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26. Links I Shared on Twitter this Week: June 27

TwitterLinksHere are highlights from the links that I shared on Twitter this week @JensBookPage. This week's topics include book lists and awards, common core and nonfiction, growing bookworms, reading, publishing, schools, libraries, and summer reading.

Book Lists and Awards

International Reading Association 2014 Book Awards | @tashrow http://ow.ly/yrDr6 #kidlit @IRAToday

The 2014 New Zealand Post Margaret Mahy Book of the Year is The Boring Book by Vasanti Unka http://ow.ly/ymcXW via @bkshelvesofdoom

The 2014 Carnegie Medal has been awarded to Kevin Brooks for The Bunker Diary, reports @bkshelvesofdoom http://ow.ly/ymcJX

My Magnificent Seven: Fiction Books for Tech Lovers from @BookZone http://ow.ly/yudF2 #yalit #kidlit

Stacked: 2014 Printz and Morris Predictions at the Half-Way Point from @catagator http://ow.ly/yudgo #YAlit

A fun list! 14 Chapter Books about the Theater from @momandkiddo http://ow.ly/ymcbF #kidlit

13 Books with #LGBTQ Characters, #booklist from @Book_Nut http://ow.ly/ykdnF #kidlit

The @bookchook Ten Top Picture Books http://ow.ly/ykdj0 #kidlit #literacy

A new #booklist from @FuseEight | 2014 Quaker Books for Quaker Kids http://ow.ly/ymd8I #kidlit

Common Core / Nonfiction

The Uncommon Corps: Mary Ann Cappiello calls for #Nonfiction Book Festivals for Kids http://ow.ly/ypPWE #kidlit

Shanahan on #Literacy: The New Bane of Beginning Reading Instruction: Phony Rigor http://ow.ly/ypPTd #CommonCore

Growing Bookworms

ReachoutandreadbwlogoAmerican Academy of Pediatrics Backs Reading Aloud from Infancy http://ow.ly/ypMVm via @PWKidsBookshelf @ReachOutAndRead @Scholastic

Pediatricians recognize importance of reading aloud to babies | @JGCanada on news from American Academy of Pediatrics http://ow.ly/ypPZu

"Reading aloud to infants is a powerful message to send to all parents" | @tashrow on new MD recs re: reading aloud http://ow.ly/ypQ2u

Reading Tips for Parents of Babies | @ReadingRockets via @librareanne http://ow.ly/yua2A#GrowingBookworms

What to Do When Reading Is Too "Sitty" | @ImaginationSoup @readingrockets via @librareanne http://ow.ly/ykdg6 #literacy

Miscellaneous

So cool! First Photos Of Universal's Diagon Alley Are A Harry Potter Nerd's Dream Come True http://ow.ly/ykdmO via @bkshelvesofdoom

Thomas the Tank Engine chugs its way to Edaville Railroad in MA. I remember visiting Edaville as a kid :-) http://ow.ly/yeKMf

I love programs like this: Google pushes girls into coding with 'Made With Code' program - @MercuryNews http://ow.ly/yh609

On Reading, Blogging, and Publishing

I read books. Does that make me a nerd? asks teen columnist in @GuardianBooks http://ow.ly/yeKAQ via @PWKidsBookshelf

A Mini-Rant on Censorship from Becky Levine, inspired by a recent post by @halseanderson http://ow.ly/yrEHt

Bill at Literate Lives shares 5 Things That Made Him a Reader (incl. Willy Wonka) http://ow.ly/yrF0o #literacy

100 First Lines from speculative #kidlit | Follow-Up: The Answers! | Views From the Tesseract http://ow.ly/ykdC9

Must-read post for book bloggers from @catagator at Stacked: On Blogging, Responsibility, and Content Ownership http://ow.ly/ymdWC

So sad to hear via @bkshelvesofdoom that the Strange Chemistry #yalit imprint is being discontinued http://ow.ly/yh3au @StrangeChem

Schools and Libraries

Way to make a difference! Bookmobile donated by Ellen DeGeneres keeps kids reading - Tulsa World http://ow.ly/yv1tV #libraries

Lemony Snicket Helps 'Little Free Library' Advocate Spencer Collins @HuffPostBooks http://ow.ly/yv1pq @PWKidsBookshelf

A detailed description of her library's 1st Digital Storytime (iPad apps projected on big screen) from @greenbeanblog http://ow.ly/yrDRB

From the Office of the Future of Reading feature @KirbyLarson says Farewell at least for the summer #libraries http://ow.ly/yuceZ

Good stuff from The Show Me Librarian: Thoughts on Reader's Advisory http://ow.ly/ymec9 #libraries

New York Schools Chief Advocates More ‘Balanced #Literacy@NYTimes via @PWKidsBookshelf http://ow.ly/yv1fY

Uncommon Corps: Get a Grip: We Need to Focus This Conversation about Including Parents in Education | Myra Zarnowski http://ow.ly/yuby5

New Baskets for Our 3rd Grade Classroom Library, @frankisibberson 's plans to keep her classroom library fresh http://ow.ly/ypPHf

"When I do give homework I’m pretty fanatic about the kids doing it on their own." @medinger on homework + parents http://ow.ly/ykdrG

Middle School Student-Parent Book Club – A Recipe for Success by @annhagedorn @NerdyBookClub http://ow.ly/yh5d7

Summer Reading

Books Beat Summer Slide, nice graphic @FirstBook blog http://ow.ly/yh1Fg #SummerReading

Good advice from Alysa @Everead : How to Visit the #Library with Kids http://ow.ly/yh4IN#SummerReading

Nashville Public Library Reinvents Its #SummerReading Model, Sees Early Success | Lindsey Patrick in @sljournal http://ow.ly/yuDxw

Children's #SummerReading Guide 2014: Level 1 Readers + Beyond - how publishers + librarians try to help parents @wsj http://ow.ly/yrBhB

Raising #SummerReaders: Tip-a-Day series | Raising Great Readers with Great Books by @aliposner http://ow.ly/ykduk

Raising Summer Readers Tip-a-Day #2: Create a Summer Bucket List from @aliposner http://ow.ly/ymdfR #GrowingBookworms

#SummerReading Tip-a-Day #3: Make sure your child always has a next book in mind for after the current one @aliposner http://ow.ly/ypPJW

Raising #SummerReading Tip-a-Day #4: Help your children make “summer book bags” | @aliposner http://ow.ly/yrEgj

Continuing the series from @MaryAnnScheuer | Summer Reading Favorites: 4th grade suggestions http://ow.ly/ymcRD #kidlit

Great Kid Books: #SummerReading Favorites: 5th grade suggestions from @MaryAnnScheuer http://ow.ly/yuaNb #kidlit

Nice list of #SummerReading suggestions for kids from Mike Lewis (link goes to PDF) http://ow.ly/ymexO via @FuseEight

First Book's Summer Book List: High School includes Mare's War by Tanita Davis :-) http://ow.ly/yh1sC@FirstBook

So glad to hear that @lochwouters experience of Going Prizeless in her library #SummerReading program is going well http://ow.ly/yh2hI

© 2014 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook.

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27. Friday Feature: Cold Calls by Charles Benoit


18222846
Three high school students—Eric, Shelly, and Fatima-have one thing in common: "I know your secret."

Each one is blackmailed into bullying specifically targeted schoolmates by a mysterious caller who whispers from their cell phones and holds carefully guarded secrets over their heads. But how could anyone have obtained that photo, read those hidden pages, uncovered this buried past? Thrown together, the three teens join forces to find the stranger who threatens them-before time runs out and their shattering secrets are revealed . . .


My thoughts:

The back of this book said it was Pretty Little Liars meets The Breakfast Club, and I was sold with that one line. One of my favorite TV series meets one of my favorite movies? Yeah, I'm reading it. I love suspense. The book begins with Eric getting a threatening call from someone who has been inside his house, judging by the photo the caller sends him. It was a great creepy moment to start the story. The caller knows Eric's secret, knows it and has evidence to send to everyone in Eric's phone contact list. That is unless Eric follows a list of tasks targeted at a kid at Eric's school. Eric is bullied into being a bully and winds up getting caught and thrown into a program for bullies.
At the program, Eric meets others who have gotten the same calls. Together they try to figure out who is harassing them and put an end to the sick game before all their secrets are spilled.

I really loved the cast of characters and the variations of their secrets. Finding out who the caller was also kept me turning the pages. And the ending! It was my kind of ending. Perfect for a suspense like this one. I highly recommend this book.

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28. Guest Post: Lessons in Pentameter

Writing Life Banner

by

Ian Doescher

shakespeare_trilogy

Note from Sooz: I am SO EXCITED (like, fangirl-flipping-out-excited) to have Ian Doescher, the author of William Shakespeare’s Star Wars on Pub(lishing) Crawl! If you guys haven’t read these books, then DO. They are incredible.

Now take it away, Ian!

In my freshman year English class, as we prepared to dive in to Shakespeare’s Othello, my teacher Jane Bidwell taught us about the four major types of poetic feet, including the meter Shakespeare wrote it: iambic pentameter.  Iambic pentameter is a set of five (pent) iambs, which is a poetic foot with the pattern unstressed-stressed, like the word re-LEASE.  So, iambic pentameter is da-DUM da-DUM da-DUM da-DUM da-DUM.

Three years later, as a senior, we were required to write ten lines of iambic pentameter, as we studied John Dryden’s poem “Mack Flecknoe.”  “Mack Flecknoe” is a poem Dryden wrote to make fun of a man named Thomas Shadwell.  Our assignment was to write a similar poem making fun of someone else, so I, naturally, chose Barney the Purple Dinosaur.  Here are the ten lines I wrote at age 17:

“Hello, there kids.  Today we’re gonna sing!

Oh who’s your friend, your ruler, and your king?

It’s me you trust, the great and mighty one

Who makes you laugh, and lets you all have fun!

‘The Purple Hero’ I am known to you,

I love you more than both your parents do!

I’m great, I’m nice, I’m smart, I’m kind, and wise,

So now then, let me give you kids advice:

Believe that I love you and you love me,

And in my power ever shall you be!”

Not too bad.  But here’s a confession: in and after high school, I wrote occasional bits of poetry, and honestly I figured it was okay to play fast and loose with the meter.  If I needed to scrunch an additional syllable or two into my line to use the words I wanted to use, that was okay.  But about eight years ago I made a pact with myself—the kind of pact that only nerds make with themselves: from that point forward, if I was going to write in verse I was going to be a total stickler about having flawless meter (and rhyme).  What I realized back then is that anyone can fudge meter, but only true artists are perfectionists about it.  My exemplar in this is not Shakespeare, actually (who bent iambic pentameter to his own will), but Dr. Seuss:

“Green eggs and ham, green eggs and ham,

I do not like green eggs and ham…”

Flawless iambic tetrameter.  The text of Dr. Seuss’ books sings as you read it because he was just about perfect when it came to meter.

