholic High School; and Briggs (9), who is entering 4th grade at St. James Elementary School. I am blessed to be able to be at home raising them and enjoying every moment! I enjoy, and have to laugh, when I’ve been running around all day in sweats and a T-shirt, then I bring Briggs to his guitar lesson and the guy in the music store wants to know “What was it like to meet Journey?”

      What do your kids think of the video?

      I guess this video stands the test of time. My children are not embarrassed. In fact, they and their friends are impressed. [By] text I get pictures and videos from their friends singing “Separate Ways” to the video while they are out, and at any time of day or night. I love that! Their happiness is priceless.



      Where do you live?

      We live on the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Yes, we met Katrina up [close] and personally; she destroyed our home on the beach.

      There were many miracles during that time. One, I guess you can say, is that one wall of our home survived the storm’s surge. We returned to survey the damages, and still hanging [on] this wall was the framed, autographed Journey album. It still has the remnants of the marsh and is proudly displayed in my husband’s office. The drumsticks, sadly, are now a part of Katrina’s collection. Luckily, I placed most of our photos upstairs in a container, and I also have pictures taken during the video. Journey came to Biloxi, MS not long after the storm. After the performance, I gave a roadie a picture taken during the [video] shoot. I asked him if he could get the band to sign it. He brought it back to me with thoughtful comments and autographs! That is all the contact I have ever had with Journey since the video.

      What did you think when you first heard from me?

      Lately the attention I receive from the video has grown. I get random questions about it, stories from friends when they tell other people they know me, and a lot of attention from my children’s friends. I mostly hear “How cool!” Still, even with this attention, I was so shocked to get your request to answer some questions!

      Has anyone else ever interviewed about this? Have you appeared at any fan conventions to sign autographs? If not, would you?

      I haven’t been interviewed, other than curious friends asking what it was like to be a part of it. I haven’t been to any conventions, either.

      How do you look back on the experience?

      I most appreciate the fact that while making the video, the band was especially nice to me. They were all easygoing. I think they truly respected each other. I guess they are genuine, thoughtful people who also have talent beyond belief. Steve Smith seemed to like having a fan who was also a drummer (Chuck) on the set.



      Janet Cross (who appeared in Huey Lewis and the News’s “If This Is It” video) is related to Frederick Law Olmsted (designer of Central Park). Are you?

      I no longer have my father’s research (Katrina) but he claimed Frederick Law Olmsted was my great-great uncle (?). The Olmsted family tree is gigantic so it’s possible [Janet Cross, AKA Janet Olmsted Cross] and I are distantly related, but it would take some effort to know for sure. Small world! I probably get asked about my famous relative and my connection to him more than I get asked about the Journey video though.

      Anything you’d like to add?

      Another recent story about this band’s heart and soul is that Neal Schon gave his guitar to a boy in the front row of a Journey concert in New Orleans. This boy loves guitar and was playing air guitar along with Neal during the concert. The cool thing is, that boy not only loves Journey…but his cousin is married to the girl in the video. I would just love for Neal Schon to know this story and how happy he made our little cousin!

      Thanks for your interest. I can’t help but smile while thinking someone is actually curious about little ol’ me! I am glad to help you, and as a dear family friend and second mother to me says, “We help each other.”

      BONUS: What happened to Sherrie Swafford? 





      Sherrie was the girlfriend of Steve Perry, classic lead singer of Journey, and the inspiration for the 1984 hit “Oh Sherrie.” She also appeared in the video and, if you ask me, she emanates sincerity.


      To my great thrill, I found Sherrie. To my great disappointment (but complete understanding), she was not comfortable participating. But to my great honor, she wrote this brief update and said I could share it:
      You are the only person [who] has ever received a response! MTV, VH1 [contacted me and] I did nothing and hoped they thought it was the wrong number! I am an esthetician, teach yoga, never married, no children. Love my animals, planting flowers, and life. Cherish my friends (including Steve) and my privacy. It was so different for us! It was just Love, nothing else!

      I can see why she and Steve were drawn to each other; they both seem like unwavering class acts. Is it any wonder “Oh Sherrie” is such a beautiful song?

      Tweet about this interview to @JourneyOfficial, @TheJonathanCain, @NealSchonMusic, and @FrontiersRec!

      Copy and tweet to help me find more 1980s music video girls:

      Real research question: if you know the Annie Hubbard who was in 1984 Night Ranger video “Sister Christian,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

      Real research question: if you know the womaneven just her name—in 1986 Cinderella video “Shake Me,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman


      Real research question: if you know woman—even just her name—in ‘87 Richard Marx video “Should’ve Known Better,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

      Next: ZZ Top, “Legs” (1984).

      10 Comments on The Girl in the Video: “Separate Ways (Worlds Apart)” (1983) and “Oh Sherrie” (1984), last added: 7/21/2013
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      47. The Girl in the Video: “Legs” (1984), part 1 of 3

      Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video.”

      The video: “Legs” by ZZ Top.

      The girl-now-woman: Wendy Frazier. [MTN: Kymberly Herrin and
      Danièle Arnaud are in  separate posts.]





