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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Short Stories, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 26 - 50 of 362
26. A Christmas message!

Here’s a great way to share your Christmas message!

Click on the link below to find out how.

Solve the puzzle to read the Christmas message!

All the best for Christmas and 2016, everyone! (The message you can solve is not this one!)

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27. Fiction wanted for Dartmouth litmag

Lost Documents, a new literary journal from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, seeks prose submissions for their second issue. Submit flash fiction and stories 2000 words max. to lostdocuments.ns@gmail.com. Deadline: Ongoing.

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28. New press seeks remarkable work for debut issue

GFT Press (US) is accepting submissions of poetry, fiction, flash fiction, nonfiction, and visual art for their January 2016 debut and the inaugural issue of their print journal (Spring 2016). Deadline: Rolling. Guidelines.

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29. Wanted: Writing about “lostness,” the unknown

Wildness (UK) wants work that evokes the unknown (“the lostness; the distance”) for their second issue. Seeks stories, poetry, prose, essays, art and photography “that linger just out of reach.” Deadline: Rolling. Guidelines.

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30. Waukesha journal wants your poetry & prose

Fox Adoption Magazine is celebrating their first anniversary and is seeking submissions. Publishes one piece per week. Welcomes prose (including flash, short stories and creative non-fiction), poetry, and art. Deadline: Rolling. Guidelines.

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31. Review: Read Between the Lines

Read Between the Lines by Jo Knowles. Candlewick Press. 2015. Reviewed from ARC.

Read Between the LinesThe Plot: Ten chapters takes us to one day in the life of a high school, told through voices of past and present students and one teacher.

In each, a raised middle finger is part of the story. It gives power to the person giving someone the finger; it hurts the person who it's aimed at.

And in each, we see how a person looks at others and judges them; or how they look at themselves.

OK for those who want more of a plot: a group of boys think it's smart and clever to fake car accidents to get people to give them cash instead of calling the police -- until it backfires.

The Good; I love this type of book! I love that each chapter is told by someone different, and it's their own story, and that the thread connecting them is sometimes obvious and strong, and other times takes a bit to figure out.

And I love that there are ten chapters; one for each finger.

I love that a bullied boy becomes empowered by his broken finger that means he is constantly giving the finger; but before we embrace the idea that hey, it's not so bad, a girl is disturbed and upset when an angry man gives her the finger. The finger means rage, anger, hatred, rebellion. It's like a word: context matters.

I love that sometimes someone is viewed as a bully and then it turns out they have their own inner demons or frustrations that others don't see. If there were a moral to this story, it's that everyone is fighting their own internal battles, and be a bit less quick to judge.

Also, if your teenage son has a lot of spending money and his old car keeps getting dinged and battered, you may want to ask a few questions.

A Favorite Book for 2015.

 Amazon Affiliate. If you click from here to Amazon and buy something, I receive a percentage of the purchase price.

© Elizabeth Burns of A Chair, A Fireplace & A Tea Cozy

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32. New book trailer for Emily and the Enchanted Wood!

Check out the book trailer for this fantasy adventure for children!

When in the enchanted wood, Emily finds she has a surprising connection with her little dog and all of the other animals.  When she discovers she needs to help rid the wood of marauding goblins, she must work with the animals to bring peace back to the woodland realm.

Front cover

 

View on YouTube

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33. Seeking stories for short attention spans

Online journal TRACER (Toronto) is looking for short stories for short attention spans. Submit pieces 2000 words max. Any genre welcome. Deadline: Open.

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34. Wanted: Your insensitively-sensitive works

The Sacrificial seeks concise, original, dark, humorous, twisted, and insensitively-sensitive works. Accepts short stories, poetic prose, dialogues, commentaries, etc. Length: 500 words. Deadline: Ongoing. Guidelines.

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35. Poetry & fiction contest with $1275 in prizes

The Dream Quest One.com invites international entries for their Poetry & Writing Contest. Accepting poems (30 lines max.) and short stories (5 pages max.) on any subject or theme. First prize poetry: US$250; first prize short fiction: US$500. Entry fees: US$5 (poetry) and US$10 (fiction).
Deadline: January 24, 2016.

