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1. Comics, Comics, Comics!

It’s a great time to be a comics fan.

There are loads of amazing ones coming out right now. The Newbery, Caldecott, and Printz committees all recognized graphic novels as honor books this year. People are starting to sit up and pay attention to the world of comics and graphic novels, so I am here with a list for your kids (AND YOU!). Happy reading! And welcome to the comics life.

Lumberjanes is by  Noelle Stevenson, Grace Ellis, and Brooke Allen. It’s published by Boom studies in single-issue format, but the first trade paperback (collecting issues 1-4) is out on April 7th. Y’all, this one is so incredible. Feminist, funny, and constantly focused on friendship, this series is set at a summer camp and shouldn’t be missed.

 

PrinceLess by Jeremy Whitley has been a relatively new find for me and I’m obsessed. Princess Adrienne is tired of sitting around in her tower waiting for a prince to slay her dragon and rescue her. So she and her dragon decide to go do the rescuing themselves. Completely turns sexist and racist tropes on their head, as displayed by this panel:

PRINCELESS_PREVIEW_Page2

 

PrinceLess hasn’t been checked in since we got it. Your kids are gonna love it.

 

The Explorer books (there are three) are comics anthologies edited by Kazu Kibuishi, whom your students already know because they adore amulet. This trilogy asks well-known comic artists like Raina Telgemeier, Emily Carroll, and Faith Erin Hicks, to write comic shorts based on a topic. They’re amazing. There’s something for everyone in this series!

Ms. Marvel by G. Willow Wilson. Kamala Khan is a Pakistani-American teenager in Jersey City who suddenly and quite accidentally becomes empowered with extraordinary gifts. She has to figure out how to handle being a typical Muslim teenager–who’s now a superhero.

Honestly, when I discovered these (there are two so far), I bought them based solely on the tagline: “Yet another troll-fighting 11-year-old Orthodox Jewish girl.” Basically, that’s enough to sell me, but Mirka is fun and amazing and her religion is shown as something that’s part of her life, not something to be overcome or chafed against. Plus, dragons.

This is just a really small cross-section of all of the wonderful comics for kids that are being published right now. I hope you and your kids love them as much as me and mine do!

*
Our cross-poster from YALSA today is Ally Watkins (@aswatki1). Ally is a youth services librarian in Mississippi, and has worked with ages birth-18 for the last 6 years.

 

 

 

 

The post Comics, Comics, Comics! appeared first on ALSC Blog.

0 Comments on Comics, Comics, Comics! as of 3/29/2015 12:37:00 PM
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2. Comics, Comics, Comics!

It's a great time to be a comics fan.

There are loads of amazing ones coming out right now. The Newbery, Caldecott, and Printz committees all recognized graphic novels as honor books this year. People are starting to sit up and pay attention to the world of comics and graphic novels, so I am here with a list for your kids (AND YOU!). Happy reading! And welcome to the comics life.

Lumberjanes is by  Noelle Stevenson, Grace Ellis, and Brooke Allen. It's published by Boom studies in single-issue format, but the first trade paperback (collecting issues 1-4) is out on April 7th. Y'all, this one is so incredible. Feminist, funny, and constantly focused on friendship, this series is set at a summer camp and shouldn't be missed.

PrinceLess by Jeremy Whitley has been a relatively new find for me and I'm obsessed. Princess Adrienne is tired of sitting around in her tower waiting for a prince to slay her dragon and rescue her. So she and her dragon decide to go do the rescuing themselves. Completely turns sexist and racist tropes on their head, as displayed by this panel:

PRINCELESS_PREVIEW_Page2

PrinceLess hasn't been checked in since we got it. Your kids are gonna love it.

The Explorer books (there are three) are comics anthologies edited by Kazu Kibuishi, whom your students already know because they adore amulet. This trilogy asks well-known comic artists like Raina Telgemeier, Emily Carroll, and Faith Erin Hicks, to write comic shorts based on a topic. They're amazing. There's something for everyone in this series!

Ms. Marvel by G. Willow Wilson. Kamala Khan is a Pakistani-American teenager in Jersey City who suddenly and quite accidentally becomes empowered with extraordinary gifts. She has to figure out how to handle being a typical Muslim teenager--who's now a superhero.

Honestly, when I discovered these (there are two so far), I bought them based solely on the tagline: "Yet another troll-fighting 11-year-old Orthodox Jewish girl." Basically, that's enough to sell me, but Mirka is fun and amazing and her religion is shown as something that's part of her life, not something to be overcome or chafed against. Plus, dragons.

This is just a really small cross-section of all of the wonderful comics for kids that are being published right now. I hope you and your kids love them as much as me and mine do!

*
Our cross-poster from YALSA today is Ally Watkins (@aswatki1). Ally is a youth services librarian in Mississippi, and has worked with ages birth-18 for the last 6 years.

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3. 19 Books Celebrating China with Author Demi

Demi booklist

I’ve long been a fan of author/illustrator Demi.

Demi (September 2, 1942) born Charlotte Dumaresq Hunt, is an award-winning children’s book author and illustrator. During her career she has published over 300 titles. Demi is known for her biographies for spiritual figures including Buddha, Krishna, Lao Tzu, Jesus, Mary (mother of Jesus), Muhammad, Rumi, Francis of Assisi, Gandhi, and the Dalai Lama. (wikipedia)

I personally appreciate the way she unfolds a story whether a classic folktale, religious figure, or cultural celebration has always greatly captivated my attention. Add on top of that her amazing and gorgeous illustrations and you have what I consider a treasure trove from book heaven.

While deciding on a book to use to celebrate Chinese New Year I was going through my stacks of great reads and that’s when I noticed Demi has written so much about China and probably our beautiful impression of that country stems from her. Through her eyes, we as a family, have happily embraced it’s stories, history, and traditions.

Today let’s go on a journey to China with one of our most cherished book friends, Demi.

More About Demi

Demi was born in Cambridge, Mass. She studied at the Instituto Allende in Guanajuato, Mexico, at Immaculate Heart College with Sisters Magdalen Mary and Sister Corita in Hollywood, California. She also studied at the M.S. University in Baroda, India, while on a Fulbright Scholarship, as well as the China Institute For Arts in New author DemiYork City.

Her husband Tze-si Huang introduced her to the religion, folklore, ancient culture, and history of China.

Demi has illustrated and authored more than 300 children’s books including biographies of Jesus, Buddha, and the Dalai Lama, as well as folktales such as The Empty Pot and Liang and the Magic Paintbrush. Her work has received many awards and accolades, among them the Christopher Award, which recognizes individuals whose work makes a positive difference in the world, and the Middle East Book Award. Her titles have been designated American Library Association Notable Children’s Books, New York Times Best Illustrated Books, Notable Books for a Global Society, and American Bookseller Pick of the List Books.

Celebrating China with Demi : A Booklist

The Empty Pot

Demi

A Chinese boy with an green thumb wins the emperor’s competition; PW praised the “extraordinarily delicate Oriental landscapes.” Ages 4-7.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Happy Happy Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year book

“In a book that is itself a celebration, Demi explains the rituals and ideas behind the Chinese New Year festival. The last 15 days of the old year are spent cleaning and preparing (‘Wash your hair and get a new haircut. Pay the debts that you owe and collect what is owed to you!’). On the eve of the new moon, a special feast is prepared. . . . The first 15 days of the new year are spent celebrating with lion dances, firecrackers, and other activities. Demi’s characteristic tiny, lively figures illustrate each page, with several spreads devoted to small, labeled pictures identifying things associated with the holiday. Infused with joy and filled with information.”—Booklist

One Grain of Rice: A Mathematical Folktale

Demi

“Exotic, beautiful, and instructive, this “mathematical folktale” by author-illustrator Demi emerged from her love of India. The narrative and the evocative illustrations combine to create a real sense of the culture and atmosphere of this romantic land.” (Amazon)

Marco Polo

Marco Polo by Demi

Many people say Marco Polo was the greatest explorer that ever lived, traveling 33, miles by land and sea from Venice, Italy, to modern-day Beijing, China. His famous book, The Travels of Marco Polo, indicates that he was a man of extraordinary bravery, brilliance, and strength. With his uncle and father, he traveled across Turkey, Armenia, the Middle East, the rugged mountains of Afghanistan, and the hot Taklimakan Desert before finally reaching China in 1275. Welcomed by the great emperor Kublai Khan, Marco Polo was amazed by the inventions, riches, and religious tolerance of the great Khan’s kingdom, where Marco remained for the next 2 years.

The Boy who Painted Dragons

Demi

Smoke, fire, dragons, wisdom, fear, and bravery…All of these elements are brought to life by award-winning author and artist Demi in a story of valor in the face of overwhelming fear.

Liang and the Magic Paintbrush (Reading Rainbow Books)

Demi

When a poor boy in China receives a magical paintbrush, everything he paints turns to life. But the wicked emperor wants to capture the boy when he hears the news. The story will excite readers as the ruler gets his just reward when the boy creates a masterpiece that spells his doom.

The Greatest Power

Demi

Emperor Ping, the boy emperor known for his love of harmony, sets a challenge to the children of his kingdom: show him the greatest power in the world. “To know the greatest power in the world is to know the greatest peace,” Emperor Ping announces. “Whoever knows this harmony will become the new prime minister.”

The Legend of Lao Tau and the Tao Te Ching

Demi

This thoughtful and thought-provoking book opens with a biography of Lao Tzu, the mysterious philosopher who is said to have been born at the age of eighty-one with snow-white hair, the ability to walk and talk, and unparalleled wisdom. Many credit him with creating the Tao Te Ching, which was written for the good of all humankind. Twenty of the eighty-one passages of the Tao Te Ching are included here, paired with stunning illustrations by the award-winning artist Demi.

The Pandas and their Chopsticks

Demi

Read my book review of this book with companion activities HERE.

Buddha Stories

Buddha stories by Demi

Throughout the ages, moral tales have been passed down from one generation to the next. Centuries ago in China, hundreds of parables were told by the Buddha to his devoted followers. His messages became widespread through fables adapted by famous storytellers like Aesop and La Fontaine. In this collection, the author has chosen ten of the most engaging classic tales from the Buddha’s works. Compiled and illustrated by Demi, this wonderful collection of stories is sure to draw young readers into the ancient teachings of the Buddha, teachings that are as relevant today as they were over two thousand years ago.

Buddha

Buddha by Demi

Many centuries ago, in a kingdom in the foothills of the Himalayan mountains, a miraculous child was born to the king and queen. The young prince, Siddhartha, was raised in the greatest luxury, sheltered from all pain and ugliness. But one day Siddhartha left the palace and saw, for the first time, human suffering and death. He knew then that he must relinquish everything– his family, his wealth, his position– to discover the Truth of life and death.

The Girl who Drew a Phoenix

demi

The Magic Pillow

Demi

Based on a famous Chinese folktale, The Magic Pillow tells the story of a poor boy named Ping who is given a magic pillow by a mysterious magician. Ping sees what a lifetime of wealth and power would be like, and discovers that the riches of family and freedom are much more valuable.

Happy New Year! Kung-Hsi-Fa-Ts-Ai

demi

“In a book that is itself a celebration, Demi explains the rituals and ideas behind the Chinese New Year festival. The last 15 days of the old year are spent cleaning and preparing. On the eve of the new moon, a special feast is prepared.