      How I found Wendy:
      • “richlunt” posted she’s from Marlborough, CT.
      • The high school for Marlborough, RHAM, confirmed she was class of ‘81 but would not say (or knew) nothing more.
      • On the chance that “richlunt” was a man named Rich(ard) Lunt, I searched “Lunt” in CT phone directory.
      • Luckily, one was listed in Hebron, a town next to Marlborough and one of the towns that feeds into RHAM.
      • The person at that number is related to Richard and gave me his number. (That number matched a Richard Lunt on Zabasearch.)
      • I called and Richard’s wife gave me his e-mail.
      • I did not hear back so I checked with a town librarian; she came up empty but suggested I call the town tax collector, who gave me three names, but two actually did not know the Fraziers and one said she’d pass word to her daughters. I did not hear back.
      • I searched the web for “RHAM class of ‘81” and searched some of those names on Facebook. One ‘81 led me to others via her friends list (there’s an option to view friends by high school). I contacted several and then randomly chose one and searched “Frazier” on that person’s high school list. No luck, but when I searched it on her whole friends list, Wendy Frazier came up.

      [I recount this only to give insight into my research process and to show that dead ends should not be deterrents; I cite details that are already public but out of respect for Wendy, I am, of course, vague with private details. I probably do not need to state this, but please do not try to contact her, or anyone else profiled in this series. If you disregard this courtesy, both the Eliminator girls and a biker gang will show up and make you regret it.]

      Like Margaret Olmsted Menendez, Wendy unshackled herself from my Q&A format and answered in a (lovely) free-form essay.
      Once I started to think about it I was surprised how many memories came back to me.

      When I was a young girl, I always dreamed of being Miss America. The excitement I felt each year when it was televised was more than picking the winners but also slipping into their crowns and being carried away, away from my simple and at times abusive childhood.

      [Just after] I just turned 18, I moved to Los Angeles with a girlfriend. I can’t say my initial intention was the silver screen; [it was] more of an escape from the small town I grew up in. My father always told me when I was a little girl to get out of Marlborough, CT as soon as I could and see the world. I remember[ed that] he once lived in California so my tongue always tasted its sweetness.

      My girlfriend and I took off from the east coast on a drive across country in her Porsche convertible, chiffon dresses peeking thru the small trunk and blowing in the wind. I was young and naïve, she was older and experienced, so I followed her with the intent of growing up and exploring the life I felt destined for. 

      Not long after I arrived I met two girls, a crazy beautiful party girl named Nina and a stunning model named Julie Anne. I will get to Julie Anne later…

      I loved Nina. Not only was she fun but also a great singer, always focused on making her first album—a common dream in this town, but I believed in her. We became fast buddies. Nina had her hand in many pots and was well connected, so hanging out with her was a bevy of wild new experiences, not always good…

      [I asked her to elaborate]

      Anything said about Nina was “light-hearted.” I have learned, although sadly it took a while, that there are no bad experiences with friends, loved ones, etc., just circumstance to teach you more about yourself. All of the pains and joys I’ve experienced or mistakes/hurts made by myself or others were fundamental in becoming who I am today. Rehashing negativity [is] pointless. I prefer to move forward in my life positively.

      While driving down Sunset Boulevard one afternoon, I ran into her at a stoplight. She told me that she was on her way to audition for a rock video and [asked me] to join her. I’d never done anything like this and the butterflies started flying but I followed her. The band was called Baxter Robinson or Robertson [MTN: Robertson] and the song was called “Silver Strand.” I got the part!
      I was shocked, nervous, and beyond excited. I don’t believe MTV had launched yet but would in the very near future [MTN: this video was in 1983 and MTV had debuted two years earlier]. The director was Tim Newman, [who also directed] most or maybe all of the innovative storytelling ZZ Top videos.

      Nina later starred in Billy Idol’s “Eyes Without a Face.”

      My first experience in front of the camera, although terrifying, was a dream. All of the attention I received having my hair and makeup done, a stylist dressing me, even a choreographer—I was constantly pinching myself. The video premiered the same day of MTV’s launch [MTN: as noted above, MTV launched in 1981 and this video came out in 1983]. I waited at the foot of my bed watching every video until 4 a.m. when it finally [aired]. I never heard of the band after that but for me it was unforgettable and almost as exciting as “Legs.”

      I’m not sure how much time had passed [when] I received a call from either the casting director or Tim Newman’s office and was asked to come down and audition for “Legs.” When I walked into Tim’s office, he was on the telephone; I remember him saying something to the tune of “I think ‘Legs’ just walked in.” My heart skipped a beat.

      From what I remember I was brought into the final audition [during which] only a few girls were being considered. I got the part. As excited as I was, I felt I would never be able to compete with the sexy ZZ Top girls, gorgeous playmates who “knew how to use it.” I say that playfully—I was in awe of them.

      I had my 21st birthday on the set. I believe the band gave me a signed teddy bear. The video was filmed in the Valley in the middle of nowhere, a two- or three-day shoot. Things went fairly smoothly—a few “girl” dramas but I don’t remember who or why.
      One particular scene I remember: after I had been given the ZZ Top keychain and transformed into a long-legged Tinker Bell of sorts, I entered the store and confronted my “bullies”; [when] snapping the nose of Eddie (who was actually the choreographer…and my manicurist [in the video] was Deborah Kurtz, the casting director), [I] really hurt him. My acting skills—not great, so when I did it, I had to mean it < smirk >.
      I think the most memorable scene (although some would disagree, preferring the lingerie shot) was being placed by the biker up on the counter and spinning to kick off my boyfriend’s boss. In the process, by accident, just a peek of the crotch of my underwear showed. I was ahead of Sharon Stone. A true slip and never brought to my attention.

