What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Posts

(tagged with 'Governance')

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Governance, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 41
1. President’s Report

March 2014 President’s Report
The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) is a national organization of librarians, library workers, and advocates whose mission is to expand and strengthen library services for teens, aged 12-18. Through its member-driven advocacy, research, and professional development initiatives YALSA builds the capacity of libraries and librarians to engage, serve, and empower teens.

Happy National Volunteer Week! YALSA is an innovative, dynamic, and generally awesome organization because of the enthusiasm and dedication of amazing volunteers. Thank you.

Activities
• Led the YALSA Board in a Spring Quarterly conference call meeting.
• With Executive Director Beth Yoke and the Executive Committee, finalized an agenda for the Spring Executive meeting.
• With President-elect Chris Shoemaker and Past President Jack Martin, participated in virtual discussions on topics related to YALSA’s report, The Future of Library Services for and with Teens: A Call to Action. Recordings of all sessions are available on the National Forum webpage.
• Participated in media interviews on Teen Tech Week with NPR, Huffington Post Live, and School Library Journal.
• Discussed candidates with the Executive Committee and held interviews for the YALSA Blog Manager position.
• Discussed virtual engagement needs and possible strategies with Division Presidents.

Updates
• National Library Legislative Day is right around the corner and YALSA wants YOU to participate. From organizing an event to tweeting your senator, there are a variety of ways to make an impact. Check out the YALSA NLLD wiki for links, ideas, and talking points.
• Registration for YALSA’s YA Literature Symposium is open! Join us this November in Austin to learn, connect, and have an amazing weekend with teen librarians, educators, and YA authors from all over the country.
• Gearing up for summer? Join YALSA’s Summer Reading and Learning Ning to check out free webinars, resources, recommending lists and more.
• Looking for some professional development on your lunch break? YALSA has over 40 on-demand webinars that are free to members.
• Share your Teen Tech Week feedback via a brief online survey. We’re looking to get your input by April 15th so we can use it to improve and expand this initiative for next year.
• Our Making in the Library Toolkit has been launched! Thanks to Erica Compton and the Maker Committee for their hard work in creating this amazing resource.
Polls for ALA and Division Elections close April 25th. Don’t forget to cast your vote!

Gratitude
• Thank you to YALSA Membership guru Letitia Smith for her patience and expertise in helping me to coordinate and complete Spring Taskforce appointments.
• Thank you again to all of the fab panelists who participated in the Mondays in March Future of Teens and Libraries series, I’ve learned so much from you! Crystle Martin, Mimi Ito, Renee Hobbs, Ernie Cox, Marijke Visser, Maureen Hartman, Peter Kirschmann, K-Fai Steele, Kafi Kumasi, Vanessa Irvin Morris, Linda Braun, Jan Chapmen, and Sarah Ludwig.
• Thank you to the Summer Reading and Learning Taskforce for selecting this year’s grant recipients. Cheers to the grantees and huge thanks to the Dollar General Literacy Foundation for making these member grants possible.

In Feb. membership was at 5,131, which off -1.3% over this time last year. Donations for Feb. totaled $200.

Add a Comment
2. Elinor and Vincent Ostrom: federalists for all seasons

By John Kincaid


When Elinor Ostrom visited Lafayette College in 2010, the number of my non-political science colleagues who announced familiarity with her work astonished me. Anthropologists, biologists, economists, engineers, environmentalists, historians, philosophers, sociologists, and others flocked to see her.

Elinor’s work cut across disciplines and fields of governance because she deftly employed and developed interrelated concepts having applications in multiple settings. A key foundation of these concepts is federalism—an idea central also to the work of her mentor and husband, Vincent Ostrom.

Vincent understood federalism to be a covenantal relationship that establishes unity for collective action while preserving diversity for local self-governance by constitutionally uniting separate political communities into a limited but encompassing political community. Power is divided and shared between concurrent jurisdictions—a general government having certain nationwide duties and multiple constituent governments having broad local responsibilities. These jurisdictions both cooperate and compete. The arrangement is non-hierarchical and animated by multiple centers of power, which, often competing, exhibit flexibility and responsiveness.