So, what about you?  How can you write great verse?  The trick is to be honest with yourself about where the syllables in your line fall, and if you are fitting in extra syllables or if your rhymes aren’t perfect (“wise” doesn’t rhyme with “advice,” sorry 17-year-old Ian!), you need to go back to the drawing board.  Sometimes this is painful.  In the course of writing the William Shakespeare’s Star Wars trilogy, I can’t tell you the number of times I had to ditch a line and start over because I couldn’t get the syllables to work the way I wanted them to.  In the end, though, I think the books are better for it.  And so will your verse be if you stick to your guns and go for perfection.

As a 17-year-old, I didn’t know that what I was learning about iambic pentameter would change my life, and I didn’t know that my nerdy pact with myself 8 years ago would also be so important.  I’m convinced, though, that (at least in part) it was the attention given to my iambic pentameter that made William Shakespeare’s Star Wars attractive to Quirk Books.  I wouldn’t say my verse is 100% perfect—that’s almost impossible (particularly with words like “stormtrooper” and “lightsaber,” which defy iambic pentameter)—but I know I tried my hardest.  Here’s to taking the time to make your meter sing, like dear ol’ Dr. Seuss!

Thank you SO MUCH for stopping by, Ian!! To celebrate your visit, we’re giving away the entire William Shakespeare’s Stars Wars series + posters! HOORAY! Just fill out the Rafflecopter form to be entered!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

And don’t miss the rest of Ian’s blog tour:

  • Mon, June 23rd: GOOD BOOKS & GOOD WINE
  • Tues, June 24th: BIBLIOMANTICS
  • Thurs, June 26th: GEEKY LIBRARY
  • Fri, June 27th: NOVEL THOUGHTS
  • Mon, June 30th: ON WEDNESDAYS WE WEAR PINK
  • Tues, July 1st: GEEKOSYSTEM
  • Weds, July 2nd: MY MERCURIAL MUSINGS
  • Thurs, July 3rd: QUIRK BOOKS BLOG

Ian DoescherIan is a Portland native, and lives in Portland with his spouse and two children.  He has a B.A. in Music from Yale University, a Master of Divinity from Yale Divinity School, and a Ph.D. from Union Theological Seminary.  He is currently the Creative Director at Pivot Group LLC, a full service marketing, research and web agency in Portland, Oregon.

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29. Libraries: More Than The Common Core

Listen, I get it.

I understand the attention that school and public libraries are giving the Common Core. As professionals who deal with information and research, we know that schools, teachers, and parents will have questions and that we need to support that. As with other things, we need to support it regardless of our own feelings about the Common Core, how it was created, the process behind it, how it's being implemented, etc.

"Support" means knowing what it is and knowing, and determining ahead of time, what types of resources will be needed in a library or school.

One thing that's interesting: when you start looking into who questions the Common Core -- well, there are many people who aren't thrilled with it, for many reasons. I think public and school libraries should have a general understanding of this, if for no other reason than to recognize that those challenging it, and it's implementation, are diverse in their reasons.

So, yes, that's my paragraphs in understanding and defending the role that libraries have in the Common Core.

As that support gets rolled out, I just want to throw out a simple reminder.

Libraries are more than the Common Core. We are more than supporting the stated educational goals of a school.

We are also about enjoyment. Reading for pleasure. (This is true even for school libraries, who may not be part of an institution that explicitly states this, but who understand that an element of literacy, even when unsaid, is that reading is and can be something that is fun. And it's OK to encourage and celebrate fun reading.)



As libraries, especially public libraries, take a look at programs and resources and books within the context of the Common Core --

Remember. We are more than the Common Core. We are also about escaping into literature. We are about the joys of getting lost in a book. We are about celebrating the act of reading for the sole reason that some of us like to read. Or, rather, love to read.

And that simple pleasure, well, sometimes, it does get attacked. Is the person reading the right books? What are they learning from those books? Is it making them a better person? Is it uplifting? Does it have a moral? Is deep reading going on? Is the reading being done the "right" way? Will this make someone a better employee? Is reading too passive? Isn't it better to be making something than reading? Isn't it better to be talking to people? Don't people have better things to do than read? Than read that book?

I think one of the wonders of libraries is that it is still a place for the person who loves reading. Libraries are more -- we are the sum of our parts, more than any one part of our mission. And part of that more is, and should continue to be, celebrating reading and being there for readers.


Amazon Affiliate. If you click from here to Amazon and buy something, I receive a percentage of the purcshase price.

© Elizabeth Burns of A Chair, A Fireplace & A Tea Cozy

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30. Common questions about shared reading time

By Jamie Zibulsky, Anne Cunningham, and Chelsea Schubart


Throughout the process of reading development, it is important to read with your child frequently and to make the experience fun, whether your child is a newborn or thirteen. This may not sound like news to many parents, but the American Academy of Pediatrics is just announcing their new recommendation that parents read with their children daily from infancy on, and it is expected that this announcement will serve as a reminder to many parents and a call for educators and policymakers to help parents who lack the time, resources, and skills to read with their children encourage reading development. We are so excited about this new development because the benefits of shared reading accrue over time and we believe that this announcement will create the energy needed to help many young children become successful, motivated readers.

Although reading together is important at all ages, the specific strategies parents use will change dramatically as their children get older. The strategies parents use will also be dependent upon their children’s interests, temperament, and abilities. There is no one “right” way to read together.

parent reading to children

Figuring out the best way to engage in shared reading with a child while he or she is young gives parents an opportunity to use cuddle time together as a way to also help a child understand a book more deeply, and to simultaneously teach specific reading skills. Perhaps as important, children who have an enthusiastic reader as a role model may stay determined to learn to read, even when facing challenges, rather than becoming easily discouraged. The magic of shared reading comes from this combination of warm, interpersonal experiences, playful and captivating storytelling, and opportunities for learning. This winning combination helps children not only learn to read, but learn to love and value reading.

There are many questions that parents often ask about reading together with their children, and some of those questions are answered below. We hope that thinking through these issues inspires parents to start reading with their children regularly (even if they are already a bit older), and create family reading rituals that last a lifetime!

How can I get my child more engaged in reading time?

If you are having difficulty engaging your child in reading time, try searching for books on topics that she finds interesting (even if those topics are not ones that you find engaging). If your child enjoys looking at comic books, embrace this type of reading, rather than discouraging it. Although it might be surprising to hear, they include much richer language than we encounter in a typical day. Reading any printed material also helps children get comfortable turning pages, and give you the chance to talk with your child about new ideas and vocabulary words.

Many children also respond well to having some freedom and getting to make choices during reading time. You may want to let your child to choose the book you will be reading, whether you are picking books out in the library or off your own bookshelf. You can also let your child select where and when you will read…within reason, of course.

Most importantly, try to make the reading experience enjoyable by focusing on what goes well. Praise your child just for sitting down with you to read, even if she only wants to sit briefly. The next day, try to get her to sit through a few pages of the story and sit a bit longer. Reading time should be a time to relax and bond with your child. If she acts up, simply end reading time, but do so calmly and try again later.

How do I know if my child is actually listening while I am reading to him/her?

Asking questions throughout the story that actively engage your child in the reading process should encourage him to listen more closely while you are reading. If you think your child is not listening as you read, try asking a question or two on each page in order to get your child to interact with the story and actively express himself. If he seems particularly distracted, simply end reading time, but do so calmly and try again later.

How long should I spend trying to explain something to my child if they get frustrated?

Reading time should be a relaxing, bonding experience for both you and your child. Rather than trying to teach many new skills during any one reading session, pick just one idea to focus on each day, whether it is a new vocabulary word or letter to identify. Setting manageable reading goals will help make this time feel fun, rather than stressful, for you both.

If you ask a question about a book that your child is having trouble understanding, respond calmly and either restate your question in a simpler way or give a clue regarding the correct answer. If she seems to be frustrated, move on and return to the concept at another time. Story concepts might become clearer to children with repeated readings of the same story.

What if my child wants to read the same book every night?

Repeated readings of a story actually help children to more deeply understand the plot. In addition, your child will grow more familiar with the story and the words that make it up. You can even try having your child read to you. If he is familiar with the book, he might be able to decode words he would not be able to decode in an unfamiliar context. If your child is not ready to actually read the words on the pages, have him retell the story to you using the pictures and what he recalls from other readings of the story. By asking questions and making comments, you can continue to build his vocabulary and background knowledge, even while reading a familiar story.

Anne E. Cunningham, Ph.D. and Jamie Zibulsky, Ph.D. are the authors of Book Smart: How to Develop and Support Successful, Motivated Readers. Anne Cunningham is Professor of Cognition and Development at University of California Berkeley Graduate School of Education and Jamie Zibulsky is Assistant Professor of Psychology at Fairleigh Dickinson University. Learn more at Book Smart Family. Suggestions are adapted Book Smart: How to Develop and Support Successful, Motivated Readers by Anne E. Cunningham and Jamie Zibulsky. Read their previous blog posts.

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31. Finding Friends and Followers

I had the chance to add more than 1,000 followers to my Twitter account last week. It was tempting. I mean let’s be honest – who doesn’t want to believe that there are thousands of people who want to hear what you think about I had the chance to add more than 1,000 followers to my Twitter account last week. It was tempting. I mean let’s be honest – who doesn’t want to believe that there are thousands of people who want to hear what you think about books and writing and more?

The only thing that held me back? The cost.

And I don’t mean the $25 charge for adding their Twitter handles to my account.

One of the things I love about Twitter – about the internet in general – is the way it allows us to connect with other people. Last week Andrew Smith favorited and retweeted one of my tweets. And yes, I had a major fangirl moment ☺ I live in a tiny town in California with a population of less than a thousand people. And yet, I shared mini conversations with people in Canada, Florida, New England – even a guy in Africa. How cool is that?

I wouldn’t have had these conversations with people I bought from a list, people who may not even know their name was on the list. We had these conversations because we share a common interest. And finding those people to connect with – people who like books and reading, writing and publishing, movies and music – that’s half the fun. Finding and making those connections. Not buying them.

I may not have as many followers as some of the people who’ve been doing it longer. But I’m content to find those people over time. So that when we do find and follow each other, we’ll share a real connection. Maybe even have a memorable conversation.

That’s worth more to me. That’s priceless.?

The only thing that held me back? The cost.

And I don’t mean the $25 charge for adding their Twitter handles to my account.

One of the things I love about Twitter – about the internet in general – is the way it allows us to connect with other people. Last week Andrew Smith favorited and retweeted one of my tweets. And yes, I had a major fangirl moment ☺ I live in a tiny town in California with a population of less than a thousand people. And yet, I shared mini conversations with people in Canada, Florida, New England – even a guy in Africa. How cool is that?

I wouldn’t have had these conversations with people I bought from a list, people who may not even know their name was on the list. We had these conversations because we share a common interest. And finding those people to connect with – people who like books and reading, writing and publishing, movies and music – that’s half the fun. Finding and making those connections. Not buying them.