      The only thing I was aware of at the time was the pain and the horrible bruises on my thighs from the counter. When we returned to the hotel that night, well after 4 a.m., I sunk into a hot bath. I don’t think I ever felt so exhausted.

      We had to reshoot part of the video. Something happened that slips my mind. One of the actors had to be replaced, but Alison Reynolds, the makeup artist, made it undetectable. I still see Alison’s beautiful face from time to time.
       
      I don’t think I saw the band again after the shoot—maybe once.

      I’m not sure if it was his real name or not, but I think we called my boyfriend in the video “Billy.” I never spoke more than a few words to him.

      As far as the Eliminator girls [the three ZZ Top bombshells-in-residence], it was the same. Jeana [Ellen Keough, then Tomasino] was the only one who took an interest in helping me, and basically that was limited to “Wendy, no need to keep acting once the director calls cut.”

      I never saw or heard from any of them again except to be pleasantly surprised to see Jeana, looking gorgeous, on Housewives of Orange County. Oh…and even more surprising was when my girlfriend Laura Morton, a best-selling author, texted me a couple of years ago to say she was having lunch with Jeana. I think they might have been working on a project but Laura is always cloak and dagger about her work and I know not to ask and never heard mention of her again.
      Julie Anne…
      I don’t remember how we met but I’m guessing it was a party Nina invited me to. [Julie Anne] was a tall, dark beauty who seemed to know everyone. We became fast friends and I was always her plus one.

      Julie Anne invited me to a party aboard a boat to launch an album by an up-and-coming band called Duran Duran. I had never heard of them but after that night there was no forgetting. I spent the evening watching Nick Rhodes fall head over heels in love with Julie Anne while the boat cruised around the marina. Needless to say I drove the car home and Julie Anne went “on tour” with the band.

      News of the nuptials was not a surprise. I was so happy for Julie Anne.

      “Legs” had premiered and I was ecstatic. It was so much fun! I think the first time I was recognized was at the airport on my way to Julie Anne’s wedding. I was shocked and really flattered.

      The wedding was my first trip to London. I met Nina at the hotel and it was a crazy fun week of celebration. The ceremony was at the Savoy; so many beautiful people, flamingos, magic… Nick’s best man was a woman. I don’t remember all the names but the event was star-studded.

      Sometime after the wedding, Julie Anne informed me that the newspaper from her hometown had more to say about me being at the wedding than her. I found this hard to believe but reveled in the thought of it. Her comments to me about the article were most likely her just poking fun, her sense of humor dry—something I would most certainly appreciate much more now.


      Des Moines Register 8/23/84;
      the relevant passage is the following, which includes a statement
      from Jay Levitt, a University of Iowa student who attended the event:

      [His] biggest thrill was meeting a rock video model named “Wendy.” “She’s in the ZZ Top ‘Legs’ video. … I like that video. It was really exciting to meet her. She was very nice.” The “Legs” video features four pulchritudinous beauties with minimal clothing arriving in a customized street rod to transform a plain Jane wimp woman into a knock-em-dead siren.

      My boyfriend at the time wasn’t invited to the wedding; Julie Anne couldn’t stand him, for good reason. I didn’t go back to LA from London and [instead] moved [directly] to New York to avoid further contact with him.

      New York…wow. Luckily Nina was around to show me the ropes whether that be good or bad. Ha ha. She was from New York and always had a nose for fun; we moved into a five-story walk-up studio apartment somewhere in the Village.

      Not long after my arrival to New York, I was informed that “Legs,” along with “Sharp Dressed Man,” had been nominated for an MTV Video Award. I went to the awards with Tim Newman and sat in the first few rows. Madonna was there performing “Like a Virgin.” Although “Legs” lost to “Sharp Dressed Man” [MTN: actually, “Legs” won “Best Group Video,” beating “Sharp Dressed Man”], the night was magic.

      I received fan mail, none of which I still have. I have moved so many times in my life that any photos, fan mail, etc., from that period have been lost. I never really felt “connected” to any of it anyway. But I will always appreciate the kind words both men and woman expressed—mostly “I wish you would come and rescue me out of my town.” Sometimes lingerie was included and once a pair of sneakers…strange but sweet.

      The last time I was recognized was on Easter Sunday in Aspen, CO. I was shocked—it had been at least 10 years since the video premiered. Fun!

      It’s been over 20 years since I have seen either Nina or Julie Anne…

      My girlfriends still make it a point to tell people we meet of the video. I always blush and tell them it dates me and to stop. Nothing is worse than seeing the blank face of a person who was an infant when “Legs” was in its glory and clueless to the video; however, there are those who do remember and it’s always a treat for me to see the smiles and get recognition.

      I have since lived and traveled all over the world, experiencing life to its fullest, learning about and appreciating different cultures, and, most importantly, discovering and appreciating who I am, something I never paid much mind to in my youth.
      Upon my return to California, I purchased a beautiful home. I decorated, renovated, and turned it into the one of the sexiest rentals in town, one of my favorite tenants being Kelly Clarkson.

