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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: booklists, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 226
1. Best Books of June 2014

June 2014: 18 books and scripts read

Recommended for ages 11 and up
The Summer I Saved the World...in 65 Days by Michele Weber Hurwitz
Summer State of Mind by Jen Calonita
Infinite Sky by C. J. Flood
The Secret Hum of a Daisy by Tracy Holczer

Recommended for ages 14 and up
Everything Leads to You by Nina LaCour
We Are the Goldens by Dana Reinhardt

Non-Fiction Pick
Making Your Life as an Artist by Andrew Simonet

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2. Kid Writing and Biographies: Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson {Guest Post from The Unconventional Librarian}

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Discover Your Wolrd Summer Reading Extravaganza

I am so happy to be able to welcome the funnest librarian on the planet, Pam Margolis from the Unconventional Librarian and her post; Kid Writing and Biographies: Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson to the Discover Your World Summer Reading Extravaganza!

pam5

I believe that growing up in the South during the civil rights era is akin to growing up in different country. We all know that people of color were not treated well in the South. It’s difficult to imagine that there was a time when literature for children did not include people of color. Of any color.

 

Jacqueline Woodson, a powerful voice for multicultural children and teens, was born in Ohio in the 60s. Her childhood was spent in South Carolina and Ohio before finally settling in New York City. Imagine watching the differences in the interactions between Whites and Blacks from a child’s perspective. Woodson’s sensitivity to a child’s thoughts is uncanny. There are many ways to incorporate family projects into the reading of this book.

 

What I love about Brown Girl Dreaming is that not only is it an autobiography (written in free verse) but it’s also a tale of the civil rights movement told through the voice of a child. Even the youngest child will understand the meaning of the behaviors described in the book. For example:

pam

 

In the stores downtown

we’re always followed around

just because we’re brown.

 

Any point in the book is a great opportunity to discuss race, our differences, and similarities. There are so many teachable moments in this book. In addition to discussing civil rights, the book would also make a great study of Black literature, for example, young Jackie discovers Langston Hughes:

 

I loved my friend.

He went away from me.

There’s nothing more to say.

The poem ends.

Soft as it began—

I loved my friend.

–Langston Hughes

 

I remember when I first discovered Langston Hughes and this sad poem. I was instantly moved. Fortunately, young Jackie is discovering her writing voice and she writes a poem in response to Hughes:

 

I love my friend

and still do

when we play games

we laugh. I hope she never goes away from me

Because I love my friend.

-Jackie Woodson

 

She was in fourth grade, when she wrote that, can you believe it? Wouldn’t this make a great lesson on poetry writing or writing your own biography? When given the proper tools, children are amazingly astute writers.

 

The book will be published in August; perhaps writing could be a late summer project for your family? If your family can’t wait until August to learn more about Jacqueline Woodson, there are many books to become acquainted with:

 

Picture Books:

This is the Rope (a story of migration)

pam4

Each Kindness (a story on bullying)

Each Kindness

Middle Grade:

Locomotion

Locomotion

Feathers

Feathers

 

Young Adult:

Hush

hush

 

Miracles Boys

miracle's boys

 

Many of Woodson’s books are multiple award winners, so I’m sure you’ll find at least one good book for your family to enjoy together.

p.s. I’ve had the pleasure of meeting her twice and I’m proud to say I acted like a complete idiot each time (gabbing and fawning all over her); but I don’t care. Good authors are my rock stars.

Brown Girl Dreaming could also be the title of my autobiography. What could the title of yours be?

READ. ALL. THE BOOKS!!!

PammyPam

An Unconventional Librarian

Pam, a.k.a. An Unconventional Librarian, is a curator of YA and children’s literature, a book blogger, coffee drinker and cupcake lover, who seeks multicultural books that appeal to all kids. Pam is also building a Harry Potter collection to enter the record books and she thinks being a little silly never hurts. You can connect with Pam on her website Pinterest page or on her Facebook page.

 

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The post Kid Writing and Biographies: Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson {Guest Post from The Unconventional Librarian} appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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3. Freedom Summer reading

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer, the 1964 grassroots campaign to register black voters in Mississippi — the state with the lowest percentage of black voters registered and a history of disenfranchisement through intimidation and violence. These books about that significant and bloody summer are all recommended by The Horn Book Magazine and The Horn Book Guide.

Fiction

scattergood glory be Freedom Summer readingProtagonist Glory doesn’t understand what’s happening in her Mississippi hometown during the “Freedom Summer” of 1964 in Augusta Scattergood’s novel Glory Be. Difficult and changing relationships with her sister Jesslyn and friend Frankie mirror the swirling upheaval. The hotly debated closing of the segregated community pool both serves as a snapshot of the tumultuous era and illustrates Glory’s realizations about the power of her own convictions. (Scholastic, 2012; intermediate)

wiles freedom summer Freedom Summer readingIn 1964, two young friends — Joe, who is white, and John Henry, who is black — find the town pool being filled with tar to avoid enforced integration. Their disappointment is palpable — and galvanizing. John Henry decides to enter a previously forbidden store, and the friends join arms and go in together. Deborah Wiles’s text for picture book Freedom Summer, though concise, is full of nuance, and illustrator Jerome Lagarrigue’s oil paintings shimmer with the heat of the South in summer. (Atheneum/Schwartz, 2001; new ed. Atheneum, 2014; primary)

wiles revolution Freedom Summer readingIn Revolution [Sixties Trilogy], also by Deborah Wiles, twelve-year-old Sunny Fairchild (who is white) tells of Greenwood, Mississippi during Freedom Summer: a town turned upside-down, in need of change but resistant to it. As in the previous volume, Countdown, a “documentary novel” format intersperses all manner of documents with Sunny’s first-person narrative and occasional chapters narrated by black teen Raymond Bulliss. It’s an ambitious, heady endeavor that succeeds in capturing the atmosphere of that pivotal and eventful summer, with the documents offering a broader context. An author’s note and a solid bibliography round out this innovative work commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of Freedom Summer. (Scholastic, 2014; intermediate, middle school)

 

Nonfiction

rubin freedom summer 170x205 Freedom Summer readingFreedom Summer: The 1964 Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi by Susan Goldman Rubin provides a useful and informative look at the event’’s organizers, the volunteers, the voter registration drives, etc. Rubin conducted many interviews, in person, by telephone, and by e-mail, with people who were directly involved, and their firsthand accounts — along with copious archival black-and-white photographs — bring the events to life. (Holiday, 2014; middle school, high school)

mitchell freedom summer murders 170x227 Freedom Summer readingFor The Freedom Summer Murders, author Don Mitchell conducted a number of interviews with close friends and family members of slain civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner. Fascinating biographical sketches of the three men, based on these interviews, give readers insight into their deep commitment to social justice. Mitchell also provides a thorough account of the search for their bodies, and of the years of investigation that culminated in the 2005 trial of one of the murderers (at that time eighty years old). This book will grab you from its opening paragraphs and won’t let go until justice is served. (Scholastic, 2014; middle school, high school)

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The post Freedom Summer reading appeared first on The Horn Book.

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4. WEEKEND LINKS-Build a Summer Reading List So Kids Can Discover our World

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The Internet is just a buzzin with planning, thoughts and activity prep for the upcoming summer reason. If you are like me, this time of year when school and is ending and summer is beginning is met with with a mixture of excitement and dread. Excitement for all the fun family plans, adventures and travel you may be working on, but also dread for the time of year when reading activity slides and our young ones are easily bored stiff.

As usual, I have seen a ton of great activities, booklists and suggestions from other bloggers and I’d like to share my favorites with you today. I would also like to share and remind readers of some of the top booklists and summer reading activities that have appeared right here on JIAB, and post that will Build a Summer Reading List So Kids Can Discover our World. Enjoy!

We’ve done a whole series called Read Around the Continents over the course of these last 12 months and these blog posts are chocked full of great book suggestions about different cultures and continents:

Read Around the Continents

 

Read Around the Continents: North America/United States 

Read Around The Continents: Eastern Europe

Read Around The Continents: Australia/Oceania Reading List

Read Around The Continents: 24 Children’s Books About Western Europe

 

Speaking of Global Booklists…here’s an awesome one!

Crafty Moms Share: Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month. Lots of great booklist ideas!

I see a few favorites on here, how about you? ‘37 Children’s Books that Changed People’s Lives’ by Riffle Childrens.

37

 

A Mighty Girl Heroes: Inspiring the Next Generation of History Makers has a list of great books featuring Mighty Girls.


27 Vintage Books Every Child Should Read from No Time for Flash Cards.

27-vintage-books-every-child-should-read

Summer Reading Tree: Forming “Roots” for Motivated Readers

summer reading

Summer Reading Tree- 15 Green Books for Kids

Summer Reading

 

The A-Z Summer Reading Tree: 26 Ways To Encourage Reading This Summer

summer reading

25 Books That Diversify Kids’ Reading Lists This Summer via @Mind Shift

 'Ruby in Ruby's Wish' is a determined protagonist any boy or girl can learn from.

What good summer reads have you found?

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The post WEEKEND LINKS-Build a Summer Reading List So Kids Can Discover our World appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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5. Building a Home Library

Building a Home Library lists

Building a Home Library (photo courtesy of ALSC)

The ALA-Children’s Book Council (CBC) Joint Committee, with cooperation from ALSC’s Quicklists Consulting Committee, have updated the four Building a Home Library bibliographies below to provide guidance to parents, grandparents, and others interested in assembling a high-quality library for their children at home.

Librarians, educators, and others who work with families are encouraged to download and print these brochures and share them with parents, grandparents, and caregivers in their community.