The Greatest Treasure

demi

Su Dongpo: Chinese Genius

demi

Even as a young boy in eleventh-century China, Su Shih was clearly special. After finding a rare inkstone, he began to write stories and verses expressing his love of the natural world. His words flowed effortlessly. His brush danced across the paper.

Kites

Kites by Demi

The Great Voyages of Zheng He

demi

Over 600 hundred years ago, Emperor Zhu Di of China decided to build the greatest naval fleet the world had ever seen to befriend and trade with countries throughout Asia and Africa. The admiral of this diplomatic and treasure-gathering fleet was a brilliant and peace-loving man named Zheng He.

The Emperor’s New Clothes: A Tale Set in China

demi

Long ago in a province in China there lived an emperor whose greatest pleasure in life was to dress in new clothes.

Which of these Demi books has your family enjoyed?

**Some of these links are affiliate links.

Homeschooling can be complicated and frustrating, especially if you are overloaded with information. The good news is that you don’t have to figure it out alone. Donna Ashton’s The Waldorf Home School Handbook is a simple and step-by-step guide to creating and understanding a Waldorf-inspired homeschool plan. Within the pages of this all-in-one homeschooling guide parents will find information, samples of lesson plans and curriculum, helpful hints and the secrets behind the three Areas for Optimum Learning. Join Donna as she guides you through the Waldorf method and reveals how to educate your children in a nurturing and creative environment. Visit the Waldorf Homeschool Handbook info page HERE.

waldorf collage

 

 

The post 19 Books Celebrating China with Author Demi appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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4. Best Books of February 2015

February 2015: 42 books and scripts read

Picks of the Month
Beyond the Parallel (Parallelogram #4) by Robin Brande
Backlash by Sarah Darer Littman
The Apartment screenplay by Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond

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5. Recommended reading on “the circuit”

In his 1998 Boston Globe–Horn Book Award acceptance speech for The Circuit, Dr. Francisco Jiménez said, “The blowing of the horn for The Circuit will draw attention to and compassion for the thousands of migrant families and their children of yesterday and today. This sound is truly music to my ears.” These books, all recommended by The Horn Book Magazine and The Horn Book Guide, similarly highlight the experiences of migrant farmworker families.

Primary

adler_picture book of cesar chavezUsing quotes from the subject’s autobiography, David A. Adler and Michael S. Adler’s A Picture Book of César Chávez tells Chávez’s abbreviated life story, from migrant farm work in childhood through his life of activism to his death in 1993. Marie Olofsdotter’s warm-hued illustrations reflect the man’s heritage and commitment to his cause. The book’s source notes and other ancillary material are excellent. (Holiday, 2010)

brown_side by sideMonica Brown makes a significant contribution to the increasing number of books about César Chávez by focusing equally on his partner, Dolores Huerta, in Side by Side / Lado a lado: The Story of Dolores Huerta and César Chavéz / La historia de Dolores Huerta y César Chávez. Their life stories are told in parallel until they meet and “side by side…began their journey.” Huerta’s accomplishments are admirable, and she gets her due in this heartfelt bilingual volume enhanced by Joe Cepeda’s emotion-filled mixed-media illustrations. (HarperCollins/Rayo, 2010)

krull_harvesting hopeIn Harvesting Hope: The Story of César Chávez, Kathleen Krull shows how Chávez developed into an advocate and spokesman for migrant workers, focusing on the march he led as part of a grape-pickers strike. The brief text creates a complex view of Chávez, and Yuyi Morales’s mixed-media paintings are suffused with a variety of emotions. There are no sources, but this is an excellent choice for furthering understanding of racism, of nonviolent protest, and of the lives of workers before unions. Look for Spanish-language edition Cosechando esperanza: La historia de Cesar Chavez. (Harcourt, 2003)

mateo_migrantIn a straightforward first-person narration, Migrant by José Manuel Mateo recounts a child’s memories of his migration from Mexico to Los Angeles. The dramatic journey includes jumping a train, scaling a wall, and being chased by dogs. Javier Martínez Pedro’s intricately detailed black-and-white artwork is presented as one long vertical image with an accordion fold, in the style of ancient Mayan codices. The reverse side of the book presents the Spanish translation. (Abrams, 2014)

Separate Is Never Equal In 1947 the Mendez family fought for — and won —the desegregation of schools in California. Author/illustrator Duncan Tonatiuh uses a child’s viewpoint to succinctly capture the segregated reality of Mexican Americans in Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation. The straightforward narrative is well matched with illustrations in Tonatiuh’s signature style, their two-dimensional perspective reminiscent of the Mixtec codex but collaged with paper, wood, etc. to provide textural variation. An author’s note with photos is appended. (Abrams, 2014)

 

Intermediate

atkin_voices from the fieldS. Beth Atkin’s Voices from the Fields: Children of Migrant Farmworkers Tell Their Stories features children and teenagers of migrant workers, depicted in black-and-white photographs, speaking about family experiences, work, gangs, friends, and assorted fears, hopes, and dreams. Poetry by the young people, printed in both English and Spanish, is interspersed among the interviews. (Little, Brown, 2000)

jimenez_the circuitFrancisco Jiménez’s The Circuit: Stories from the Life of a Migrant Child was originally published only in paperback (by University of New Mexico Press). The hardcover edition of this moving and transcendent book — which won the 1998 Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for fiction — includes an appended author’s note drawn from Jiménez’s acceptance speech for that award. (Houghton, 1999)

jimenez_breaking throughBreaking Through, Francisco Jiménez’s sequel to The Circuit, follows the pattern of the coming-of-age novel. Francisco and his family obtain visas that allow them to enter and stay in the United States without fear of deportation. Like its hero, the book’s pace is steady and deliberate, relying upon natural development rather than theatrics. For all its recounting of deprivation, this is a hopeful book, told with rectitude and dignity. (Houghton, 2001)

ryan_esperanza risingIn Esperanza Rising, Pam Munoz Ryan’s poignant novel of the realities of immigration, thirteen-year-old Esperanza, daughter of an affluent Mexican rancher, is forced to trade fancy dolls and dresses for hard work and ill-fitting hand-me-downs after her beloved father dies. Laboring in the United States, picking grapes on someone else’s land for pennies an hour, Esperanza is transformed into someone who can take care of herself and others. (Scholastic, 2000)

 

Older

brimner_strikeIn his comprehensive history Strike!: The Farm Workers’ Fight for Their Rights, Larry Dane Brimner recounts the movement for better wages and working conditions among migrant farm workers in the Southwest, from California’s burgeoning need for farm workers in the twentieth century to the story of César Chávez, the United Farm Workers of America, and the Delano grape workers’ strike. The compelling narrative includes both textual and visual primary sources. (Boyds Mills/Calkins, 2014)

jimenez_reaching outFrancisco Jiménez (The Circuit, Breaking Through) continues the fictionalized story of his maturation in Reaching Out, here describing his character’s college years in the early 1960s. The writing is precise and evocative, with the author’s affection for family and friends being especially palpable. A quietly compelling book for older teens and an important contribution to the body of works addressing the immigrant experience. (Houghton, 2008)

young_cesar chavezJeff C. Young’s thorough, well-documented biography César Chávez [American Workers series] recounts Chávez’s progression from fieldworker in California to activist, union organizer, and civil rights advocate. Chávez’s untiring efforts, extremely modest salary, refusal to back down, hunger strikes, and growing awareness of political process are emphasized, with the United Farm Workers Union as his crowning achievement. Considerable primary material is used, and captioned photographs illustrate the text. (Morgan, 2007)

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6. A Look back at Past President’s Day Booklists and Activities!

“Presidents’ Day is an American holiday celebrated on the third Monday in February. Originally established in 1885 in recognition of President George Washington, it is still officially called “Washington’s Birthday” by the federal government. Traditionally celebrated on February 22—Washington’s actual day of birth—the holiday became popularly known as Presidents’ Day after it was moved as part of 1971’s Uniform Monday Holiday Act, an attempt to create more three-day weekends for the nation’s workers. While several states still have individual holidays honoring the birthdays of Washington, Abraham Lincoln and other figures, Presidents’ Day is now popularly viewed as a day to celebrate all U.S. presidents past and present.” History.com

Not only do I enjoy this holiday, I love looking back on the plethora of books I have reviewed in the past with a “Presidential theme.” To say the least, there are some wonderful books and activities out there on this topic that I know kids and families will enjoy. Here are some of my top picks:

Back in November 2012 of  I created a very fun booklist in honor of the upcoming elections season.

presidents

Presidential politics.

I Grew Up to Be President by Laurie Calkhoven, illus by Rebecca Zomchek.

From George Washington to Barack Obama, this child’s is a child’s perfect introduction to all of the U.S. Presidents. On every spread, readers will learn about the Presidents’ childhoods, families, careers, accomplishments in office, and life after the White House. Famous quotes, major events, and fun facts are all included. With simple text and full-color illustrations and photographs throughout, every parent, teacher, and child will want this essential reference for their bookshelf.-Amazon

 

Worst of Friends: Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and the True Story of an American Feud. By Suzanne Tripp Jurmain, illustrated by Larry Day.Worst of Friends

John Adams was short, fat, and talkative. Thomas Jefferson was tall, thin, and quiet. Together, they made an excellent case for American Independence. But when Tom and John couldn’t agree whether a weak or strong presidency was better, they had a falling out that spanned their two presidencies and long into their retirements. Would they hold a grudge forever?-Amazon

See more of this presidential booklist blog post HERE.

In February of last year we enjoyed the Family Book Festival here on JIAB. AND one of my favorite young authors was kind enough to contribute a very fun book review. Felicia from Stanley & Katrina: Pet Authors   offered up her book pick; Duck for President. Read more about Felicia and here fun review of Duck for President HERE.

Family Book Festival

During the last presidential election there was a lot of discussion about political parties. How are they different ? How are they the same? Who, exactly would make the better leader of our country ?

Here is an entertaining book which helps answer these questions. Using the cat and dog in a brilliant analogy of what really happens during the political process, author Julia Dweck brings voting and campaigning to life through her creative rhymes and entertaining conclusions. Read more about Cat or Dog for President HERE.

Cat and Dog For President

During our Read Around the Continents series we spotlighted North America and in the process pinpointed some amazing kidlit books about our country’s founding fathers and leaders.

The United States is 3.79 million square miles or 983 million square kilometers. With 315 million people living inside it’s borders, the United States is the world’s most ethnically diverse and multicultural nation. As well as it’s people, the geography and climate of the U.S. are equally diverse, with deserts, plains, forests, and mountains that are home to a wide variety of wildlife. Read more about this topics and the books that go with it HERE.

read-around-the-continents-north-amer-1024x1024

Exciting news! Is the winter blues and cabin fever making your family a bit “cray-cray”I have a fun idea up my sleeve to help get everyone moving and reading. My latest book (co-written with Marilyn Scott-Waters) A Year in The Secret Garden is a gorgeous book inspired by the classic children’s tale Secret Garden. Within these pages your family will find new activities, crafts, recipes and lessons (inspired by the book) in a something-to-do-every month format. SO, for the next few months I will be pulling some “fun-ness” from the pages of A Year in the Secret Garden and sharing them here every Wednesday. Watch for Secret Garden Wednesday coming very soon!