I may not have as many followers as some of the people who’ve been doing it longer. But I’m content to find those people over time. So that when we do find and follow each other, we’ll share a real connection. Maybe even have a memorable conversation.

That’s worth more to me. That’s priceless.

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32. Question of the Week: Where is Your Favorite Place to Read?

Hey everyone! Clara Kensie here. A few times a month at Adventures in YA Publishing, I post a question for you and the Adventures in YA team to answer. The questions cover all topics important to writers and book lovers: craft, career, reading, books, and more. Join the discussion!

Question of the Week:
WHERE IS YOUR FAVORITE PLACE TO READ?

Where is your favorite place to read?
photo credit: sidewalk flying via photopin cc

Alyssa Hamilton: I would love to say my room, because it's a beautiful sea foam green colour with white furniture and accents. It's all very serene and gorgeous but I hate reading on my bed during the day because it just makes me sleepy, so when I'm home I tend to sit in my armchair in the living room right by the window for some good natural lighting. My backyard would have to easily be my favourite place though. We just redid the patio last summer and it's just amazing. I have big outdoor furniture out there and it's private and there are wind chimes and it's the perfect place to read in the summer!

Martina Boone: I have a great chair in my office, or a couch in the living room. But I also love to read on the deck where I feel like I’m outside and can soak up the sun and the words at the same time. Where I really end up reading mostly is in bed. I can’t sleep until I’ve read for a while.

Jan Lewis: In the bed, I guess. That's the only place I ever read.

Lisa Gail Green: I like reading in my bed. I don’t always get to, because the light bothers DH, but that’s why I love my Kindle Paper White. :D Lately though, with the toddler, I fall asleep when my head hits the pillow, and she has a habit of stealing my books out of my hand because she doesn’t want my attention elsewhere, so it’s been a little tougher to find time. So I guess currently my favorite place to read is anywhere I get the opportunity!

Clara Kensie: My favorite place to read is outside, on a not-too-hot not-too-cool sunny day, in the shade. But between the Chicago weather and my busy schedule, those days are hard to come by! When the weather isn’t cooperating, my favorite place to read is on my bed.

YOUR TURN: Where is your favorite place to read?

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33. Talking about Books - Megan Rix

I've been having a nail biting, train zooming, speed-writing, brain tingling time recently. Deadlines have loomed and thankfully been achieved. Awards received (thank you Stockton-on-Tees and Shrewsbury) and talks and presentations for children and adults given.



My first Hay Festival talk went well (even though my dogs who'd been given special dispensation to come along too decided to lie in muddy puddles just before and had to be washed off with bought bottled water from the Co-op.) They're appearing in Edinburgh next.
I got final edits done and lots of emails from my website replied to whilst on the train to Roehampton University to talk to final year teaching students for Reading Zone and more done on the train up to Manchester to talk to teachers and student teachers with Andy Seed, Kate Pankhurst and Jon Mayhew about Reading to Inspire. We were invited by the lovely Nikki Gamble from Just Imagine. Andy told everyone how when he was a teacher the books he pitched to the children were the ones that were most read and it reinforced how important it is that adults show how much they enjoy reading and talk about books they love to inspire children. Our enthusiasm rubs off.
I love days when I can cuddle up with a good book and be transported into another world. It's just the best. I especially used to like Diana Wynne Jones's Howl's Moving Castle as a comfort book.
But my favourite book of all time is Charlotte’s Web. It was read and re-read more than once when I had whooping cough as a child and had a whole term off school. Every week my mum would bring me back all the books she could from the library and I went from a non-reader at the start of my illness to a child with the reading bug by the end.

Thumbs up to the brand new reading group for 8-12's  @suttonlibrary that launched on Saturday 7th June. Hope you all keep on having a brilliant time.
bomberdogdrawing
At the Shrewsbury Bookfest the children were so passionate and knowledgable about the short-listed books. They even made book trailers
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jFPl5xbxxQ and had videos of them talking about their favourite books. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qJvlICSuOA
This week I received a letter from a school I visited during my last book tour:

'Every time we go into one of our classrooms, we see someone reading one of the books that they bought when you visited- Even one of our teachers, who isn't an animal-person, read your book overnight and loved it. 
When we knew we were going to write to you we wondered what our friends thought of your books -so we asked them! Ben in year 6 said they took me into another dimension in my learning about World War 2 and I found it hard to escape. Year 3 came up with words like 'awesome', 'epic' and 'can't wait 'til the next one.' And finally, Jessica in year 5 actually made up a new word - 'AMAZEYBULLS!'

Nothing beats letters and emails from happy readers.

I've been taking Traffy in to listen to children read at our local school. She loves it and the children love it and I'm very pleased to say that the children who've been seeing her each week have shown significant improvement in their reading. 
I'll be at the Higgins Museum for the first Bedford Bookfest on Saturday 5th July at 11am talking about 'A Soldier's Friend'. Sadly Traffy and Bella won't be allowed because of the risk of dog fur on the exhibits (probably just as well!) :)


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34. Links I Shared on Twitter this Week: June 20

TwitterLinksHere are highlights from the links that I shared on Twitter over the past two weeks @JensBookPage. I have a lot of links because I was traveling last week, and wasn't able to do a post. Topics include book lists and awards, common core, diversity and gender, growing bookworms, kidlitosphere, reading, writing, schools, libraries, and summer reading.

Book Lists and Awards (find other lists in the Summer Reading section below)

10 Books For Kids Who (think they) Hate Reading by Lisa Graff in @HuffPostBooks http://ow.ly/y9Klq via @tashrow

Cool Correspondence | Great Books About Writing Letters | @sljournal #booklist http://ow.ly/yeCXi #kidlit

Always interesting | Newbery / Caldecott 2015: The Summer Prediction Edition from @fuseeight http://ow.ly/y9Ovj #kidlit

Ten Fantastic Father-figures in middle grade science speculative fiction from Views From the Tesseract http://ow.ly/ybPhK #kidlit

I love it! A Tuesday Ten: Incredible Introverts in #kidlit science fiction + fantasy | Views From the Tesseract http://ow.ly/xWOyZ

Congratulations to @gregpincus | The 14 Fibs of Gregory K is deservedly on the Bank Street Best Children's Books list http://ow.ly/ybO3d

Another fun set of lists from @catagator Stacked | Microtrends in YA Fiction (like being stuck in elevators) http://ow.ly/y9L6p #yalit

Semi-Grown-Up Gumshoes: Three Adult-Market Girl Detectives. http://goo.gl/A5QZmW @bkshelvesofdoom

Fun! RT @tashrow Cameron McAllister’s top 10 amazing machines in children’s books | Children’s books http://buff.ly/1ulw6o4  #kidlit

Common Core

Math: "a lens through which we can see the world better", Jordan Ellenberg quoted in post by Marc Aronson #CommonCore http://ow.ly/ybOwD

Cut to the Core: #CommonCore Is a Hot Topic at Trade Shows http://ow.ly/xWP9y @PublishersWkly

Testing (Again), the Gates Foundation, and Curriculum by Mary Ann Cappiello at The Uncommon Corps http://goo.gl/v6NzfJ

Great Kid Books: #CommonCore IRL: Digital Resources for students studying Colonial America http://ow.ly/xFrGv @MaryAnnScheuer

Diversity + Gender

Diverse Books – on why we ALL need them! by @BooksYALove http://ow.ly/xNviZ  #WeNeedDiverseBooks

The Brown Bookshelf shares message from @RIFWEB | how + why to choose good multicultural children's books http://ow.ly/ybPY7  #diversity

#Diversity in Publishing: Next Steps from the Discussion from @thetoast http://ow.ly/xWPmL via @PWKidsBookshelf

Useful resource from Grace Lin | A Cheat Sheet for Selling #Diversity in books http://ow.ly/xQBH2 via @FuseEight

First Book Pledges to Buy Diverse Books in response to #WeNeedDiverseBooks @sljournal http://ow.ly/xNQUI @FirstBook

Interesting question from @haleshannon squeetus: Is anyone really "able-bodied"? Disability as continuum http://ow.ly/xNqjk #diversity

The Muscle-Flexing, Mind-Blowing Book Girls Will Inherit The Earth : Monkey See : @NPRBooks http://ow.ly/xNBBj via @tashrow

Growing Bookworms

How YA Books Engender a True Love of Reading in My Students | Tina Yang @PubPerspectives http://ow.ly/yeKbS via @PWKidsBookshelf #yalit

So true! "It doesn’t take fine literature to hook a kid for life." @LisaGraff @NerdyBookClub on keeping reading fun http://ow.ly/yerfH

"Reading should not be a chore." On the use of apps that force kids to log book time to earn screen time @salon http://ow.ly/y9H50

Are fathers better at bedtime stories than mothers? - @TelegraphNews via @librareanne http://ow.ly/xWQKo

#DadsRead Campaign Celebrates Fathers Reading to Kids | @sljournal @ZoobeanForKids @goodmenproject http://ow.ly/xWQaU

"I ... credit my husband's love for literature with ... Sprout's enthusiasm for books." @SproutsBkshelf for #DadsRead http://ow.ly/xWOPe

#DadsRead Because Dads are Awesome —adorable photos from @fuseeight for @ZoobeanForKids + @goodmenproject effort http://ow.ly/xNVAC

Raise A Reader: A Parent Guide to Reading for Ages 3-5 | @Scholastic http://ow.ly/xNEqc via @librareanne #literacy

Series books for summer pleasure reading - This is the post for parents by @pwbalto http://goo.gl/fqsJNF #kidlit

How to encourage students to read for pleasure: teachers share their top tips | Teacher Network via @librareanne http://ow.ly/xFsHm

Kidlitosphere

The scoop from @100scopenotes | #Bookaday-gate Resolved! @donalynbooks #BookADay #BookADayUK http://ow.ly/xNqzn

For her 200th Post, Stephanie Whelan shares First Impressions Through 100 Favorite First Lines in #kidlit http://ow.ly/y9K4w

On Reading, Writing, Publishing

An Art Exhibit Honors 75th anniversary of 'Madeline' - @WSJ http://ow.ly/xWQ0s via @PWKidsBookshelf

The fault in our aesthetic pigeonholing: Who cares if grown-ups read young-adult fiction? - @GlobeAndMail http://ow.ly/xWPGs

Where, What, How, and Why Teens Do and Don’t Read | Consider the Source | Seeta Pai @CommonSense Media in @sljournal http://ow.ly/xNR5V

Really? Are We Still Genre Shaming People For The Books They Like? Lauren Davis at io9 http://ow.ly/xQCCh via @gail_gauthier

This is hilarious: "adults should be ashamed to read children’s literature!" Satire from Marjorie Ingall http://ow.ly/xQBet @FuseEight

More great stuff! Ten Reasons To Read YA (No Matter What Age You Are) from @Gwenda http://ow.ly/xNtT5 #yalit

