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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: booklists, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 355
1. YA Poster: Great Non Fiction for Teens

I used to be a minimalist.  I believed that the library walls should be blank so the emphasis was on the books and displays on top of the shelves.

I have VERY MUCH changed my mind about that...

There are some great places to get YA Books posters:

From vendors Follett, Mackin, and Junior Library Guild
Epic Reads Blog
Teen Librarian Toolbox
Lunanshee's Lunacy

The last two are fellow librarians I absolutely love, both online and in person!  So I thought to myself that I need to start trying to create some themed YA book posters myself and emulate those I adminre.  So here's the beginning of my poster venture! As always, please feel free to download and print and post :)

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2. I Laughed Until I (fill in the blank): Humor in YA literature

Yesterday, we had a great discussion on #readYAlit Twitter chat about humor in young adult literature.  It's a nebulous genre because humor can mean something completely differently to one person than another. 

Is humor universal?  That was one question that was tackled in our chat.  Genders, experiences, and type of humor are different elements of humor that play an important part in that question.  There is guy humor and there is girl humor.  How each gender approaches it can be wildly different and how authors use it can reflect those differences.  That isn't to say either gender can't read humor that relates more to one than the other...it's just the appeal may lean toward one side more than the other.

And then there's humor that's found in serious books.  One participant wrote that humor is needed in YA literature to balance the realistic lives in fiction that can be dark and dangerous.  I have to be very careful about what I read so that I'm not focused on realistic fiction because of an incident that took places several years ago.  After booktalking, a student mentioned that it was depressing and she wasn't interested in any of them because of the mood I created with the titles I talked about.  And that student was RIGHT....so now I find as many different genres, and include humor in it. 

There are many different places online to find titles about humor that could help out any library and those wanting the "fun" side of YA lit.  If you genrefy, does it have it's own genre or it is part of each major genre (one librarian on the chat had an EXCELLENT answer to that one!)? Would you include humorous titles with those darker novels where humor peeks in every now and then (think John Green)?  Those are questions that I believe are more personal decisions, but the great thing is the exchange of ideas our chat last night held. 

And if you need a title list, never fear!  Here are a few resources you can use:

Ebsco's Novelist of Humorous YA Fiction by Tom Reynolds

YALSA's Genre Guide to Young Adult Humor

Humor in YA Fiction Flowchart

And then there is that often looked over section where you can find MANY humorous titles: Non-fiction (and dewey)!!  Here's my list of non-fiction/dewey I've read that I couldn't help but chuckle and sometimes outright laugh at:


The Stupid Crook Book by Gregory Leland

Cake Wreck: when professional cakes go hilariously wrong by Jen Yates
How They Croaked: the awful ends of the awfully famous by Georgia Bragg
How They Choked: Failures, flops and flaws of the awfully famous by Georgia Bragg
Visit Sunny Chernobyl: And other adventures in the world's most polluted places by Andrew Blackwell
Historical Heartthrobs: 50 timeless crushes from Cleopatra to Camus by Kelly Murphy
I’m Down: A memoir by Mishna Wolff
We Should Hang Out Some Time: Embarrassingly, a true story by Josh Sundquist
Emily the Strange graphic novels by Rob Reger
Happy Bunny Books graphic novels (?) by Jim Benton


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3. Diversity and stuff

America - the Melting Pot!  That image is sort of wrong.  I don't want the Mediterranean part of me melted into the Germanic part of me - not entirely!  I want to own the Mangia! and the Gesundheit! both - to say nothing of the Pip Pip Cheerio!  and Top o' the morning!  I am proud of every single patch in my patchwork DNA.

At the same time,  America as a Cooking Pot is sort of right.  I love soups and stews - foods where different ingredients blend together but keep their individual flavors.  America is more like a hearty soup.

Hey!  We're all people!  We all share the same home, the Earth.

A good cook doesn't let any one ingredient overpower all the others.

I think I forgot where I was going with this.  Oh!  Right!  Diversity!  Celebrate the differences, everyone!  All the lovely differences!

Here are some book lists to get you started in this celebration of America, the Cooking Pot.  Mangia!

From the Cooperative Children's Book Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, here are 50 Multicultural Books Every Child Should Know.

Reading Is Fundamental has 40 books on their list.

The Center for the Study of Multicultural Literature for Children puts out a booklist for books published in the current year.  2016 isn't over yet. (Sigh.) So, here is their list for 2015.

Scholastic.com puts a LOT of work into their various websites, so here is their little 7 book long book list about diversity.

Here is an interesting list of picture books, from Storytime Standouts, on diversity and empathy.  Some of the titles seem to be off topic.  But, there are all kinds of differences out there.

And No Time for Flashcards put together this list of books about families that don't fit the mother/father/2.5 children/and a dog mold.

Hmm, I think this soup needs a little more of.....YOU!


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4. Thanksgiving

 My sister teaches music in an elementary school.  Half of one of her early elementary classes is made up of first generation Americans.   In explaining the words of "My Country 'Tis of Thee", my sister told those children that they were today's pilgrims.

As we prepare for Thanksgiving, let's remember those who come here to find sanctuary from persecution, poverty, and discrimination. We all came from somewhere else, no matter what some people want to believe.