SG-promo-36-37-900x600_c

 

 

The post A Look back at Past President’s Day Booklists and Activities! appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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7. Love Abraham Lincoln? Here’s the Ultimate Abe Lincoln Booklist

abe lincoln booklist

Abraham Lincoln has always been one of my favorite presidents. When I was 9 I became obsessed with him and read every book I could get my hands on. Many years later, I had the honor of giving birth to the sweetest little boy on Abraham Lincoln’s birthday. Today my sweet boy is 16, and nearly as tall as President Lincoln.

In celebration of my favorite president and my only and favorite son. I thought I’d share a few fun facts as well as some favorite “Honest Abe” reads.

Abraham Lincoln Fun Facts:

  • Abraham Lincoln was born on February 12, 1809 in Hodgenville, Hardin County, Kentucky.
  • He was born in a log cabin to an extremely poor family.
  • He was largely self-educated and taught himself law.
  • Abraham Lincoln was 6 feet 4 inches tall, and was reported to have kept money in his stove-pipe hat!
  • He became the 16th president of America in 1861, when he was 52 years of age, he served for 4 years until 1865.
  • Major events which happened during the presidency of Abraham Lincoln included the Civil War which lasted from 1861 until 1865 and the raising of the Emancipation Proclamation which secured the liberty of slaves.
  • Abraham Lincoln hated having his name shortened to Abe, and often chose to use his surname/last name, Lincoln. Sources suggest that even his wife even called him Mr. Lincoln!
  • Abraham Lincoln was the first American President to wear a beard!
  • When Abraham Lincoln was called two-faced by a rival, he was quoted as saying “If I had another face, do you think I’d wear this one?”
  • The Proclamation was issued by Abraham Lincoln on January, 1863 and slavery ended with the passage of the 13th amendment.
  • Abraham Lincoln married Mary Todd Lincoln on November 4, 1842, together they had 4 children, they were all boys.
  • He led the Union into the Civil War to protect the nation and put an end to slavery.
  • His celebrated career came to an end when he was assassinated on April 15 1865, five days after the Confederate armies surrendered the Civil War.
  • Abraham Lincoln died on April 15, 1865, the day after being shot at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C. He was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth and was buried at Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Illinois

The Ultimate Abraham Lincoln Book List

1. A Picture book of Abraham Lincoln by David A Adler and John C. Wallner: Follows the life of the popular president, from his childhood on the frontier to his assassination after the end of the Civil War.

Abe Lincoln booklist

2. I am Abraham Lincoln (Ordinary People Change the World) by Brad Meltzer: #1 bestseller Brad Meltzer is on a mission to give kids the right role models in this lively, funny picture book biography series.”Kids always search for heroes, so we might as well have a say in it,” Brad Meltzer realized, and so he envisioned this friendly, fun approach to biography – for his own kids, and for yours.

abe lincoln booklist

3. Who Was Abraham Lincoln? by Janet Pascal and Nancy Harrison: Born to a family of farmers, Lincoln stood out from an early age—literally! (He was six feet four inches tall.) As sixteenth President of the United States, he guided the nation through the Civil War and saw the abolition of slavery. But Lincoln was tragically shot one night at Ford’s Theater—the first President to be assassinated. Over 100 black-and-white illustrations and maps are included.

abe lincoln

4. National Geographic Readers: Abraham Lincoln by Caroline Crosson Gilpin: The most effective method used to influence children to read is to incorporate the information that interests them the most. National Geographic Readers are educational, high-interest, and comprehensive for children. In this title, readers will learn about the fascinating life and legacy of our 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln and his historic decision to abolish slavery. Readers will also learn why this decision impacted the United States, as well as the extent of Lincoln’s impact as a fearless leader of the Civil War.

abe lincoln booklist

5. Abraham Lincoln by Ingrid and Edgar D’Aulaire: A Caldecott Medal Book, A Child Study Children’s Book Committee: Children’s Book of the Year. This edition is published from the original 1940 printing and we were able to recreate the vivid colors originally intended by the d’Aulaires. This is a must have for any fan of the d’Aulaires’.

abe lincoln booklist

6. Abe Lincoln’s Hat by Martha Brenner and Donald Cook

abe lincoln booklist

7. Meet Abraham Lincoln by Barbara Cary: This warmly told biography of our sixteenth president is enriched by many authentic but seldom told anecdotes and complemented by bold color illustrations that capture the spirit of Lincoln and his era.

abe lincoln booklist

8. Abe Lincoln: The Boy who Loved Books by Kay Winters: In a tiny log cabin a boy listened with delight to the storytelling of his ma and pa. He traced letters in sand, snow, and dust. He borrowed books and walked miles to bring them back. When he grew up, he became the sixteenth president of the United States. His name was Abraham Lincoln

abe lincoln booklist

9. Magic Tree House Fact Tracker: Abraham Lincoln: A Nonfiction Companion to Magic Tree House #47. By Mary Pope Osborne and Natalie Pope Boyce: When Jack and Annie got back from their adventure in Magic Tree House #47: Abe Lincoln at Last!, they had lots of questions. What was it like to grow up in a log cabin? How did Lincoln become president? What was his family like? Why did the US fight the Civil War? Find out the answers to these questions and more as Jack and Annie track the facts.

abe lincoln booklist

10. DK Biography: Abraham Lincoln by Tanya Lee Stone: Abraham Lincoln, sixteenth president of the United States, led the nation through its darkest hour-the Civil War. Find out about Lincoln’s childhood on a frontier farm, how a struggling small town lawyer became president, and why he became one of America’s most revered leaders.

In this groundbreaking new series, DK brings together fresh voices and DK design values to give readers the most information-packed, visually exciting biographies on the market today. Full-color photographs of people, places, and artifacts, and sidebars on related subjects add dimension and relevance to stories of famous lives that students will love to read.

abe lincoln booklist

11. Lincoln: A Photobiography by Russell Freedman

abe lincoln booklist

12. Abraham Lincoln for Kids: His Life and Times with 21 Activities by Janis Herbert:2008 National Parenting Publications Awards (NAPPA) Honors Award winner. Providing a fresh perspective on one of the most beloved presidents of all time, this illuminating activity book tells the rich story of Abraham Lincoln’s life and details the events of his era. Highlighting Lincoln’s warm, generous spirit and impressive intellect, the guide teaches children about his fascinating life story, his struggles at the onset of the Civil War, and his relevance in today’s world.

abe lincoln booklist

13. Magic Tree House # 47: Abe Lincoln at Last! By Mary Pope Osborne: Jack and Annie are! They are trying to get a special feather that will help save Merlin’s baby penguin, Penny. When the magic tree house whisks them back to Washington, D.C., in 1861, Jack can’t wait to meet Abraham Lincoln himself!

abe lincoln booklist

14. Abe’s Honest Words: The Life of Abraham Lincoln by Doreen Rapapport and Kadir Nelson: From the time he was a young boy roaming the forests of the unsettled Midwest, Abraham Lincoln knew in his heart that slavery was deeply wrong. A voracious reader, Lincoln spent every spare moment of his days filling his mind with knowledge, from history to literature to mathematics, preparing himself to one day lead the country he loved towards greater equality and prosperity.

abe lincoln booklist

**some of these links are affiliate links

Don’t forget to grab your FREE copy of my Read Your World Multicultural Booklists and Activities for Kids.

Read Your World Multicultural Booklist and Activities for Kids

The post Love Abraham Lincoln? Here’s the Ultimate Abe Lincoln Booklist appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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8. Books mentioned in the February 2015 issue of Notes from the Horn Book

Five questions for Lucy Cousins
Count with Maisy, Cheep, Cheep, Cheep! by Lucy Cousins, Candlewick, 2–5 years.
I’m the Best by Lucy Cousins, Candlewick, 2–5 years.

ABC, easy as 123

Mix It Up! by Herve Tullét, Chronicle, 2–5 years.
Press Here by Herve Tullét, Handprint/Chronicle, 2–5 years.
The Happy Little Yellow Box: A Pop-Up Book of Opposites by David A. Carter, Little Simon, 2–5 years.
B Is for Box: The Happy Little Yellow Box by David A. Carter, Little Simon, 2–5 years.
Once Upon an Alphabet: Stories for Each Letter by Oliver Jeffers, Philomel, 5–8 years.
Before After by Anne-Margot Ramstein and Matthais Aregui, Candlewick, 5–8 years.

Be-bop-a-skoodley!
Little Melba and Her Big Trombone by Katheryne Russell-Brown, illus. by Frank Morrison, Lee & Low, 5–8 years.
Leontyne Price: Voice of a Century by Carole Boston Weatherford, illus. by Raúl Colón, Knopf, 5–8 years.
Mahalia Jackson: Walking with Kings and Queens by Nina Nolan, illus. by John Holyfield, Amistad/HarperCollins, 5–8 years.
Bird & Diz by Gary Golio, illus. by Ed Young, Candlewick, 5–8 years.

(Not-so) long ago or far away
Bo at Iditarod Creek by Kirkpatrick Hill, illus. by LeUyen Pham, Holt, 8–12 years.
Bo at Ballard Creek by Kirkpatrick Hill, illus. by LeUyen Pham, Holt, 8–12 years.
The War That Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley, Dial, 8–12 years.
Stella by Starlight by Sharon M. Draper, Atheneum, 8–12 years.
The Paper Cowboy by Kristin Levine, Putnam, 8–12 years.

Bad company
On a Clear Day by Walter Dean Myers, Crown, 14 years and up.
The Doubt Factory by Paolo Bacigalupi, Little, Brown, 14 years and up.
Denton Little’s Deathdate by Lance Rubin, Knopf, 14 years and up.
Tabula Rasa by Kristen Lippert-Martin, Egmont, 12–14 years.

These titles were featured in the February 2015 issue of Notes from the Horn Book.

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9. Weekend Links: Caldecott Winners Booklists and More

Each year the American Library Association honors books, videos, and other outstanding materials for children and teens. Recognized worldwide for the high quality they represent, the ALA Youth Media Awards, including the prestigious Newbery, Caldecott, Printz, and Coretta Scott King Book Awards, guide parents, educators, librarians, and others in selecting the best materials for youth. Selected by committees composed of librarians and other literature and media experts, the awards encourage original and creative work in the field of children’s and young adult literature and media.

The 2015 Youth Media Awards were announced at 8:00 a.m. Central time on Monday, Feb. 2, 2015, during the ALA Midwinter Meeting & Exhibition in Chicago. The Randolph Caldecott Medal is awarded annually , to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children. The award is administered by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association.

Caldecott, Newbery and More 2015 Winners!-Pragmaticmom

Caldecott, Newbery and More 2015 Winners!

Melissa from Imagination Soup offered up a post on 2015 Newbery and Caldecott Winners

2015 Newbery and Caldecott Winners

Reading is Fundamental has a great list of 10 Years of Caldecott Winners

Great Kids Books- 2015 Caldecott Awards: a terrific range & selection of books!!! (ages 4-14, yes really!!)

Scholastic Books has a list of Caldecott Medal Winners for Grades 1-2

Cover image for Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That TypeCover image for Coming on Home SoonCover image for Owl Moon

More 2015 Caldecott Picks & Picture Book of the Day-Pragmaticmom

More 2015 Caldecott Picks & Picture Book of the Day

 

WAIT! Winter blues and cabin fever making your family a bit “cray-cray??” A Year in The Secret Garden is a gorgeous book inspired by the classic children’s tale Secret Garden. Within these pages your family will find new activities, crafts, recipes and lessons (inspired by the book) in a something-to-do-every month format.