From this foundation, one can understand why the Ostroms embraced the concept of polycentricity advanced in Michael Polanyi’s The Logic of Liberty (1951), namely, a political or social system consisting of many decision-making centers possessing autonomous, but limited, powers that operate within an encompassing framework of constitutional rules.

This general principle can be applied to the global arena where, like true federalists, the Ostroms rejected the need for a single global institution to solve collective action problems such as environmental protection and common-pool resource management. They advocated polycentric arrangements that enable local actors to make important decisions as close to the affected situation as possible. Hence, the Ostroms also anticipated the revival of the notion of subsidiarity in European federal theory.

connecting the dots

But polycentricity also applies to small arenas, such as irrigation districts and metropolitan areas. Elinor and Vincent worked on water governance early in their careers, and both argued that metropolitan areas are best organized polycentrically because urban services have different economies of scale, large bureaucracies have inherent pathologies, and citizens are often crucial in co-producing public services, especially policing (the subject of empirical studies by Elinor and colleagues).

The Ostroms valued largely self-organizing social systems that border on but do not topple into sheer anarchy. Anarchy is a great bugaboo of centralists, who de-value the capacity of citizens to organize for self-governance. Without expert instructions from above, citizens are headless chickens. But this centralist notion exposes citizens to the depredations of vanguard parties and budget-maximizing bureaucrats.

This is why Vincent placed Hamilton’s famous statement in Federalist No. 1 at the heart of his work, namely, “whether societies of men are really capable or not, of establishing good government from reflection and choice” rather than “accident and force.” The Ostroms expressed abiding confidence in the ability of citizens to organize for self-governance in multi-sized arenas if given opportunities to reflect on their common dilemmas, make reasoned constitutional choices, and acquire resources to follow through with joint action.

Making such arrangements work also requires what Vincent especially emphasized as covenantal values, such as open communication, mutual trust, and reciprocity among the covenanted partners. Thus, polycentric governance, like federal governance, requires both good institutions and healthy processes.

As such, the Ostroms also placed great value on Alexis de Tocqueville’s notion of self-interest rightly understood. Indeed, it is the process of self-organizing and engaging one’s fellow citizens that helps participants to understand their self-interest rightly so as to act in collectively beneficial ways without central dictates.

Consequently, another major contribution of the Ostroms was to point out that governance choices are not limited to potentially gargantuan government regulation or potentially selfish privatization. There is a third way grounded in federalism.

John Kincaid is the Robert B. and Helen S. Meyner Professor of Government and Public Service at Lafayette College and Director of the Meyner Center for the Study of State and Local Government. He served as Associate Editor and Editor of Publius: The Journal of Federalism, and has written and lectured extensively on federalism and state and local government.

More on the applications and reflections on the work of Elinor and Vincent Ostrom can be found in this recently released special issue from Publius: The Journal of Federalism. An addition to this, Publius has also just released a free virtual collection of the most influential articles written by the Ostroms and published in Publiues over the past 23 years.

Publius: The Journal of Federalism is the world’s leading journal devoted to federalism. It is required reading for scholars of many disciplines who want the latest developments, trends, and empirical and theoretical work on federalism and intergovernmental relations.

Subscribe to the OUPblog via email or RSS.
Subscribe to social sciences articles on the OUPblog via email or RSS.
Image credit: Social network background. © bekir gürgen via iStockphoto.

The post Elinor and Vincent Ostrom: federalists for all seasons appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Elinor and Vincent Ostrom: federalists for all seasons as of 3/31/2014 8:47:00 AM
Add a Comment
3. YALSA Election: An Interview with Board Candidate Rachel McDonald

Get ready to vote! The YALSA election runs from March 19 through April 25, and to help you be an informed voter, we’re sharing interviews with each of the 2014 YALSA Governance candidates.YALSA_173x79

We will start with the candidates for Board Director-at-large. YALSA Board members serve three-year terms, during which they jointly determine YALSA’s policies, programs, and strategic direction, in accordance with YALSA’s bylaws. They attend both virtual and in-person meetings and serve as liaisons to YALSA’s committee chairs and members. A full description of Board duties and responsibilities can be found here.