Right now, this is my favorite Thanksgiving book.  Puppets, balloons and pageants - the birth of an American tradition.

Some of my favorite Thanksgiving books, new and old.

Molly's Pilgrim by Barbara Cohen.  This classic was turned into an Academy Award-winning short film.  Third grader, Molly, asks her mother to make a Pilgrim doll from a clothespin.  Her mother, who was born in Eastern Europe, doesn't know what a Pilgrim is.  Molly explains that a pilgrim is someone who came to this country to worship freely, and to escape hard times.  Her mama makes a doll that looks like a Russian girl.  Molly's doll helps the teacher explain that America still welcomes pilgrims for all kinds of reasons.

A Strawbeater's Thanksgiving by Irene Smalls.  Jess, a slave, looks forward to the corn shucking party.  He hopes to be the special boy chosen to keep time for the fiddler by beating on the fiddle strings with a pair of strong wheat straws.  Hopes don't always come true and Jess works hard to make his hope become a reality.  Melodye Rosales provides beautiful illustrations for this story.

A Turkey For Thanksgiving by Eve Bunting.  Mr. Moose is determined to deliver a turkey to his wife for Thanksgiving.  Turkey is equally determined to stay away.  No worries, happy endings abound, all around.  And Diane de Groat's pictures are colorful and adorable.

Balloons over Broadway by Melissa Sweet.  Tony Sarg, a German-born puppeteer, was the artistic genius behind the first Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade.  He designed it to mirror the parades and processions of many of Macy's immigrant employees.  This picture book biography, written and illustrated by Melissa Sweet, is my FAVORITE Thanksgiving book right now. 

Thanksgiving Poems by Myra Cohn Livingston.  If you are looking for something short to read before you stuff yourselves, take a look at this collection.

Over the River and Through the Wood by Lydia Maria Francis Child, with illustrations by David Catrow.  You MUST get the version with pictures by David Catrow.  The poem is lovely but the pictures are hilarious!

There are more, so many more.  I might add to this list in the next week or two.  Just remember to be kind to everyone you meet.  Stand up for people who need defending.   Give thanks for what you have. 

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5. Books to Give Teens Who....

I tried my hand at making an infographic, and first of all, I must say KUDOS to those who create the "What To Read If You Like..." et al.  They are time-consuming!

So in the middle of that, I thought, "hey, why not make a website instead?"  So using Adobe Spark Page, that's what I did :)  Here is the result:


What To Give Teens Who...


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6. MLA 2016 Booklist-YA (and MG) Lit Update

For those of you that attended the Missouri Library Association Conference last week (or for those that missed it!) here is the booklist of titles I talked about. I'd love to hear your thoughts on them and if you have any favorites of 2016!

Trends:
Origin Stories & Retellings (fairy tales, classics, history retold, Peter Pan, Alice in Wonderland)
Sequels and Series
Contemporary Fiction continues to rise
Creative formats (Replica by Lauren Oliver, Between Worlds by Skip Brittenham)

Middle Grade/Young YA:
Ghost by Jason Reynolds
Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier
The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill
The Inquisitor's Tale by Adam Gidwitz
It Ain't So Awful, Falafel by Firoozeh Dumas
Pax by Sara Pennypacker
Save Me a Seat by Sarah Weeks & Gita Varadarajan
Shadow Magic by Joshua Kahn
Raymie Nightingale by Kate DiCamillo
Some Writer! by Melissa Sweet
Wolf Hollow by Lauren Wolk

Young Adult:
And I Darken by Kiersten White
Exit, Pursued by a Bear by E. K. Johnston
Girl in the Blue Coat by Monica Hesse
The Girl From Everywhere by Heidi Heilig
The Great American Whatever by Tim Federle
Highly Illogical Behavior by John Corey Whaley
Holding Up the Universe by Jennifer Niven
If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo
The May Queen Murders by Sarah Jude
Passenger by Alexandra Bracken
Rebel of the Sands by Alwyn Hamilton
The Reader by Traci Chee
Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys
The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
The Unexpected Everything by Morgan Matson
We Are the Ants by Shaun David Hutchinson
When We Collided by Emery Lord




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7. Best Books of July 2016

July 2016: 10 books and scripts read

Non-Fiction Pick
Hamilton: The Revolution by Lin-Manuel Miranda and Jeremy McCarter

Fiction Picks
You Know Me Well by Nina LaCour and David Levithan
Tell Us Something True by Dana Reinhardt

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8. 14 Minecraft Books for Kids

**some of these links are affiliate links
minecraft booklist

Last week we had some much fun digging into the Minecraft Lab book from John Miller and Chris Scott. So much so, I decided to roundup a Minecraft booklist just for the Minecraft fans in your life! Here are 14 Minecraft Books for Kids to inspire reading and creativity.

Minecraft: The Complete Handbook Collection by Stephanie Milton and Paul Soares Jr.