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36. Wanted: Writing that goes for the heart over the head

Bougainvillea Road Lit Mag is a new online journal looking for literary flash, short stories, poems, vignettes, standalone excerpts from longer work, and creative non-fiction pieces. Looks for writing that is eclectic, alive, and intrepid. Length: 2000 words max. Three pieces max. per submission. Send to Brian1750@hotmail.com. Deadline: Rolling.

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37. Writers, get your gory on

Goreyesque, on online journal featuring work inspired by the spirit and aesthetic of Edward Gorey, is seeking short stories, poems, artwork and essays for their Halloween issue. Deadline: October 15, 2015. Guidelines.

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38. Seeking character studies from Canadian writers

Online literary journal and small press Pictures and Portraits (Toronto) seeks experimental prose and character studies from Canadian writers. Accept fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Length: 2500 words or less. Deadline: Ongoing. Guidelines.

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39. Collected Fiction by Leena Krohn


The most peculiar property of language is its symbolic function. The writer exchanges meanings for marks, while the reader performs the opposite task. There are no meanings outside us, or if there are, we do not know them. Personal meanings are made with our own hands. Their preparation is a kind of alchemy. Everything that we call rationality demands imagination, and if we did not have the capacity to imagine, we could not even speak morality or conscience.

—Leena Krohn, "Afterword: When the Viewer Vanishes"
Ann and Jeff VanderMeer have done wonders for the availability of contemporary Finnish writing in English with their Cheeky Frawg press, and in December they will release their greatest book yet: Collected Fiction by Leena Krohn.

I've been a passionate fan of Leena Krohn's work ever since I first read her book Tainaron ten years ago. I sought out the only other translation of her writings in English available at the time, Doña Quixote & Gold of Ophir, and was further impressed. I read Datura when Cheeky Frawg published it in 2013. It's all remarkable work.

Collected Fiction brings together all of those books, plus more: The Pelican's New Clothes (children's fiction from the 1970s, just as entrancing as her adult work later), Pereat Mundus (which I've yearned to read ever since Krohn mentioned it when I interviewed her), some excerpts and stories from various books published over the last 25 years, essays by others (including me) that give some perspective on her career, and an afterword by Leena Krohn herself.

This book is as important a publishing event in its own way as New Directions' release earlier this year of Clarice Lispector's Complete Stories. It's a similarly large book (850 pages), and though not Krohn's complete stories, it gives a real overview of her career and provides immeasurable pleasure.

Leena Krohn
One of the wonders of this collection is just how big it is. I keep jokingly referring to it as KROHN!, and not just because of Jeremy Zerfoss's gorgeous cover, but because this is a doorstop of a book that collects the work of someone whose writing might often be described as delicate, miniature tales. Her books don't tend to be especially long, and even her novels are built of miniatures. But now we can hold this huge collection of decades of writing and its solidity is stunning.

In a helpful overview of the first thirty years of Krohn's writing (1970-2001) included here, Minna Jerman writes: "Gold of Ophir is constructed in such a way that you could easily read its chapters in any order, and have a different experience with each different sequence." This is true for most of Krohn's novels, it seems to me, and is another virtue of her writing, something that makes it feel so different from so many other books, so truly strange, and yet so captivating, like a puzzle that isn't especially insistent about its puzzle-ness — or, to quote the great John Leonard, it embodies "Chaos Theory, with lots of fractals."

This is what I want to tell you, then: Reader, you should get this book at the first opportunity and you should spend a year (at least!) reading through it in whatever order you feel like, letting it be a magical, mind-warping cabinet of curiosities, a wonderbox of a book. You should not devour Leena Krohn's writing. Savor it, take it in in small bits, because there are so many glorious small bits here. Why rush? This is rich, rich material. Just as no rational person would ever guzzle a truly fine scotch, so you should sip from Krohn's fountain of dreamwords.

And this is what I want to tell you, O Writerly Types: This book is a gift to you, a tome of possibilities. Stop writing like everybody else. We don't need you to make your vision fit into the airport bookstore shelves. Those shelves are full. We need more writers who will do what Leena Krohn has done, who will seize language as a tool for dreaming back toward consciousness, who will find forms that fit such dreaming, who will not replicate the conventions of now but instead reconfigure their own conventions until they seem inevitable. Learn from this book, O Writers. Let it inspire you to write in your own new ways, your own new forms, your own truthful imaginings.