A Year in The Secret Garden

Award-winning authors and co-creators Valarie Budayr and Marilyn Scott-Waters have come together to create A Year in the Secret Garden as an opportunity to introduce a new generation of families to the magic that is The Secret Garden. With over 120 pages, 150 original color illustrations and 48 activities, your family and friends will be crafting, cooking, enjoying, learning and playing together with monthly activities inspired by the characters and events of the original children’s classic. Every month readers will get to meet another Secret Garden character, as well as experiencing original crafts and activities based on the book.

SG-promo-36-37-900x600_c

So much fun and great way to get families AWAY from the computer or electronics and into the kitchen and craft room! Get more details and grab your copy here.

The post Weekend Links: Caldecott Winners Booklists and More appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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10. Best Books of January 2015

January 2015: 36 books and scripts read

Short Story Spotlight
An Optical Illusion by Eimear Ryan

Non-Fiction Pick
Yes Please by Amy Poehler

The Play's the Thing
I and You by Lauren Gunderson

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11. My Free Gift To YOU-Read Your World Multicultural Books Activities for Kids Guide

free gift

As a reading and play advocate, I am always looking for fun and innovative ways to shine the spotlight on new children’s literacy and inspire families to pull books off of shelves and stories off of pages.

So early last year, I decided to create a fun guidebook to do just THAT.

To create this Multicultural Books & Activities for Kids, I reached out to some of the brightest bloggers and asked them to pick a book that is meaningful to them, review it and create a fun activity to go along with it. The following is a line-up consisting of not only passionate reading advocates, but some of the most creative writers and bloggers I know.

The result?  This guidebook is packed full of 17 great book ideas for kids and offers up not only suggestions to keep young minds reading, but matching activities and extensions inspired by the books. This guide is designed to keep families engaged in the wonder and magic that can be found within the pages of a book and offer suggestions for diversity in children’s literature. The good news is that I am giving this e-book away for FREE! Yes, you heard me; FREE.

Jump Into a Book’s

Read Your World

Multicultural Books & Activities for Kids

By Valarie Budayr

Jump Into a Book’s Read Your World Multicultural Books & Activities for Kids

Some of the books used in the reviews and activities are:

  • Stand Tall, but Read All Around!
    {by Shannon Medisky}
  • Read Around the World Summer Reading Series
    {Guest post from Multicultural Kid Blogs}
  • Kid Writing and Biographies: Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson
    {Guest Post from The Unconventional Librarian Pam Margolis}
  • Down Under Calling by Margot Finke Book Review and Penpal Activity
    {A Multicultural Children’s Book blog post from Jump Into a Book}
  • Anna Hibiscus by Atinuke
    {Guest Post by Sprout’s Bookshelf}
  • Read a Book; Travel the World & Make a Wish
    {Guest Post from Gladys Elizabeth Barbieri}
  • Fiesta Fiasco by Ann Whitford Paul
    {Guest Post by Frances from Discovering the World Through Her Son’s Eyes}
  • If you were Me and Lived in…by Carole P. Roman
  • {Guest Post from Squishable Baby}
  • Discovering The Cree Culture in America-Wild Berries by Julia Flett Review & Activity!
    {Guest Post from Felicia at Stanley and Katrina}
  • TOMB OF SHADOWS (7 Wonders Book III)
    {Guest Post from This Kid Reviews Books}
  • Cooking with Books: Lucky Birthday Noodles
    {Guest Post from Jodie @ Growing Book by Book}
  • A Peek into Thailand
    {Guest Post from Stephanie Kammeraad of Mama-Lady Books}
  • A Chair for My Mother Book Review & Activity
  • {Guest Post from Vicki Arnold}
  • The Magic Poof Review and Activity
    {Guest Post by Stephen Hodges}
  • Grandfather Tang’s Story: Storytelling with Tangrams
    {Bookjump by Valarie Budayr}

 

 And so much more! Ready for a FREE GIFT that will give your family hours of reading fun and activity? I thought so :)

This e-book will only be available for a short time so grab your copy HERE.

Read On!

The post My Free Gift To YOU-Read Your World Multicultural Books Activities for Kids Guide appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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12. Fusenews: Chock full o’ NYPL

  • Some me stuff to start us off.  NYPL turned its handy dandy little 100 Titles for Reading and Sharing 2014 list into an interactive bit of gorgeousness.  So as to help it along, I wrote a blog post on the library’s website (I have two blogs, if you want to get technical about it, but only one of them has my heart) with the following clickbait title: They Put THAT Into a Book for Kids?!  Forgive me, oh blogging gods.  I couldn’t help it.  It was too much fun to write.  Oh, and while we’re on the NYPL blogs, I really enjoyed Andrea Lipinski’s post about our old (and I mean OLD) Books for the Teen Age lists.  How can you resist this cover, after all?
  • Recently I was alerted to two older but really fascinating links regarding ARCs (Advanced Readers Galleys) and their procurement and use in the book world.  Over at Stacked Books one post discussed the current state of handing out galleys at large national conferences like ALA.  The other one took the time to poll people on how they use their ARCs and what they do with them.  Both make for magnificent reading.  Thanks to Charlotte Taylor for the links.
  • It’s sort of nice when our reference librarians, both past and present, get a little acknowledgment for the super difficult questions they have to field.  Boing Boing recently related a piece on some of the crazier questions the adult reference librarians have to field.  Children’s librarians get some out there ones as well, but nothing quite compares to these.
  • Ah. It’s the end of an era, everyone.  In case you hadn’t heard the ccbc-net listserv has closed its doors (so to speak) for the last time.  Now if you’re looking for children’s literary listservs you’ve PUB-YAC and child_lit.  Not much else to read these days, I’m afraid.  Except bloggers, I suppose.  *irony laden shudder*
  • I was over at Monica Edinger’s apartment the other day when she showed me this little beauty:

She’d already blogged a quickie review of it, so when the news came in that it won a UK Costa Award I had the odd sensation of being, if only momentarily, inside the British book loop.  And if you looked at that cover and thought to yourself, “Gee, that sure looks like a WWI sequel to E. Nesbit’s Five Children and It” you’re sort of right on the money.

  • So I’m prepping my branches for some hardcore Día programs (El día de los niños/El día de los libros or Children’s Day/Book Day) by buying them lots of Día books.  I go on the Día website to order off of the book lists they have there, and what do I find?  Some of the coolest most up-to-date STEM/STEAM booklists I have EVER had the pleasure to see.  They’re so good, in fact, that I had to alert you to them.  If you’re looking for STEM/STEAM fare, search no further.
  • Daily Image:

Pretty much off-topic but while strolling through Bryant Park behind the main library for NYPL, my boss and I came across the fountain back there.  Apparently when the temperatures plunge they figure it’s better to keep it running rather than risk bursting the pipes.  Whatever the reason, it now looks like this:

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13. The “Best of ” Jump Into a Book’s Booklists (& More) for 2014!

Happy 2015!

Doing “best of” lists seems to be all the rage these days so I thought, “Why should JIAB be any different?” We created some amazing bookjumps and book reviews on this site in 2014, had some awesome guest posts and shared a plethora of exciting news as well. Here are some of the highlight.

Top Blog Post and Booklists:

I’ve always thought the best way to teach my kids to be kind is to be kind myself. While that’s a really good start, I can’t be with them all day long and life is filled with opportunities to be both kind and unkind. This got me thinking, what books are out there that teach kindness?

Here’s a look at what I found.

The Kindness Booklist for Kids

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To honor and celebrating the first ever cross country mail delivery and a bit of American itself, I created a booklist that takes a look at the Pony Express.

 

ponyexp7

Stargazing & Astronomy Booklist for the whole family.

starg8

Love and respect the rainforest? We do too. Here is our Rainforest Booklist roundup in honor of World Rainforest Week (Oct 12th – Oct 18th)

rf collage

We had a ton of fun with some “snow fun” as well in December. Here’s a recap of JIAB’s Snow Festival:

 It’s been a SNOW FESTIVAL all this week! With all the white stuff on the ground and the kids off of school, might as well celebrate, right?
This week kicked off my super-fun-book-filled Snow Festival here at JIAB. In case you missed it, here’s a recap:
Snow Festival Day 1:
Snow Festival Day 2:
This playful depiction of a snowy day and the transformation of a city is perfectly captured in simple, poetic text and lively watercolor and pen-and-ink illustrations.
Plus: Homemade Snow Cream
snow cream
Snow Festival Day 3:
Story of the Snow Children
Who couldn’t love Poppy in her little red hat going to a winter’s feast?
Plus: Make a Message Crown
 Snow festival

The Story of Snow by Mark Cassino celebrates the magic of snow through science, math, language arts, music, and visual art activities.
Plus: Paper Snowflakes and Snow Storm in a Jar.

Snow Festival Day-5 Snowflake Bentley and Creating your own Snowflake Exhibit!

Snow Festival Day 6--A Snow Booklist.

Amazing Guests

During the summer months we had some A-List blogger stop by during our Discover Your World Summer Reading Extravaganza. Here are a few of our favorites:

A Chair for My Mother Book Review & Activity {Guest Post from Vicki Arnold}

A Peek into Thailand {Guest Post from Stephanie Kammeraad of Mama-Lady Books}

Discovering The Cree Culture in America-Wild Berries by Julia Flett Review & Activity! (Guest Post from Felicia at Stanley and Katrina)

Cooking with Books: Lucky Birthday Noodles {Guest Post by Jodie from Growing Book by Book}

Read A Book, Travel The World & Make A Wish {Guest Post from Gladys Elizabeth Barbieri}

Kid Writing and Biographies: Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson {Guest Post from The Unconventional Librarian}

Events and News

As everyone may know, I am one of the co-founders of Multicultural Children’s Book Day and our second (upcoming event) has gotten larger and more vibrant than we could have every dreamed! Even though our second event hasn’t occurred yet (1/27/15), our victories in regard to this important initiative still remain some of the top highlights of 2014 for me:

NEWS! Multicultural Children’s Book has is getting BIGGER and gaining momentum more and and more every day! With 9 CoHosts, 17 super Sponsors, over 125 bloggers, and countless authors and publishers donating multicultural children’s books, this wonderful event promises to be bigger and better than ever. Our ultimate goal is to shine the spotlight on multicultural children’s books and offer up resources for parents, caregivers, teachers and librarians to continue to help kids “see themselves” in the pages of a book.You can view our Author Blogroll Sponsor Page HERE, our Virtual Book Drive (through First Book) page HERE and please watch for (and re-tweet!) our event hashtag #ReadYourWorld.)
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
And…I had a baby! OK. not really. But it kind of felt like it when I “birthed” my newest book with the super creative (and always funny) Marilyn Scott-Waters. Audrey’s Press’ (my publishing house) newest book is A Year in the Secret Garden and I couldn’t be more proud of not only how beautiful it turned out, but how wonderfully book buyers have responded to this book that is inspired by the classic children’s take The Secret Garden.
Year in the Secret Garden
MCCBD Co-Founder Mia Wenjen from PragmaticMom and myself are super excited to announce that, on February 14th 2015, we will be a co-host for International Book Giving Day! As we get closer to the event I’ll fill in the details.
IBGDposterLARGE
I know I’ve missed of bunch of things and this list could go on FOREVER. 2014 was an amazing year for me and my team at Jump Into a Book and as always, I want to say “THANK YOU” from the bottom of my heart for your support and readership.
Here’s to an even more exciting 2015!