Minecraft books
Minecraft: Ultimate Handbook, Master Minecraft Secrets by Kwick Reads

minecraft books
Diary of a Minecraft Zombie by Zack Zombie (multiple books)

minecraft books
Ultimate Minecraft Secrets: An Unofficial Guide to Minecraft Tips, Tricks, and Hints You May Not Know by Zack Zombie Books

minecraft books
Minecraft Creative Handbook by Steve Builder

minecraft books
Amazing Minecraft Activity Book by Gameplay Publishing

minecraft
Minecraft: The Ultimate Survival Handbook by William Herobrine

minecraft books
Ultimate Book of Traps by Minecraft Books

minecraft books
Minecraft Book of Mysteries by Minecraft Library

minecraft books
Minecraft: Kids Stories by Minecraft Books

minecraft books
Diary of a Steve Trapped in Minecraft by Minecraft Books

minecraft books
Minecraft Short Stories by Minecraft Books

minecraft
Diary of a Minecraft Creeper by Minecraft Books

minecraft books

Diary of a Wimpy Minecraft Herobrine by Minecraft Books

minecraft books

See any “must-haves” in this booklist? Happy Reading!

**some of these links are affiliate links

Breaking News! Proof that Dragons are indeed REAL!

My newest book, Dragons are Real is available and the excitement is almost blowing the roof off at Jump Into a Book/Audrey Press headquarters!
Dragons are real
SO…what if I told you that all of the fairy tales, myths and legends that have been told about dragons over the years are WRONG. What if I told you that Dragons are indeed Real and that they are different than you’ve ever imagined?
This fairly true story is based on the author’s childhood friendship with a REAL live Dragon; a very special Dragon that she and her brother spent two magical summers with.

As readers turn the pages and learn the truth about Dragons, they will see that the fiercest beasts in known history can actually be the best of friends. It’s a lesson in finding companionship in the most unusual of places. Dragons are Real is a magical book filled with stunning illustrations and hints that dragon are indeed all around us :)

Dragons are Real is now available for purchase on both Amazon and Gumroad! We are also offering a special free bonus gift of a Dragons Are Real Inspiration Activity Guide when you purchase your copy of this enchanting picture book.

The post 14 Minecraft Books for Kids appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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9. My Summer Reading List - What are You Reading?

June, July, August.  Three months equal 12 weeks equal....how many books could I possibly read this summer?  Here are my top 10 books I AM going to read and some bonus titles I may get to.



1.Dead Wake by Erik Larson  non-fiction, adult

2. Everything Everything by Nicola Yoon  young adult, realistic read

3. Paper Hearts by Meg Wiviott  young adult, novel in verse/historical fiction

4. Rebel Bully Geek Pariah by Erin Jade Lange  young adult, realistic read

5.  Every Last Word by Tamara Ireland Stone young adult, realistic read

6. Novice by Taran Matharu  young adult, fantasy

7. Radical by E.M Kokie  young adult, realistic fiction

8. Tell Me Three Things by Julie Buxbaum young adult, realistic fiction

9. These Shallow Graves by Jennifer Donnally, mystery

10. The Light Fantastic by Sarah Combs, thriller



And lest we forget these (don't!)

Claiming Noah by Amanda Ortlepp adult, realistic fiction

Beware That Girl by Teresa Toten young adult, thriller

Hold Me Like a Breath by Tiffany Schmidt young adult, thriller

Holding Up the Universe by Jennifer Niven  young adult, realistic fiction

Mayday by Karen Harrington young adult, realistic fiction

Shallow Graves by Kali Wallace, horror/supernatural supernatural/horror

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10. Coming Soon!

Summer Reading is imminent, librarians. We all have a ton on our plates and very little time to think about anything but programming, performers, reading logs, and summer fun.

Here are just a few books coming out in the next couple of months. Something to put on your radar when you get a minute, in between programs, when you’re trying to put together book orders.  Your kids will like these, and you will, too.

Source: Goodreads

Maria lives in the Bronx with her mom, who works two jobs to keep them afloat. Then her mom gets a job on a seaside estate on Martha’s Vineyard, and Maria’s life for the summer is radically different. Maria spends her summer juggling new friends, her Lebanese family, and an old map that she’s sure will lead to pirate treasure.

Source: Goodreads

Mafi’s long-awaited first middle grade novel has been called “rich and lush” by Kirkus. Alice lives in a land of magic and color, and she has neither. But she’s determined to find her beloved Father in magical Furthermore anyway. She has only one companion: someone she’s not sure she can trust. Can she use her wits to find her dad?

Source: Goodreads

The second in Gene Luen Yang’s graphic novel series about the mysteries and magic of coding, this one will basically fly off your shelves completely by itself. There’s something lurking in an underground classroom of Stately Academy: Hooper, Eni, and Josh are determined to find out what!

Source: Goodreads

Jenni Holm’s latest novel is about Beans, a kid growing up during the Great Depression on Key West. Beans knows that grown-ups lie to him. But he doesn’t really let it bother him. He’s got plans of his own. Beans is the cousin of the titular Turtle in Holm’s Newbery Honor-Winning Turtle in Paradise and returning to her beautiful novels is always worth it.

Good luck with summer reading! These books will be waiting for you on the other side.

*
Ally Watkins (@aswatki1) is a library consultant at the Mississippi Library Commission.