      My rental property is like a hotel for those who prefer to stay in a home. It’s cost effective when traveling with others, private, and fabulous, so it’s a full time job. I’m very proud of my “sanctuary.” I believe its energy inspires creativity to those who stay and know it creates a sense of peace and relaxation for them which gives me so much pleasure.

      [I asked if Kelly Clarkson knew of Wendy’s own distinguished connection to the music industry]

      I guess it sounds as if I name-dropped. I’m blushing… While I respect Kelly’s fame and love her music, she is one of my favorite tenants because of the beautiful energy she left behind in my home; not everyone does, sadly. Kelly had no idea [of her music video past]; my contact [with her was] brief and landlord-like, ha ha.

      [I asked why she didn’t continue as an actress/model]

      I was never really cut out to be an actress or model, although I loved the attention and did do a few successful ad campaigns and commercials I was incredibly camera shy which caused an uncomfortable anxiety in me. I preferred entertaining and making a home for those I loved. Although a bit wild, I’m an old-fashioned girl at heart.
      [I asked if she has kids]
      I always thought I would have children, but as of late only a small petting zoo. I would love to adopt a child when and if it is my calling, but for now I am beyond thrilled to be the godmother to my oldest and best friend Randall’s son Miles.

      I’m a bit of an artist at heart. My latest passion: designing and creating chandeliers out of semi-precious stones; the first was out of labradorite, the second citrine, the third will be quartz, but sadly, I haven’t had the time to begin this labor of love. This is beginning to sound like an online dating profile so I will stop before I embarrass myself!
      I presently live in Los Angeles.

      [I asked her reaction when she heard from me]

      It was a delight and a bit of a giggle to hear from you; just hoping that you are with good intention and forthright...

      Actually it [this interview] was fun—although sobering sometimes, ha ha—remembering.
      Tweet about this interview to @ZZTop, @BillyFGibbons, and @jeanakeough!

      Copy and tweet to help me find more 1980s music video girls:

      Real research question: if you know the Annie Hubbard who was in 1984 Night Ranger video “Sister Christian,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

      Real research question: if you know the womaneven just her name—in 1986 Cinderella video “Shake Me,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman


      Real research question: if you know woman—even just her name—in ‘87 Richard Marx video “Should’ve Known Better,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

      Next: ZZ Top, more “Legs” (1984).

      7 Comments on The Girl in the Video: “Legs” (1984), part 1 of 3, last added: 8/11/2013
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      48. The Girl in the Video: “Legs” (1984), part 2 of 3

      Part 1.

      Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video” (including list of interviewees).

      The video: “Legs” by ZZ Top.

      The girl-now-woman: Kymberly Herrin. [MTN: Wendy Frazier and Danièle Arnaud are in separate posts.]



      Kym was the second ZZ Top girl to answer in essay form:

      The first time I saw a ZZ Top video, I was in a club and “Sharp Dressed Man” came on. I recognized one of the models, a centerfold friend of mine, Jeana Tomasino. She was one of the three hot ZZ Top girls. I remember thinking, “Wow, I would love to do one of these MTV videos. This band is so good. The girls are super hot.” The director [Tim Newman] was the first to use three girls in videos. Everyone started using three girls after (“Addicted to Love”). [MTN: Actually five girls!]

      I was in L.A. partying with some friends. I was up late. I had a cold. I checked my [answering] machine in Santa Barbara and there was the casting call. Be there today and I had one hour. I flipped out. I found the building. I was wearing a T-shirt, jeans, and tennis shoes. I had nothing [else] in my car to wear, and my friends were on their way to work, so I had nothing in the way of cool clothing to wear within 30 minutes. My voice, from the cold, made me sound like Kim Carnes. Deep and masculine, but good.
      I looked in the window into the waiting room and there must have been somewhere around 15-20 beautiful girls. Miniskirts, high heels, perfect hair, nails, and makeup. I came so close to leaving, getting on the 101 freeway, and hightailing it home. I walked into the room and the girls [looked] me up and down, [as if] thinking, “Oh, she’s no competition.”

      They called my name and I met the boys in the band. I apologized for my appearance. Then I asked if anyone had mineral water—or better, a beer. They must have been thirsty, also. Out came the beer and we started talking about everything—motorcycles, chili cook-offs, Santa Barbara…and we had mutual friends in S.B. They were super nice guys. We hit it off.

      I went home and told my friends there was no way I was going to get the job. I looked like crap; I [hadn’t even used] a hairbrush. Next day a call came from my agent: I got a callback. I couldn’t believe it. This time I was dressed to kill, the works…

      They had me dance with their choreographer. I had to have attitude in my dance style and be able to follow and learn new dance moves quickly. The next day I got the call. Yahoo, I got it!

      We had a blast shooting the video. Apparently something happened [with] the blond girl on the set of “Sharp Dressed Man” [the second in the video trilogy that began with “Gimme All Your Lovin’” and ended with “Legs”]. Danièle and Jeana didn’t like her. She was pushed out. Danièle and Jeana didn’t get along [either]. I was the third girl and I was new so I didn’t think I would even be seen in the video. They were always pushing me to the back. They said my red top stood out on screen.
      We were paid really well. We all got over $2,000 for the shoot, which is so much for a video dancer. Most people won’t believe it. I would have done it for free!