The post The “Best of ” Jump Into a Book’s Booklists (& More) for 2014! appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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14. My Top Books of 2014


It's the end of the year! My favorite part of year end festivities is all the best of lists. And of course, as a librarian and a reader, I have to make my own!

I couldn't pick just a top ten, so I decided to include different categories and include a long list of what my top picks area.

This are my personal favorites, books I've enjoyed for various reasons throughout the year, and what I felt were my personal top books of 2014. Also, it's hard to put them in a list order of what is number one, so I just did them alphabetically-I am a librarian after all!

I'd love to hear more suggestions if you have favorites too. My TBR pile is never too long! Ha!

Top 2014 Picture Books:












  • Viva Frida by Yuyi Morales-I'm a sucker for unique illustrations and I love photographs and this book has a stunning use of both. 


Chapter Books (Beginning Reader, Middle Grade & Young Adult)

  • 100 Sideways Miles by Andrew Smith-OK, yeah Smith's other book, Grasshopper Jungle, is on many year end best of lists, but for me 100 Sideways Miles was perfection. Great characters, lots of heart (in an honest and real way and not sappy), and great exploration of relationships. I also like examples of fantastic writing in parent/child relationships and this book has that.
  • The Crossover by Kwame Alexander-Another fantastic example of a novel in verse, I especially love the use of various forms of poetry to express everything-from the characters feelings to a game of basketball.

  • El Deafo by CeCe Bell-This book had me laughing so much. It was like talking to a childhood best friend at a sleepover. So honest and funny and a great graphic novel.
  • Let's Get Lost by Adi Alsaid- This book just came at the right time and pulled me out of a slump. I loved the interconnecting stories and the characters and it had the right combination of humor, heart, and just a bit of sap and romance.
  • The Young Elites by Marie Lu-Drama, secret organizations, powers, and politics. This was a fast paced adventure and I got lost in the story.






And One Adult Title:


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15. Snow Festival Day 6: A Snow Booklist

snow3

It’s been a great few days of Snow Festival fun here on Jump into a Book.  To finish I thought I’d share a few of our all time favorite books about snow. Hope you’ve enjoyed yourselves and have had a romping good snow filled time.

1. Blizzard by John Rocco

snow booklist

2. Snow by Uri Shulevitz

snow

3. Story of the Snow Children

snow booklist

4. The Story of Snow by Mark Cassino

snow booklist

5. Snowflake Bentley by Jacqueline Briggs Martin

snow booklist

6. The Secret Life of a Snowflake: An up-close look at the Art and Science of Snowflakes.

snow booklist

7. The Jacket I wear in the Snow by Shirley Neitzel

snow booklist

8. White Snow, Bright Snow by Alvin Tresselt

snow booklist

9. The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats

snow booklist

10. Snow by Cynthia Rylant

snow booklist

11. The Snowman by Raymond Briggs

snow booklist

12. The Big Snow by Berta Hader

snow booklist

What books would you add to this list?

DON’T FORGET! This is the LAST DAY of the Audrey Press Holiday Book Sale! (ends 12/31/14)

Year in the Secret Garden

 

A Year in the Secret Garden (inspired by the classic children’s book Secret Garden) is on a wonderful sale until December 31st. Books always make an excellent gift for anyone in your life and it’s not too late to get your copy of A Year in the Secret Garden book for the special holiday price of $15.00 (ends December 31st) if you use the secret code word secret garden at checkout.

This guide uses over two hundred full color illustrations and photos to bring the magical story to life, with fascinating historical information, monthly gardening activities, easy-to-make recipes, and step-by-step crafts, designed to enchant readers of all ages. There’s also a link to a free download website for all of the wonderful paper toys that Marilyn Scott-Waters has created. Each month your family will unlock the mysteries of a Secret Garden character, as well as have fun together creating the original crafts and activities based on the book. This book also includes month-by-month activities as well INCLUDING fun book-related fun for the colder months of the year!

Get your copy here.

**some of these links are affiliate links

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16. ALSC announces Building STEAM with Día booklists

Download all three 2015 Building STEAM with Día book lists

Download all three 2015 Building STEAM with Día book lists (image courtesy of ALSC)

The Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association, has released new Building STEAM with Día book lists for children from birth to 8th grade. Intended to accompany El día de los niños/El día de los libros (Día) programming, the four book lists are comprised of multicultural titles that showcase STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) topics.

The four Building STEAM with Día book lists are available for children from birth to Pre-K, kindergarten to 2nd grade, 3rd to 5th grade and 6th to 8th grade. PDFs of the reading lists are available online in full color and are free to download, copy and distribute. Book lists are available to download through the ALSC or Día website.

The lists also feature simple and age appropriate STEAM activities to accompany one of the titles on the list. Each is designed to help librarians and parents bring the book to life through easy hands-on STEAM activities.

Titles and activities in the Building STEAM with Día book lists were selected and developed by members of ALSC’s Quicklists Consulting Committee. These free book lists were made possible through the Everyone Reads @ your library grand funded by the Dollar General Literacy Foundation.

The post ALSC announces Building STEAM with Día booklists appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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17. Building a Home Library for Friends and Family

Do you often field gift book questions from patrons around the holiday season? I’ve had my share of parents ask me for the best new picture book of the year for their daughter or a grandparent who wants to gift their tween a book but has no clue where to start. If you have also had these experiences, check out ALSC’s updated booklists! These are a great resource to help parents, grandparents and caregivers of all sorts purchase great books for the children in their lives during the winter holiday season- or any time of year.

Image from http://www.ala.org/alsc/building-home-library-2014-update.

Image from http://www.ala.org/alsc/building-home-library-2014-update.

The ALA-Children’s Book Council (CBC) Joint Committee, with cooperation from ALSC’s Quicklists Consulting Committee, have updated the four Building a Home Library booklists to provide advice to caregivers and others interested in constructing an excellent, star quality library for children at home. The committee looked to include less mainstream gems, wonderful multicultural books, beloved classics and new, notable titles.

The CBC Committee has included two printer-friendly versions of the bibliographies for four specific age groups. You will find suggested titles of exemplary content and quality for children from birth to age 3, children ages 4-7, children ages 8-11 and even for tween-aged children 12-14. The brochures are great for putting out at your desk for interested patrons. Does your library receive donation gifts for area shelters, churches or other organizations? You can place these brochures next to your donation bin for easy suggestions the busy patron can bring to their local bookseller when shopping.

Some of my favorite choices from the lists that would be perfect gifts are:

Carle, Eric. La oruga muy hambrienta/ The Very Hungry Caterpillar. Philomel/ Penguin, 2011.

This classic story from beloved author and illustrator Carle is indeed a great gift for babies birth to age 3.  This publication is particularly great because it will introduce both English and Spanish words to your little one.

Snicket, Lemony. Illustrated by Jon Klassen. The Dark. Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, 2013.

The Dark by Lemony Snicket. Image from www.hachettebookgroup.com.

The Dark by Lemony Snicket. Image from www.hachettebookgroup.com.

Children ages 4-7 are sure to enjoy this wonderful picture book that gives a voice to the dark. This is an especially fun read-aloud with two readers and a perfect opportunity for caregivers to participate in their preschooler’s reading time!

Palacio, R.J. Wonder. Knopf/ Random House, 2012.

8-11 year olds of all reading levels will appreciate this heart-warming story of a 5th grade boy with facial abnormalities. It’s realistic tone and kind message make it a lovely holiday gift choice.

Telgemeier, Raina. Drama. Graphix/ Scholastic Inc., 2012.

Encourage caregivers to snag this title if they have a reluctant tween reader to please. This graphic novel about middle-school drama club and making new friends will become a well-read book at home.

What books do you love to recommend for holiday gifts? If you have any favorites, please share them with us in the comments!

From everyone on the Public Awareness Committee, happy holidays!

_________________________________________________________

Nicole Lee Martin is a  Librarian at the Grafton-Midview Public Library in Grafton, OH and is writing this post for the Public Awareness Committee. You can reach her at nicolemartin@oplin.org.

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18. Horn Book Fanfare 2014

fanfarebanner 2014 500x95 Horn Book Fanfare 2014

Although we didn’t plan it this way, this year’s Fanfare, the Horn Book’s list of the best books for children and teens published in 2014, has something for just about everyone. From a picture book about a bus driver to another about a haunted dog to a historical novel about Baba Yaga to a contemporary novel about an Omani boy to nonfiction about sharks, Romanovs and growing up black in America, the twenty-nine choices offer plenty of scope in genre, subject, age level, and mood. There, your holiday shopping list is DONE.

roger signature Horn Book Fanfare 2014

Roger Sutton
Editor in Chief


Picture Books

barnett samanddave Horn Book Fanfare 2014Sam & Dave Dig a Hole
written by Mac Barnett, illustrated by Jon Klassen; Candlewick
(Primary)

Sam and Dave dig a hole in hopes of finding something spectacular, but even though their dog notices the indeed-spectacular buried gems all around them, the boys pass obliviously by. Text and illustration are perfectly balanced; earthy tones work with understated wit to create a funny, smart, mind-blowingly open-ended work. Review 11/14.

barton my bus Horn Book Fanfare 2014My Bus
written and illustrated by Byron Barton; Greenwillow
(Preschool)

This companion to My Car (rev. 11/01) is pitched just as perfectly to its young audience. Along with a friendly bus driver, cat and dog passengers, and different vehicles (bus, boat, train, plane), Barton incorporates some math and counting concepts in this toddler joy-ride. Clear compositions, vibrant colors, and an engagingly simple text welcome listeners aboard. Review 3/14.

blackall baby tree Horn Book Fanfare 2014The Baby Tree
written and illustrated by Sophie Blackall; Paulsen/Penguin
(Preschool, Primary)

When a young boy asks various grownups where babies come from, he gets some confusing answers. Finally, Mom and Dad provide the boy — and young listeners — with an age-appropriate and reassuring explanation. Blackall’s fanciful illustrations bring the boy’s funny misinterpretations to life, and her graceful, respectful handling of “the facts” is about as good as it gets. Review 5/14.

colon draw Horn Book Fanfare 2014Draw!
written and illustrated by Raúl Colón; Wiseman/Simon
(Primary)

In this vividly imagined wordless story, a boy sits, confined to bed, with a book about Africa and lots of art supplies. As he sketches, he’s transported (along with sketchbook, easel, and pencils) to Africa — and adventure. Colón’s signature lush saturated colors and scratched-in textures depict a budding artist communing with his jungle-animal muses and reveal the power of art. Review 9/14.

dipucchio gaston Horn Book Fanfare 2014Gaston
written by Kelly DiPucchio, illustrated by Christian Robinson; Atheneum
(Preschool, Primary)

DiPucchio and Robinson play off the “one of these things is not like the other” trope in this lively tale of a rough-and-tumble bulldog in a refined poodle family. The story’s takeaway: it’s not your breed that makes you a family. Robinson’s illustrations are classic yet contemporary, bold and expressive; DiPucchio’s text begs to be read aloud. Review 5/14.