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6. Best Books of May 2014

May 2014: 22 books and scripts read

Scripts made up the overwhelming majority of my reading list this month. Amongst the binders and staples and papers and scribbles, there was Deb Caletti's latest novel, The Last Forever, a beautiful story that was a great read, especially as the cold weather here gave way to sunshine. Read my full-length review of the book.

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7. Books mentioned in the May 2014 issue of Nonfiction Notes from the Horn Book

Folklore

Duffy, Chris, Editor Fairy Tale Comics
Gr. K–3    128 pp.     Roaring Brook/First Second    2013
Trade ISBN 978-1-59643-823-1

Goldman, Judy Whiskers, Tails & Wings: Animal Folktales from Mexico
Illustrated by Fabricio VandenBroeck
Gr. 4–6    58 pp.    Charlesbridge    2013
Trade ISBN 978-1-58089-372-5

Lee, H. Chuku, Reteller Beauty and the Beast
Illustrated by Pat Cummings
Gr. K–3    32 pp.    HarperCollins/Amistad    2014
Trade ISBN 978-0-688-14819-5

McHugh, Maura Twisted Fairy Tales: 20 Classic Stories with a Dark and Dangerous Heart
Illustrated by Jane Laurie
Middle school, high school    144 pp.    Barron’s    2013
Trade ISBN 978-0-7641-6588-7

Munduruku, Daniel Amazonia: Indigenous Tales from Brazil
Illustrated by Nikolai Popov
Gr. 4–6, middle school    95 pp.    Groundwood (House of Anansi Press)    2013
Trade ISBN 978-1-55498-185-4

 

Insects and Arachnids

Arnosky, Jim Creep and Flutter: The Secret World of Insects and Spiders
Gr. 4–6    40 pp.    Sterling    2012
Trade ISBN 978-1-4027-7766-0

Burns, Loree Griffin Handle with Care: An Unusual Butterfly Journey
Photographs by Ellen Harasimowicz
Gr. K–3    32 pp.    Millbrook    2014
Library binding ISBN 978-0-7613-9342-9
E-book ISBN 978-1-4677-2542-2

Huber, Raymond Flight of the Honey Bee
Illustrated by Brian Lovelock
Gr. K–3    32 pp.    Candlewick    2013
Trade ISBN 978-0-7636-6760-3

Lasky, Kathryn Silk & Venom: Searching for a Dangerous Spider
Gr. 4–6, middle school    64 pp.    Candlewick    2011
Trade ISBN 978-0-7636-4222-8
Photographs by Christopher G. Knight

Pringle, Laurence Scorpions!: Strange and Wonderful
Illustrated by Meryl Henderson
Gr. 4–6    32 pp.    Boyds    2013
Trade ISBN 978-1-59078-473-0

 

Oceanography

Butterworth, Chris See What a Seal Can Do
Illustrated by Kate Nelms
PS–Gr. 3    32 pp.    Candlewick    2013
Trade ISBN 978-0-7636-6574-6

Hibbert, Clare If You Were a Shark [If You Were A... series]
Gr. K–3    32 pp.    Smart Apple    2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-59920-962-3

Simon, Seymour Seymour Simon’s Extreme Oceans
Gr. 4–6    57 pp.    Chronicle    2013
Trade ISBN 978-1-4521-0833-9

Swinburne, Stephen R. The Sea Turtle Scientist [Scientists in the Field series]
Gr. 4–6, middle school    65 pp.    Houghton    2013
Trade ISBN 978-0-547-36755-2

Turner, Pamela S. The Dolphins of Shark Bay [Scientists in the Field series]
Photographs by Scott Tuason
Gr. 4–6, middle school    76 pp.    Houghton    2013
Trade ISBN 978-0-547-71638-1

 

Gardening and outdoor discovery

Ancona, George It’s Our Garden: From Seeds to Harvest in a School Garden
Gr. K–3    48 pp.    Candlewick    2013
Trade ISBN 978-0-7636-5392-7

Berkes, Marianne What’s in the Garden?
Illustrated by Cris Arbo
Gr. K–3    32 pp.    Dawn    2013
Trade ISBN 978-1-58469-189-1

Burns, Loree Griffin Citizen Scientists: Be a Part of Scientific Discovery from Your Own Backyard
Photographs by Ellen Harasimowicz
Gr. 4–6    80 pp.    Holt    2012
Trade ISBN 978-0-8050-9062-8

Grow Your Own series

Lanz, Helen Lettuce
Gr. 4–6   32 pp.    Sea to Sea    2012
Library binding ISBN 978-1-59771-311-5

Lanz, Helen Potatoes
Gr. 4–6      32 pp.    Sea to Sea    2012
Library binding ISBN 978-1-59771-312-2

Lanz, Helen Strawberries
Gr. 4–6    32 pp.    Sea to Sea    2012
Library binding ISBN 978-1-59771-313-9

Lanz, Helen Tomatoes
Gr. 4–6    32 pp.    Sea to Sea    2012
Library binding ISBN 978-1-59771-314-6

Root, Phyllis Plant a Pocket of Prairie
Illustrated by Betsy Bowen
Gr. K–3    40 pp.    Minnesota    2014
Trade ISBN 978-0-8166-7980-5

 

Sports and recreation

Girls’ SportsZone series

Hudson, Maryann Girls’ Golf
Gr. 4–6    48 pp.    ABDO    2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-61783-985-6

Lawrence, Blythe Girls’ Gymnastics
Gr. 4–6    48 pp.    ABDO    2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-61783-986-3

Peters, Chris Girls’ Hockey
Gr. 4–6      48 pp.    ABDO    2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-61783-987-0

Williams, Doug Girls’ Basketball
Gr. 4–6    48 pp.    ABDO    2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-61783-984-9

McClafferty, Carla Killough Fourth Down and Inches: Concussions and Football’s Make-or-Break Moment
Middle school, high school     96 pp.    Carolrhoda    2013
Trade ISBN 978-1-4677-1067-1

Mulder, Michelle Pedal It!: How Bicycles Are Changing the World [Orca Footprints series]
Gr. 4–6    48 pp.    Orca    2013
Trade ISBN 978-1-4598-0219-3

First Step Nonfiction: Sports Are Fun! series

Nelson, Robin Baseball Is Fun!
Gr. K–3   24 pp.    Lerner    2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4677-1101-2

Nelson, Robin Basketball Is Fun!
Gr. K–3    24 pp.    Lerner    2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4677-1744-1

Nelson, Robin Dance Is Fun!
Gr. K–3    24 pp.    Lerner    2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4677-1104-3

Nelson, Robin Football Is Fun!
Gr. K–3    24 pp.    Lerner    2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4677-1746-5

Nelson, Robin Soccer Is Fun
Gr. K–3
    24 pp.    Lerner    2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4677-1105-0

Nelson, Robin Swimming Is Fun!
Gr. K–3    24 pp.    Lerner    2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4677-1106-7

Rosenstock, Barb The Streak: How Joe DiMaggio Became America’s Hero
Illustrated by Terry Widener
Gr. K–3    32 pp.    Boyds/Calkins    2014
Trade ISBN 978-1-59078-992-6

These titles were featured in the May 2014 issue of Nonfiction Notes from the Horn Book.

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8. Take Some Cues from Gilligan: build a nation of readers, not an island

Taking a cue from a popular show in the sixties, Gilligan’s Island, I re-wrote the intro to reflect today’s school libraries (so sing it with the music in mind):
Just sit right back and you’ll hear a tale,
A tale of some really good reads,
That started on the very first page
Aboard the library.
You really need to integrate
Technology brave and sure
Soon teens will start to pick up books
Fav books won’t be obscure… Fav books won’t be obscure
Trying to get students to look beyond a textbook and read for pleasure is a situation that occurs frequently in high schools. One librarian vs. many teachers on campus isn’t a well-balanced scale, but it’s not so much the tipping point as much as it is the approach.  Understanding the expectations of academics and being able to integrate pleasure reading into this can be the start of a symbiotic reading relationship where both the library and the classroom understand how important both types of reading are to a student. One way to attract both students and teachers alike to build interest in pleasure reading is by integrating technology for a 21st century makeover.
Why use technology in the first place?  There are several reasons why, but the first reason is to create relationships with both students and teachers.  Both of these populations use online resources not only for research and academia, but also to collaborate and most importantly, to communicate.  By using something simple as everyday email, you can create interest and even stimulate conversation.  Here are a few examples how you can use email:
  • Create and email out a survey of what books they’d like to see in the library (creates a sense of ownership so it’s more about THE library instead of MY library)
  • Send out advanced information on author visits, book talks, new books coming in, new programs or collections in the library
  • Send out a weekly book review to share with staff and students.
  • Send out emails to teachers asking if they have time for a genre-based booktalk that goes along with their particular unit they’re studying.

If an email doesn’t catch their eye, perhaps an online poster will.  Create these using any different type of poster creator like Smore or Canva and send out the same information in a more pictographic way.  Embed these onto websites or email out the link (make your message and title catchy!).  This type of technology-laced information is based less on words, more on design, but is used to convey the same meaning.
  • Use this to let students know what hours the library is open
  • Advertise open houses and let everyone know the library will be there, ready to check out books to students while their parents are talking to teachers or even accompanying  them to the library
  • Create a poster of book pairs to send out to educators showing them the correlation between pleasure and academic reading on a visual scale

Nothing attracts more attention than a great book trailer.  These add spice to a book before it may even be picked up, and more often than not, it has been (personally and statistically speaking) the most checked out and popular books. Pictures do tell a thousand words.  Here’s how to use book trailers to stimulate pleasure reading:
  • Put them on a digital picture frame and set it on the circulation desk.  If you don’t have one, try converting an old desktop computer screen into one.
  • Send them to your school’s video announcement system, if you have one.  This will reach the widest audience and all you have to do is sit back and watch them come through the library doors
  • Use them in your booktalks.  Create a 3:1 ratio to not only create interest, but also break up the monotony of a spoken booktalk.