The post Coming Soon! appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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11. New ALSC Summer Reading Lists Available

Download the new ALSC Summer Reading lists (image courtesy of ALSC)

ALSC’s Quicklists Consulting Committee has updated our Summer Reading Lists with new and exciting titles!

The lists are full of book titles to keep children engaged in reading throughout the summer. Four Summer Reading book lists are available for Birth-Preschool, K-2nd, 3rd- 5th and 6th-8th grade students.

Each list is available here to download for free. Lists can be customized to include library information, summer hours and summer reading programs for children before making copies available to schools and patrons.

Titles on the 2016 Summer Reading List was compiled and annotated by members of ALSC’s Quicklists Consulting Committee.

Image courtesy of ALSC

The post New ALSC Summer Reading Lists Available appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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12. Best Books of April 2016

April 2016: 7 books and scripts read

Genre Fiction Pick
The Demonists by Thomas E. Sniegoski

YA Fiction Pick
Essential Maps for the Lost by Deb Caletti

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13. 2016 Día Booklists

 2016 Building STEAM with Día Booklists

Download your copy of the new 2016 Building STEAM with Día Booklists (image courtesy of ALSC)

ALSC’s Quicklists Consulting Committee has developed two new booklists for this celebratory year of Día.

The 2016 Building STEAM with Día Booklists continue the theme of identifying promising resources to supplement (S)cience, (T)echnology, (E)ngineering, the (A)rts, and (M)ath programming while reflecting a variety of cultures and languages.

The 20 Years of Día: Share the Gift of Reading lists are a special tribute to encourage everyone to participate in the celebration of Día’s 20th anniversary. To help libraries and community members access these books as easily as possible, ALSC has collaborated with our Official Día Supporter, First Book, to identify which books are available through their First Book Marketplace. By registering with First Book, librarians and others serving children in areas of high poverty can access books at little or no cost. In addition to printed books, these titles may also be available as unlimited eBooks through the recently launched Open eBooks Initiative.

20 Years of Día Booklist

New for 2016! The 20 Years of Día Booklist is great for your celebration (image courtesy of ALSC)

Each of the lists are available for download in the ranges of Birth to Pre-K, Kindergarten to 2nd Grade, 3rd Grade to 5th Grade and 6h Grade to 8th Grade. Click the Free Program Downloads tab to download them all today!

The post 2016 Día Booklists appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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14. An Extra Special #DragonsAreReal Booklist for Beginning Readers

Disclosure: some of these links are affiliate links

Extra Special #DragonsAreReal Booklist for Beginning Readers

I’ve been doing a lot with dragons lately and in honor of my new book Dragons are Real so I thought I’d share a little bit of our favorite dragon reads from our favorite dragon library. You may not know this but Dragons love to read and are actually book hoarders. So if you’re missing a book, there’s a good chance a dragon took it. 😉

So going forward, we’re operating on the premise here that Dragons are Real. I should know because I’ve had my very own dragon friend since I was 7. Look for a sneak peak at the end of this post. It’s a surprise and you won’t be disappointed. I promise!

Dragon Books for Beginning Readers

Dragonbreath #1 by Ursula Vernon

Dragon booklist

Danny Dragonbreath can’t breathe fire, but he has no fear. And that comes in handy when a bad grade at school inspires him to enlist his cousin the sea-serpent’s help with a research project. Using a hybrid of comic-book panels and text, Ursula Vernon introduces an irresistible set of characters that will have readers laughing until smoke comes out of their noses!

The Rain Dragon Rescue (The Imaginary Veterinary) by Suzanne Selfors; Illustrated by Dan Santat

dragon booklist

Someone or something is stealing from the peaceful residents of Buttonville. But is the thief from the real world…or the imaginary one? Ben and Pearl are about to find out. When they report for duty at Dr. Woo’s, Mr. Tabby hands them a bucket and a shovel — for the collection and proper disposal of dragon droppings — and directs the apprentices to the hospital’s roof. Soon, they come face-to-snout with the dragon that lives there and find a pile of proof that he is the thief.

Before Ben and Pearl can persuade the dragon to stop stealing, an emergency call comes in from the Imaginary World. The rain dragon has been injured! But with Dr. Woo out of town and Mr. Tabby busy with percolating pixies, time is running out.

Will Ben and Pearl finally get a chance to travel to the Imaginary World? Even if it means breaking Dr. Woo’s rules? Even if it means they might never come back?

Geronimo Stilton and the Kingdom of Fantasy #4: The Dragon Prophecy by Geronimo Stilton

dragon booklist

The last existing dragon egg had been stolen from Sterling. If that egg was destroyed, dragons would become extinct forever! I couldn’t let that happen. So he set out across enchanted lands to find the egg and restore peace to the Kingdom of Fantasy.

Jeremy Thatcher, Dragon Hatcher by Bruce Coville

dragon booklist

Sixth-grader Jeremy Thatcher discovers a strange magic shop he has never seen before. He enters, and his life is changed forever. Buying what he thinks is a marble, he discovers he has really purchased a dragon’s egg.

Great Dragon Series for Beginning Readers

These great reads are CLASSICS by Ruth Stiles Gannett Kahn.

dragon booklist

This next series are easily read and are very cute but they lack a bit of action for my taste. I put them here simply because they are well done and kids really seem to love them and that’s the important thing.

dragon booklist

The Dragon Slayer’s Academy by Kate McMullan is an extremely fun journey into the world of Dragon Slayers. It’s sure to amuse and delight the most earliest of readers.