Candidates, who will be presented in alphabetical order, were asked to craft “Twitter-length” responses (i.e. around 140 characters). Full biographical information on all of the candidates can be found on the sample ballot.

Today we have an interview with Rachel McDonald.

Name and current position: Rachel McDonald Teen Librarian, King County Library System.

Why did you decide to run for a YALSA office? What excites you about serving on YALSA Board?  

After getting to know YALSA by serving on task forces & selection committees, serving on the board is the logical & exciting next chapter.

What areas of YALSA’s Strategic Plan do you think you can best contribute to? Why? 

Having served on the YA Advocacy Benchmarks Task Force, I’m excited to educate and empower our members to do more advocacy.

What is the most pressing issue facing YALSA today?

Advocating for our members whose positions, whether in school or public libraries, are often in jeopardy. Let’s show everyone how much we’re needed!

What priority activities should YALSA take on to address the “paradigm shift” as described in The Future of Library Services for and with Teens report?

We need to encourage librarians to facilitate connected learning with teens and provide opportunities for them to connect with mentors.

What attributes have helped you succeed professionally?

I welcome the opportunity to collaborate and learn from others, but still do my research so I can back up the positions I hold.

What do you see as the primary role of the Board?

Using the strategic plan as a guide, the primary role of the board is to help our members better serve teens in their communities.

If elected, how will you help YALSA members (in their daily work, in their careers, other)?

I look forward to helping library staff & teen advocates connect by sharing research, best practices, & advocacy tools.

What else would you like voters to know about you?

I believe my collaborative skills & vision will help move YALSA forward as we continue to look for ways to engage & support our members.

Add a Comment
4. YALSA Election: An Interview with Board Candidate Jennifer Korn

Get ready to vote! The YALSA election runs from March 19 through April 25, and to help you be an informed voter, we’re sharing interviews with each of the 2014 YALSA Governance candidates.YALSA_173x79

We will start with the candidates for Board Director-at-large. YALSA Board members serve three-year terms, during which they jointly determine YALSA’s policies, programs, and strategic direction, in accordance with YALSA’s bylaws. They attend both virtual and in-person meetings and serve as liaisons to YALSA’s committee chairs and members. A full description of Board duties and responsibilities can be found here.

Candidates, who will be presented in alphabetical order, were asked to craft “Twitter-length” responses (i.e. around 140 characters). Full biographical information on all of the candidates can be found on the sample ballot.

Today we have an interview with Jennifer Korn.

Name and current position: Jennifer Korn, TeenSpot Manager, The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County.

Why did you decide to run for a YALSA office? What excites you about serving on YALSA Board?  

Serving on Board will allow me to give back to YALSA and to lead the organization in a way that supports my fellow teen serving professionals to reach their potential.

What areas of YALSA’s Strategic Plan do you think you can best contribute to? Why? 

Advocacy and continuous education because of my past and present involvement in both of these activities within my library system, regional organizations, and YALSA.

What is the most pressing issue facing YALSA today?

The decrease in support for teen-focused, school and public library services as illustrated by a reduction of allocated resources and dedicated professionals.

What priority activities should YALSA take on to address the “paradigm shift” as described in The Future of Library Services for and with Teens report?

Advocating for the necessity of teen library services needs to be a top priority – advocacy to legislators, library and school administrators, potential partners.

What attributes have helped you succeed professionally?

I welcome challenge and growth. I perform best with a team and prefer collaborative work. I am thorough and focused with all of my work.

What do you see as the primary role of the Board?

Creating high-level initiatives that support the organization’s strategic plan, and then arming members so they can translate these initiatives into objectives that address immediate organizational needs and encourage member growth.

If elected, how will you help YALSA members (in their daily work, in their careers, other)?