      At the shoot everything went fine, I thought. I was sad [when] it was over because everyone was so nice. I believe it was one or two days later [when] I got a call from the casting agent. Something had gone wrong in the lab [when] developing the film. I’m not positive exactly what it was, but I heard the film came out black. We had to reshoot a major portion of the video. Good for me. [More] money and more fun.
      My father [had] passed away [before the video]. My stepfather is a retired judge. Everyone [in my family] was very supportive. I never did anything that embarrassed them. They thought the video was great.

      My friends saw the video before I did. They told me [my] red top popped on the screen and the garter belt with the fishnet stockings looked great. I was on the coral coast of East Africa, near Madagascar, and a guy asked me if I was the girl in the “Legs” video. Once in Australia, a young boy, knowing I was an American model, flipped when he recognized me. He said that ZZ Top just won MTV’s Best Group Video [1984]. The Aussies treated me like an American movie star. I was blown away.
      Billy Gibbons was my favorite [member of ZZ Top]. We became good friends later. He gave me the video on tape. We went out a few times (just as good friends). The night he was on Johnny Carson, he sent a limo from L.A. to pick me up in S.B. That night he spent the night our ranch in Carpinteria (10 minutes from S.B.). My boyfriend [at the time] told Billy and me to go out. I was wearing tiny shorts and was going to change and Billy said, “No, wear those.” But Billy was a super gentleman. My boyfriend was surprised at what a gentlemen he was. Still is.

      Whenever ZZ Top [came] to S. B., Billy always [left] me a couple front area and backstage passes. He introduced me to his friends backstage, invited me and my sister Debbie to dinner or any get-together after the concerts.

      I partied with Danny Aykroyd and John Belushi, just us three. [At the time] Blues Brothers videos [were] running on MTV.

      John Belushi died in March 1982, meaning this photo was taken
      at least a year before “Legs” and two years before Ghostbusters.
      I would’ve thought Kym would’ve met Dan Aykroyd on set.

      They were super fun and nice. The first night they took me to Madison Square Garden—Grateful Dead, backstage. Jerry Garcia was a good friend of theirs. He followed us to the “Blues Brothers club.” [It was small and] I think it was a personal bar with instruments and a great old jukebox, [a place where] they could bring their friends and not be surrounded by fans. We danced, everyone jammed a little.

      Danny showed me the town in New York for a couple days. Great memories.
      Kym is not the only person here who met Dan Aykroyd.
      Sorry for my hair. I wish I could blame it solely on 1994...

      I don’t mean to compare people, but I must say Billy Gibbons possesses a certain sweet, rare charm. I know all his friends know what I’m talking about. He’s definitely one of a kind. I’m sure his brother Dusty is really cool. I just didn’t get to know him as well. I’ve never seen anyone print up special pads with [their own band] logo and sign them and take pictures with patience. He really loves his fans.

      I got three [big] jobs within a two-day period—the ZZ Top video, Romancing the Stone (Angelina, the heroine whom Kathleen Turner is writing about at the beginning), and Ghostbusters.

      For Ghostbusters, I walked in and they told me to unwrap my hair and shake it. They told me that day that I got the part of the dream ghost. They did a cast of my body while I was wearing a leotard. Neck to knees. The make a mold in which I would be comfortable when they hung me up. They shot me through six to ten plates so it comes out ghostly. Fans were blowing my hair.
      Danny didn’t know [in advance that] I was going to be in that scene, but we had already partied in Santa Barbara and New York. I did not date anyone from Ghostbusters. Danny tried late one night, but I said we were just friends.

      I can’t believe how much work I got from being in the “Legs” video. It made me famous. I became [a] ZZ Top girl instead of “Miss March.” That was fine with me. People recognized me more from “Legs” because [my scene in] Ghostbusters was so fast. I also got recognized from Playboy. I made Playmate of the Year. I liked it when I would meet somebody and he wouldn’t know anything of what I’d done before, especially the Playboy centerfold.

      I did two ZZ Top videos. I never saw the second one—“Sleeping Bag.”

      I was in the Kiss [long form] video Exposed [1987]—about twelve videos. Paul Stanley became a friend and came up to Santa Barbara with some friends. We went out to dinner and came back to my place above the city and got in the Jacuzzi.
      I was also one of the girls in the “California Girls” video—the Van Halen guy with the long blond hair. [MTN: We think it may actually be a different David Lee Roth video.] No comment on that shoot.

      David Lee Roth… This guy lined us up wearing the smallest bathing suits we had and high heels on the top of a high-rise building in L.A. I decided to [go with] the Sheena/Tarzan look. I was very tan at the time and my girlfriend made me a chamois swimsuit and I wore African accessories. [Roth] made us all step forward, one at a time; he eyed us up and down and said “no,” “no way,” “uh-uh,” “back up,” “you can go,” or “yes, step over there.” He was just sooooo rude in his way of casting. The way he [made] the choices made us feel cheap. We all had been on many casting calls, so we knew a jerk when we met [one]. One girl was in tears when she left. A lot of the girls talked about this after the shoot. It’s not as easy as you may think.

      They wanted a dozen girls out of the 40-50 who showed. I got picked. We worked all day. It was cold and windy and the pay wasn’t much. Couldn’t pay me to work with him [again].

      My boyfriend Dan died of cirrhosis of the liver after 12 years [together] and then my house—all my material possessions—burned up in the Montecito Tea Fire of 2008. I ran out of the house in slippers with my cat. I could smell my hair starting to burn. Material possessions are not worth crying over. But I did lose all the numbers and addresses of all my friends and fans from around the world. Losing a lot of my pictures [with Dan Aykroyd, etc.] was the hard part. I had a storage unit and I found some pictures. Good times!