frazee farmer and the clown Horn Book Fanfare 2014The Farmer and the Clown
written and illustrated by Marla Frazee; Beach Lane/Simon
(Preschool, Primary)

What happens when a crotchety old farmer rescues a toddler clown who has fallen off a circus train? Rarely has posture been used so well in a picture book, here used to wordlessly portray the kindness of strangers thrown (literally!) together by happenstance but then changed forever. Review 11/14.

jeffers once upon an alphabet Horn Book Fanfare 2014Once Upon an Alphabet
written and illustrated by Oliver Jeffers; Philomel
(Primary, Intermediate)

Each letter gets a drily delivered four-page story in this intricately conceived picture book for advanced alphabet aficionados. Careful readers will spot connections between far-apart letters, often involving aspiring astronaut Edmund. Insouciant illustrations, in ink (with occasional digital spot colors added) on oversized pages, add to the abundant absurdity. Review 1/15.

morales VivaFrida 300x300 Horn Book Fanfare 2014Viva Frida
written and illustrated by Yuyi Morales, with photos by Tim O’Meara; Porter/Roaring Brook
(Primary)

With the sparest of impressionistic texts in both Spanish and English (“busco / I search // Veo / I see… // Juego / I play”) and stunning digitally manipulated, three-dimensional art, Morales captures the essence of Frida Kahlo — and of an artist’s very soul. Ethereal, imagistic, and virtuosic. Review 9/14.

newgarden bow wows nightmare neighbors Horn Book Fanfare 2014Bow-Wow’s Nightmare Neighbors
written and illustrated by Mark Newgarden and Megan Montague Cash; Porter/Roaring Brook
(Preschool)

This wordless picture book with graphic novel–like paneling, brilliant colors, and a cinematic flair is supremely energetic, packed with movement, and populated by a cast of sassy (ghost) cats and one perplexed pup. Bow-Wow’s nightmare is surrealistic and goofy with a hint of the gothic, creating a multi-layered narrative that will have readers returning again and again. Review 9/14.


Fiction

curtis madman of piney woods Horn Book Fanfare 2014The Madman of Piney Woods
written by Christopher Paul Curtis; Scholastic
(Intermediate, Middle School)

An unlikely friendship develops, in Buxton, Ontario, 1901, between thirteen-year-old black Canadian boy Benji Alston and Irish Canadian boy Alvin “Red” Stockard. Both nature lovers, they encounter the (supposedly mythical) Madman of Piney Woods. Curtis’s poignant, often very funny companion to Elijah of Buxton (rev. 11/07) stands on its own, though familiarity with Elijah deepens emotional resonance. Review 9/14.

gantos key that swallowed joey pigza Horn Book Fanfare 2014The Key That Swallowed Joey Pigza
written by Jack Gantos; Farrar
(Intermediate)

He’s still wired, but Joey Pigza is growing up, assuming the role of “man of the house” and caring for his baby brother — solo — until his friend Olivia (the “meanest blind girl in the world”) shows up. “Crummy parents,” “roachy row house,” and expired meds notwithstanding, Joey soldiers on in his inimitable, imperfect way, in a series-ender that lets readers know this kid will be okay. Review 11/14.

lagercrantz my heart is laughing Horn Book Fanfare 2014My Heart Is Laughing
written by Rose Lagercrantz, illustrated by Eva Eriksson, translated from the Swedish by Julia Marshall; Gecko
(Primary)

First-grader Dani (My Happy Life, rev. 7/13) is always happy…but not now: she misses her moved-away best friend Ella, and the class mean-girls are bullying her. The text is funny and full of fresh, convincing detail; profuse line drawings brilliantly capture emotions through facial expressions and body language. Sweet and salty — umami for the emerging reader. Review 11/14.

lockhart we were liars Horn Book Fanfare 2014We Were Liars
written by E. Lockhart; Delacorte
(High School)

This taut psychological mystery about a wealthy but broken family revolves around an unspecified accident that left eldest granddaughter Cadence with memory loss. Just as unforgettable as the book’s explosive ending is Lockhart’s unreliable narrator, Cady, whose arresting voice will stick with readers long after the shock wears off. Review 5/14.

maguire egg and spoon 170x242 Horn Book Fanfare 2014Egg & Spoon
written by Gregory Maguire; Candlewick
(Middle School)

Wealthy Ekaterina and destitute Elena accidentally exchange lives in 1907 Russia. In Maguire’s hands, what could have been a simple story of mistaken identity becomes a multilayered tale that draws from Russian folklore and features a wickedly funny Baba Yaga. Rich, consistently surprising prose propels readers through the complex but always intriguing story. Review 9/14.

martin reign rain Horn Book Fanfare 2014Rain Reign
written by Ann M. Martin; Feiwel
(Intermediate)

Rose (whose “official diagnosis is high-functioning autism”) loves homonyms, consistency, and her dog, Rain (“rein,” “reign”). When a superstorm upends Rose’s world, she must face many things that scare her — including losing Rain. Martin’s fully realized characters, and particularly Rose’s voice, make this an engaging read — or, as Rose would say, “read (reed).” Review 9/14.

nye turtle of oman Horn Book Fanfare 2014The Turtle of Oman
written by Naomi Shihab Nye, illustrated by Betsy Peterschmidt; Greenwillow
(Intermediate)

His family is packing up for a three-year stint in America, but Aref isn’t ready to leave his Oman home or his grandfather, Sidi. The bond between grandparent and child is a stalwart of children’s literature, and this novel quietly but surely evokes the classic theme against a sensuously rendered landscape that feels like home. Review 11/14.

preus west of the moon Horn Book Fanfare 2014West of the Moon
written by Margi Preus; Amulet/Abrams
(Intermediate, Middle School)

In nineteenth-century Norway, young teen Astri is determined to go to America, but first she must escape the brutish goat herder to whom her greedy relatives have sold her. Norwegian folklore and myth are seamlessly integrated into the lyrically narrated story, which features a protagonist as fearless as any fairy-tale hero. Review 5/14.

tamaki this one summer Horn Book Fanfare 2014
This One Summer

written by Mariko Tamaki, illustrated by Jillian Tamaki; First Second/Roaring Brook
(Middle School, High School)

This graphic novel captures Rose’s summer on the cusp of adolescence, caught between her younger friend’s childish interests and the compelling (but confusing) adult world. Episodic vignettes, contextualizing flashbacks, and Rose’s own musings — all related in spare text and dynamically paced, indigo-hued illustrations — build to a poignant conclusion. Review 7/14.


Folklore

elya little roja riding hood Horn Book Fanfare 2014Little Roja Riding Hood
written by Susan Middleton Elya, illustrated by Susan Guevara; Putnam
(Primary)

“There once was a niña who lived near the woods. / She liked to wear colorful capas with hoods.” This modern-day Little Red, along with her sassy-senior abuela, foils the wicked lobo“¡No problema!” Elya’s rhyming text, liberally sprinkled with Spanish words, never stumbles; Guevara’s sly illustrations wink at Western folklore and Hispanic culture. Review 7/14.


Poetry

janeczko firefly july2 Horn Book Fanfare 2014Firefly July: A Year of Very Short Poems
selected by Paul B. Janeczko, illustrated by Melissa Sweet; Candlewick
(Preschool, Primary)

Thirty-six brief, memorable, mostly familiar poems thoughtfully arranged into seasons meet their match in Sweet’s glorious gouache, watercolor, and mixed-media illustrations. As arresting as the poems themselves, the accompanying art is expansive yet intimate, rendered in luminous colors on oversized pages. Review 3/14.

nelson how i discovered poetry Horn Book Fanfare 2014How I Discovered Poetry
written by Marilyn Nelson, illustrated by Hadley Hooper; Dial
(Middle School)

Unrhymed sonnets tell the story of Nelson’s 1950s youth, spent mostly on air force bases and in predominantly white communities. A culminating scene — in which she must read aloud a poem containing racist language — leads to a realization of the power of words. Black-and-white photographs and spare, blue-tinted illustrations allow readers space to visualize Nelson’s detailed imagery. Review 1/14.


Nonfiction

bang buried Horn Book Fanfare 2014Buried Sunlight: How Fossil Fuels Have Changed the Earth
written by Molly Bang and Penny Chisholm, illustrated by Molly Bang; Blue Sky/Scholastic
(Primary, Intermediate)

The latest book in this series about energy on Earth tackles the concept of fossil fuels. The text (narrated by the Sun) explains large ideas with clarity, while the sumptuous art illuminates both the science and the dire situation brought on by our rapid consumption of a resource millions of years in the making. A breathtaking wake-up call for young environmentalists. Review 9/14.

eldeafo Horn Book Fanfare 2014El Deafo
written and illustrated by Cece Bell, color by David Lasky; Amulet/Abrams
(Intermediate, Middle School)

Bell’s graphic memoir about growing up deaf, fictionalized only in that the people look like large-eared rabbits, depicts a childhood involving friendships, insecurities, and a “Phonic Ear” that lets her hear her teacher from anywhere in the school. Bell clearly demonstrates, through plenty of relatable humor, that “our differences are our superpowers.” Review 11/14.

bryant right word Horn Book Fanfare 2014The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus
written by Jen Bryant, illustrated by Melissa Sweet; Eerdmans
(Primary)

This picture-book biography traces Peter Mark Roget’s journey from a lonely and solitary child, coping with loss through a compulsive keeping of lists, to the adult creator of the Thesaurus. Sweet’s visionary illustrations add layers of meaning to Bryant’s clear, linear text; gentle watercolors are embellished with all manner of realia and, appropriately, hundreds of words (the tour-de-force closing endpapers alone contain a stunning one thousand). Review 11/14.

dillon story of buildings Horn Book Fanfare 2014The Story of Buildings: From the Pyramids to the Sydney Opera House and Beyond
written by Patrick Dillon, illustrated by Stephen Biesty; Candlewick
(Intermediate, Middle School)

Biesty’s talents have never been put to better use or subtler effect than in these endlessly perusable drawings of buildings from the past and present (complete with wow-factor fold-out pages). The fact that the book is a by-the-way history of humankind is a bonus. Review 7/14.

fleming romanov Horn Book Fanfare 2014The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion, and the Fall of Imperial Russia
written by Candace Fleming; Schwartz & Wade/Random
(Middle School, High School)

This intimate portrait of Russia’s last imperial family seamlessly integrates telling details of the Romanovs’ daily lives with the sobering sociopolitical context of their reign, downfall, and eventual murders. Into this narrative, Fleming masterfully intersperses vignettes that illuminate Russian peasants’ experiences, resulting in a compelling and poignant narrative that humanizes the haves and the have-nots alike. Review 7/14.

powell josephine Horn Book Fanfare 2014Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker
written by Patricia Hruby Powell, illustrated by Christian Robinson; Chronicle
(Intermediate, Middle School)

A dazzling book for a dazzling subject: Powell and Robinson depict, in words and pictures, the wit, the vivaciousness, the “razzmatazz,” of Josephine Baker. The text’s jazzy rhythm and the illustrations’ humor and theatricality allow Baker’s talent — along with her hustle, and her social consciousness — to shine. Review 5/14.

roy neigborhood sharks 170x217 Horn Book Fanfare 2014Neighborhood Sharks: Hunting with the Great Whites of California’s Farallon Islands
written and illustrated by Katherine Roy; Macaulay/Roaring Brook
(Primary, Intermediate)

Dramatic text and motion-filled illustrations in blues, grays, and blood-reds follow a great white shark as it hunts a seal off the coast of San Francisco. Along the way, sections organized by physical feature — accompanied by clear (and frequently witty) diagrams — explain the science of the great white’s predatory prowess. Informative, fascinating, and beautiful. Review 9/14.

woodson brown girl dreaming Horn Book Fanfare 2014Brown Girl Dreaming
written by Jacqueline Woodson; Paulsen/Penguin
(Intermediate, Middle School)

In Woodson’s eloquent, steeped-in-American-history verse memoir, we watch her childhood unfolding within the larger world (amidst the burgeoning civil rights movement; the deep South and urban Brooklyn) and her own particular one (of family, friends, and neighborhood). Most compelling, perhaps, is her development as a nascent writer, poised to make her mark: “My name is Jacqueline Woodson / and I am ready for the ride.” Review 9/14.