Dragon Salyers Academy books

Dragon Masters Series by Tracey West

The DRAGON MASTERS series is “How to Train Your Dragon” meets the DRAGON SLAYERS’ ACADEMY!

DRAGON MASTERS has it all! Dragons, a Dragon Stone, a king, a wizard, and magic! In the first book in this fully-illustrated series, 8-year old Drake is snatched up by King Roland’s soldier and taken to the castle. He is to be trained as a Dragon Master. At the castle, he is joined by three other young Dragon Masters-in-training: Ana, Rori, and Bo. The Dragon Masters must learn how to connect with and train their dragons–and they must also uncover their dragons’ special powers. Does Drake have what it takes to be a Dragon Master? What is his dragon’s special power?

The Dragon Master series

More Dragon Booklists to come!

**Some of these links are affiliate links. That means if you click and buy, I may get a very small commission.
This money goes towards postage and supplies to keep books and ideas in the hands of young readers!

Coming soon!

My newest book, Dragons are Real will be available on Amazon around the first part of May and the excitement is almost blowing the roof off at Jump Into a Book/Audrey Press headquarters!

Dragons are real

SO…what if I told you that all of the fairy tales, myths and legends that have been told about dragons over the years are WRONG. What if I told you that Dragons are indeed Real and that they are different than you’ve ever imagined?
This fairly true story is based on the author’s childhood friendship with a REAL live Dragon; a very special Dragon that she and her brother spent two magical summers with.

As readers turn the pages and learn the truth about Dragons, they will see that the fiercest beasts in known history can actually be the best of friends. It’s a lesson in finding companionship in the most unusual of places. Dragons are Real is a magical book filled with stunning illustrations and hints that dragon are indeed all around us :)
Dragons are real

Dragons are Real is slated for a May 5th release. If you want to be among the first to know when this colorful and enchanting children’s book goes on sale, sign up below and I will keep you in the loop. (P.S. I have plans to have some fun free gifts available as well!) Thanks for your support and Read On!

Sign up for Dragons Are Real Updates!

* indicates required




The post An Extra Special #DragonsAreReal Booklist for Beginning Readers appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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15. An Extra Special #DragonsAreReal Booklist for Beginning Readers

Disclosure: some of these links are affiliate links

Extra Special #DragonsAreReal Booklist for Beginning Readers

I’ve been doing a lot with dragons lately and in honor of my new book Dragons are Real so I thought I’d share a little bit of our favorite dragon reads from our favorite dragon library. You may not know this but Dragons love to read and are actually book hoarders. So if you’re missing a book, there’s a good chance a dragon took it. 😉

So going forward, we’re operating on the premise here that Dragons are Real. I should know because I’ve had my very own dragon friend since I was 7. Look for a sneak peak at the end of this post. It’s a surprise and you won’t be disappointed. I promise!

Dragon Books for Beginning Readers

Dragonbreath #1 by Ursula Vernon

Dragon booklist

Danny Dragonbreath can’t breathe fire, but he has no fear. And that comes in handy when a bad grade at school inspires him to enlist his cousin the sea-serpent’s help with a research project. Using a hybrid of comic-book panels and text, Ursula Vernon introduces an irresistible set of characters that will have readers laughing until smoke comes out of their noses!

The Rain Dragon Rescue (The Imaginary Veterinary) by Suzanne Selfors; Illustrated by Dan Santat

dragon booklist

Someone or something is stealing from the peaceful residents of Buttonville. But is the thief from the real world…or the imaginary one? Ben and Pearl are about to find out. When they report for duty at Dr. Woo’s, Mr. Tabby hands them a bucket and a shovel — for the collection and proper disposal of dragon droppings — and directs the apprentices to the hospital’s roof. Soon, they come face-to-snout with the dragon that lives there and find a pile of proof that he is the thief.

Before Ben and Pearl can persuade the dragon to stop stealing, an emergency call comes in from the Imaginary World. The rain dragon has been injured! But with Dr. Woo out of town and Mr. Tabby busy with percolating pixies, time is running out.

Will Ben and Pearl finally get a chance to travel to the Imaginary World? Even if it means breaking Dr. Woo’s rules? Even if it means they might never come back?

Geronimo Stilton and the Kingdom of Fantasy #4: The Dragon Prophecy by Geronimo Stilton

dragon booklist

The last existing dragon egg had been stolen from Sterling. If that egg was destroyed, dragons would become extinct forever! I couldn’t let that happen. So he set out across enchanted lands to find the egg and restore peace to the Kingdom of Fantasy.

Jeremy Thatcher, Dragon Hatcher by Bruce Coville

dragon booklist

Sixth-grader Jeremy Thatcher discovers a strange magic shop he has never seen before. He enters, and his life is changed forever. Buying what he thinks is a marble, he discovers he has really purchased a dragon’s egg.