Can you infer an author's interests sometimes? Check out Cats, Dogs and Other Authors’ Favorite Motifs @read4keeps http://ow.ly/xNqL6

Schools and Libraries

A teacher says: "you continue the practice of reading aloud because it is right" @Shoulded @NerdyBookClub http://ow.ly/xNrFc

Ways that kindergarten teachers can foster the love of literacy in kids | Jennifer Schwanke @ChoiceLiteracy http://ow.ly/xNO2h

"As a teacher, I see the importance of caring, compassionate, and dedicated librarians" @JustinStygles @NerdyBookClub http://ow.ly/xNCt9

When You Know Better: A Journey to Authentic Book Clubs (learning from @donalynbooks ) by @jenbrittin @NerdyBookClub http://ow.ly/y9KvH

Rethinking Teaching Choices, some thoughts on Accelerated Reader programs from @katsok http://ow.ly/y9Mce

Press Release Fun: Teachers Are Givers Contest from Walden Media highlighting release of The Giver movie — @fuseeight http://ow.ly/ybOSC

I love @lochwouters descriptions of her annual Library Camp-Out programs. Such a fun way to grow bookworms! http://ow.ly/yegbW

The loss of a school's librarian, from the librarian's point of view, sadly, Zoe @playbythebook http://ow.ly/yeuVb

UpClose: Designing 21st-Century Libraries | How we were vs. are now using libraries @LibraryJournal http://ow.ly/yeCND

Good news! RT @tashrow Libraries see light after years of cuts http://buff.ly/1ulvqiq #libraries

Summer Reading

Great stuff! Top 10 Ways to Enjoy Reading This Summer by @jamibookmom @NerdyBookClub http://ow.ly/xNth2 #GrowingBookworms

10 Tips for Getting Kids Reading This Summer #SummerReading @5m4b http://ow.ly/xWOYj #literacy

Great photos! Top 10 Just Right #SummerReading Nook Ideas from @growingbbb http://ow.ly/y9JYf

BeBookSmartSigh! New Survey from @RIFweb Finds Only 17% of Parents Make Reading a Top Priority for Summer http://bit.ly/1iHaziD

8 Tips to Prevent the #SummerReading Slide from @growingbbb http://ow.ly/yeqPb #literacy

RAISING A READER Organization Offers Tips for Getting Children to Read During Summer Vacation http://ow.ly/xNwmU via @tashrow

I'm loving this series by @MaryAnnScheuer | Here are #SummerReading favorites for Kindergarteners http://ow.ly/y9KVc #kidlit

Lots of ideas in #SummerReading favorites: 1st grade suggestions from @MaryAnnScheuer http://ow.ly/y9K9R #kidlit

#SummerReading favorites: 2nd grade suggestions compiled by @MaryAnnScheuer http://ow.ly/y9JST #kidlit

Reading is fun! #SummerReading favorites from @MaryAnnScheuer | 3rd grade suggestions http://ow.ly/yeqca #kidlit

12 #SummerReading lists by transportation category (inc. rocketship) from @NPR http://ow.ly/ybPEl #bookyourtrip via @bkshelvesofdoom

#Diverse #SummerReading Picks For Kids from Michael Martin @npr via @PWKidsBookshelf http://ow.ly/xNPPB

Stacked with a literal twist on "Summer" Reads, 2014 Edition ( #yalit with summer in the title) http://ow.ly/xNrTe @catagator

© 2014 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook.

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35. Writers Write — and Read

Writing Life Banner

by

E.C. Myers

EC Myers

It’s harder than ever to become a writer.

Not because of all the doom and gloom about the death of the novel, print vs. electronic books, big publishers vs. self-publishing, or Amazon vs. everyone. The problem is that many kids today (girls and boys) not only aren’t reading, but they don’t have access to books. Good writers are born from a lifetime love of reading.

It’s not a matter of kids and teens choosing to play video games, or watch TV, or go online instead of picking up a book — books simply are not in their lives as much as they should be. I was recently invited to talk to a couple of English classes at my old high school about my writing. I was honored, and even more so when I discovered what a hardship it was for the school to afford an author visit and books on their limited budget, which does not include much money even for school books. Or for a school newspaper or literary journal. Or a full-time librarian. These kinds of budgetary cutbacks in school and public libraries is an epidemic.

LegoMovie_Poster_200x300Back in my day, we had all those things. (Although one committed English teacher did sometimes have to resort to photocopying Marlowe, in an early form of book piracy.) I’m a product of every school library, every book we studied in class, every librarian who either recommended good reads to me or quietly looked the other way while I explored on my own. I’m a published author because of English teachers like Mrs. Fein, Mrs. Post, Mrs. Halpern, Mr. Riti, and Mr. Valk.

My author bio says that I was “raised by a single mom and a public library” for a reason: I was lucky enough to live a 10-minute walk from my local library (and I’m not exaggerating when I say I had to walk home up a huge hill in 100-degree weather carrying an armload of books, but it was worth it.) I was lucky because I had family and teachers who nurtured my love for reading and gave me the tools to turn that love into something else: a desire to write books of my own one day.

RRlogo_homeI was also fortunate to have other positive influences in my life like Reading Rainbow, which reinforced reading as a good thing; even at the time, I stood out for reading so much. Many people of a certain age remember the show’s theme song fondly. It talks about the amazing and varied experiences readers can have in the pages of a book, but the lyrics are also motivational for what readers can accomplish in life: “Butterfly in the sky, I can go twice as high.” “I can go anywhere!” “I can be anything!” Those are important messages to give young people. Happily, Reading Rainbow is making a comeback and will be able to reach new generations via computers and mobile devices.

At my former high school, where kids no longer have a creative outlet or writing instruction, one student asked me if I needed a college degree to become a writer. Though I was a little embarrassed, because college is important to getting most good jobs these days, I was also truthful. “No,” I said. “I learned how to write by reading books.” By reading, you naturally gain a knowledge of proper grammar (even if you don’t know the names of the rules or how to parse a sentence) and story structure and pacing, and you begin to develop a prose style and your own voice. Yes, you can take classes and join workshops or critique groups, and I think those are useful things. But to build a solid foundation with words, an active imagination, and a lifelong devotion to consuming and creating stories, you have to read.

handy_rabSo my best advice, forever and always, to kids in school, aspiring writers, and published authors is READ. Read anything. Read everything. Read genres you love and books you think you’ll hate. Read young adult and middle grade and books intended for adults, even if you aren’t meant to understand them. Pick up literary bestsellers and mysteries and science fiction. Try urban fantasy and new adult. Read non fiction and fanfiction, comics and read magazines — and yes, the internet. Read for pleasure. Read for research. Read for inspiration. Read to learn how other authors write well, and to learn what you shouldn’t do. Just read.

So… What are you reading now? (Other than this blog post.) Me, I’m finishing up my friend Rajan Khanna’s excellent debut science fiction novel, Falling Sky, out in October from Pyr. In the comments below, tell us about what’s on your eReader, in your bag, or on your night stand.

E.C. Myers was assembled in the U.S. from Korean and German parts and raised by a single mother and a public library in Yonkers, New York. He is the author of the Andre Norton Award–winning young adult novel FAIR COIN and its sequel, QUANTUM COIN; his next YA novel, THE SILENCE OF SIX, will be published by Adaptive in November 2014. You can find traces of him all over the internet, but especially at his blogTwitter, Facebook, and Tumblr.

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36. Monday Mishmash: 6/16/14


Happy Monday! Here's my mishmash of thoughts:
  1. The Monster Within Release Tomorrow!  Tomorrow is the big day! I wrote The Monster Within the first twelve days of 2012, and I signed with Spencer Hill Press the following September. It's been a long wait, and I'm so excited to share Sam and Ethan's story with you all. 
  2. Face of Death is the Kindle Big Deal  Face of Death is part of the Kindle Big Deal June 13 through June 28th! That means you can grab a copy for only $2.99! Get yours here. Oh, and Touch of Death is now only $2.99 as well since the full series is out. :)
  3. Out on Submission  Today my YA contemporary written under my pen name, Ashelyn Drake, goes out on submission. I'm excited and nervous!
  4. Father's Day  I hope all you dads had a great Father's Day. I didn't get to see my dad, but I we'll celebrate another day. I did have a nice day with my husband, daughter, and my in-laws though.
  5. Revisions  I'm finishing up revisions on a YA title my CPs got back to me last week. My goal is to send it to my agent in the next couple of days.
That's it for me. What's on your mind today?

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37. Save the Enemy Book Review

Title: Save the Enemy Author: Arin Greenwood Publisher: Soho Teen Publication Date: November 12, 2013 ISBN-13: 978-1616952594 288 pp. ARC provided by publisher I think the marketing department got this one wrong. If you look at the cover, you'd think it's an intense thriller. But, really, it's a comedy. Zoey Trask is a senior at a private school in Washington, D.C., but she's the New Girl,

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38. Question of the Week: Do You Have a Book Tattoo? (and if not, which one would you get?)

Hey everyone! Clara Kensie here. A few times a month at Adventures in YA Publishing, I post a question for you and the Adventures in YA team to answer. The questions cover all topics important to writers and book lovers: craft, career, reading, books, and more. Join the discussion!

Question of the Week:
IF YOU COULD GET A LITERARY TATTOO, WHAT WOULD IT SAY? 
WHERE WOULD YOU PUT IT?

"Don't Panic" quote from The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
photo credit: Idhren via photopin cc

Alyssa Hamilton: Well I have two book related tattoos already, the first one is an actual book on my right wrist. The second is the quote "Books Fall Open, You Fall In" on my collarbone. I've been thing of more that I want because tattoos are so addictive. Recently I read The Sky Is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson and I feel like I could have the whole book tattooed on me and it wouldn't be enough because there are so many beautiful quotes out there. I've always really wanted some form of the butterfly shawl scene from Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor as a tattoo.

Martina Boone: This is a toss up: I love this one from Oscar Wilde: “The books that the world calls immoral are books that show the world its own shame.” I also love “Words have the power to change us,” from Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare. If I put a quote in a tattoo, I’d want the words to stay readable and beautiful forever, so probably the inside of the wrist would be the place I’d choose.

Jan Lewis: "Winter is coming" from A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin. Across my upper back. I've wanted to get it for like 10 years now... one of these days.

Clara Kensie: I love tattoos. I don’t have any, but I’ve wanted a literary tattoo for quite some time. The only thing that’s stopping me is my inability to pick one. After much, much consideration, I think I have it narrowed down to two:

For sentimental reasons, I want to commemorate the publication of my first novel, RUN TO YOU, with a tattoo of my favorite quote from the book. I’d get it inked on my left collarbone in small, swirly, tasteful letters:
“Us,” he said. “You and me.”
And my heart echoed in rhythm: Thump. Thump-th-thump.

Or (and?) I might get a one-word quote, spoken by Severus Snape in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, on the inside of my left wrist. This line of dialogue chokes me up every time I read it. You probably already know what it is:
Always.