If you don’t try differentiation through various formats, you’re missing the mark and a potential reader, especially in high school, may slip through the net.  Making not only books, but e-books available is becoming a more standard practice in libraries.  Although they may be a little more expensive to buy, a librarian has to personally ask and answer the hard question of price vs. student access.  But there are other alternatives:
  • Let students know about Project Gutenberg.  Most required reading, if it’s a classic, can be found here, or there are books for students who want to lose themselves in the Bronte sisters or a great gothic like Frankenstein.
  • There are apps that also access free e-books.  Free Books – 23,469 Classics to Go is one such app that allows readers to access all types of digital books by genre or author
  • iBooks is a common app for phones or iPads.  The beauty of online reading is that students can find interesting articles online and download them as PDF files to read later.

Sharing booktalks via social media is another way to catch readers, especially those that don’t come often to the library.  It’s a given that most students are on Twitter, Vine, Facebook and Instagram, so grab this opportunity to “talk” to students about great books!
  • Take a picture of the books you may be booktalking and send it out as a picture on all types of social media
  • Take a 15 second video of yourself talking about a great book and put in on the library Instagram page.
  • If you have a PowerPoint, upload it in Google Drive and share it with all the teachers in your building.  Share the link further by posting to Twitter and Facebook.

This isn’t a world of hardcopy vs. technology, but one that accommodates both and creates excitement!  In the library, one of the most important things a young adult librarian can do is think like a teenager.  See how they view the world, how they communicate, and why they read (or don’t) and hone in on those ideas to create a bigger, better and well-grounded library program for teens to enjoy reading for pleasure.

**Republished from  a post I wrote for nerdybookclub.wordpress.com

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9. 2014 ALSC Summer Reading List

2014 ALSC Summer Reading List

2014 ALSC Summer Reading List (courtesy of ALSC)

ALSC recently released three summer reading lists. Each is available to download for free on the ALSC website in color and black and white. Lists can be customized to include library information, summer hours and summer reading programs for children before making copies available to schools and patrons.

The Summer Reading List was compiled and annotated by ALSC’s Quicklists Consulting Committee and School-Age Programs and Services Committee through a 2013 Carnegie Whitney Grant funded by the American Library Association Publishing Committee. The 2014 list was updated by ALSC’s Quicklists Consulting Committee.

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10. Let’s Celebrate Children’s Book Week! {Linky Party}

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It’s Children’s Book Week!! — {May 12-18, 2014}

Children's Book Week!

Children’s Book Week is the annual celebration of books for young people and the joy of reading.

Established in 1919, Children’s Book Week is the longest-running national literacy initiative in the country. Every year, commemorative events are held nationwide at schools, libraries, bookstores, homes — wherever young readers and books connect!

Children’s Book Week originated in the belief that children’s books and literacy are life-changers. In 1913, Franklin K. Matthiews, the librarian of the Boy Scouts of America, began touring the country to promote higher standards in children’s books. He proposed creating a Children’s Book Week, which would be supported by all interested groups: publishers, booksellers, and librarians.

The need for Children’s Book Week today is as essential as it was in 1919, and the task remains the realization of Frederic Melcher’s fundamental declaration: “A great nation is a reading nation.”

To read more about the history of this event that is celebrating is 95th Anniversary, go here.

Here’s something fun. Show your support by creating a CBW Twibbon! Create your own Twibbon here.

Twibbon


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11. 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: High School Fiction and Nonfiction

Need suggestions for beach reading or books to bring to summer camp? We’ve hand-picked our top ten in each age range, all published 2013–2014, that are ideal for the season. Grade levels are only suggestions; the individual child is the real criterion. For a handy take-along list of titles, follow this link to a printable PDF.

Picture Books (Fiction and Nonfiction) | Early Readers and Younger Fiction
Intermediate Fiction and Nonfiction | Middle School Fiction and Nonfiction

High School Fiction and Nonfiction

Suggested grade level for all entries: 9 and up

alexander he said she said 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: High School Fiction and NonfictionHe Said, She Said by Kwame Alexander (Amistad/HarperTeen)
Claudia Clarke — sharp, opinionated, and Harvard-bound — is the only girl who isn’t impressed by quarterback Omar “T-Diddy” Smalls. Omar takes a bet that he can win Claudia over, and when his usual seduction tactics fail, he applies his social clout to Claudia’s cause du jour. 330 pages.

berry all the truth thats in me 170 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: High School Fiction and NonfictionAll the Truth That’s in Me by Julie Berry (Viking)
Eighteen-year-old narrator Judith is ostracized from her claustrophobic village after a trauma that left her mute. Readers gradually learn “all the truth” about the incident and the village itself as Judith speaks directly (though only in her head) to her love, Lucas. 274 pages.

farizan if you could be mine 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: High School Fiction and NonfictionIf You Could Be Mine by Sara Farizan (Algonquin)
Seventeen-year-old Sahar has been in love with her best friend Nasrin for years. But the girls live in Iran, where their love is illegal. When Nasrin accepts a marriage proposal, both girls must face the untenable future of their relationship; Sahar hatches a desperate plan for them to be together. 247 pages.

maggot moon 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: High School Fiction and NonfictionMaggot Moon by Sally Gardner; illus. by Julian Crouch (Candlewick)
Printz Honor Book
In an alternate dystopian United Kingdom, the Motherland regime consigns undesirables to the derelict housing of Zone Seven. When his friend Hector disappears, Standish sets out to rescue him and uncovers a shocking government hoax. 281 pages.

lewis march book 1 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: High School Fiction and NonfictionMarch: Book One by John Lewis and Andrew Aydin; illus. by Nate Powell (Top Shelf)
In this memoir told in graphic novel form, Congressman John Lewis — the last surviving member of the “Big Six” civil rights leaders — recounts his formative years, beginning with 1965′s infamous “Bloody Sunday.” From this violently chaotic event the narrative fast-forwards to the morning of Barack Obama’s January 2009 inauguration. 128 pages.

lockhart we were liars 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: High School Fiction and NonfictionWe Were Liars by E. Lockhart (Delacorte)
At fifteen, Cady survived an unspecified accident on the private island where her wealthy family and her love interest Gat spend their summers. Two summers later, Cady battles the resultant migraines and memory loss to piece together what really happened, building to a shocking reveal. 228 pages.

rowell fangirl 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: High School Fiction and NonfictionFangirl by Rainbow Rowell (St. Martin’s Griffin)
Change-resistant college freshman Cath holes up in her dorm room writing fantasy fanfiction. As the year progresses, she is pushed outside her comfort zone by her snarky roommate, her love interest, and her loving but dysfunctional family. 438 pages.

sedgwick midwinterblood 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: High School Fiction and NonfictionMidwinterblood by Marcus Sedgwick (Roaring Brook)
Printz Medal Winner
Seven interconnected short stories progress backwards through the history of a remote Scandinavian island, from 2073 to a “Time Unknown.” Together the tales gradually reveal the ritual that brings bloody death and forbidden love to “Blessed Island.” 263 pages.

wein rose under fire 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: High School Fiction and NonfictionRose Under Fire by Elizabeth Wein (Hyperion)
This WWII-set companion to Boston Globe–Horn Book Honor winner Code Name Verity follows eighteen-year-old American pilot Rose Justice. Captured while delivering supplies and personnel, Rose is sent to notorious German women’s concentration camp Ravensbrück, where she’s befriended by victims of Nazi medical experiments. 360 pages.

boxers saints 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: High School Fiction and NonfictionBoxers & Saints by Gene Luen Yang; illus. by the author; color by Lark Pien (First Second/Roaring Brook)
This “diptych” of graphic novels (with touches of magical realism and humor) is set during China’s Boxer Rebellion. In Boxers, Little Bao learns to harness the power of ancient gods to fight the spread of Christianity, while in Saints, Four-Girl sits squarely on the other side of the rebellion. 328 and 172 pages.

For past years’ summer reading lists from The Horn Book, click on the tag summer reading.

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12. 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Picture Books (Fiction and Nonfiction)

Need suggestions for beach reading or books to bring to summer camp? We’ve hand-picked our top ten in each age range, all published 2013–2014, that are ideal for the season. Grade levels are only suggestions; the individual child is the real criterion. For a handy take-along list of titles, follow this link to a printable PDF.