      In the ‘80s, I had a soft leather women’s apparel company, but even after I was 30 I was still getting a lot of modeling work, so I closed that down. I wrote a book which made me only $20,000, but it’s not in print.
      I was on two Playboy covers and worked for Playboy for quite some time. I made lots of money. Headshots cost $10-15 each. That’s less than [what is charged at] the conventions. I’ve been to a lot of promotion[al events] where I sign autographs; I went to one huge autograph show in L.A. a long time ago. Now I have an autograph agent, the one and only Mr. John O’Neill of O’Neill’s Autographs. He is a friend of Hugh Hefner’s and a lot of Playboy Playmates. He has more pictures of me than I do. Checks come three a year. [Want an autograph from Kym? Contact johnb@pin-ups.com.]

      I also rent a house in Lompoc, a town in Santa Barbara County.

      And now I’m doing a jewelry line called Kym’s Designs. I make them all myself.

      I have done numerous interviews with magazines and newspapers. Please be one who prints the truth. Do not take me out of context.

      Last time I spoke to Hef [Hugh Hefner] was after the fire. I reordered a necklace, a gift that he’d given us at a reunion. I’d gotten my earlier though. A diamond bunny necklace.

      I lost touch with Danny when he married Donna Dixon. He came to S.B. before he got married. We went out to breakfast. He kept me in stitches.

      I have not talked to Billy in years. I miss his sweet accent. He always made me smile. I’m going to call his good friend Seymour Duncan and give him my new cell number and tell him to [tell Billy to] call me.

      I don’t have kids. I was engaged to a man who had a business in the Florida Keys, but he died of leukemia. And Paul, a boyfriend before Dan [the one who had died after a twelve-year relationship with Kym], [died jumping] off a waterfall in Kauai. He [was with friends at a waterfall and he had gone up to a] higher waterfall. You were supposed to dive to the right. It was an accident. I’m single now.

      You really want to know what I thought when I first heard from you? I thought you were maybe some fake wanting to talk to me and maybe something else. You were [contacting] my family in Hawaii and my friends here in S.B. About four [people] saw me and told me your trip. It was my stepsister on Kauai who said you were okay. She is very protective of me and I love her.

      Want an autograph from Kym? Contact johnb@pin-ups.com.

      Tweet about this interview to @ZZTop, @BillyFGibbons, @missfreyja, and @jeanakeough!


      Copy and tweet to help me find more 1980s music video girls:

      Real research question: if you know the Annie Hubbard who was in 1984 Night Ranger video “Sister Christian,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

      Real research question: if you know the woman—even just her name—in 1986 Cinderella video “Shake Me,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

      Real research question: if you know woman—even just her name—in ‘87 Richard Marx video “Should’ve Known Better,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

      Next: ZZ Top, even more “Legs” (1984).

      2 Comments on The Girl in the Video: “Legs” (1984), part 2 of 3, last added: 7/15/2013
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      49. The Girl in the Video: “Legs” (1984), part 3 of 3

      Part 1.

      Part 2.

      Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video” (including list of interviewees).

      The video: “Legs” by ZZ Top.

      The girl-now-woman: Danièle Arnaud. [MTN: Wendy Frazier and Kymberly Herrin are in separate posts.]



      Unlike Wendy and Kymberly, Danièle was in the earlier two ZZ Top videos in the Eliminator girls trilogy (“Gimme All Your Lovin’,” “Sharp Dressed Man”).

      How old were you when you appeared in the “Legs” video?


      26 or 27.

      Where were you living at the time?

       
      Studio City, CA.

      What music videos, shows, or movies had you appeared in prior to that?


      Manhattan Transfer and other ZZ Top videos, MTV dance videos, School Spirit (film), Down Under (film).

      How were you cast?


      Talent agency.

      Do you remember what your reaction was when you were cast?

      Happy! I was already doing pretty well with modeling assignments; this was not the first time I was selected to work in Hollywood and elsewhere.

      Where was the video filmed?

      The name of the town is escaping me right now but in Los Angeles Valley, outside Los Angeles and downtown Los Angeles and Big Bear.

      How long was the shoot?

      Two or three days.

      How did you feel making the video?

      Happy, of course.



      What was the hardest part of the shoot?

      The wait between scenes and night [shooting].

      How was it to work with the band? What were they like?

      Very friendly and cooperative. Very nice people.

      Do you have any anecdotes about filming?

      Some sort of competition [among] the ZZ Top girls to get more exposure by pushing [each other] a bit [to] the side while filming!



      Do you remember anything specific anyone said or did?

      “Always nice to have you here, Danièle!”

      Did anything go wrong?

      No.

      Anything funny happen?

      Not really.

      Did any band members hit on you?

      Of course, not! They knew where to stand. Very respectful and also I was married, if this makes the difference.



      Did you have any favorite bands/songs/videos at the time?

      No.

      What did you think of the video?

      Every video was a good experience for me so one or the other did not make a difference to me.

      What did your parents think of it?

      My father was already deceased and my mother in France did not know about it.

      What did your friends think of it?

      Proud to know a “star,” ah, ah!