In a trance, his hand already numb and senseless, accompanied by the rustle of the rain and the croaking of frogs, Håkan was taken through the eras toward the wondrous time when he did not yet exist.
—Leena Krohn, Pereat Mundus: A Novel of Sorts

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40. Paying journal wants your monsters, myths & magic

Small independent journal The Quilliad (Toronto) seeks flash fiction, short stories, poetry, comics, photography, and art from Canadian writers and artists. Looking for literary science fiction and horror; magic realism; fairy tales, folk tales, myths, and legends; monsters, death, magic, and fear. Submit 1-5 pieces. Deadline: October 20, 2015. Payment: $12 honorarium plus copy. Guidelines.

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41. Short fiction contest with $1500 prize

PRISM international is now accepting submissions for their 2016 Short Fiction Contest, judged by Lee Maracle. First prize: $1500 + publication; more prizes available. Length: 6000 words max. Entry fee: $35-$45 (includes subscription). Deadline: January 20, 2016. Guidelines.

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42. Short story contest with no entry fee, $300 prize

Words & Brushes invites writers to write a short story (length: 2000-5000 words) around an artwork from their image gallery. First prize: $300. Participants may enter as many stories as they like. No entry fee. Deadline: December 1, 2015. Guidelines.

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43. Wanted: Writing that ‘cat-burgles’ expectations

The Los Angeles Review invites submissions for Vol. 20. Theme: Ekphrasis. Publishes fiction (“hard-to-put-down shorts”) under 1000 words as well as sequences of such shorts and/or stand-alone lengthier stories up to 4,000 words; nonfiction (1000-4000 words); flash nonfiction (“that cat-burgles expectations”), poetry and book reviews. Reading fee: $3. Deadline: December 1, 2015. Guidelines.

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44. Get in Trouble

cover artI was so excited to read Kelly Link’s newest story collection Get in Trouble. I read Magic for Beginners a long time ago and really liked it. It was so quirky and strange. The stories would be perfectly normal expect for the zombies. Or the rabbits. Or some other weird twist that made everything shift just a little off the reality axis.

Get in Trouble has much of the same thing going on. I am reading and the story seems ho-hum and then a small detail slips in and — wait, what, did that just say she has two shadows? But as weird as a story might get, the characters in it find nothing weird going on and they have the most banal conversations. It keeps the stories grounded and prevents the slightly off-kilter from wobbling into the absurd.

I should have liked the collection. And I did like several of the stories. There is one called “The Summer People” that manages to be both innocent and creepy at the same time. Another, “Secret Identity,” is everyday enough. A teenage girl playing online pretends she is much older than she is, hops a bus to New York City to meet the guy who likes her in person only to end up at a hotel where there are two conventions going on, dentists and superheroes. Everyone keeps asking her if she is a sidekick or there to apply to be a sidekick. And the man she is supposed to meet? Turns out he is a superhero but she never meets him for various reasons. It’s a good story about the masks we wear and who we really are underneath.

“The New Boyfriend” is also pretty good. Teenage girls and synthetic boyfriends that you can buy — take your pick between vampire, werewolf, or a few others. The ghost version is no longer on the market because there were problems. But Ainslie always somehow gets what she wants and Immy just can’t stand it any longer. Not a story so much about boyfriends, Immy has had a real boyfriend and Ainslie has not, but more about friendship and jealousy, popularity and social power.

The rest of the stories were uninteresting to me. The humor and weirdness rubbed me the wrong way. The strange was expected instead of surprising and it was even at times boring; the charm and shine faded.

Overall I was disappointed. I seem to recall other folks reading the collection and finding it lacking a bit too. Unfortunately I don’t remember who they all are. If you have not read Kelly Link before and have heard what a good story writer she is and want to see for yourself, don’t choose Get in Trouble as your collection of discovery. Go for Magic for Beginners instead.


Filed under: Books, Reviews, Short Stories Tagged: Kelly Link

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45. How well do you know Sherlock Holmes? [quiz]

Test your knowledge of Sherlock Holmes with this quiz, based on the novels and short stories, the canon's history and its place in modern day life.