From the January/February 2015 issue of The Horn Book Magazine. For previous years’ Fanfare lists, click on the tag Fanfare list.

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19. Best Books of October 2014

October 2014: 9 books and scripts read

Recommended for Teens
Hit by Lorie Ann Grover
Girl on a Wire by Gwenda Bond

Recommended for Kids
Sisters by Raina Telgemeier

Wishing all of my readers a safe and happy Halloween!

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20. Entertainment Weekly's list of 50 Books Every Kid Should Read

Entertainment Weekly just released a list of 50 Books Every Kid Should Read. As I read the list, I kept thinking, "That's interesting," as in it was interesting to see what was included and what was not. For example, I was incredibly happy to see The Phantom Tollbooth, the All-of-a-Kind Family books, and The Book Thief on the list. Then there are some titles that I wouldn't have included, but that's just me. I'd be interested to hear what books on this list my fellow bloggers and loyal readers have read, and what books they would add to the list. Please leave your comments below so we can discuss.

Here is the list as presented by Entertainment Weekly. Note: The print article has the byline "by Chris Lee" while website says "by EW staff."

If the title is italicized, then I've read it.
If the title is bold and italicized, then I strongly recommend it.

Ages 3-5
Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans
Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss
Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak
Bread and Jam for Frances by Russell Hoban
- All of the Frances books are cute. My favorite Hoban story is Emmet Otter's Jug-Band Christmas.
Strega Nona by Tomi dePaola
The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg - This story is special to me.
The Mitten by Jan Brett

Library Lion by Michelle Knudsen
The Lion & the Mouse by Jerry Pinkey

Ages 6-8
The Story of Babar by Jean de Brunhoff
Charlotte's Web by E.B. White
The Ramona series by Beverly Cleary
- I have read every single Ramona book, and all of the books that take places on Klickitat Street!
A Bear Called Paddington by Michael Bond
Sylvester and the Magic Pebble by William Steig
- Very precious to me.
Tar Beach by Faith Ringgold
The Magic Tree House series by Mary Pope Osborne - I've only read a few
The Arrival by Shaun Tan - I think this is the wrong category for this book; it is a wordless graphic novel, and Tan himself differentiates it from children's picture books
Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney</i> - I've only read a few

Ages 9-11
The Black Stallion by Walter Farley
All-of-a-Kind Family by Sydney Taylor - Wonderful books!
The Borrowers by Mary Norton

Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O'Dell
James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl - I prefer Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster - So awesome.
Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls

D'Aulaires' Book of Greek Myths by Ingrid & Edgar D'Aulaire
Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh
From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
Are You There, God? It's Me, Margaret. by Judy Blume
Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred D. Taylor

The Adventures of Captain Underpants by Dav Pilkey
Holes by Louis Sachar
Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis
A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket - I've only read a few
The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo
One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams-Garcia
Wonder by R.J. Palacio

Ages 12+
The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis - My favorite in the series
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle</b>
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson - Tears.
The Giver by Lois Lowry - So much better that the companion books that followed it.
The Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling

Monster by Walter Dean Myers
Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan
The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants by Ann Brashares
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak - TEARS.
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
Smile by Raina Telgemeier
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
- I prefer Looking for Alaska.

See the article/list in image form at Dave Roman's Tumblr or click through the gallery at the Entertainment Weekly website.

Want to check out my top book picks for kids? Here you go:
So You Want to Read YA?
Middle School Must-Haves
Funny Fiction for Kids
Favorite Picture Books
Favorite Beginning Readers
Coming-of-Age Novels aka Bildungsromans
Tough Issues for Teens
...and all of my booklists plus my best of lists, which I post once a month and once a year.

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21. Books mentioned in the November 2014 issue of Nonfiction Notes from the Horn Book

Social change

Captured History series

Burgan, Michael Tank Man: How a Photograph Defined China’s Protest Movement
Gr. 4–6     64 pp.     Capstone/Compass Point     2014
Library binding ISBN 978-0-7565-4731-8
Paperback ISBN 978-0-7565-4787-5

Nardo, Don Hitler in Paris: How a Photograph Shocked a World at War
Gr. 4–6   64 pp.     Capstone/Compass Point     2014
Library binding ISBN 978-0-7565-4733-2
Paperback ISBN 978-0-7565-4789-9

Cooper, Ilene A Woman in the House (and Senate): How Women Came to the United States Congress, Broke Down Barriers, and Changed the Country
Illustrated by Elizabeth Baddeley
Gr. 46    144 pp.    Abrams     2014
Trade ISBN 978-1-4197-1036-0

Kuklin, Susan Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out
High school     182 pp.     Candlewick     2014
Trade ISBN 978-0-7636-5611-9

Levy, Debbie We Shall Overcome: The Story of a Song
Illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton
Gr. K–3      32 pp.     Disney/Jump     2013
Trade ISBN 978-1-4231-1954-8

Runstedler, Nancy Pay It Forward Kids: Small Acts, Big Change
Gr. 46     64 pp.     Fitzhenry     2013
Trade ISBN 978-1-55455-301-3

 

How things work

Lightning Bolt Books: How Flight Works series

Boothroyd, Jennifer How Do Hang Gliders Work?
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Lerner     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-0-7613-8970-5

Boothroyd, Jennifer How Do Helicopters Work?
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Lerner     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-0-7613-8966-8

Boothroyd, Jennifer How Do Parachutes Work?
Gr. K–3     32 pp.      Lerner     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-0-7613-8968-2

Silverman, Buffy How Do Hot Air Balloons Work?
Gr. K–3     32 pp.      Lerner     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-0-7613-8969-9

Silverman, Buffy How Do Jets Work?
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Lerner     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-0-7613-8967-5

Silverman, Buffy How Do Space Vehicles Work?
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Lerner     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-0-7613-8971-2

Enz, Tammy The Amazing Story of Cell Phone Technology: Max Axiom STEM Adventures [Graphic Library: STEM Adventures series]
Illustrated by Pop Art Properties
Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Capstone     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4765-0137-6
Paperback ISBN 978-1-4765-3457-2

Blazers: See How It’s Made series

Hammelef, Danielle S. Building an Airplane
Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Capstone     2014
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4765-3978-2
Paperback ISBN 978-1-4765-5118-0

Omoth, Tyler Building a Motorcycle
Gr. 4–6      32 pp.     Capstone     2014
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4765-3977-5
Paperback ISBN 978-1-4765-5117-3

Macaulay, David Toilet: How It Works [My Readers series]
With Sheila Keenan
Gr. K–3    32 pp.     Square Fish/David Macaulay Studio     2013
Trade ISBN 978-1-59643-779-1
Paperback ISBN 978-1-59643-780-7

How Does My Home Work? series

Oxlade, Chris Heating
Gr. K–3     24 pp.     Heinemann     2012
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4329-6564-8
Paperback ISBN 978-1-43296569-3

Oxlade, Chris Water
Gr. K–3      24 pp.    Heinemann     2012
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4329-6567-9
Paperback ISBN 978-1-4329-6572-3

 

Indigenous cultures

Bruchac, James and Bruchac, Joseph Rabbit’s Snow Dance: A Traditional Iroquois Story
Illustrated by Jeff Newman
Gr. K–3
     32 pp.     Dial     2012
Trade ISBN 978-0-8037-3270-4

Charleyboy, Lisa, and Leatherdale, Mary Beth, Editors Dreaming in Indian: Contemporary Native American Voices
Middle school, high school
     130 pp.     Annick     2014
Trade ISBN 978-1-55451-687-2

Ellis, Deborah Looks like Daylight: Voices of Indigenous Kids
Middle school, high school    253 pp.     Groundwood (House of Anansi Press)     2013
Trade ISBN 978-1-55498-120-5

McLaughlin, Timothy P. Walking on Earth & Touching the Sky: Poetry and Prose by Lakota Youth at Red Cloud Indian School
Illustrated by S. D. Nelson
Gr. 4–6     80 pp.     Abrams     2012
Trade ISBN 978-1-4197-0179-5

Ray, Deborah Kogan Paiute Princess: The Story of Sarah Winnemucca
Gr. 4–6     48 pp.     Farrar/Foster     2012
Trade ISBN 978-0-374-39897-2

 

Geography and maps

Map Smart series

Brasch, Nicolas Community Maps
Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Smart Apple     2012
Library binding ISBN 978-1-59920-413-0

Brasch, Nicolas Country Maps
Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Smart Apple     2012
Library binding ISBN 978-1-59920-414-7

Brasch, Nicolas Land and Sea Maps
Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Smart Apple     2012
Library binding ISBN 978-1-59920-415-4

Brasch, Nicolas World Maps
Gr. 4–6     32 pp.     Smart Apple     2012
Library binding ISBN 978-1-59920-416-1

Pebble Books: My World series

Cane, Ella Countries in My World
Gr. K–3     24 pp.     Capstone     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4765-3122-9
Paperback ISBN 978-1-4765-3464-0

Cane, Ella Neighborhoods in My World
Gr. K–3     24 pp.     Capstone     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4765-3119-9
Paperback ISBN 978-1-4765-3461-9

Cane, Ella States in My World
Gr. K–3      24 pp.     Capstone     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-4765-3121-2
Paperback ISBN 978-1-4765-3463-3

Kralovansky, Susan What Would You Do with an Atlas? [Super SandCastle: Library Resources series]
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     ABDO     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-61783-606-0

Mizielinska, Aleksandra Maps
Illustrated by Daniel Mizielinski
Gr. 4–6     110 pp.     Candlewick/Big Picture     2013
Trade ISBN 978-0-7636-6896-9

Walker, Sally M. Boundaries: How the Mason-Dixon Line Settled a Family Feud & Divided a Nation
High school     202 pp.     Candlewick     2014
Trade ISBN 978-0-7636-5612-6

 

Medicine and the human body

Arnold, Caroline Too Hot? Too Cold?: Keeping Body Temperature Just Right
Illustrated by Annie Patterson
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Charlesbridge     2013
Trade ISBN 978-1-58059-276-6
Paperback ISBN 978-1-58089-277-3

Super Simple Body series

Halvorson, Karin Inside the Ears
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     ABDO     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-61783-610-7

Halvorson, Karin Inside the Eyes
Gr. K–3      32 pp.     ABDO     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-61783-611-4

Halvorson, Karin Inside the Heart
Gr. K–3      32 pp.     ABDO     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-61783-612-1

Halvorson, Karin Inside the Lungs
Gr. K–3      32 pp.     ABDO     2013
Library binding ISBN 978-1-61783-613-8

Jarrow, Gail Red Madness: How a Medical Mystery Changed What We Eat
Middle school, high school   192 pp.     Boyds/Calkins (Boyds Mills Press)     2014
Trade ISBN 978-1-59078-732-8

Murphy, Jim and Blank, Alison Invincible Microbe: Tuberculosis and the Never-Ending Search for a Cure
Gr. 4–6     149 pp.     Clarion     2012
Trade ISBN 978-0-618-53574-3

Ziefert, Harriet You Can’t See Your Bones with Binoculars!: A Book About Your 206 Bones
Illustrated by Amanda Haley
Gr. K–3     32 pp.     Blue Apple     2014
Trade ISBN 978-1-60905-417-5

Ziefert, Harriet You Can’t Taste a Pickle with Your Ear!: A Book About Your 5 Senses
Illustrated by Amanda Haley
Gr. K–3
     32 pp.     Blue Apple     2014
Trade ISBN 978-1-60905-418-2

These titles were featured in the November 2014 issue of Nonfiction Notes from the Horn Book.