Early Readers and Younger Fiction | Intermediate Fiction and Nonfiction
Middle School Fiction and Nonfiction | High School Fiction and Nonfiction

Picture Books (Fiction and Nonfiction)

Suggested grade level for all entries: PS–2

atinuke splash anna hibiscus 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Picture Books (Fiction and Nonfiction)Splash, Anna Hibiscus! by Atinuke; illus. by Lauren Tobia (Kane Miller)
Anna (Anna Hibiscus’ Song) and her family take a trip to the beach. Everyone else is too busy — reading, talking, digging in the sand — to go in the water, so she takes a dip by herself. Her ensuing joy entices the others. 40 pages.

journey 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Picture Books (Fiction and Nonfiction)Journey by Aaron Becker; illus. by the author (Candlewick)
Caldecott Honor Book
In the tradition of Harold and the Purple Crayon, this wordless story follows a girl who uses a crayon (red) to draw herself into other worlds. The worlds she enters are lush, detailed, and elaborate, and she gets pulled into a rescue mission involving a purple bird. 40 pages.

brown mr tiger goes wild 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Picture Books (Fiction and Nonfiction)Mr. Tiger Goes Wild by Peter Brown; illus. by the author (Little, Brown)
Upright Mr. Tiger, bored in his very drab, very proper community, drops to all fours, sheds his clothing, and runs wild — and for the first time looks happy. The townsfolk are appalled…then they, too, unleash their animal natures. 48 pages.

dipucchio gaston 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Picture Books (Fiction and Nonfiction)Gaston by Kelly DiPucchio; illus. by Christian Robinson (Atheneum)
Dog Gaston looms over his teacup-sized poodle sisters. In the park they meet a family like theirs but in reverse: bulldogs Rocky, Ricky, Bruno, and petite Antoinette. Were Gaston and Antoinette switched at birth? And, if so, should they switch back? 40 pages.

locomotive 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Picture Books (Fiction and Nonfiction)Locomotive by Brian Floca; illus. by the author (Jackson/Atheneum)
Caldecott Medal Winner, Sibert Honor Book
Striking cinematic front endpapers describe the creation of the Transcontinental Railroad, then a historical-fiction-meets-travelogue narrative zeroes in on one family’s journey from Omaha to San Francisco. 64 pages.

idle floraflamingo 228x300 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Picture Books (Fiction and Nonfiction)Flora and the Flamingo by Molly Idle; illus. by the author (Chronicle)
Caldecott Honor Book
In this unique wordless picture book, a little girl mimics a flamingo’s graceful movements. The bird, at first annoyed, eventually relents and teaches her ballet. The book is cinematic, comedic, and balletic, with dynamic pacing and physical comedy facilitated by ingenious pull-down flaps. 40 pages.

janeczko firefly july2 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Picture Books (Fiction and Nonfiction)Firefly July: A Year of Very Short Poems selected by Paul B. Janeczko; illus. by Melissa Sweet (Candlewick)
Child-friendly mixed-media illustrations enhance this collection’s thirty-six excellent brief poems. Most of the verses are by familiar poets (Carl Sandburg, Langston Hughes), including those known for their children’s verse (Alice Schertle, Charlotte Zolotow). 48 pages.

morales ninowrestlesworld 297x300 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Picture Books (Fiction and Nonfiction)Niño Wrestles the World by Yuyi Morales; illus. by the author (Porter/Roaring Brook)
Belpré Illustrator Award
Pint-sized Niño, fearless luchador (and big brother), dons his red mask, ready to take on all comers. He battles a series of imagined foes from Mexican history and popular culture before facing the trickiest of opponents: las hermanitas! 40 pages.

roth parrots over puerto rico 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Picture Books (Fiction and Nonfiction)Parrots over Puerto Rico by Susan L. Roth and Cindy Trumbore; illus. by Susan L. Roth (Lee & Low)
Sibert Award Winner
In this gorgeously illustrated history of the endangered Puerto Rican parrot, the blue-and-green birds witness early settlement on the island; decline disastrously in numbers due to human population growth and invasive species; then slowly make a comeback thanks to conservation efforts. 48 pages.

mr wuffles 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Picture Books (Fiction and Nonfiction)Mr. Wuffles! by David Wiesner; illus. by the author (Clarion)
Caldecott Honor Book
Housecat Mr. Wuffles toys with a tiny spaceship. The ship’s little green passengers, assisted by a ladybug, flee to the space under a radiator, which harbors a thriving insect civilization. Friendship ensues, food and technology are shared, repairs are made, and the cat is foiled. 32 pages.

For past years’ summer reading lists from The Horn Book, click on the tag summer reading.

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13. 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Middle School Fiction and Nonfiction

Need suggestions for beach reading or books to bring to summer camp? We’ve hand-picked our top ten in each age range, all published 2013–2014, that are ideal for the season. Grade levels are only suggestions; the individual child is the real criterion. For a handy take-along list of titles, follow this link to a printable PDF.

Picture Books (Fiction and Nonfiction) | Early Readers and Younger Fiction
Intermediate Fiction and Nonfiction | High School Fiction and Nonfiction

Middle School Fiction and Nonfiction

Suggested grade level for all entries: 6–8

ellis outside in 170x255 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Middle School Fiction and NonfictionOutside In by Sarah Ellis (Groundwood)
Lynn, raised by an irresponsible, unreliable bohemian mother, yearns for normalcy. After meeting Blossom, a girl whose family lives off the grid in a self-sufficient underground bunker, Lynn begins to see her city and her own experience through new eyes. 207 pages.

gansworth if i ever get out of here 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Middle School Fiction and NonfictionIf I Ever Get Out of Here by Eric Gansworth (Levine/Scholastic)
Lewis, from the Tuscarora Indian Reservation in 1970s upstate New York, is beginning seventh grade at a mostly white junior high, and he’s tired of not fitting in. A friendship with newcomer George helps Lewis cope with loneliness and bullying. But does it constitute a betrayal of his identity? 360 pages.

gleason clockwork scarab 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Middle School Fiction and NonfictionThe Clockwork Scarab [Stoker & Holmes] by Colleen Gleeson (Chronicle)
In alternate Victorian London, Mina Holmes (Sherlock’s niece) and Evaline Stoker (Bram’s sister) team up to solve a series of murders involving high-society girls, the British Museum, and ancient Egyptian artifacts. The story veers into sci-fi when an unwitting time-traveler, modern-day boy Dylan, arrives. 356 pages.

greenberg mad potter 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Middle School Fiction and NonfictionThe Mad Potter: George E. Ohr, Eccentric Genius by Jan Greenberg and Sandra Jordan (Porter/Roaring Brook)
Sibert Honor Book
“Eccentric” is an apt word for Ohr, a Mississippi blacksmith’s son (1857–1918) who reinvented himself as a potter. Greenberg and Jordan have produced a magisterial portrait that’s both a character study and an appreciation of their subject’s oeuvre. 56 pages.

kidd go 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Middle School Fiction and NonfictionGo: A Kidd’s Guide to Graphic Design by Chip Kidd; illus. by the author (Workman)
This overview makes graphic design immediate and accessible, posing questions and answering them in engaging ways. The first four chapters — “Form,” “Typography,” “Content,” “Concept” — tackle design essentials and some advanced ideas. The final chapter presents “10 Design Projects.” 160 pages.

far far away 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Middle School Fiction and NonfictionFar Far Away by Tom McNeal (Knopf)
Jeremy has the ability to hear ghosts; long-dead Jacob Grimm becomes his mentor and guardian. With Jacob’s help, Jeremy becomes a whiz at school and charms his crush Ginger — but the presence of the malevolent “Finder of Occasions” gives the story a shiver of horror as dark as any of the Grimm tales. 373 pages.

meyer cress 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Middle School Fiction and NonfictionCress [Lunar Chronicles] by Marissa Meyer (Feiwel)
This fairy tale/sci-fi hybrid series continues with a “Rapunzel”-inspired story. Cress, taken from her Lunar parents as a baby, is forced to live alone on a satellite, spying on the Earthens for Queen Levana. But her real loyalty lies with cyborg Cinder’s plan to protect Earth by dethroning the queen. 550 pages.

moriarty cracks in the kingdom 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Middle School Fiction and NonfictionThe Cracks in the Kingdom [Colors of Madeleine] by Jaclyn Moriarty (Levine/Scholastic)
In this sequel to the Boston Globe–Horn Book Honor winner A Corner of White, Madeleine (in Cambridge, England) and Elliot (in the Kingdom of Cello) continue to communicate through a “crack” between the two worlds. When the Cello royal family goes missing in Madeleine’s world, Madeleine and Elliot attempt to cross over themselves. 499 pages.

reynolds when i was the greatest 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Middle School Fiction and NonfictionWhen I Was the Greatest by Jason Reynolds (Atheneum)
Ali’s thing is boxing, Noodles’s is comic books, and Needles’s is…knitting, to help control his Tourette’s syndrome. The three friends live in Brooklyn’s tough Bed-Stuy neighborhood, but the book also shows how zip codes are just one aspect of people’s lives. 232 pages.

sloan counting by 7s 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Middle School Fiction and NonfictionCounting by 7s by Holly Goldberg Sloan (Dial)
After her parents’ death, oddball twelve-year-old genius Willow Chance is taken in by her only friend, high schooler Mai Nguyen, Mai’s mother, and her surly brother Quang-ha. These initially disparate characters, plus cabdriver Jairo Hernandez, ultimately connect to form a new family. What sets this book apart are its lack of sentimentality and its truly multicultural cast. 380 pages.

For past years’ summer reading lists from The Horn Book, click on the tag summer reading.

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14. 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Early Readers and Younger Fiction

Need suggestions for beach reading or books to bring to summer camp? We’ve hand-picked our top ten in each age range, all published 2013–2014, that are ideal for the season. Grade levels are only suggestions; the individual child is the real criterion. For a handy take-along list of titles, follow this link to a printable PDF.