The post How well do you know Sherlock Holmes? [quiz] appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on How well do you know Sherlock Holmes? [quiz] as of 9/9/2015 8:49:00 AM
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46. Through the Woods

cover artI must apologize for not remembering on whose blog I first learned about Through the Woods by Emily Carroll because I owe that blogger a big thank you. Through the Woods is a short story collection like no other I have ever read. Why might that be? It is a book of graphic short stories.

When I got it from the library I didn’t remember about the graphic part of it and I worried that perhaps I had made a mistake. How can you do a book of graphic short stories? Novel, memoir, biography, but short stories? But you know what? It totally works and it is great!

The stories are of the very short and ambiguous kind and they are successful because the art and the text work so well together to move the story along. They have a fairy tale quality to them and they all felt vaguely familiar because of that but they are completely original. They all feature girls or young women. They are about things like a cold snowy winter and dad has to leave his three daughters alone. He tells them if he isn’t back in three days they are to go to the neighbor’s house. Of course he doesn’t return. The eldest daughter refuses to leave, insisting that dad will be back any time. The youngest doesn’t really seem concerned about anything in particular. And the middle daughter, the one telling the story, insists they follow their father’s wishes because if they don’t they will be completely snowed in and without food. And then during the night someone comes to the door and the eldest sister goes with that someone and doesn’t come back. The night after that, the youngest sister goes with the stranger. The middle sister is left all alone. The food is gone. She walks most of the day through the deep snow to the neighbor’s house and…

Another tale is about a father marrying off his beautiful daughter to the richest man in the county. The house is huge and gorgeous but something is not right. Someone keeps her up at night singing a strange song. Her husband tells her she’s hearing things that aren’t there. One night while her husband is away, she goes looking for the source of the song and discovers more than she bargained for.

The art in this book is amazing. Stark, deeply saturated color in a limited palette of black, white, scarlet red and deep blue, creates high contrast and a rich lushness that magnifies the creep factor of the stories. I raced through them all in less than an hour one evening before bed. The final story gave me such chills that I told Bookman if I have any nightmares Through the Woods is at fault.

A perfect RIP Challenge read for sure, but guaranteed excellent for any dark night or stormy afternoon no matter what time of year.


Filed under: Challenges, Graphic Novels, Reviews, Short Stories Tagged: Emily Carroll, fairy tales, RIP Challenge

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47. Queensland Literary Awards 2015 – still time to vote

After its recent tumultuous history, the Qld Literary Awards are growing from strength to strength under the banner of the State Library of Queensland and a bevy of eminent sponsors. The 2015 shortlists have just been announced and the winners will be revealed at the Awards Ceremony on Friday 9th October in Brisbane. Some categories […]

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48. Blood: Stories Now Available for Pre-Order


You can now order my upcoming collection Blood: Stories from the publisher, Black Lawrence Press. The book will be released in January 2016, and BLP is offering it for a bit of a discount before the publication date (it's a big book — 100,000 words — so will retail for $18.95).

Should you pre-order it? I don't know. Yes, of course, I would like you to. And if you're going to order it online, this is a good way to do it, because you'll get it pretty quickly and a larger percentage of your money will go to BLP, so you'll help a small publisher stay solvent. Once the book is published, you'll also be able to buy it from bookstores, and since I support people spending as much money as possible in local bookstores, that's a great way to get it as well.

Actually, you should probably both pre-order it and buy it from bookstores, because why would you want only one copy? You need to be able to give them away to friends — or, if you don't like the book, to enemies... Read the rest of this post

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49. Wanted: Engaging stories, vivid characters

Tethered By Letters is accepting submissions for the TBL Fall Literary Contest. Categories: Short story (1000-7500 words; $500 prize); flash fiction (55, 250, or 500 words; $150 prize); and poetry ($150 prize). Looking for engaging stories, vivid characters, and fresh writing styles. Winners published in F(r)iction. Entry fees: $7-$15. Deadline: December 1, 2015. Guidelines.

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50. Eerie experiences wanted for arts magazine

ArtAscent seeks submissions on the theme of “Haunting.” Write about spooky creatures, frightening places, eerie experiences. Entries may include fiction, poetry, short stories and other written explorations (up to 900 words). Open to international artists. Deadline: October 31, 2015. Guidelines.

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