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22. Want to teach your kids how to be kind ? A Kindness Booklist for Kids

I’ve always thought the best way to teach my kids to be kind is to be kind myself. While that’s a really good start, I can’t be with them all day long and life is filled with opportunities to be both kind and unkind. This got me thinking, what books are out there that teach kindness?

Here’s a look at what I found.

The Kindness Booklist for Kids

22

Each Kindness by Jacqueline Woodson

1

Wonder by R. J. Palacio

bully booklist

Because Amelia Smiled by David Ezra Stein

2

Absolutely Almost by Lisa Graff

3

The Lion and the Mouse by Jerry Pinkney

4

The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein

5

Enemy Pie by Derek Munson

6

The Invisible Boy by Trudy Ludwig

7

Hank Finds an Egg by Rebecca Dudley

8

Ben Rides on by Matt Davies

gratitude booklist

Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters: An African Tale by John Steptoe

gratitude booklist

Horton Hears a Who ! by Dr. Seuss

gratitude booklist

A Home for Bird By Philip C. Stead

gratitude booklist

The Monster’s Monster by Patrick McDonnell

gratitude booklist

Little Bird by Germano Zullo

gratitude booklist

The Rainbow Fish by Marcus Pfister

gratitude booklist

Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White

gratitude booklist

A Chair for My Mother by Vera B. Williams

gratitude booklist

Hey Little Ant by Phillip M. Moose

gratitude booklist

Pinduli by Janell Cannon

gratitude booklist

Fill a bucket: A Guide to Daily Happiness for Kids by Carol McCloud

gratitude booklist

**some of these links are affiliate links

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Feeling a sense of gratitude in your life? “Conditions of the Heart” is a FREE kids activity book filled with fun activities & crafts that teaches values and conduct. Grab your copy HERE:

Conditions of the Heart

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23. An Air of Mystery: Middle Reader Mystery Books & Activity Round-up

Lately, I have been in the mood for a good mystery and I also remember when my kids were growing up how much joy they got out of books like the Nancy Drew series and the Hardy Boys Mystery series. It seems to me that kidlit mystery books these days just keep getting better and better so I want to share past JIAB “air of mystery” bookjumps that will not only keep your little sleuths reading, but offer up activities to compliment those books as well.

mystery booklist

 

Holes by Louis Sachar (And some Holes-inspired Activities)

Holes is my favorite Louis Sachar book. The history of Kate Barlow and Stanley’s great-great grandfather woven into the story brings a new dimension to a children’s chapter book. He gives children the ability to make connections between history and Stanley Yelnat’s story. He pulls you into the harsh conditions of Camp Green Lake and keeps you captivated with the mystery surrounding it. None of the camps I ever went to had buried treasure. I read this with my mom when I was ill. It’s not just a story for kids, but for kids and parents to enjoy together.

Cootie Catcher Nickname Generator

Creepy Castles, Dark Dungeons and Powerful Palaces! Haunted Histories by Marilyn Scott-Waters and J.H. Everett

haunted

A great book that spawned a fun blog post full of mysterious and medivial activities!

How to Make a Popsicle Stick Catapult 

New_Catapult

Gone Away Lake by Elizabeth Enright, is a delightful, beautifully written story, and one of those books that stirs my desire to explore. The story begin with a brother and sister who arrive via train from the city  to visit their country cousin. The children discover an old, mostly abandoned summer colony of houses near a swamp that used to be a lake. There, they meet another brother and sister team with the most peculiar names. The children come across a group of old houses, mysteriously vacant and abandoned on the shore of a swampy lake. Somebody has been there — there’s a warning and an inscription carved into a rock. Can the children keep their find a secret? Who left the houses and where did they go? What’s lurking in the lake?

gone away

The Girl from Felony Bay by J.E. Thompson

The Girl from Felony Bay

Abbie Force has a mission: solve the mystery of her father’s accident and alleged theft. Since he has been in a coma for nine months and cannot defend himself, it is Abbie’s job to put the pieces together. Her life has been uprooted—her father’s unavailable; her home has been sold to a new family; she has to leave her beloved school; and now she has to live with her mean aunt and uncle that don’t give one lick about her. Her summer is starting off horribly. That is until she meets the new family that has moved into her old house with the same last name and a daughter near her age—Bee. These two adventurous girls become fast friends and on their many adventures through the plantation, discover a plot afoot right under their very noses.

The Danger Box

“The Danger Box” by Blue Balliett is a wonderfully fun and quirky mystery by the author of “Chasing Vermeer” and ” The Wright 3″. The Danger Box is her fourth novel where she leaves the art scene of her previous three books behind and plants us firmly in the rural town of Three Oaks Michigan. There we find Zoomy, a sweet, legally blind 12 year old boy, living with his grandparents. Zoomy is a boy who notices everything. When his head gets too full of things it makes him nervous and he starts tapping and twitching to relieve his brain.  His grandmother after noticing this tendancy, bought him some notebooks and encouraged him to write his thoughts down. Now every time he observes something it gets placed on a list, written with a purple pen inside his notebooks.

mystery

Horten’s Miraculous Mechanisms BookJump Adventure

Ten year old Stuart stumbles on a note daring him to find his great-uncle’s hidden workshop full of wonderful mechanisms, trickery, and magic.

“I have to go away, and I may not be able to get back. If I don’t return, then my workshop and all it contains is yours if you can find it- then you’re the right sort of boy to have it.

Affectionately,

Your Uncle Tony

P.S. Start in the telephone booth on Main Street.

magicbox

Would you like to create a afternoon of sleuthing, mysteries and mysterious adventures? Grab a copy of our FREE Secret Codes, Mysteries and Adventure downloadable PDF Activity Guide! This guide is 19 pages of fun including activities like Creating and Deciphering Invisible Messages, baking “I Spy” Cookies and learn more about the US President who was a master decoder! Click the image below to get your free copy!

secret_code2

The post An Air of Mystery: Middle Reader Mystery Books & Activity Round-up appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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24. Best Books of November 2014

November 2014: 11 books and scripts read

Recommended for Tweens
The Swap by Megan Shull

Recommended for Teens and Adults
Girl Defective by Simmone Howell
Afterworlds by Scott Westerfeld

Non-Fiction Pick
Normally, This Would be Cause for Concern: Tales of Calamity and Unrelenting Awkwardness by Danielle Fishel

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25. Books mentioned in the December 2014 issue of Notes from the Horn Book

Picture books
Sam & Dave Dig a Hole by Mac Barnett, illus. by Jon Klassen, Candlewick, 5–8 years.
My Bus written and illus. by Byron Barton, Greenwillow, 2–4 years.
The Baby Tree written and illus. by Sophie Blackall, Penguin/Paulsen, 3–7 years.
Draw! written and illus. by Raúl Colón, Simon/Wiseman, 5–8 years.
Gaston written by Kelly DiPucchio, illus. by Christian Robinson, Atheneum, 3–7 years.
The Farmer and the Clown written and illus. by Marla Frazee, Simon/Beach Lane, 3–7 years.
Once Upon an Alphabet  written and illus. by Oliver Jeffers, Philomel, 6–9 years.
Viva Frida written and illus. by Yuyi Morales, with photos by Tim O’Meara, Roaring Brook/Porter, 5–8 years.
Bow-Wow’s Nightmare Neighbors written and illus. by Mark Newgarden and Megan Montague Cash, Roaring Brook/Porter, 2–4 years.

Fiction
The Madman of Piney Woods by Christopher Paul Curtis, Scholastic, 9–13 years.
The Key That Swallowed Joey Pigza by Jack Gantos, Farrar, 8–11 years.
My Heart Is Laughing written by Rose Lagercrantz, illus. by Eva Eriksson, translated from the Swedish by Julia Marshall, Gecko, 5–8 years.
We Were Liars by E. Lockhart, Delacorte, 13 years and up.
Egg & Spoon by Gregory Maguire, Candlewick, 12–14 years.
Rain Reign by Ann M. Martin, Feiwel, 8–11 years.
The Turtle of Oman written by Naomi Shihab Nye, illus. by Betsy Peterschmidt, Greenwillow, 8–11 years.
West of the Moon by Margi Preus, Abrams/Amulet, 9–13 years.
This One Summer written by Mariko Tamaki, illus. by Jillian Tamaki, Roaring Brook/First Second, 12–16 years.

Folklore
Little Roja Riding Hood written by Susan Middleton Elya, illus. by Susan Guevara, Putnam, 5–8 years.

Poetry
Firefly July: A Year of Very Short Poems selected by Paul B. Janeczko, illus. by Melissa Sweet, Candlewick, 3–7 years.
How I Discovered Poetry written by Marilyn Nelson, illus. by Hadley Hooper, Dial, 12–14 years.

Nonfiction
Buried Sunlight: How Fossil Fuels Have Changed the Earth written by Molly Bang and Penny Chisholm, illus. by Molly Bang, Scholastic/Blue Sky, 8–11 years.
El Deafo written and illus. by Cece Bell, color by David Lasky, Abrams/Amulet, 9–13 years.
The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus written by Jen Bryant, illus. by Melissa Sweet, Eerdmans, 5–8 years.
The Story of Buildings: From the Pyramids to the Sydney Opera House and Beyond written by Patrick Dillon, illus. by Stephen Biesty, Candlewick, 12–14 years.
The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion, and the Fall of Imperial Russia by Candace Fleming, Random/Schwartz & Wade, 12–16 years.
Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker written by Patricia Hruby Powell, illus. by Christian Robinson, Chronicle, 9–13 years.
Neighborhood Sharks: Hunting with the Great Whites of California’s Farallon Islands written and illus. by Katherine Roy, Roaring Brook/Macaulay, 8–11 years.
Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson, Penguin/Paulsen, 9–13 years.

These titles were featured in the December 2014 special Fanfare issue of Notes from the Horn Book.

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The post Books mentioned in the December 2014 issue of Notes from the Horn Book appeared first on The Horn Book.

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