      Did the video ever affect your dating life in any way (i.e. when you first told boyfriends you were a woman in it)?

      On the contrary! I was married so it made no difference to me to do the video.

      Did you receive fan mail? If so, do you still have any of it?

      I keep everything. [but has none from the 1980s]

      Did the video generate any controversy that you know of?

      Not at all.

      What were you paid?

      Fair amount.

      Did you watch the MTV World Premiere of the video? If so, where and how did that feel?

      Yes, MTV Awards ceremony, New York. The very best! [I was asking about the premiere on TV; she is referring to the video music awards]

      Were you ever recognized in public?

      Yes, but from people who already knew about me by looking up my name on the Internet. 

      How often?

      I [wasn’t counting].

      When last?

      A year and a half ago.

      Any stories about that?

      They can’t believe they know a ZZ Top girl.

      If you ever met other women who were female leads in a mainstream ‘80s rock video, who?

      No.

      If you went to college, where and what did you study?

      IUT, Toulon, France; CU, Boulder, CO; UCLA, Los Angeles, CA.

      What are you doing these days?

      Selling art, working on museum projects, teaching languages in college and for private clients. 



      Where do you live?

      Oceanside, CA.

      If you are/were married, what was your future husband’s reaction when he learned you were in this video?

      He was thrilled and told everyone he knew. He still is...

      Kids?

      Chloé, 14 years old.

      What does she think of the video?

      She was proud of me but that was several years ago!

      What did you think when you first heard from me?

      I believed you! I still have fans asking me for pictures and staying in touch with me over all those years.

      Has anyone else ever interviewed about this?

      About two years ago, I was approached by a reporter from New York [for a] book about the MTV years. The interview was a conference call from New York.

      Have you appeared at any fan conventions to sign autographs?

      Yes!

      Did you stay in touch with the band after the shoot?

      Yes, of course. They called me at home. I was invited on tours for signing posters in different parts of the States.

      When was the last time you were in touch with them?

      Several years ago—receiving and sending them New Year’s cards and I saw them in concert in San Diego.

      How do you look back on the experience?

      Some of the best years of my life!


      Danièle in France, July 2013
       
      Tweet about this interview to @ZZTop, @BillyFGibbons, @missfreyja, and @jeanakeough!

      Copy and tweet to help me find more 1980s music video girls:

      Real research question: if you know the Annie Hubbard who was in 1984 Night Ranger video “Sister Christian,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

      Real research question: if you know the woman—even just her name—in 1986 Cinderella video “Shake Me,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

      Real research question: if you know woman—even just her name—in ‘87 Richard Marx video “Should’ve Known Better,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

      Next: Don Henley, “The Boys of Summer” (1984).

      0 Comments on The Girl in the Video: “Legs” (1984), part 3 of 3 as of 7/16/2013 7:28:00 AM
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      50. The Girl in the Video: “The Boys of Summer” (1984)

      Introduction to series “The Girl in the Video” (including list of interviewees).

      The video: “The Boys of Summer” by Don Henley.

      The girl-now-woman: Audie Lenkov (Audie England).




      How old were you when you appeared in the “Boys of Summer” video?

      16.

      Where were you living at the time?

      I was living with my parents in Lakewood, CA.


       In the seventies everyone was dropping the e on their name. 
      ‘Debbie’ became ‘Debbi’—with a heart above the ‘i’—as well as Julie, and so on…
      I dropped the e from probably 7th grade to 20 years old. I put it back because 
      I got tired of being called Audi like the car and likened to it.

      What music videos, shows, or movies had you appeared in prior to that?

      “Boys of Summer” was my first music video. In fact, it was the first acting/modeling job I ever got…and also the first audition I ever went on.

      How were you cast?

      I auditioned along with at least a hundred or so other models. When I arrived at the casting location the line was so long, I decided to leave…then returned hours later when the wait was much shorter. But it also meant I was one of the last girls seen that day…and at a time when the director and casting associates were most likely exhausted from spending the entire day looking at models. Not the ideal scenario for someone looking to book her first gig.




      Do you remember what your reaction was when you were cast?

      Total surprise. You have to remember…this was my first audition. I was so new to the business. So naïve. When the casting director asked me to slate my name (say my name on camera), I didn’t know what that meant. Strike one.

      Where was the video filmed?

      My scenes were shot at Raleigh Studios in Hollywood.

      How long was the shoot?

      I’m not sure how long it took to shoot the entire video, but my portion was one very full day.

      How did you feel making the video?

      I was a huge Eagles fan, so working on a Don Henley video was a real treat. I was also being paid as a model for the very first time which to me was a huge accomplishment.  

      What was the hardest part of the shoot?

      The hours. My call time was very early and I spent most of the day waiting for the director to shoot my scenes, which turned out to be the last filmed.  

      How was it to work with Don Henley? You don’t appear in scenes with him; did you meet him?

      I unfortunately did not get to work with Mr. Henley…or ever meet him. My scenes were pretty modular and didn’t require him to be on set.


         
      The video seems to be about three stages of a man’s life—a boy drumming, a young man on the beach with a girlfriend (not you), and a man in an office. How did you fit in?

      That’s a very interesting question. One I have never been asked before. Sure, I’ve thought about my role, but never really came to any finite conclusion on who I was meant to be. The director never went into that kind of depth, only gave me action cues and never any real backstory or motivation.