Picture Books (Fiction and Nonfiction) | Intermediate Fiction and Nonfiction
Middle School Fiction and Nonfiction | High School Fiction and Nonfiction

Early Readers and Younger Fiction

Suggested grade level for all entries: K–3

archer big bad wolf 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Early Readers and Younger Fiction archer itsy bitsy spider 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Early Readers and Younger FictionBig Bad Wolf and Itsy Bitsy Spider [Urgency Emergency!] by Dosh Archer; illus. by the author (Whitman)
New readers are in for a treat with these British imports set in an emergency room where Doctor Glenda (a dog) and Nurse Percy (a rooster) ably assist their nursery-rhyme- and fairy-tale-character patients. 48 pages each.

broach miniature world of marvin and james 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Early Readers and Younger FictionThe Miniature World of Marvin & James [Masterpiece Adventures] by Elise Broach; illus. by Kelly Murphy (Ottaviano/Holt)
This amiable debut in an early chapter book series follows the friendship of beetle Marvin and human boy James (from Broach’s middle grade novel Masterpiece). Marvin helps James pack for a week-long trip to the beach, then has adventures of his own inside the house. 104 pages.

english dog days 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Early Readers and Younger FictionDog Days [Carver Chronicles] by Karen English; illus. by Laura Freeman (Clarion)
In this companion series to English’s Nikki and Deja books, Gavin is starting to fit in at Carver Elementary School. On the home front, he and his new pal Richard accidentally break a snow globe belonging to Gavin’s sister, and Gavin must take on a challenging dog-walking gig to earn the money to replace it. 122 pages.

fortunately the milk 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Early Readers and Younger FictionFortunately, the Milk by Neil Gaiman; illus. by Skottie Young (Harper/HarperCollins)
A father goes out for milk for his children’s cereal. He’s abducted by aliens, escapes from pirates, and saves the universe from destruction. Dad arrives home safely and tells the shaggy-dog tale to his kids — who, naturally, don’t believe a word of it. 113 pages.

year of billy miller 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Early Readers and Younger FictionThe Year of Billy Miller by Kevin Henkes; illus. by the author (Greenwillow)
Newbery Honor Book
Billy starts off on the wrong foot with his second-grade teacher; his seat isn’t next to his best friend; and he worries he may not be smart enough for school. The book is divided into four parts (each focusing on an important person in Billy’s life) that together offer a vivid portrait of a boy coming into his confidence. 229 pages.

lin ling and ting share a birthday 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Early Readers and Younger FictionLing & Ting Share a Birthday by Grace Lin; illus. by the author (Little, Brown)
The terrific twins from Ling & Ting: Not Exactly the Same! are back in this birthday-themed offering, this time buying presents, baking cakes, and making wishes. Once again, young readers will enjoy spotting the differences (big and small) between these identical twin sisters with distinct personalities. 48 pages.

liniers big wet balloon 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Early Readers and Younger FictionThe Big Wet Balloon by Liniers; illus. by the author (Toon/Candlewick)
Matilda teaches her little sister Clemmie how to catch raindrops on her tongue, jump in puddles, and search for worms, as pictured in the panels of this early-reader comic. Amidst her excitement, Matilda mistakenly releases Clemmie’s precious red birthday balloon into the sky. 40 pages.

mckay Lulu and the Cat in the Bag 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Early Readers and Younger FictionLulu and the Cat in the Bag by Hilary McKay; illus. by Priscilla Lamont (Whitman)
Grandmother Nan is taking care of Lulu and her cousin Mellie, and they’re all staying at Lulu’s house so they can tend to her many rescued pets. When kindhearted Lulu finds a large cat on her doorstep, there’s a problem: Nan is not a cat person. 84 pages.

pizzoli watermelon seed 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Early Readers and Younger FictionThe Watermelon Seed by Greg Pizzoli; illus. by the author (Hyperion)
Geisel Medal Winner
A watermelon-loving crocodile imagines the worst after swallowing a seed: “it’s growing in my guts! Soon vines will come out of my ears!” After much fretting, the croc burps and brings the seed back up. Crisis over…until the next bite. 32 pages.

willems big guy took my ball 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Early Readers and Younger FictionA Big Guy Took My Ball! by Mo Willems; illus. by the author (Hyperion)
Geisel Honor Book
Piggie is upset when a “big guy” takes her “big ball.” In fact, the ball belongs to a whale, who calls it his “little” ball. When Piggie and Gerald learn that the whale is lonely, they invent a new game for the trio to play together. 64 pages.

For past years’ summer reading lists from The Horn Book, click on the tag summer reading.

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15. Best Books of March 2014

March 2014: 21 books and scripts read

Non-Fiction Picks
Hyperbole and a Half: Unfortunate Situations, Flawed Coping Mechanisms, Mayhem, and Other Things That Happened by Allie Brosh
Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina by Misty Copeland

Teen Fiction Picks
Hung Up by Kristen Tracy
Don't Even Think About It by Sarah Mlynowski

The Play's the Thing
Alice by Laura Wade (a modern-day adaptation of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll)

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16. KU Children's Lit Conference

The Kutztown University Children's Literature Conference occurred today and it was, as always, wonderful.  Thanks so much to all the people who pull this conference together.  The keynote speakers, Frank Serafini, Jim Murphy and David Wiesner, were amazing and the book reviews were, too.  (She lowered her eyes, modestly.)  The problem with being a book review presenter is that you can't see what the other reviewer is doing.  I put out a booklist.  I wonder if she does, too. My booklist is up on the Lists page but check back in a day or two to see The Titles That I Forgot!



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17. Dayenu!

Pour the wine (or grape juice) and chop the nuts and apples. Here are some new books for Passover. (And here are two more.)

 

Preschool

balsley its a mitzvah grover Dayenu!Two Shalom Sesame series entries, written by Tilda Balsley and Ellen Fischer and illustrated by Tom Leigh, follow Sesame Street characters in Israel as they learn about doing good deeds. In It’s a Mitzvah, Grover!, Grover and friends clean up a playground after a storm, though Moishe the grouch hesitates to participate. In Grover and Big Bird’s Passover Celebration, Big Bird joins Grover and learns about Passover as they do mitzvot en route to a seder. The tone is un-preachy and preschoolers will recognize the friendly cast of characters. (both Kar-Ben, 2013)

glaser hoppy passover Dayenu!The rabbit family that celebrated Hanukkah in author Linda Glaser and illustrator Daniel Howarth’s Hoppy Hanukkah! now joyously observes Passover. In Hoppy Passover!, siblings Violet and Simon participate in traditions such as reciting the Four Questions and preparing the Seder plate. The rabbit-children’s infectious excitement comes across in both text and illustrations (though the cheerful, pastel-colored palette and bouncing bunnies may bring to mind another springtime holiday).
(Whitman, 2011)

 

Primary

adler passover Dayenu!David A. Adler follows up 2011′s The Story of Hanukkah with the The Story of Passover . The straightforward text touches on Jacob and the Children of Israel; slavery and Pharaoh’s cruelty; Moses’s encounter with the burning bush; the ten plagues; and the Red Sea escape. Jill Weber’s expressive, rich-hued acrylics play up the drama (ew, lice) but also offer reassurance and even some humor through small, eye-pleasing details. (Holiday, 2014)

glaser stone soup with matzoh balls Dayenu!Stone Soup with Maztoh Balls: A Passover Tale in Chelm begins with a stranger arriving in Chelm on Passover. Let “all who are hungry come and eat,” sure, but the villagers don’t have much to share. The stranger produces a stone, promising to make matzoh ball soup…and you know the rest. Linda Glaser’s well-cadenced text and Maryam Tabatabaei’s digital-looking art are as light as the Chelmites’ matzo balls (“…so light they can almost fly”). (Whitman, 2014)

kimmelman little red hen and the passover matzah Dayenu!Who will help make the Passover matzah? When Sheep, Horse, and Dog prove unreliable, stereotypical Jewish mother Little Red Hen (somewhat grudgingly) takes up the reins.  The good-natured cadence of Leslie Kimmelman’s text for The Little Red Hen and the Passover Matzah extends the mother-hen comparison, while Paul Meisel’s affectionate ink, watercolor, and  pastel illustrations keep things from going too far over the top. An author’s note about Passover and a matzah recipe are appended. (Holiday, 2010)

passover lamb Dayenu!Miriam, protagonist of Linda Elovitz Marshall’s The Passover Lamb, is looking forward to singing the Four Questions at her grandparents’ Passover seder. But when a newborn lamb on the family’s farm is abandoned by its mother, Miriam worries she’ll have to miss the seder to care for the unwanted baby. Her solution is unsurprising but charming; soft illustrations by Tatjana Mai-Wyss reinforce Miriam’s affection for the (particularly cute) baby sheep. (Random House, 2013)

portnoy tale of two seders Dayenu!In A Tale of Two Seders by Mindy Avra, a young girl has gone to six different Passover seders in the three years since her parents’ divorce. At the sixth seder, attended by both her mom and dad, the girl’s mother likens families to different varieties of charoset, a traditional dish: “Some have more ingredients…But each one is tasty in its own way.” The realistic story is accompanied by Valeria Cis’s pattern-filled illustrations. Charoset recipes are included. (Kar-Ben, 2010)

longest night Dayenu!A young Jewish slave describes the ten plagues and the Israelites’ hurried flight from Egypt in The Longest Night: A Passover Story. Illustrator Catia Chien’s dark, expansive acrylic paintings are well matched with Laurel Snyder’s impeccable rhyming couplets (although some illustrations, such as a full-page, open-jawed wolf, may be too intense for very young readers). The concluding spreads, featuring the parting of the Red Sea and a gorgeous sunrise, are a treat. (Random House/Schwartz & Wade, 2013)

strauss elijah door Dayenu!In a small village long ago, the once-close Lippa and Galinsky families feuded. With the rabbi, their children (who loved one another) enacted a plan to bring their families together for Seder so that Passover could truly be celebrated. How the whole village participates makes Linda Leopold Strauss’s The Elijah Door: A Passover Tale  a warmhearted story of reconciliation and togetherness. Strikingly painted woodcuts by Alexi Natchev illustrate the Passover tale. (Holiday, 2012)

weber yankee at the seder Dayenu!In 1865, a Jewish family in Virginia hosts an unanticipated Passover guest: a Yankee soldier. The “festival of freedom,” here celebrated by people with conflicting beliefs but a common cultural history, has great meaning. Elka Weber’s The Yankee at the Seder, a well-told tale based on actual events, is accompanied by Adam Gustavson’s richly textured oil paintings. Endnotes provide more information about the real-life figures and the Passover holiday. (Tricycle, 2009)

ziefert passover celebrating now remembering then Dayenu!Harriet Ziefert’s appealing Passover: Celebrating Now, Remembering Then presents contemporary Passover rituals alongside a retelling of the festival story. Left-hand pages include “Now” information while right-hand gatefold pages open to reveal the “Then” side: additional details about the Passover tale. Karla Gudeon’s unfussy illustrations against natural-paper-textured backgrounds help illuminate events. The decorated endpapers are adorned with holiday symbols. (Blue Apple, 2010)

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18. KU Addendum

 Kutztown University Children's Literature Conference  The official logo of the Kutztown University Children's Literature Conference.