YOUR TURN: Do you have a literary tattoo? What is it and where did you ink it? If you don’t have a book tattoo, what would you get?

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39. Veterans’ Blogs Offer a Glimpse into Life on the Front Lines

Last week was the 70th anniversary of D-Day, the start of the Allied landing in Normandy, France, that contributed to the end of World War II.

While some marked it with (deserved) pomp and circumstance, we observed it by reading the latest from some of our favorite veterans’ blogs on WordPress.com:

Carrying the Gun

Then-infantryman Don Gomez served two tours in Iraq with the US Army in the early 2000s. After a stint in graduate school and a dissertation on the experiences of Iraqi soldiers during the Iran-Iraq War, he re-upped and heads to Afghanistan later this summer as a Second Lieutenant.

carrying the gun

His blog, Carrying the Gun, is a mix of  thoughtful essays on everything from modern soldiering to women in combat to the transition from soldier to civilian. Sprinkled throughout are photos and letters from his Iraq deployments — a fascinating portrait of the life on the front lines.

O-Dark-Thirty

O-Dark-Thirty is a literary journal for veterans, current military personnel, and their families. Created by the Veterans Writing Project, it helps those who have served tell their stories — and makes sure those stories are accessible to the rest of us.

o-dark-thirty

The magazine is home to The Report, which publishes unedited fiction, non-fiction, and poetry, and The Review, an edited quarterly journal presenting the best literary writing on the veterans’ experience. Browse the latest entries for a poetic take on the forgotten veteran, a fictionalized encounter between German and Russian troops, and a writer’s memoir of a day spent driving his wounded brother to yet another hospital.

O-Dark-Thirty accepts submissions year round — find their guidelines here — and the Veterans Writing Project holds workshops around the US.

Paving the Road Back

For many soldiers, especially those who have served in combat roles, returning to “regular” life brings a new set of challenges. In Paving the Road Back, psychiatrist and Warrior Wellness Unit director Rod “Doc” Deaton gives those who serve our veterans a deeper understanding of the stresses of this transition.

paving the road

Readers seeking information on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder will find analyses of the ethics of PTSD diagnoses and the relationship between PTSD and other psychiatric disorders, along with the stories of real veterans (fictionalized, to protect their privacy). “Doc” also provides the transcripts of his podcast, “Beam Me Up, Scotty,” and a variety of additional links and resources.

For more reading, check out:

  • Firefight, blog of Rick Kurelo, who served with Canadian forces in Bosnia and Afghanistan and recently published a book on his experiences.
  • Fever Dreams, the official site of Brian Castner, Iraq veteran and author of the bestselling book The Long Walk.
  • Voices from Warwhich provides writing workshops for veterans interested in telling their stories.
  • Jason Lemieux, a former Marine and current human rights advocate.
  • True Boots, the blog of Army vet and frequent NPR guest Kristen Rouse.
  • From the Green Notebook, where current Army officer Joe Byerly discusses military life and leadership best practices.
  • Grand Blog Tarkin, a collaborative blog at the intersection of contemporary warfare and science fiction covering “the full range of war and warfare across the multiverse.”

Filed under: Community, Reading

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40. Three Memorable Visits to United Cerebral Palsy After School Programs

I was invited to visit three separate After School Programs this week for United Cerebral Palsy of South Florida. This generous organization serves over 1,800 children and adults in South Florida with Cerebral Palsy, Down syndrome, autism, spina bifida, prematurity, hearing, intellectual disabilities and speech delays with a variety of programs such as occupational, speech and music therapy, skills courses, respite care, counseling, after care and much more.

I discovered that most authors decline invitations to visit organizations that serve those with special needs. I suppose it is because they feel their books are not geared toward that type of audience. I was happy to visit these children knowing  they would simply enjoy listening to my cartoon voices, looking at the colorful pictures and dancing to the music. Some may not understand the story I am telling, but that’s not what enrichment is all about.

All the participants enjoy my world map and were proud to use the pointer to show others where their favorite places are in the world.

We learn about the animals of the Costa Rican rainforest.

The kids cheer when I tell them the book is recorded on CD with music and sound effects, and of course they want to know all about the story.

What I realized this week while spending time with the program participants is that they teach us how to live in the moment and be truly happy from the inside out. Dancing is the best!!!

And they sure like to give great hugs!

Teacher, Mr. Albert wanted to get in on the hug action too! LOL!

Ah, learning about the magic of watercolor pencils!

The teachers and assistants who work in the UCP After School Programs are equally as inspiring as the children. Their energy, dedication and love for what they do are truly remarkable. I wish to thank Allyson Nanny for inviting me and Site Directors Pat McGee and Lakeya Hariott as well as all the other wonderful staff members.

For more information about UCP programs, be sure to visit the United Cerebral Palsy of South Florida website.

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41. Monday Mishmash: 6/9/14


Happy Monday! Here's my mishmash of thoughts:

1. Construction  Major construction is underway and I'll be fleeing to my mom's house for a while. If I'm a little MIA, you know why. I have to drive my daughter back and forth to school each day from NJ, which won't be fun. 


2. Beth Fred's Blurb Writing Class  There are still openings in Beth Fred's online blurb writing course. Sign up here.

3. Drafting  Last week I fast drafted the opening of a new manuscript. I'm hoping to keep moving on it this week, but I'm sure my pace will slow quite a bit thanks to the craziness of this construction. Wish me luck, please!

4. Catch Me When I Fall Cover Reveal and Giveaway  My agency sister, Vicki Leigh, has a cover reveal for her upcoming YA releasing October 23 through Curiosity Quills Press. Check it out. 

Recruited at his death to be a Protector of the Night, seventeen-year-old Daniel Graham has spent two-hundred years fighting Nightmares and guarding humans from the clawed, red-eyed creatures that feed off people’s fears. Each night, he risks his eternal life, having given up his chance at an afterlife when he chose to become a Protector. That doesn’t stop a burnt-out Daniel from risking daring maneuvers during each battle. He’s become one of the best, but he wants nothing more than to stop.

Then he’s given an assignment to watch over sixteen-year-old Kayla Bartlett, a clinically depressed patient in a psychiatric ward. Nightmares love a human with a tortured past. Yet, when they take a deep interest in her, appearing in unprecedented numbers, the job becomes more dangerous than any Daniel’s ever experienced. He fights ruthlessly to keep the Nightmares from overwhelming his team and Kayla. Soon, Daniel finds himself watching over Kayla during the day, drawn to why she’s different, and what it is about her that attracts the Nightmares. And him.

A vicious attack on Kayla forces Daniel to break the first Law and reveal his identity. Driven by his growing feelings for her, he whisks her away to Rome where others like him can keep her safe. Under their roof, the Protectors discover what Kayla is and why someone who can manipulate Nightmares has her in his sights. But before they can make a move, the Protectors are betrayed and Kayla is kidnapped. Daniel will stop at nothing to save her. Even if it means giving up his immortality.
    a Rafflecopter giveaway
5. The Monster Within Teaser, Kindle Pre-order Sale, and Trailer!  Lots of good stuff going on for The Monster Within. First the Kindle edition is on sale for only $3.99. This sale won't last so get your copy here now. And here's a new teaser for you:

And…here's the book trailer:


    That's it for me. What's on your mind today?

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    42. Question of the Week: Do You Like Books That Make You Cry?

    Hey everyone! Clara Kensie here. A few times a month at Adventures in YA Publishing, I post a question for you and the Adventures in YA team to answer. The questions cover all topics important to writers and book lovers: craft, career, reading, books, and more. Join the discussion!

    Question of the Week:
    DO YOU LIKE BOOKS THAT MAKE YOU CRY?
    WHAT BOOKS HAVE MADE YOU CRY?

    Do you like books that make you cry?
    photo credit: Emily's mind via photopin cc
    Alyssa Hamilton: I LOVE books that make me cry, but I don't cry easily in a book. If it's a movie, I'll be pouring tears, but a book is much harder. My most recent book that had me extremely close to tears was The Impossible Knife of Memory by Laurie Halse Anderson and it's easily become one of my favourite books. The choked up feeling I had the entire time I was reading is an awesome sign for me. It shows me how deftly an author was able to wring my emotions out of me. If they actually make me cry, even better!

    Lisa Gail Green: I cry at almost everything. That’s the truth. So it could be a totally fun, lighthearted book, and I’d still bawl. But yes, I do like reading books that have an emotional impact, but I have to be in the mood.

    Martina Boone: I definitely like books that make me feel — emotion is a HUGE, HUGE draw for me. (In fact I cry and smile when I’m writing, and if I don’t, I figure I’m not doing my job.) My favorite books make me tense and make me laugh out loud. The best of those often make me cry. I cried at almost all my favorite books, but some of the two-boxes-of-Kleenex reads include: Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta, The Sky is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson, If I Lie by Corinne Jackson, Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein, Everybody Sees the Ants by A.S. King, Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver, If You Come Softly by Jacqueline Woodson, The Book Thief by Marcus Zuzak, If I Stay by Gayle Forman

    Jan Lewis: I am super sensitive, so I cry very easily. I have been known to cry as soon as I start reading a book, just because I was so excited to read it. The most recent books that made me cry were COMPULSION by Martina Boone and FORBIDDEN by Kimberley Griffiths Little, and they each made me cry for different reasons.

    Clara Kensie: I love books that make me cry! When I signed with my agent, the lovely Laura Bradford, in 2012, she said one of the things she loved about my manuscript was a scene that reminded her of one of her favorite books: Linda Howard’s CRY NO MORE. I immediately bought CRY NO MORE (and yes! There is an amazing, powerful, heartbreaking scene in CRY NO MORE that’s so incredibly similar to a scene in my manuscript!). So of course, I loved that book. And despite the title, I cried, cried, cried. I read it the same day my husband and I were hosting a Superbowl party later that night, and I was late coming downstairs to greet our guests because I was upstairs being an emotional mess. It was fantastic. (By the way: my manuscript is now a book, and it is the first serial from Harlequin TEEN. The first book in the RUN TO YOU series released in February 2014 in three parts: First Sight, Second Glance, and Third Charm. The sequel releases in July 2014, also as a three-part serial: Fourth Shadow, Fifth Touch, and Sixth Sense)

    IF I STAY by Gayle Forman is another book that made me cry. Oh my, that scene with the grandpa? If you’ve read the book, you know which scene I’m talking about.

    I also cried over ELEANOR AND PARK by Rainbow Rowell. I was reading it while waiting for my daughter’s soccer game to start, and before I knew it, it was already half-time—I’d missed the entire first half of the game, and my cheeks were soaked with tears. Beautiful, beautiful. What a wonderful, moving book.