      Did you meet any of the other performers? Do you know whatever happened to any of them?

      Not on the day, but funny enough a short time after that experience I was set up on a blind date with Charlie, the guy who was running along the beach.

      How did you two realize you were both in the video? Did you recognize him or vice versa, or did you know before the date? Was there a second date?

      When I was set up with Charlie, I was told that he was also in the video. It wasn’t a true blind date. He had tickets to Cirque du Soleil and his date had to back out, so Charlie called the head booking agent, Capucine, at Elite Models (we were both signed to Elite) and asked if she could find someone available and willing to go with him. I was Capucine’s roommate at the time, so I think I was her first call. Charlie and I never became romantically involved but we were good friends for years after and we would occasionally go to a show or grab a bite to eat together.

      What did you think of the video?

      Don Henley. Great fashion. Black and white. Shot by Jean-Bapiste Mondino. What’s not to love? Seriously, I was very impressed and very proud to be a part of it.






      What did your parents think of it?

      My father’s pretty conservative, so seeing me in a music video in a negligee was not a topic of conversation at the dinner table. It was only years later that I discovered he had kept a scrapbook of all my work and photos from the Don Henley video were in there…so I imagine he was proud, albeit not very vocal about it.


       photo credit: Steve Bigler

      What did your friends think of it?

      My friends were proud, although we never really discussed it. I was a high school student and I didn’t want to be different. I just wanted to fit in. My physics teacher on the other hand thought it was extremely cool. So much so, he occasionally allowed me to cut classes to audition for roles.

      Did the video ever affect your dating life in any way (i.e. when you first told boyfriends you were in it)?

      Absolutely not.

      Did you receive fan mail? If so, do you still have any of it?

      Nope. Not one letter.

      Did the video generate any controversy that you know of?

      Not that I know of.

      What were you paid?

      Union scale. Approximately $300. 

      Did you watch the MTV World Premiere of the video, and if so, where and how did that feel?

      I don’t remember.

      Were you at the MTV Video Awards when the video won a handful?

      No.

      Were you ever recognized in public? How often and when last? Any stories about that?

      Never.

      Did you appear in other music videos after that?

      Yes, about a couple dozen, although “Boys of Summer” will always hold a special place in my heart.

      What are some of the other videos you appeared in?

      I can’t remember many of the artists names and definitely not the song titles. A few [artists] that I can remember are Eddie Money, Peter Cetera, The Blasters, Prince (but I think I may have been cut out of it. A lot of girls. I never saw it). There was also an Adam Ant and Stewart Copeland video. Colin James’s “Why’d You Lie” [1989] is the only song title I remember. 



      If you ever met other women who were female leads in a mainstream ‘80s rock video, who?

      A few. Dana Patrick from the Meat Loaf video “I’d Do Anything for Love (But I Won’t Do That)” became a good friend.

      When and how did you meet Dana Patrick?


      I met Dana Patrick at a beach party probably in 1999. She was just getting into photography and I had a studio that I was looking to share. We ended up becoming fast friends and studio partners.

      If you went to college, where and what did you study?

      After high school, I traveled and spent years modeling and ultimately came back to Los Angeles where I took extension courses at UCLA and Art Center.

      What are you doing these days?

      My days are filled with being a wife and mom.



      Where do you live?

      Southern California.

      What was your future husband’s reaction when he learned you were in this video?

      He was a fan of the video so it made it easy to guarantee a second date. [MTN: Her husband is Peter Lenkov, a TV producer (Hawaii Five-O) and writer of both TV and comic books, which obviously resonates with me.]



      Kids?

      I have two boys, ages 4 and 7, and twin stepdaughters, 17. 

      What do your kids think of the video?

      They’ve never seen it. 

      Why?

      I’ve never thought to show them. It just seems like another time, a person other than me now (mom). Spongebob is much more interesting to watch.

      What did you think when you first heard from me?

      It just reminded me how old I was.

      On Wikipedia, it gives your birth year as 1972, but then also says you were born in 1967?

      Yes, I wish it were 1972…but it is 1967.

      It also says you were one of People Magazine’s “Most Beautiful Stars” in 1998. I looked but don’t think it was in 1998?

      I also heard that I was featured in that issue, but at the time I was out of town. I never saw a copy. I can’t say for certain that I was in it. I was always bad about collecting articles and magazines that I was featured in.

      Has anyone else ever interviewed about this? If so, who, when, and for what publication?

      No.

      Have you appeared at any fan conventions to sign autographs? If not, would you?

      No.

      Did you stay in touch with Don Henley or anyone else from the shoot?

      No.

      How do you look back on the experience?

      With fond memories. It was the springboard for a short but very fulfilling career.


      Tweet about this interview to @TheEaglesBand and @PLenkov!

      Copy and tweet to help me find more 1980s music video girls:

      Real research question: if you know the Annie Hubbard who was in 1984 Night Ranger video “Sister Christian,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

      Real research question: if you know the womaneven just her name—in 1986 Cinderella video “Shake Me,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

      Real research question: if you know woman—even just her name—in ‘87 Richard Marx video “Should’ve Known Better,” pls contact @MarcTNobleman

      Next:
      Huey Lewis and the News, “If This Is It” (1984).

      8 Comments on The Girl in the Video: “The Boys of Summer” (1984), last added: 7/27/2013
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