My KU Addenda ( or "um", I can't remember which) is up on the Lists page.  But here is the link if you need immediate gratification.

And here is the link to the list I handed out at the KU Children's Literature Conference on Saturday.

Thanks.  Stay tuned for more book stuff.

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19. Earth Day Booklist and Ginormous 10 Book Giveaway!

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Wherever you are on this beautiful planet it’s time to celebrate the diversity and nature which lives here. There has been much talk of late as to global warming, nature deficit disorder, and many other topics which suggest that we are becoming completely disconnected from our life source “The Planet.” Not only are we celebrating Earth Day this week, we are giving one lucky winner the chance to win all 10 books with our Earth Day 10 Book Giveaway!  Here are my top picks for wonderful Earth Books for kids :

What Does it Mean to Be Green? This colorful, insightful story, demystifies for children what it means to be green by helping them to view everyday tasks through an environmentally-friendly lens. The book empowers children to do whatever they can to protect the earth’s precious resources.

Whole World

Connect with the whole wide, wonderful world with this green book that rejoices in the marvels of our environment. The catchy rhyme in this new take on a traditional spiritual begs to be sung aloud. Includes lots of facts about the Earth’s eco systems and tips on how to be eco-conscious.

Olivia’s Birds: Saving the Gulf {by Olivia Bouler}

Olivia's Birds

One 11 year-old girl can make a difference-as budding ornithologist and artist Olivia Bouler has proven, single-handedly raising over $175,000 for the Gulf Coast oil spill recovery. Devastated by the disaster and eager to do her part, Olivia wrote a letter to Audubon, “11 years old and willing to help” offering her own bird paintings to raise contributions for Gulf recovery efforts. The idea took flight, and Olivia proceeded to send out over 500 paintings, many of which are captured in this lavish picture book that recaps her valiant campaign to save birds affected by the spill. Olivia has been a guest at JIAB and I have also had the pleasure of meeting this delightful young lady in person.

The Magic School Bus and the Climate Change

Like it or not, global warming is a hot topic, and it will affect the younger generation the most. So why not turn to the teacher kids like the most, Ms. Frizzle! Only the Friz can boil all the hoopla down to the scientific facts in a fun and informative way.

The Magic School Bus and the Climate Challenge (Magic School Bus Series)

The World is Waiting for You {by Barbara Kerley}

“What do you want to be when you grow up?” is a question kids get asked over and over. But very few connections are made for kids between the present and the future. This book shows kids a pathway from their current interests and talents to a future career or interest. And in so doing, it also encourages adventure, exploration, and discovery, three core principles of National Geographic’s mission. It’s a celebration of possibility–so simple and so profound.

The World is Waiting

Care for Our World {by Karen S. Robbins}

Get ready to meet some truly wonderful wild animals from every continent on Earth. As children turn the pages of this book, theyll encounter dozens of playful creatures in their natural habitats and will learn about the importance of caring for all the plants, animals, and people that call planet Earth their home. A timely reminder of the responsibility every generation shares: to nurture and respect life in all its many forms

Care for our world

 

10 Things I can do to Help my World { by Melanie Walsh}

Even young children are eager to help the environment — and here is a bright, inviting novelty book that offers simple ways to make a difference.

earth day

Outside Your Window: A First Book of Nature By Nicola Davies

This stunning book takes us through the 4 seasons and beacons us out into the natural world. From listening to the pond in Spring to seeing bird tracks in the snow, this exquisite column of nature poems captures the sights and sounds of a child’s experiences from building dens to planting acorns, watching the birds above and tasting a crisp apple. Children soon appreciate that whatever is outside their window they are free to venture and explore. Be sure and take a peek at a past book review JIAB did of this book and profile of author Nicola Davies.

Outside Your Window

I Love Dirt:52 Activities to Help You and Your Kids Discover the Wonders of Nature {by Jennifer Ward}

Protect our earth by learning to cherish it. I Love Dirt! presents 52 open-ended activities to help you engage your child in the outdoors. No matter what your location—from a small patch of green in the city to the wide-open meadows of the country—each activity is meant to promote exploration, stimulate imagination, and heighten a child’s sense of wonder.

dirt

COMMON GROUND:The Water, Earth, and Air We Share {by Molly Bang}

A simple story of our planet’s natural resources with jewel-like paintings by Caldecott Honor author Molly Bang. Through the example of a shared village green and the growing needs of the townspeople who share it, Molly Bang presents the challenge of handling our planet’s natural resources. Full color picture book.

earth day

Giveaway guidelines and Official Rules:

Giveaway runs from April 22 to April 29th, 2014

  • One winner will win one copy of all ten titles.
  • Residents of USA and Canada only please.
  • Must be 18 years or older to enter
  • One entry per household.
  • Staff and family members of Audrey Press are not eligible.
  • Grand Prize winner has 48 hours to claim prize
  • Winner will be chosen via Rafflecopter on April 29, 2014
  • How to enter: Enter using the Rafflecopter widget below.
  • Terms and Conditions: NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED BY LAW. The winners will be randomly drawn through the Rafflecopter widget and will be contacted by email within 12 hours after the giveaway ends. The winners will then have 48 hours to respond. If a winner does not respond within 48 hours, a new draw will take place for a new winner. Odds of winning will vary depending on the number of eligible entries received. This contest is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with Facebook. This giveaway is hosted and managed by Valarie from Jump Into A Book. If you have any additional questions – feel free to send and email to the JIAB Project Manager Becky(at)AudreyPress(dot)com.

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20. Best Books of April 2014

April 2014: 15 books and scripts read

For the majority of April, I had my nose in a script, rather than a novel, and was running around for 18 hours a day. I did manage to read a few books, but mostly quick reads, as well as Neil LaBute's Autobahn, which included seven short pieces. I participated in the seventh annual Rock the Drop with readergirlz and was delighted by all of the pictures and stories readers and authors shared that day. I introduced new people to Leverage and Orphan Black, worked on a lot of original pieces, and looked forward to the spring.

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21. ¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!

It’s Cinco de Mayo! Celebrate by sharing these books starring the holiday itself, Mexican and Mexican American protagonists, and the Spanish language — all recommended by The Horn Book Magazine and The Horn Book Guide. (For more recommended Spanish-language and bilingual books, click here.)

Picture books

ada let me help ¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!In Alma Flor Ada’s Let Me Help! / ¡Quiero ayudar!, pet parrot Perico knows how to say “Let me help!” He repeats this statement as his (human) family members prepare for the San Antonio Cinco de Mayo festival. They shoo him away, but to everyone’s surprise he eventually finds a way to help. Angela Domínguez’s warm-hearted illustrations — from a bird’s-eye view — support the family-centered text, printed in both English and Spanish. (Children’s Book Press, 2010)

cumpiano quinito day and night ¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!Quinito describes, in English and Spanish, his family, friends, and activities in terms of opposites: “My Mami is short. My Papi is tall…I’m just the right size.” Quinito, Day and Night / Quinito, día y noche by Ina Cumpiano succeeds as a book of opposites, an exposition of bilingual vocabulary, and an engaging portrayal of family and neighborhood. José Ramírez’s naive-style paintings in warm colors over black are both comforting and energy-packed. (Children’s Book Press, 2008)

medina tia isa wants a car ¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!The young narrator of Meg Medina’s Tía Isa Wants a Car, who lives in America with her aunt and uncle, describes how Tía Isa wants a car, one that’s “the same shiny green as the ocean.” However, they don’t have enough money — yet. The narrator incorporates Spanish words naturally, giving the dialogue an authenticity that is neither laborious nor stilted. Soft watercolor illustrations by Claudio Muñoz mirror the text. Also available in a Spanish-language edition. (Candlewick, 2011)

morales ninowrestlesworld 297x300 ¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!Pint-sized Niño, fearless luchador and reluctantly attentive big brother, dons his red mask, ready to take on all comers, in Niño Wrestles the World. He battles a series of imagined foes from Mexican history and popular culture before facing the trickiest of opponents, las hermanitas! Working in digital collage, author/illustrator Yuyi Morales packs every polychromatic double-page spread with action, trying — not quite successfully, fortunately — to contain Niño’s energy within their frames. (Roaring Brook/Porter, 2013)

reiser my way ¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!Author/illustrator Lynn Reiser uses the bilingual structure of My Way: A Margaret and Margarita Story / A mi manera: Un cuento de Margarita y Margaret in an ingenious way, with the English (Margaret’s voice) and Spanish (Margarita’s) mirroring each other on facing pages, but with each girl presenting a distinct self. Reiser’s cheerful primary-bright palette signals readers that friends liking different things is just fine. A satisfying, upbeat reminder that kids can be true to themselves and be a good friend, too. (Greenwillow, 2007)

saenz perfect season for dreaming ¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!A Perfect Season for Dreaming / Un tiempo perfecto para soñar begins on the first day of summer as Octavio Rivera begins to dream. He shares these visions with his granddaughter Regina, who also experiences dreams as if they are “good friends who…console you when you’re lonely.” Author Benjamin Alire Sáenz beautifully evokes a dream state with long, languorous sentences in English and Spanish. Esau Andrade Valencia’s richly hued and textured surrealist tableaux are both accessible and inspired. (Cinco, 2008)

soto big bushy mustache ¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!In Big Bushy Mustache by Gary Soto and Joe Cepeda, the only costume Ricky wants to wear for his class’s Cinco de Mayo play is a big, bushy mustache, because it looks just like Papi’s. When he wears it home from school to show his parents, he loses it along the way. Papi’s solution — he generously offers his own freshly shaved mustache — is a little unlikely, but the warm family relationship, emphasized in Cepeda’s bold paintings, comes across nevertheless. (Knopf, 1998)