I will make decisions guided by member needs and concerns, and emphasize the importance of engaging more members in YALSA’s activities.

What else would you like voters to know about you?

My involvement in YALSA has helped me move from librarian to a manager with recognized leadership ability. I want all of YALSA’s members to experience the same benefits to their professional growth.

 

Add a Comment
5. YALSA Election: An Interview with Board Candidate Gretchen Kolderup

Get ready to vote! The YALSA election runs from March 19 through April 25, and to help you be an informed voter, we’re sharing interviews with each of the 2014 YALSA Governance candidates.YALSA_173x79

We will start with the candidates for Board Director-at-large. YALSA Board members serve three-year terms, during which they jointly determine YALSA’s policies, programs, and strategic direction, in accordance with YALSA’s bylaws. They attend both virtual and in-person meetings and serve as liaisons to YALSA’s committee chairs and members. A full description of Board duties and responsibilities can be found here.

Candidates, who will be presented in alphabetical order, were asked to craft “Twitter-length” responses (i.e. around 140 characters). Full biographical information on all of the candidates can be found on the sample ballot.

Today we have an interview with Gretchen Kolderup.

Name and current position: Gretchen Kolderup,Manager for YA Education & Engagement @ New York Public Library.

Why did you decide to run for a YALSA office? What excites you about serving on YALSA Board?  

I’m jazzed about the opportunity to to dig into the work of our association with others who care deeply about library services for teens!

What areas of YALSA’s Strategic Plan do you think you can best contribute to? Why? 

Member recruitment/engagement. My YALSA experience has been so meaningful; I love sharing that & helping others hook in to the association!

What is the most pressing issue facing YALSA today?

Remaining relevant and effective to its members as well as financially stable as our profession continues to change.

What priority activities should YALSA take on to address the “paradigm shift” as described in The Future of Library Services for and with Teens report?

Sounds silly, but: help ppl feel comfortable getting out of comfort zones. Report shows evolution’s necessary & good, but change can be scary.

What attributes have helped you succeed professionally?

Determination, creativity, collaborative leadership style. Learned from building YA svcs from scratch in my first job & leading The Hub!

What do you see as the primary role of the Board?

Board fulfills YALSA’s mission to expand & strengthen teen services. Should help members in the now & advocate for members’ futures.

If elected, how will you help YALSA members (in their daily work, in their careers, other)?

Provide practical tools (like YALSA’s Pub Lib Eval Tool), create opps to recognize & share best ideas, advocate for teen services nationwide.

What else would you like voters to know about you?

Whether I’m elected or not, I’m interested in helping us all become even more stellar librarians for teens. Always up to collaborate or chat!

Add a Comment
6. YALSA Election: An Interview with Board Candidate Betsy Fraser

Get ready to vote! The YALSA election runs from March 19 through April 25, and to help you be an informed voter, we’re sharing interviews with each of the 2014 YALSA Governance candidates.YALSA_173x79

We will start with the candidates for Board Director-at-large. YALSA Board members serve three-year terms, during which they jointly determine YALSA’s policies, programs, and strategic direction, in accordance with YALSA’s bylaws. They attend both virtual and in-person meetings and serve as liaisons to YALSA’s committee chairs and members. A full description of Board duties and responsibilities can be found here.

Candidates, who will be presented in alphabetical order, were asked to craft “Twitter-length” responses (i.e. around 140 characters). Full biographical information on all of the candidates can be found on the sample ballot.

Today we have an interview with Betsy Fraser.

Name and current position: Betsy Fraser,Selector, Calgary Public Library

Why did you decide to run for a YALSA office? What excites you about serving on YALSA Board?  

I was inspired to run by the Board liaison I had while chairing the Summer Reading Taskforce and I am excited about the opportunity to do the same thing for someone else.

What areas of YALSA’s Strategic Plan do you think you can best contribute to? Why? 

Advocacy and member recruitment, as I am a staunch believer in YALSA and what it offers.

What is the most pressing issue facing YALSA today?

The need to attract and retain members, which offers possibilities for partnerships and advocacy.