Great Dragon Series for Beginning Readers

These great reads are CLASSICS by Ruth Stiles Gannett Kahn.

dragon booklist

This next series are easily read and are very cute but they lack a bit of action for my taste. I put them here simply because they are well done and kids really seem to love them and that’s the important thing.

dragon booklist

The Dragon Slayer’s Academy by Kate McMullan is an extremely fun journey into the world of Dragon Slayers. It’s sure to amuse and delight the most earliest of readers.

Dragon Salyers Academy books

Dragon Masters Series by Tracey West

The DRAGON MASTERS series is “How to Train Your Dragon” meets the DRAGON SLAYERS’ ACADEMY!

DRAGON MASTERS has it all! Dragons, a Dragon Stone, a king, a wizard, and magic! In the first book in this fully-illustrated series, 8-year old Drake is snatched up by King Roland’s soldier and taken to the castle. He is to be trained as a Dragon Master. At the castle, he is joined by three other young Dragon Masters-in-training: Ana, Rori, and Bo. The Dragon Masters must learn how to connect with and train their dragons–and they must also uncover their dragons’ special powers. Does Drake have what it takes to be a Dragon Master? What is his dragon’s special power?

The Dragon Master series

More Dragon Booklists to come!

**Some of these links are affiliate links. That means if you click and buy, I may get a very small commission.
This money goes towards postage and supplies to keep books and ideas in the hands of young readers!

Coming soon!

My newest book, Dragons are Real will be available on Amazon around the first part of May and the excitement is almost blowing the roof off at Jump Into a Book/Audrey Press headquarters!

Dragons are real

SO…what if I told you that all of the fairy tales, myths and legends that have been told about dragons over the years are WRONG. What if I told you that Dragons are indeed Real and that they are different than you’ve ever imagined?
This fairly true story is based on the author’s childhood friendship with a REAL live Dragon; a very special Dragon that she and her brother spent two magical summers with.

As readers turn the pages and learn the truth about Dragons, they will see that the fiercest beasts in known history can actually be the best of friends. It’s a lesson in finding companionship in the most unusual of places. Dragons are Real is a magical book filled with stunning illustrations and hints that dragon are indeed all around us :)
Dragons are real

Dragons are Real is slated for a May 5th release. If you want to be among the first to know when this colorful and enchanting children’s book goes on sale, sign up below and I will keep you in the loop. (P.S. I have plans to have some fun free gifts available as well!) Thanks for your support and Read On!

Sign up for Dragons Are Real Updates!

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The post An Extra Special #DragonsAreReal Booklist for Beginning Readers appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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16. The authors are coming!! The authors are coming!!!


Emily is just one of FOUR awesome children's authors at the KU Children's lit Conference

 This is the latest that I have ever gone in finishing my KU Children's Literature Conference booklist.  I am embarrassed at the lateness.  But it IS done - except for the inevitable addendum or addenda.  Maybe I'll skip those this year.  And you can find it here.

You can find the KUCLC's website here, too.  Show up early (7:30 to 8:30 am) on Saturday if you haven't pre-registered.  The cost is ONLY $50 for a day of children's book fantasticality!  This year Kutztown hosts Daniel Kirk, Andrea Davis Pinkney, Emily Arnold McCully and Jonathan Bean.


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17. Ten Ways to Publicize Notable Children’s Books

In her 2002 Newbery Award acceptance speech, Linda Sue Park recalled how her father, a Korean immigrant, regularly took her and her siblings to the library and helped them find books. As an adult, she had once asked how he chose the books. As she relayed his explanation in her speech, it brought tears to the eyes of librarians in the audience: “He left the room for a few moments,” she said, “and came back with a battered accordion file and handed it to me. Inside were dozens of publications listing recommended children’s books–brochures, flyers, pamphlets–and most of them were issued by ALA.”

As this moving story shows, booklists can be enormously helpful to parents and teachers, and even the kind of young reader who likes lists. Instead of being overwhelmed by all those books on the shelves, the library user has a guide with ideas from experts.

I’m a great fan of the ALSC lists, and particularly Notable Children’s Books. Many years ago I served on the committee so I know how much work and care goes into creating it. Yet do these annual lists reach as many young readers as we’d like, either directly or through parents and teachers? I’m confident we can spread the word about these books even further. Here are some ways to share the list online or in print:

Ten Ways to Publicize Notable Children’s Books

1. Use the power of social media to connect to ALSC’s online version of the list. You’ll find “share the page” buttons for Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, Stumbleupon, Reddit, Digg, Pinterest, Tumblr, and Addthis.

2. In the past, libraries could buy brochures of the list. Now you can print out the whole list or part of it at the ALSC website, and make it available as a good old-fashioned list on paper for library patrons. Or, if you want a list without annotations, I’ve created versions by age group that can be found here:

3. Create a bookmark with a link to the online list and an explanation of what it offers.

4. Make a book display of the Notables books or a bulletin board display. There’s a reason that publishers pay to have their books displayed at the front of bookstores: those are the books that catch people’s eye. Displays serve the same function in libraries. Have the lists or bookmarks there for patrons to take home.
Notable Seal

5. Put a Notables sticker on the books. ALA sells these along with other award stickers at the ALA Store. They can be used for the Notable books, recordings, videos, and software.