 

Intermediate

ada love amalia ¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!Amalia is devastated when she learns her best friend is moving to California; fortunately, her abuelita comforts her with stories about loved ones far away. When Abuelita suddenly dies, Amalia must draw on what her grandmother has taught her to accept her grief and anger. Love, Amalia, written by Alma Flor Ada and illustrated by Gabriel M. Zubizarreta, portrays a multigenerational immigrant family with sensitively drawn characters and a low-key story. Concurrently published in Spanish. (Atheneum, 2012)

ryan esperanza rising ¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!In Esperanza Rising, Pam Munoz Ryan’s poignant look at the realities of immigration, thirteen-year-old Esperanza, daughter of an affluent Mexican rancher, is forced to trade fancy dolls and dresses for hard work and ill-fitting hand-me-downs after her beloved father dies. Laboring in the United States, picking grapes on someone else’s land for pennies an hour, Esperanza is transformed into someone who can take care of herself and others. (Scholastic, 2000)

 

Older

de la pena mexican white boy ¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!The one place Danny feels accepted is the baseball field. He imagines becoming a star, making his father proud enough to return from Mexico. Matt de la Peña’s Mexican White Boy is a fast-paced baseball story is unique in its gritty realism, framed in the context of broken homes and bicultural pressures. De la Peña poignantly conveys the message that, despite obstacles, you must shape your own future. (Delacorte, 2008)

mcneal dark water ¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!Fifteen-year-old Pearl starts an illicit relationship with Amiel, an undocumented migrant laborer. When fire consumes southern California, Pearl abandons her family to warn Amiel of the approaching flames. Pearl ominously hints at impending disaster throughout the narrative; this foreshadowing heightens the climax’s suspense. Inspired by southern California’s 2007 fires, Laura McNeal’s National Book Award finalist novel Dark Water captures the desperation of both love and survival with wrenching authenticity. (Knopf, 2010)

saenz aristotleanddante 199x300 ¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!Two boys strike up a friendship that will change their lives in ways both subtle and profound in Benjamin Alire Sáenz’s Belpré Author Award—winning Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe. Ari saves Dante’s life but breaks his own legs in the process, cementing the bond between the two Mexican American families. Ari’s first-person narrative — poetic, philosophical, honest — skillfully develops the relationship between the two boys from friendship to romance. (Simon, 2012)

saldana finding our way ¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!In the eleven disparate coming-of-age cuentos about Chicano culture collected in Finding Our Way: Stories, author Rene Saldaña Jr. forces the reader to experience the linguistic world of many of his protagonists — the decision to offer no glossary for the Spanish phrases that infuse his text serves as a curative disadvantage for the English-speaking reader. Never maudlin or overdrawn, these taut but lyrical tales bring light into the corners of kids’ lives. (Random/Lamb, 2003)

 

Poetry, folklore, and nonfiction

muu moo ¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!Alma Flor Ada and F. Isabel Campoy’s ¡Muu, Moo!: Rimas de animales / Animal Nursery Rhymes collects sixteen traditional nursery rhymes. Spanish is the preeminent language, with each rhyme presented first in Spanish and then in a free retelling in English (by Rosalma Zubizarreta) that captures the flavor of the original. This will be an invaluable resource for librarians and teachers, and with soft, warm watercolor illustrations by Viví Escrivá, it also makes an attractive gift book.

delacre arrorro mi nino ¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!Selector/illustrator Lulu Delacre includes the best known Latino lullabies and finger plays in her collection Arrorro mi nino: Latino Lullabies and Gentle Games, a veritable Latina Mother Goose. The fifteen selections are presented bilingually; the English versions are literal (unrhymed) translations of the original Spanish. Oil-wash illustrations capture lovely scenes of mothers and grandmothers with children and offer glimpses of Latino life. Finger-play instructions and music are included. (Lee and Low, 2004)

hayes coyote under the table ¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!The Coyote Under the Table / El coyote debajo de la mesa: Folktales Told in Spanish and English, Joe Hayes’s collection of bilingual folktales drawn from the Hispanic New Mexico oral tradition, provides refreshing depth and humor. Brief source notes expand on the history of each of the ten tales and add social/historical context. Clean, unencumbered prose draws attention to the structure and rhythm of the stories, which are best read aloud. Antonio L.Castro’s amusing illustrations face the start of each entry. (Cinco Puntos, 2011)

shahan fiesta ¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!In ¡Fiesta!: A Celebration of Latino Festivals, author Sherry Shahan describes twelve Latino festivals, one for each month of the year, in brief poems accompanied by short explanatory paragraphs. Some of the celebrations, such as Cinco de Mayo and Día de los Muertos, will be familiar; others that are very specific to certain countries or ethnic groups may not be. Paula Barragán’s vibrantly flowing digitally enhanced cut-paper illustrations accompany the text. (August/Little Folk, 2009)

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22. Books mentioned in the May 2014 issue of Notes from the Horn Book

Five questions for Sophie Blackall
Ivy + Bean series written by Annie Barrows, illus. by Sophie Blackall, Chronicle, 6–9 years.
The Mighty LaLouche
written by Matthew Olshan, illus. by Sophie Blackall, Schwartz & Wade/Random, 5–7 years.
Pecan Pie Baby written by Jacqueline Woodson, illus. by Sophie Blackall, Putnam, 3–6 years.
Missed Connections: Love, Lost & Found, selected and illus. by Sophie Blackall, Workman, adult.
The Baby Tree by Sophie Blackall, Penguin/Paulsen, 3–6 years.
Bear and Bee by Sergio Ruzzier, Hyperion, 3–6 years.
Locomotive by Brian Floca, Atheneum/Jackson, 8–11 years.

Sassy siblings
Gaston written by Kelly DiPucchio, illus. by Christian Robinson, Atheneum, 3–6 years.
The Troublemaker by Lauren Castillo, Clarion, 3–6 years.
Splat! Starring the Vole Brothers by Roslyn Schwartz, OwlKids, 3–6 years.
Me First by Max Kornell, Penguin/Paulsen, 4–7 years.

Funny business
Masterpiece written by Elise Broach Kelly Murphy Holt/Ottaviano,
The Miniature World of Marvin and James [Masterpiece Adventures] written by Elise Broach, illus. by Kelly Murphy, Holt/Ottaviano, 5–8 years.
The Chicken Squad: The First Misadventure written by Doreen Cronin, illus. by Kevin Cornell, Atheneum, 5–8 years.
Annika Riz, Math Whiz [Franklin School Friends] written by Claudia Mills, illus. by Rob Shepperson, Farrar/Ferguson, 5–8 years.
More of Monkey & Robot by Peter Catalanotto, Atheneum/Jackson, 5–8 years.

Digital fun and learning
I Love Mountains by Forest Giant, 4–7 years.
Color Uncovered by Exploratorium, 6–10 years.
Dinosaurs by AMNH, 6–10 years.
The Poetry App by Josephine Hart Poetry Foundation, 9–14 years.

Bummer summer
We Were Liars by E. Lockhart, Delacorte, 14–17 years.
The Last Forever Deb Caletti, Simon Pulse, 14–17 years.
The Chapel Wars Lindsey Leavitt, Bloomsbury, 14–17 years.
The Geography of You and Me by Jennifer E. Smith, Little/Poppy, 14–17 years.

These titles were featured in the May 2014 issue of Notes from the Horn Book.

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23. Weekend Links: Tons of Wonderful Children’s Reading Links!

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weekend links

Oh my! What a fun Weekend Links this will be! I don’t know if it’s because Spring is in the air and the flowers are a bloomin’ here in TN, but this week has been chocked full of amazing information concerning summer reading, multicultural books and great reading lists for kids. So exciting!

As always, I’ve combed through the hundreds of amazing articles out there and brought you the best of the best (in my opinion). So grab a cup of coffee and settle in for some great kidlit-inspired reading ideas for kids!

 

The Multiracial Population Is Growing, But Kid Lit Isn’t Keeping Up: School Library Journal

2014 Books from Caldecott Winners: 100ScopeNotes

 

9780763658069 787a4 454x500 2014 Books from Caldecott Winners

 

Middle Reader Summer Reading List from PrettyOpinionated

Middle grade summer reading

22 Awesome Submissions From The #WeNeedDiverseBooks Campaign

WeNeedDiversity.tumblr.com

 

@KCEdventures 15 Amazing Vintage Summer Reads for Kids -Encourage Learning with Kids

15 Vintage Summer Books for Kids

From My Backyard Summer Reading List: Reading Rockets

Quotable Quotes: The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more you learn, the more places you'll go. -- Dr. Seuss

 

Needs some summer reading ideas?  10 to Note: Summer Preview 2014 from 100 ScopeNotes

image 500x375 10 to Note: Summer Preview 2014

What great kid-reading inspired links did YOU find this week?