What priority activities should YALSA take on to address the “paradigm shift” as described in The Future of Library Services for and with Teens report?

Promote digital and media literacy and capitalize on the know-how and innovative programming done by members.

What attributes have helped you succeed professionally?

Enthusiasm, determination, and a sense of humor.

What do you see as the primary role of the Board?

To look to the best possible future for the Division.

If elected, how will you help YALSA members (in their daily work, in their careers, other)?

Be available as a sounding board, as others have consistently been for me.

What else would you like voters to know about you?

I’ve served on Council, ALSC committees, & YALSA award, selection & process committees & have a solid understanding of where we fit.

Add a Comment
7. YALSA Board Major Actions at ALA Annual

The YALSA Board met three times at ALA Annual in Anaheim. Over those three meetings, the Board had some substantial discussions, set up some new task forces and ad hoc Board committees, approved two new committee manuals, and moved forward on several other items. For more details on these items, see the official Board documents at http://www.ala.org/yalsa/workingwithyalsa/governance/board/annual2012. The official minutes will also be posted in the Governance section of the website in the near future. The summary is below:

New Task Forces

  • A president-elect advisory task force to work with president-elect Shannon Peterson on defining her presidential theme and setting her goals.
  • An appointments task force to work with president-elect Shannon Peterson to help her make committee appointments during the coming year.
  • A 365 Days of YA task force to create and disseminate a calendar of easy to implement teen services resources aimed at new teens services librarians, library generalists, and paraprofessionals.
  • A state library association outreach task force to reach out to YA sections and roundtables of state library associations and school library associations to strengthen ties with these like-minded organizations.
  • A youth engagement task force to find ways to involve teens in the work of the YALSA Board by identifying and implementing projects in conjunction with Teen Advisory Groups.
  • A capacity-building task force to focus on the capacity-building goal of YALSA’s strategic plan.
  • A task force to create a manual for virtual selection committees.
  • A YALSA/ALSC/AASL task force to look at issues around the Common Core Standards.

New Ad-hoc Board committees

  • The previously-approved e-content task force will now be an ad hoc committee of the Board.
  • An ad hoc committee of the Board will look at the recommendations on the future of Interest and Discussion Groups from both the previous task force and from the Board members and prioritize the recommendations.

 

Committee Manuals

  • The Board approved a new manual for the Odyssey Committee. ALSC also approved the manual at this conference.
  • The Board approved a new manual for the Excellence in Nonfiction Award Committee. This includes some changes in policies and procedures, including the way the vetted nomination list is created.

Other major motions and discussions

  • The Board approved guidelines for strategic partnerships with other organizations.
  • The Board approved a two-year pilot project for virtual selection and award committees. The Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults Committee and Edwards Award Committee that begin their work in February 2013 will be virtual committees, which means that members will not be required to attend conferences to be on the committees. The Board will establish a task force to evaluate the process at the end of the first year to decide whether it should continue and if the appropriate committees were chosen.
  • The Board discussed member engagement, what it means to different members, and what YALSA wants “engagement” to look like.
  • The YALSA Board voted to endorse the School Library resolution in ALA Council, and the YALSA Councilor later reported that the resolution had been approved.
  • The Board had a discussion and exercise on YALSA’s major revenue streams (events, dues, and sales of products) and what could be done to build those sources of income.
  • The Board discussed the past year’s Board member self-assessment process and agreed to continue with it for the coming year.
  • The Board discussed how best to evaluate the success of the Strategic Plan, and directed the Strategic Planning Committee to develop an evaluation pl

    Add a Comment
8. YALSA Board Minutes

Ever wonder what’s going on with the Division? A ton of great information can be found under the “Working with YALSA” portion of the website.  The minutes from the YALSA Board and the YALSA Executive Committee meetings (as well as supporting documents) can be found there in the Governance section.