    I originally wrote and answered this question a few weeks ago, but I had to come back to edit my answer because I’m currently reading another book that’s making me cry: PRETTY GIRL-13 by Liz Coley. Back in 2011 for NaNoWriMo I wrote a manuscript on a similar subject, and now I am revising it. I recently bought PRETTY GIRL-13 to read as research. I don’t know if this book will make anyone else’s list of books that make them cry, but the subject is one that hits me right in the heart. And wow. Wow, wow, wow. I cannot stop crying. I can only hope to make my manuscript as powerful as PRETTY GIRL-13.

    YOUR TURN: Do you like books that make you cry? What books have made you cry?

    0 Comments on Question of the Week: Do You Like Books That Make You Cry? as of 6/8/2014 11:47:00 PM
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    43. Links I Shared on Twitter this Week: June 6

    TwitterLinksHere are highlights from the links that I shared on Twitter this week @JensBookPage. Topics covered this week include book lists and awards, diversity and gender, growing bookworms, the kidlitosphere, parenting, reading, writing, publishing, schools, libraries, and summer reading. 

    Book Lists and Awards

    Britain's best-loved children's book? Winnie-the-Pooh | @TelegraphArts reports on survey http://ow.ly/xD0ld via @tashrow

    Stacked: Get Genrefied: Magical Realism in #yalit http://ow.ly/xAi0O @catagator

    Barbro Lindgren Wins Lindgren Prize, reports @tashrow at Waking Brain Cells http://ow.ly/xD0Kb #kidlit

    The 2014 Lambda Awards have been announced, via @bkshelvesofdoom http://ow.ly/xAhdg #yalit

    Four-and-a-half books about the Rwandan Genocide, list from @bkshelvesofdoom who would like other suggestions http://ow.ly/xD0ST #kidlit

    Predictions for the 2014 NYT Best Illustrated Children’s Books from @100scopenotes http://ow.ly/xxfyQ #kidlit

    Stacked: Making a List & Checking it Twice: Bucket Lists and More in YA (a microtrend) http://ow.ly/xxf8c @catagator #yalit

    A solid list | The Best of the Underrated Middle School Books from @fuseeight http://ow.ly/xAhPD #kidlit

    The Top Ten Books I Never Wanted to Read (But I’m Glad I Did) by @emilypmiller3 @NerdyBookClub http://ow.ly/xtAzp #kidlit

    2014 Boston Globe/Horn Book Awards | via @tashrow http://ow.ly/xx9Od @HornBook #kidlit

    Everead: 10 Books to Read to a Kindergarten Class, plus some tips, from Alysa Stewart http://ow.ly/xxhf2 #GrowingBookworms

    Who knew that there were 12 Picture Books about Theater for Kids? Erica @momandkiddo has the list! http://ow.ly/xxd6W

    Lovely start to the week: Sink Your Teeth into a Sweet Read: Books about Candy, from SSHEL blog http://ow.ly/xx9Wh #kidlit

    Diversity + Gender

    At The Uncommon Corps, Marc Aronson addresses how we can help encourage girls in math + computer sicence http://ow.ly/xD2ki

    Guest Post @CynLeitichSmith | Varsha Bajaj on Reading Across Borders & Cultures http://ow.ly/xD1AG #kidlit #diversity

    For #WeNeedDiverseBooks @MsYingling shares a list of #kidlit since 2000 w/ focus on Hispanic culture http://ow.ly/xD1d9

    #WeNeedDiverseBooks, The Panel & Musings on Diversity Discussions from Tanita Davis http://ow.ly/xAghx + #KidLitCon plug

    Overview of #WeNeedDiverseBooks panel at BEA 2014 by @sdiaz101 in @sljournal http://ow.ly/xABg1

    #WeNeedDiverseBooks Announces New Initiatives at BEA, reports @PWKidsBookshelf http://ow.ly/xASXN

    Growing Bookworms

    DadsReadHow and Why You Should Help with the #DadsRead Campaign — @ZoobeanForKids http://ow.ly/xDeEV  #literacy

    Announcing the launch of @ReadingTub Recommendations newsletter - Just in Time for Summer | Family Bookshelf http://ow.ly/xD0xR #kidlit

    Judy Blume: Parents worry too much about their kids are reading, @TelegraphArts http://ow.ly/xATfj via @PWKidsBookshelf

    A quite useful addition to the @SunlitPages Raising Readers series: Nonfiction Early Readers http://ow.ly/xAAwp

    Growing up in home w/ lots of books + being read to as a toddler have biggest impact on school readiness http://ow.ly/xx7mN @librareanne

    The Reading Teacher by Emily Rozmus @rozmuse @nerdybookclub http://goo.gl/XN4Yeh  #growingbookworms

    Kidlitosphere

    Lots of #kidlit news at Morning Notes: Sit on a Book Edition — @100scopenotes http://ow.ly/xD2X1

    Always full of interesting tidbits: Fusenews: The Bear grumbleth “mum mum” — @fuseeight http://ow.ly/xtAQf

    48 Hour Book Challenge: A Call for Diversity from @MotherReader http://ow.ly/xAgt4 #48HBC

    Good to see countdown to this weekend's 48 Hour Book Challenge @MotherReader | Who is participating? http://ow.ly/xxcvB #48HBC

    Much deserved! Celebrating @MotherReader With a Donation to @FirstBook from @MaryLeeHahn + @frankisibberson http://ow.ly/xxfWI

    Miscellaneous

    Have a Productive Day! | @tashrow links to 2 recent articles about improving personal productivity

    Fun! Disney Parks Are Hiding These 35 Secrets From Us...And You Probably Never Noticed! http://ow.ly/xtAlX via @escapeadulthood

    On Reading, Writing, and Publishing

    Round Up of SLJ Day of Dialog 2014 at BEA from @roccoa @sljournal http://ow.ly/xAB4D

    Words to live by! RT @donalynbooks "@rikkir77 @JensBookPage Just read every day and let the rest take care of itself!"

    How Wordless Picture Books Empower Children | SLJ Day of Dialog 2014 | Sarah Bayliss @sljournal http://ow.ly/xABxJ

    Interesting ideas for reinventing the bookshop to attract people to physical stores in @intlifemag http://ow.ly/xxegk via @medinger

    On the autonomy that came with being given permission to read the once-forbidden Harry Potter books http://ow.ly/xx9lv @NPRBooks

    12 Quotes From Roald Dahl for Book Lovers @mashable via @tashrow http://goo.gl/8ogjKN #kidlit

    Parenting

    I loved reading Ami's plan to give her kids a relaxing, time-filled summer vacation at bunkers down http://ow.ly/xxb7C

    This post on Building Trust by @lochwouters in response to @NPRBooks piece, resonated with me http://ow.ly/xxhrb

    Schools and Libraries

    Helping if "kids can discover books that mean something to them, that sink in and stay with them" @MaryAnnScheuer http://ow.ly/xAhp9

    On the importance of audiobooks for teachers + in the classroom by Kristin Becker @KirbyLarson http://ow.ly/xAh3v

    I'm enjoying @MaryAnnScheuer series on #CommonCore IRL. Today: Life in Colonial America (grades 3-5) http://ow.ly/xxdxq #kidlit

    Summer Reading

    Age-selected, updated lists for Building a Home Library from @CBCBook @ALALibrary + @alscblog http://ow.ly/xDfNK  #SummerReading

    Parents: Here are links to Free #SummerReading Resources for the Whole Family from @Scholastic http://ow.ly/xAdbf

    SummerReading-LOGONice little roundup of #SummerReading Resources, including links to @Scholastic lists from @365GCB http://ow.ly/xxaln

    How to Get Kids Hooked on Nonfiction Books This Summer | @MindShiftKQED http://ow.ly/xtBFJ via @tashrow #SummerReading

    Things I wish people knew about #SummerReading from @greenbeanblog http://goo.gl/0OYULU

    © 2014 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook.

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    44. BWFBC: Grace Metalious’s Peyton Place (1956)

    Welcome to this month’s Bestselling Women’s Fiction Book Club in which we discuss Metalious’s Peyton Place.

    For the discussion on Twitter we’ll be using the hashtag #BWFBC. You can also join the converation in the comments below.

    If you haven’t read Peyton Place yet be warned there are many spoilers below.

    Enough with the housekeeping here’s how we read it:

    KE: I’m about halfway through. I’m really glad we’re doing this for book club as otherwise I would never have read this. I have mixed feelings about the novel but it is a fascinating glimpse into the mindset of the early 50s and also much franker about sex than I would have expected although I suppose that is why it made such a sensation.

    JL: I’m really struggling. The opening is so boring and overwritten and ridiculous. An Indian summer is like a woman? What? I keep reading half a page at night and instantly falling asleep. The writing is so bad. Aaargh.

    Haven’t got to any sex yet. Or anything much actually happening. I guess I’m gunna have to skim.

    KE: It’s a perfect book for skimming. Full of mid century American moralism (a form of sentimentalism), “shorthand” sketches of classism, racism, sexism. Self satisfied and judgmental. I recognize it all from my youth!!! Overall I was surprised about the explicit references to so many aspects of sex. And the writing is, as you say, consciously overwrought.

    JL: Finally got a purchase on it. And will now manage to finish in time. PHEW. All my deadlines haven’t helped. *shakes fist at them*

    Anyways, once I started thinking of it as a book about how misogyny and racism function it improved out of sight for me. That combined with skimming the descriptive passages worked a treat. God, I hate Markis. I am so so so so so so over alpha male characters who somehow know what everyone else thinks and feels better than they do. The hate crime at UCSB has made Markis even more hateful to read about. Argh.

    KE: Also a classic text on classism.

    What fascinates me about Markis is that HE RAPES HER. It is described from Constance’s pov, in her memory, and it is horrible, and yet told from the distance of time after she has “fallen in love” with him (and yes, GOD, he is RIGHT ALL THE TIME).

    The juxtapositions are whiplashing.

    OMG Norman Page and the whippings and enemas. OMG OMG

    JL: What do you mean, Alis? There’s no class differences in the USA.

    Got up to that bit now. So. Awful. What is this?! And that’s the flashback on how they fell in love because he raped her. Aaargh! Reminded me of the scene in GWTW where Rhett rapes Scarlett and she realises she cares for him. I can’t . . . .

    It’s not hard to see how we got to this moment in history—with the UCSB shootings—from the misogynist, rape-is-good mess of Peyton Place. It’s so depressing.

    Also this book makes it clear why Jackson wrote “The Lottery.”

    KE: The endless moralism. Everyone is judged and compartmentalized, as will become increasingly clear as you get through the rest of it. As far as I can tell not one person can escape their destined class fate.

    JL: Finished! Wow, is this book one great big hot mess but I totally get why it was such a big success: whole lot of plot going on. If only it weren’t broken up by interminably long descriptions of the town and the weather. I believe these are accurate descriptions but YAWN.

    KE: Metalious grew up in a mill town, so I am given to understand, so I expect she was describing a world she knew very well.

    JL: I think its overly descriptiveness is part of why it didn’t love it the way I love Valley of the Dolls.