**Don’t Forget! Children’s Book Week starts May 12th!

 

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24. 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Intermediate Fiction and Nonfiction

Need suggestions for beach reading or books to bring to summer camp? We’ve hand-picked our top ten in each age range, all published 2013–2014, that are ideal for the season. Grade levels are only suggestions; the individual child is the real criterion. For a handy take-along list of titles, follow this link to a printable PDF.

Picture Books (Fiction and Nonfiction) | Early Readers and Younger Fiction
Middle School Fiction and Nonfiction | High School Fiction and Nonfiction

Intermediate Fiction and Nonfiction

Suggested grade level for all entries: 4–6

appelt true blue scouts of sugar man swamp1 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Intermediate Fiction and NonfictionThe True Blue Scouts of Sugar Man Swamp by Kathi Appelt; illus. by Jennifer Bricking (Atheneum)
A gang of feral hogs is thundering toward Bayou Tourterelle, delirious at the prospect of wild sugarcane; raccoon Swamp Scouts Bingo and J’miah are ready for them. A human drama unfolds, too, as Chap Brayburn and his mother try to save the bayou from being turned into a theme park. 330 pages.

doll bones 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Intermediate Fiction and NonfictionDoll Bones by Holly Black; illus. by Eliza Wheeler (McElderry)
Newbery Honor Book
Twelve-year-old Zach and his friends Poppy and Alice play an elaborate game with their dolls. When Poppy is haunted by dreams of a girl whose ashes are inside the game’s queen doll, the kids embark on an adventure to lay the girl’s ghost to rest. 247 pages.

diCamillo Flora 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Intermediate Fiction and NonfictionFlora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures by Kate DiCamillo; illus. by K. G. Campbell (Candlewick)
Newbery Medal Winner
Ten-year-old Flora’s life changes when she saves a squirrel from a near-death experience with a vacuum cleaner. Flora’s lively imagination allows her to believe resilient “Ulysses” is bound for superhero greatness. There’s only one problem: her self-absorbed, squirrel-hating mother. 232 pages.

gantos from norvelt 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Intermediate Fiction and NonfictionFrom Norvelt to Nowhere by Jack Gantos (Farrar)
In 2012 Newbery Medal winner Dead End in Norvelt, Mr. Spizz allegedly poisoned seven old ladies to get to his true love, Miss Volker. Now Miss Volker enlists narrator Jack to accompany her on a wild road trip as she hunts down Spizz . 278 pages.

kadohata thingaboutluck 197x300 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Intermediate Fiction and NonfictionThe Thing About Luck by Cynthia Kadohata; illus. by Julia Kuo (Atheneum)
National Book Award Winner
Twelve-year-old Summer’s parents are helping relatives in Japan so they can’t go “on harvest” this year. Summer’s grandfather, Jiichan, comes out of retirement to drive a combine, while her grandmother, Obaachan, cooks for the work crew. When a crisis hits, Summer gathers her courage and saves the day. 273 pages.

phelan bluffton 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Intermediate Fiction and NonfictionBluffton: My Summers with Buster by Matt Phelan; illus. by the author (Candlewick)
This graphic novel tells the fictionalized story of young Buster Keaton’s summertime stays in Bluffton, Michigan, with the Actor’s Colony. Townie Henry is enchanted by the acting folk, and begins to dream of joining the show. 227 pages.

romeo blue 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Intermediate Fiction and NonfictionRomeo Blue by Phoebe Stone (Levine/Scholastic)
This sequel to The Romeo and Juliet Code continues the adventures of Flissy and the Bathburn clan in 1942 Bottlebay, Maine. Though the Coast Guard is patrolling for U-boats, life goes on, with boy-girl crushes, school dances, and, as always, secrets. Then a surprise arrival upends Flissy’s expectations in ways that are breathtakingly complex. 350 pages.

timberlake home 180x300 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Intermediate Fiction and NonfictionOne Came Home by Amy Timberlake (Knopf)
Newbery Honor Book
In this gripping and entertaining mystery set in 1870s Wisconsin, protagonist Georgie’s older sister Agatha is found dead (but unrecognizable). Sure there has been a mistake, Georgie and her sister’s unwelcome suitor Billy McCabe set off to find Agatha — or, at least, to find out how she died. 259 pages.

tingle how i became 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Intermediate Fiction and NonfictionHow I Became a Ghost: A Choctaw Trail of Tears Story by Tim Tingle (RoadRunner)
Narrator Isaac – a ghost – is alive and well at the start of this Trail of Tears story, beginning in the Choctaw Nation in Mississippi in 1830. But soon there is Treaty Talk, followed by the arrival of Nahullo (white) men, and the Choctaw must begin their journey west. 145 pages.

turner dolphins of shark bay 2014 Summer Reading from The Horn Book: Intermediate Fiction and NonfictionThe Dolphins of Shark Bay [Scientists in the Field] by Pamela S. Turner; photos by Scott Tuason (Houghton)
In the ocean waters of Western Australia, scientists investigate the behaviors of the highly intelligent bottlenose dolphin, which, unique among the species, uses tools. The detailed descriptions of the scientists’ day-to-day activities provide a window into the practice of animal behavior studies. 76 pages.

 For past years’ summer reading lists from The Horn Book, click on the tag summer reading.

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25. Summer Reading List 2014

Picture Books (Fiction and Nonfiction)
Splash, Anna Hibiscus! by Atinuke; illus. by Lauren Tobia (Kane Miller)
Journey by Aaron Becker; illus. by the author (Candlewick)
Mr. Tiger Goes Wild by Peter Brown; illus. by the author (Little, Brown)
Gaston by Kelly DiPucchio; illus. by Christian Robinson (Atheneum)
Locomotive by Brian Floca; illus. by the author (Jackson/Atheneum)
Flora and the Flamingo by Molly Idle; illus. by the author (Chronicle)
Firefly July: A Year of Very Short Poems selected by Paul B. Janeczko; illus. by Melissa Sweet (Candlewick)
Niño Wrestles the World by Yuyi Morales; illus. by the author (Porter/Roaring Brook)
Parrots over Puerto Rico by Susan L. Roth and Cindy Trumbore; illus. by Susan L. Roth (Lee & Low)
Mr. Wuffles! by David Wiesner; illus. by the author (Clarion)

Early Readers and Younger Fiction
Big Bad Wolf and Itsy Bitsy Spider [Urgency Emergency!] by Dosh Archer; illus. by the author (Whitman)
The Miniature World of Marvin & James by Elise Broach; illus. by Kelly Murphy (Ottaviano/Holt)
Dog Days [Carver Chronicles] by Karen English; illus. by Laura Freeman (Clarion)
Fortunately, the Milk by Neil Gaiman; illus. by Skottie Young (Harper/HarperCollins)
The Year of Billy Miller by Kevin Henkes; illus. by the author (Greenwillow)
Ling & Ting Share a Birthday by Grace Lin; illus. by the author (Little, Brown)
The Big Wet Balloon by Liniers; illus. by the author (Toon/Candlewick)
Lulu and the Cat in the Bag by Hilary McKay; illus. by Priscilla Lamont (Whitman)
The Watermelon Seed by Greg Pizzoli; illus. by the author (Hyperion)
A Big Guy Took My Ball! by Mo Willems; illus. by the author (Hyperion)

Intermediate Fiction and Nonfiction
The True Blue Scouts of Sugar Man Swamp by Kathi Appelt; illus. by Jennifer Bricking (Atheneum)
Doll Bones by Holly Black; illus. by Eliza Wheeler (McElderry)
Flora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures by Kate DiCamillo; illus. by K. G. Campbell (Candlewick)
From Norvelt to Nowhere by Jack Gantos (Farrar)
The Thing About Luck by Cynthia Kadohata; illus. by Julia Kuo (Atheneum)
Bluffton: My Summers with Buster by Matt Phelan; illus. by the author (Candlewick)
Romeo Blue by Phoebe Stone (Levine/Scholastic)
One Came Home by Amy Timberlake (Knopf)
How I Became a Ghost: A Choctaw Trail of Tears Story by Tim Tingle (RoadRunner)
The Dolphins of Shark Bay [Scientists in the Field] by Pamela S. Turner; photos by Scott Tuason (Houghton)

Middle School Fiction and Nonfiction
Outside In by Sarah Ellis (Groundwood)
If I Ever Get Out of Here by Eric Gansworth (Levine/Scholastic)
The Clockwork Scarab by Colleen Gleeson (Chronicle)
The Mad Potter: George E. Ohr, Eccentric Genius by Jan Greenberg and Sandra Jordan (Porter/Roaring Brook)
Go: A Kidd’s Guide to Graphic Design by Chip Kidd; illus. by the author (Workman)
Far Far Away by Tom McNeal (Knopf)
Cress [Lunar Chronicles] by Marissa Meyer (Feiwel)
The Cracks in the Kingdom [Colors of Madeleine] by Jaclyn Moriarty (Levine/Scholastic)
When I Was the Greatest by Jason Reynolds (Atheneum)
Counting by 7s by Holly Goldberg Sloan (Dial)

High School Fiction and Nonfiction
He Said, She Said by Kwame Alexander (Amistad/HarperTeen)
All the Truth That’s in Me
by Julie Berry (Viking)
If You Could Be Mine
by Sara Farizan (Algonquin)
Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner; illus. by Julian Crouch (Candlewick)
March: Book One by John Lewis and Andrew Aydin; illus. by Nate Powell (Top Shelf)
We Were Liars by E. Lockhart (Delacorte)
Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell (St. Martin’s Griffin)
Midwinterblood by Marcus Sedgwick (Roaring Brook)
Rose Under Fire by Elizabeth Wein (Hyperion)
Boxers & Saints by Gene Luen Yang; illus. by the author; color by Lark Pien (First Second/Roaring Brook)

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