6. Talk about the Notables books! Booktalk the books formally in schools and informally to individual patrons. Share your enthusiasm. Remind parents about the lists at gift-giving times.

7. Make sure your local bookstore knows about the list. They might want to highlight recommendations from experts, too, with displays and lists.

8. Alert your local newspaper, freebie parenting magazine or local family radio program about the list and send them a copy or the link. To respect copyright, follow the simple directions at ALA’s Copyright Statement.

9. Create a Voki —- a free, talking avatar at voki.com —- to promote the booklist. You can view my Voki here.

10. Write a note or email to local teachers recommending 3-5 Notable titles that you think would be particularly enjoyed by their students. Handselling individual titles can go a long way.

More ideas means more sharing the message about Notables, so please add ideas of your own in the comments!

Kathleen Odean, a children’s librarian for 17 years, is the author of Great Books for Girls and Great Books for Babies and Toddlers, and chaired the 2002 Newbery Award Committee. She currently gives workshops for educators on new YA books. She is writing this post for the Public Awareness Committee. You can reach her at kathleen [at] kathleenodean [dot] com.

The post Ten Ways to Publicize Notable Children’s Books appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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18. Weekend Links-booklists that help kids understand the Presidency.

Welcome to Weekend links! All of the drama affiliated with politics and the election can drive some of us nuts, but it is also a wonderful opportunity to share the world of American Presidents with your young readers. Here are some great book picks and booklists that help kids understand the Presidency and politics.

Check out this past blog post of mine that encourages parents, homeschoolers, teachers and librarians to take A Look back at Past President’s Day Booklists and Activities!

President Squid is a hilarious picture book from Caldecott award winner Aaron Reynolds. With a good deal of tongue and cheek it explores the ideal qualities of a good president. One resident of the sea, Squid, feels he would be perfect for the job. Why you ask ? Well because he lives in a big house, know a lot about lots of things, does all the talking, bosses people around, but mostly importantly, he wears a tie. That’s all anyone needs to be president right?

President's Day Books

Back in November 2012 of  I created a very fun booklist in honor of the upcoming elections season.

President booklist

Monster Needs Your Vote is a hardcover children’s book with vibrant illustrations from Wendy Grieb that is a great book about teaching kids to take a stand and fight for what they believe in.

monster needs your vote

When Monster learns he is too young to vote, he runs for president instead! Through trial and error, he rallies his community together to save his local library from closing. This picture book features people of all ethnicities and religions coming together in the name of education, democracy and reading-a trifecta of awesome! Read the full review here.

monster needs your vote

Dog and Cat for President: The narrator asks the intriguing question all Americans want answered: Who would win if a cat and dog ran for President of the United States? Cat and dog lovers will both agree that this is a fun rhyming tale with a political heart. Both sides of the campaign are humorously depicted in a clever way that young readers will relate to and understand. The illustrations are rich, bold and colorful. “Cat or Dog for President” will keep readers engaged and laughing from beginning to end. Read my full review here.

index

Here’s the link to the Presidential Fun Kit to create all these fun Election-themed activities.

Presidential Fun Kit

I am very excited to be an ambassador for Tinker Crate! Kiwi Crate/Tinker Crate delivers fun hands-on experiences every month. Tinker Crate is for the 9-16+ crowd and a monthly crate will contain 2-3 themed projects designed by our experts to be fun and educational. I love this service because it not only inspires young makers with tools for learning and discovery; it also encourages them to explore science, engineering and technology. I’ve always been an advocate for using imaginations via books or play so this company is a perfect fit for my book-ish passions.

Go HERE to view all of the amazing exploration, activities, science projects and use specific promo code JUMPBOOK30 at Kiwi Crate for 30% off your first crate subscription!

The post Weekend Links-booklists that help kids understand the Presidency. appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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19. Backlist Booklist: Mystery Edition

The weather outside is…pretty gross, let’s be honest. It’s the perfect time to snuggle up with a great mystery! We focus a lot on new and upcoming titles (because they’re EXCITING!) but our library shelves are filled up with backlist. Let’s take a look at some charming and fun mysteries that your tweens will be mad about.

Source: Goodreads

Theo is delighted when she finds a beautiful painting hidden underneath an other painting at her grandfather’s home–she’s trying to find money to save their family house. But her grandfather had been a security guard at the art museum. Could the painting be stolen?

Source: Goodreads

Being an Inquisitor is not a job for a nice Jewish boy, but once the police get wind of the fact that Sacha can see witches, he’s apprenticed anyway. This alternate history of early 20th century New York–with magic–is delightful. If your tweens love it, no worries! There’s a sequel.

Source: Goodreads

Enola Holmes is the 14-year-old sister of Sherlock and Mycroft Holmes. When her mother disappears on her birthday, her much older brothers swoop in to haul her off to boarding school. But Enola is just as clever as her siblings and is determined to figure out where her mother is. She soon escapes to London and begins investigating all on her own. First in a 6-book series.

Source: Goodreads

Sophie and Grace are in the seventh grade, are best friends, and they spy on their neighbors. Just as a game. But one night, they witness a really scary, really bloody scene at the home of their school counselor, and they’re determined to get to the bottom of it–and it quickly isn’t a game anymore. If you love Young and Yang, don’t worry–a second book has just been released!