    KE: It’s interesting, isn’t it? VotD has a big picture story but it is tightly told through the three narrative arcs of the three main women. In PP Metalious is, I think, trying to tell a big picture story but her method is to hammer down into a stew of moralism, sensationalism, judgmentalism, and editorializing. Thus, Susann’s book is (to my mind) far more effective as a piece of literature.

    JL: Exactly. Also I liked some of Susann’s characters. Didn’t like any of the characters in PP. Especially not Tom. What a vile, self-regarding, I-know-what-everyone-is-thinking rapist jerk. UGH.

    KE: I still cannot figure out whether Metalious purposefully makes it clear that he outright RAPES Connie that first time, or if she herself as writer does not see it as rape but rather him “showing” the woman “what is right for her” since Tom consistently is all about being the voice of Telling The Poor Benighted What Is Right. Ugh. So foul.

    JL: I have no idea. Tom is so the hero and voice of EVERYTHING THAT IS RIGHT that his raping her doesn’t compute. That, yeah, I too wonder if she didn’t think it was a rape. And that makes me really really sad.

    It sure does capture the stultifying closeness of small town living. (Or so I imagine I’ve never lived in a small town.)

    KE: It captures a way of looking at small towns. I grew up in rural Oregon a mile outside a very small town (population 1800 when I was growing up, larger now). Now I grant you that as a child I could not have known what all was going on, but while I felt that Metalious captures the judgmental moralism that permeated society at that time (many of the attitudes were so familiar to me from growing up in the 60s and 70s), her portraits are extremely narrow and not remotely nuanced. The way she kept dipping into characters to tell us exactly what we need to think about them is effective in some ways (we are invited to judge them along with the narrator, which makes “us” the reader invest more, theoretically, as we are on the narrator’s side not the characters’ side) but it also stultifies and narrows the story because it can never escape from her very heavy-handed treatment.

    JL: Yes, it definitely keeps us at a remove and meant that I didn’t like any of the characters. I didn’t like Connie. I didn’t understand her. Allison annoyed me. The doctor I was clearly supposed to love irritated me too. Selena Cross was the most sympathetic character. But I didn’t actually buy any of them. They were more like extremely detailed, well made and animated cardboard cut outs, who despite lots of really hard work never came alive for me.

    KE: We are so very agreed here. The characters so often seemed to function to prove a point, or to shock.

    JL: I think part of my problem was that so much of the writing just made me laugh out loud: “nipples as hard as diamonds.” Really? How would that work exactly? Wouldn’t it kind of hurt? Wouldn’t your nipples be constantly cutting holes in your bras?

    Anyways several of the similes sent me off into such thoughts. It was distracting.

    It did feel like a broader picture of society at the time than either Best of Everything or Valley of the Dolls. There is even a brief discussion of the desirability of racial equality. Almost as if there was a civil right’s movement happening somewhere off stage. There aren’t just white people. There are Jews and some mentions of African Americans, and a discussion of the most pejorative word–which gets used A LOT– in the US to refer to them, though no one black seems to be living in the town now. Peyton Place is very very white. It struck me as a place that might have been a sundown town.

    There were only very brief mentions of homosexuality. So that’s a contrast to the New York books.

    KE: I was fascinated by the backstory of the Samuel Peyton and the castle. It was on the one hand so deeply racist (how many times does she use the phrase “big handsome black man” or some version thereof? and that’s leaving aside the casual use of the n-word in a way that would have been entirely consistent with the times) and then on the other hand the acknowledgment that this was a thing that could happen (he goes to France to make his way because the racism of the USA closes opportunity to him) struck me as unusual in a book of its time and type.

    JL: Yes, very. I honestly don’t know what to make off that whole section. Especially the bit about how Samuel Peyton was a Confederate sympathiser, smuggling guns to them and that’s why it was okay for a New Englander to call him the n-word. So many layers of WTF?! What is this book?

    KE: It also made judgments on male characters in relationship to their service in World War II. We are alerted to Ted Carter’s unworthiness the moment we realize he stays in school instead of signing up. Selena’s brother turns out to have made good because he is a TRUE war hero/responsible man. And so on.

    JL: Yeah, masculinity was as heavily policed as femininity. Yay! I did not love this book. There was none of the joy or humour of Valley and no proto-feminism. And it wasn’t even remotely as well written as Best of Everything.

    This was not a book that had any criticism for the underlying structures of inequality except as they fell along class lines.

    KE: While I agree that to some extent she critiques the underlying structures of class inequality, the story still felt as if many of the “lower class” characters were essentialized and thus unable to escape “their place.”

    JL: Totally agree. Especially Betty who awful Rodney gets pregnant who’s sole character note seems to be “tramp.” Lovely. Though everyone was essentialised.

    The normalised sexual harassment and rape felt like a very accurate portrayal. If anything I bet it was even worse back then. But it made me sick to my stomach. Especially reading it as a young man murdered six people at UCSB out of a deep seated hatred of women. I kept turning the pages and thinking, not hard to see the seeds of his misogyny when this is how men and women are taught to be men and women. Even the so-called good people of this book are misogynist and racist to their core.

    KE: As I said earlier, the attitudes expressed struck me as true to the time, that these were pervasive in terms of the default way many people saw the world or how the world was expressed to them through the daily attitudes and interactions of life. When I or anyone speaks of systemic sexism and racism, for example, or when my dad would say, “if you grow up in a racist society, you are a racist” this is what he meant. That even while you yourself may strive to treat all people fairly, if you grow up steeped in this toxic stew you will absorb it and have to work to see past it and not fall into engrained ways of thinking about class, race, sex, gender, religion, and so on.

    JL: Exactly. But there were books at the time that did rail against it. I mean Virginia Woolf rails against sexism and misogyny earlier in the twentieth century and she was by no means the first. I found this such a complacent book. None of the women had any sense of wanting more. Unlike, well, Best of Everything or The Valley of the Dolls. This is not a book where you think, “Well, feminism’s going to hit your lives in a big way soon.” The way I did after reading those other two books.

    KE: I wanted to make one point about the one thing that did honestly surprise me in the book and that is the degree to which Metalious mentions sex in a blunt and realistic (if often really skeezy) way. Masturbation, hard ons, rape, incest, sexual feelings, and so on: all present. OMG Norman Page and the whippings and enemas from his mother, clearly outed as a form of incest. I did not expect any of that. Even the moralistic treatment of abortion.

    JL: Right. It’s more explicit than any of the other bestsellers I’ve read from the period. There’s even a scene in which a pregnant woman’s husband goes down on her. Pretty radical back then saying a pregnant woman can feel desire.

    The abortion was really interesting because the doctor very explicitly puts it as a choice between destroying the life of the foetus and destroying Serena Cross’s life and he choose Serena.

    KE: I found this quote on Wikipedia as to the frankness of her work, Metalious stated, “Even Tom Sawyer had a girlfriend, and to talk about adults without talking about their sex drives is like talking about a window without glass.”

    So I can see why the novel was a sensation.

    JL: Yes, indeed. But notices that she expresses it in terms of male desire. It’s Tom Sawyer who has a nameless girlfriend. Who was the girlfriend, Grace? What was her name? Why did you give her no agency!

    That struck me over and over: all the sex is initiated by the men. The language is about men “taking” or “having” women. Sex is something men do to women. The women have very little agency. Connie doesn’t want her daughter to go to NYC to be a writer. It’s Tom who actively encourages Allison to do so. It is, in fact, pretty much only Tom who says anything about sexism with his magical ability to know everything about everyone. What a stand up guy.

    KE: I will never get over the enemas, Justine. NEVER. And that she went there with it. Props to her.

    JL: Ha! I guess that’s our TL;DR: ENEMAS!

    Our Next Book: Ann Petry The Street (1946). Join us at the end of June to discuss the first ever bestseller in the US by an African-American woman. You can see the whole year’s schedule here.

    0 Comments on BWFBC: Grace Metalious’s Peyton Place (1956) as of 5/27/2014 12:16:00 AM
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    45. Friday Feature: Son of Set by Kelsey Ketch (Review)



    Son of Set (Descendants of Isis, #2)Seth O’Keefe has broken the laws of his god. He never thought he would sacrifice his own future to protect a Daughter of Isis. But when the Sons of Set discovered Natti is the Secret Keeper, he had no choice. Now, Seth and Natti are on the run from his father, who wants nothing more than to see Seth dead. With no allies, Seth turns to the Daughters of Isis for help, hoping they would protect Natti. But when they meet the Daughters, he discovers a secret that puts both their lives in more danger. Low on options, Seth sees only one possibility for survival. He must help Natti solve an ancient puzzle and find the secret name of Ra. 

    Natara “Natti” Stone is having a hard time swallowing the truth. She can’t believe what she has learned in the past twenty-four hours: Seth is a Son of Set blessed with charm; she is a Daughter of Isis blessed with a sliver of Ma ‘at; the locket her grandmother gave her holds an ancient Egyptian secret linking to Osiris and Isis. That along with being tortured and brutalized by the Sons of Set, she can hardly hold herself together. Thank God for Seth’s touch! That warm, tingling sensation that drowns it all out. Yet her heart struggles to stay focused. She must quickly embrace her destiny before the secret name of Ra falls into the wrong hands.


    My thoughts:
    It's rare that I like a sequel more than book one, but I did with this one. Son of Set grabbed me from the start and didn't let go. There was plenty of action and emotion throughout. The dynamic between Seth and Natti was amazing in this book. I love them together. And the twists that Ketch throws in…just wow! I couldn't wait to see what was going to happen next. I don't want to give any spoilers, which is tough because I want to gush about so many things. I'll just say that I didn't see one particular twist coming, but it was genius. It's one of those things that when I read it, I could see all the things from the previous book just fall into place. It made sense, which was awesome because I hate when you come to find out something and there were no clues planted along the way. This was done so well because it was such an "OMG! I didn't see that but I totally get it now!" moment for me.

    If you haven't started this series yet, you should.

    *I'm at BEA so if I don't get to respond to comments, please forgive me. I still love you all.*

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    46. Links I Shared on Twitter this Week: May 30

    TwitterLinksHere are highlights from the links that I shared on Twitter this week @JensBookPage. There are a few links from last week, too, shared from my iPad while I was on vacation in Disney World. Topics this week include authors, book lists and awards, common core, diversity, events, growing bookworms, reading, publishing, schools, libraries, and summer reading.

    Authors

    Henry Winkler: I love acting but I am proudest of my books - @TelegraphBooks http://ow.ly/xmNSB via @PWKidsBookshelf

    12 Charming Tidbits About Beverly Cleary | Mental Floss via @bkshelvesofdoom http://goo.gl/Db5nMs #kidlit

    Book Lists and Awards

    As Easy as ABC: Awards, Best Sellers, and Critical Thinking by @gregpincus http://goo.gl/UAAJPU

    Kirkus Reviews unveils three $50,000 book prizes (for fiction, nonfiction, and #kidlit) http://ow.ly/xoTaovia @bkshelvesofdoom

    Ten Dystopian Visions for middle grade readers, some classic some new, at Views From the Tesseract http://ow.ly/xmSqh #kidlit

    Damian Dibben's top 10 time travel books | @GuardianBooks via @tashrow http://ow.ly/xjUgM #kidlit

    Interesting! Top Ten List: Favorite Postmodern Picture Books by Frank Serafini @nerdybookclub http://goo.gl/c9lTMY #kidlit

    Killers in Plain Sight: Five Stories about Assassins in High School @bkshelvesofdoom http://goo.gl/80hEuM #yalit

    So You Want To Read Middle Grade: Natalie Aguirre on upper middle grade #kidlit @greenbeanblog http://goo.gl/8WRC6T

    YA Gets Nordic: Seven Stories with Roots in Norse Mythology from @bkshelvesofdoom http://goo.gl/O2QRoK #yalit

    A Tuesday Ten: London Calling . . . | Speculative #kidlit set in London | Views From the Tesseract http://goo.gl/5TRX3v

    3 YA Novels To Help Us Remember Our Nigerian Girls @mitaliperkins http://goo.gl/nXDsp1

    15 books that should be the next Percy Jackson from @book_nut http://ow.ly/3kFTAy #kidlit

    Common Core

    Part One: Developing Your Nonfiction Reading Aptitude by Sue Bartle at The Uncommon Corps http://goo.gl/m4oB5p #commoncore

    Beyond the Backmatter: Nonfiction Equivalents of Bonus Features and Director Commentary at The Uncommon Core http://goo.gl/45sIvh

    Diversity

    30 Diverse YA Titles To Get On Your Radar from @catagator @bookriot http://ow.ly/xoUr1 #WeNeedDiverseBooks #yalit

    Thursday Three: Diverse Picture Books suggested by @MotherReader http://goo.gl/A96Hsv

    For Armchair BEA, @MsYingling shares a list of books for kids about other cultures http://ow.ly/xoTHk #WeNeedDiverseBooks #kidlit

    DiverseBooksCampaignHow To Get People To Care: Anatomy Of A Trending Hashtag, #WeNeedDiverseBooks campaign @FastCompany http://ow.ly/xmD0i @PWKidsBookshelf

    Where Are All The Fat Girls In Literature? | Mariko Tamaki in @HuffPostBooks http://ow.ly/xkbwt via @PWKidsBookshelf

    It's Not Me, It's You: Letting Go of the Status Quo | Zetta Elliott @HuffPostBooks http://ow.ly/xkaUJ via @SheilaRuth #diversity

    Diversity in Children's Books: Moving From Outcry to Real, Market-Driven Solutions | Kyle Zimmer @FirstBook @HuffPost http://ow.ly/xjUln

    The Great Greene Heist goes on sale today! Have you taken the Great Greeene Challenge? @haleshannon http://ow.ly/xjTwg @varianjohnson

    Events, Programs and Research

    Activities for Children's Book Week 2014 suggestions from @BookChook http://goo.gl/LjsVS1

    Read with your ears! Free SYNC audiobooks this summer, starting now! | @BooksYALove http://ow.ly/xjYKR

    It's time for The Sixth Annual Book-a-Day Challenge from @donalynbooks http://goo.gl/PFqkBw #bookaday

    48hbc_newCentral Ohio Blogger Breakfast to Kick Off to 48 Hour Read and Book-A-Day @FrankiSibberson #bookaday #48hbc http://goo.gl/GuDSL1

    Successful Brains, on the behavior differences between successful people and not from @tashrow http://goo.gl/8rK7sd

    Growing Bookworms

    When Imagination, Story & Creativity Work As One by @TrevorHCairney http://goo.gl/xEFYwm #literacy

    Create a reading culture, make sure you are not perpetuating" gender stereotypes, writes Stacy Dillon http://goo.gl/XD4i1t

    Good advice! Chris Evans: parents must read to their children, in @TelegraphArts http://ow.ly/xoM7F via @librareanne

    The progression of her sons as readers by @katsok and how to create the next generation of @NerdyBookClub members http://ow.ly/xmwtR

    "The best thing we can do to ensure our boys are reading ... is to get to know each child" @katsok on boys + reading http://ow.ly/xjTJm

    On building a reading culture | We’re All In This Together by Emily Meixner @NerdyBookClub http://goo.gl/vUn4y1

    Kidlitosphere

    RT @RosemondCates Check out the fabulous @JensBookPage on http://www.bighairandbooks.blogspot.com  #spotlightsaturday

    On Reading, Writing, and Publishing

    "why do we keep judging readers who don’t have the privilege of buying ... books from a (physical) store?" @catagator http://ow.ly/xoUWM

    At The Uncommon Corps, Marc Aronson explores the question of what we mean by "pleasure reading" http://ow.ly/xmvh1

    Define "Reading", @catagator responds to recent studies about people reading less, questions definition of readinghttp://ow.ly/xjYEs

    Fun! Putting Your Book in Your Book — @100scopenotes (on illustrators including call-backs to their own work) http://ow.ly/xmw26

    A refreshing primer from @tlt16 | Dear Media, Let me help you write that article on #YAlit http://ow.ly/xkbiY via @PWKidsBookshelf

    MAKING OUR OWN MARKET: Why I Leaped into Print-on-Demand and Ebook Publishing by Carole Boston Weatherford | http://ow.ly/xmvH8

    On ‘The John Green Effect,’ Contemporary Realism, and Form as a Political Act by Anne Ursu http://goo.gl/Tkt2UK via @bkshelvesofdoom

    Schools and Libraries

    Can teachers read books only for pleasure or do they think about teaching? Both. by Amanda Jaksetic @nerdybookclub http://goo.gl/pEDT0U

    Another sigh! School Librarians Get No Love in Allentown School District (1 librarian for 15 elem dists) | @sljournal http://ow.ly/xmDgH

    Sigh! California’s Modesto City Schools To End Library Instruction for Elementary Schools | @sljournal http://ow.ly/xk5Fa

    Summer Reading

    IndieBound has released recommended#SummerReading #kidlit. @tashrow shares the top ten, w/ links to more http://ow.ly/xoSS8

    #SummerReading List: Books, Resources and Programs by @momandkiddo http://goo.gl/UJI80R

    © 2014 by Jennifer Robinson of Jen Robinson's Book Page. All rights reserved. You can also follow me @JensBookPage or at my Growing Bookworms page on Facebook.

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    47. Let’s Review – Goodreads or Point of Purchase?

    I've been somewhat of a slacker recently on Goodreads, actually with reviews in general. I used to write reviews for books whether or not I liked them, but that took a lot of time. So I started only writing reviews for the books I loved. Then after hearing about the rise of fake reviews, I stopped reviewing all together.

    But the thing is – fake review or real – I read reviews before I buy a book. And having my own book out there makes me realize how important it is to have those reviews from real readers. (I'm so grateful to every person that has ever written a review of my book, even if it wasn't a glowing review. I just appreciate their time first in reading, and second in writing the review.) So the question remains: how do you get legitimate reviews for a book without begging, bribing or otherwise paying for them? And where do people look for reviews? Goodreads? Amazon? Barnes & Noble? Or old-fashioned word of mouth?

     I love reading the reviews that come through my Goodreads feed, telling me what books my friends have read. (And if we aren't already friends over there, send me a friend request!) I have definitely read someone's review and then gone online to buy the book. But otherwise, I tend to just look at the reviews at whatever online portal I'm buying the book from.

    What about you? Do you generally review books that you read? How much do reader reviews inform your purchases? And where do you go to find reviews?

    And speaking of Goodreads, author friend Dawn Malone is giving away 10 copies of her new novel, Bingo Summer. Pop on over to enter for your chance to win!

    0 Comments on Let’s Review – Goodreads or Point of Purchase? as of 6/2/2014 8:07:00 AM
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    48. Ziv & Zebra a WIP by Sharon Vargo


    0 Comments on Ziv & Zebra a WIP by Sharon Vargo as of 6/3/2014 4:59:00 PM
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    49. Reading Rainbow

    I never watched Reading Rainbow when I was a kid because it didn’t start airing until I was fifteen. I’m sure if I had been younger when it started I would have watched it and loved it. I know that lots of other kids younger than me watched and loved the show. And while I can’t go back in time and be a kid again and watch it myself, as an adult with an income I can help bring the show back and give other kids the opportunity to love it.

    Have you ever contributed to a Kickstarter campaign? I hadn’t. Had no interest really however much I thought it a great idea. But when I found out that LeVar Burton started a campaign to bring back Reading Rainbow and make it accessible from everywhere (TV, web, mobile devices) as well as free to schools in need, well, I had to contribute. And while I didn’t contribute enough to get to have a private dinner or a group picnic with LeVar Burton or even have him record my voicemail message, I will be getting two Reading Rainbow mugs, one for me and one for Bookman and that’s exciting enough for me. Because, you know, if I did get a picnic with Burton, this is probably what would happen:

    The Kickstarter campaign will be running through the end of June in case you’d like a mug or t-shirt too.


    Filed under: Books, Reading

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    50. Friday Feature: Daughter of Chaos by Jen McConnel (Review)



    Daughter of Chaos (Red Magic, #1)

    Witches must choose the path they will follow, and Darlena Agara is no exception. She’s been putting it off long enough, and in her case, ignoring it has not made it go away. In a moment of frustration, Darlena chooses to follow Red Magic, figuring she had outsmarted the powers that be, since there’s no such thing as Red Magic. But alas, Darlena’s wrong (again) and she becomes a newly declared Red Witch.

    Her friends are shocked and her parents horrified by the choice Darlena has made. As a Red Witch, she now governs one third of the world’s chaos. She is the walking personification of pandemonium, turmoil, and bedlam, just as the patrons of Red Magic would have it to be.

    But Darlena believes there must be more to Red Magic than chaos and destruction, and she sets out on a journey to achieve balance. Only doing so puts her at odds with the dark goddess Hecate, who simply will not allow Darlena to quit. She encourages Darlena to embrace who and what she is and to leave good magic to the good witches. If only Darlena could, life would be simple, and she would not be the Daughter of Chaos.


    My thoughts:
    I liked Darlena from the start. She thinks she can outsmart Hecate, and for me that just spelled guts right there. Of course it backfires and she winds up pledging herself to Red Magic, which she didn't even know existed. Still, Darlena seems suited for Red Magic and the fact that Hecate wants her means she has a lot of power. Unfortunately, that power makes her a very sought after witch. Darlena doesn't know who to trust or how to use her Red Magic for good, and she winds up on a journey she never could have imagined.

    Witches and Greek gods! This seriously couldn't get any better. I have a weird obsession with Hades, and he was awesome in this story. I tore through this book, loving every second and being totally invested in Darlena and her future. McConnel has a winner with Daughter of Chaos and in my opinion, book two can't get here fast enough. If you enjoy witch books, go get Daughter of Chaos now!

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