Source: Goodreads

What’s a discussion of mysteries without a good heist story?? Jackson Greene is a reformed schemer and conman. Those days are behind him, and he just wants to get on with his middle school life. But when he gets wind that the upcoming school president elections may not be on the up-and-up, he can’t stop himself from assembling a crack team to make sure everything goes the right way. Excellent, diverse cast, and super fun adventure, and a sequel came out just this week!

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Our cross-poster from YALSA today is Ally Watkins (@aswatki1). Ally is a library consultant at the Mississippi Library Commission.

The post Backlist Booklist: Mystery Edition appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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20. Best Books of January 2016

January 2016: 43 books and scripts read

I read a great deal of unpublished scripts and manuscripts this month, so I cannot include those titles on this list. I do have two recommendations: Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson and Sunny Side Up by Jennifer L. Holm and Matthew Holm, both full-color graphic novels for kids and tweens. Click the titles to read my reviews.

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21. Books mentioned in the February 2016 issue of Notes from the Horn Book

Five questions for Tanita Davis
Peas and Carrots by Tanita S. Davis, Knopf, 13–16 years.
Mare’s War by Tanita S. Davis, Knopf, 13–16 years.

Not your average problem novel
Unbecoming by Jenny Downham, Scholastic, 14 years and up.
Rules for 50/50 Chances by Kate McGovern, Farrar, 14 years and up.
The Smell of Other People’s Houses by Bonnie-Sue Hitchcock, Random/Lamb, 14 years and up.
Instructions for the End of the World by Jamie Kain, St. Martin’s Griffin, 14 years and up.

Apps for morning, noon, and night
Fiete: A Day on the Farm, Ahoiii, 3–6 years.
Goldilocks and Little Bear, Nosy Crow, 3–6 years.Sago Mini Fairy Tales, Sago Mini, 3–6 years.
Goodnight, Goodnight, Construction Site by Sherri Duskey Rinker, illus. by Tom Lichtenheld, Oceanhouse Media, 3–6 years.
Steam Train, Dream Train by Sherri Duskey Rinker, illus. by Tom Lichtenheld, Oceanhouse Media, 3–6 years.

Winning sports picture books
The Wildest Race Ever: The Story of the 1904 Olympic Marathon by Megan McCarthy, Simon/Wiseman, 5–8 years.
The Kid from Diamond Street: The Extraordinary Story of Baseball Legend Edith Houghton written by Audrey Vernick, illus. by Steven Salerno, Clarion, 5–8 years.
Miss Mary Reporting: The True Story of Sportswriter Mary Garber written by Sue Macy, illus. by C. F. Payne, Simon/Wiseman, 5–8 years.
Game Changer: John McLendon and the Secret Game written by John Coy, illus. by Randy DuBurke, Carolrhoda, 6–9 years.

Of magic and mettle
My Diary from the Edge of the World by Jodi Lynn Anderson, Simon/Aladdin, 9–12 years.
The Wrinkled Crown by Anne Nesbet, HarperCollins/Harper, 9–12 years.
The Last Bogler written by Catherine Jinks, illus. by Sarah Watts, Houghton, 9–12 years.
Hereville: How Mirka Caught a Fish by Barry Deutsch, Abrams/Amulet, 9–14 years.

These titles were featured in the February 2016 issue of Notes from the Horn Book.

The post Books mentioned in the February 2016 issue of Notes from the Horn Book appeared first on The Horn Book.

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22. Booklist: Real Life Reads for Young Adults

Instead of the traditional booklist, I'm sharing a pictorial list...they appeal more to the senses and you got to hand it to book covers - these ROCK!

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23. Black History Month: YA Titles

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24. Amazing February Girls Round-Up

February was a month for middle-grade books about amazing girls that do amazing things! They save their families! They go to bat for their friends! They fight for survival! Let’s take a look at some stories your young patrons will love.

Source: Goodreads

A witch has come to Brye and she has kidnapped Hans, Greta’s little brother. Greta has to travel to the perilous city of Belladonna to rescue him. It’s going to be a difficult journey, but she’ll stop at nothing to get her brother back.

Source: Goodreads

Mabel’s baby sister is plucked from her crib Mabel must brave the jungles of The Forbidden City to get her back!

Source: Goodreads

Real and imaginary worlds are colliding in the world of Story. Tuesday sets off with her friends at the request of the Librarian to find the Gardener: the only person who can stop this catastrophe.

BONUS MARCH GIRL:

Source: Goodreads

Soledad and her sister Ming moved from the Philippines to Louisiana with their dad–and then he left them. Now all they have left is each other and the amazing stories that Sol creates to comfort them. But as time goes by and all they have to look forward to is a life with their hated stepmother, will Sol’s stories save them or make everything worse?

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Our cross-poster from YALSA today is Ally Watkins (@aswatki1). Ally is a library consultant at the Mississippi Library Commission.

The post Amazing February Girls Round-Up appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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25. Best Books of February 2016

February 2016: 13 books and scripts read

Recommended for Teens
Some of the Parts by Hannah Barnaby

Recommended for Tweens
The Battle of Darcy Lane by Tara Altebrando

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