Check out the most recent draft Board minutes here

and draft Exec Committee minutes here.

bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark

9. Does the state still matter?

By Mark Bevir


Governance, governance everywhere – why has the word “governance” become so common? One reason is that many people believe that the state no longer matters, or at least the state matters far less than it used to. Even politicians often tell us that the state can’t do much. They say they have no choice about many policies. The global economy compels them to introduce austerity programs. The need for competitiveness requires them to contract-out public services, including some prisons in the US.

If the state isn’t ruling through government institutions, then presumably there is a more diffuse form of governance involving various actors. So, “governance” is a broader term than “state” or “government”. Governance refers to all processes of governing, whether undertaken by a government, market, or network, whether over a family, corporation, or territory, and whether by laws, norms, power, or language. Governance focuses not only on the state and its institutions but also on the creation of rule and order in social practices.

Martin Schulz, President of the European Parliament

The rise of the word “governance” as an alternative to “government” reflects some of the most important social and political trends of recent times. Social scientists sometimes talk of the hollowing-out of the state. The state has been weakened from above by the rise of regional blocs like the European Union and by the global economy. The state has been weakened from below by the use of contracts and partnerships that involve other organizations in the delivery of public services. Globalization and the transformation of the public sector mean that the state cannot dictate or coordinate public policy. The state depends in part on global, transnational, private, and voluntary sector organizations to implement many of its policies. Further, the state is rarely able to control or command these other actors. The state has to negotiate with them as best it can, and often it has little bargaining power.

But, although the role of the state has changed, these changes do not necessarily mean that the state is less important. An alternative perspective might suggest that the state has simply changed the way it acts. From this viewpoint, the state has adopted more indirect tools of governing but these are just as effective – perhaps even more so – than the ones they replaced. Whereas the state used to govern directly through bureaucratic agencies, today it governs indirectly through, for example, contracts, regulations, and targets. Perhaps, therefore, the state has not been hollowed-out so much as come to focus on meta-governance, that is, the governance of the other organizations in the markets and networks that now seem to govern us.

The hollow state and meta-governance appear to be competing descriptions of today’s politics. If we say the state has been hollowed out, we seem to imply it no longer matters. If we say the state is the key to meta-governance, we seem to imply it retains the central role in deciding public policy. Perhaps, however, the two descriptions are compatible with one another. The real lesson of the rise of the word “governance” might be that there is something wrong with our very concept of the state.

All too often people evoke the state as if it were some kind of monolithic entity. They say that “the state did something” or that “state power lay behind something”. However, the state is not a person capable of acting; rather, the state consists of various people who do not always not act in a manner consistent with one another. “The state” contains a vast range of different people in various agencies, with various relationships acting in various ways for various purposes and in accord with various beliefs. Far from being a monolithic entity that acts with one mind, the state contains within it all kinds of contests and misunderstandings.

Descriptions of a hollow state tell us that policymakers have actively tried to replace bureaucracies with markets and networks. They evoke complex policy environments in which central government departments are not necessarily the most important actors let alone the only ones. Descriptions of meta-governance tell us that policymakers introduced markets and networks as tools by which they hoped to get certain ends. They evoke the ways central government departments act in complex policy environments.

When we see the word “governance”, it should remind us that the state is an abstraction based on diverse and contested patterns of concrete activity. State action and state power do not fit one neat pattern – neither that of hollowing-out or meta-governance. Presidents, prime ministers, legislators, civil servants, and street level bureaucrats can all sometimes make a difference, but the state is stateless, for it has no essence.

Mark Bevir is a Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of several books including Governance: A Very Short Introduction (2012) and  The State as Cultural Practice (2010). He is also the editor or co-editor of 10 books, including a two volume Encyclopaedia of Governance (2007). He founded the undergraduate course on ‘Theories of Governance’ at Berkeley and teaches a graduate course on ‘Strategies of Contemporary Governance’.

The Very Short Introductions (VSI) series combines a small format with authoritative analysis and big ideas for hundreds of topic areas. Written by our expert authors, these books can change the way you think about the things that interest you and are the perfect introduction to subjects you previously knew nothing about. Grow your knowledge with OUPblog and the VSI series every Friday!

Subscribe to the OUPblog via email or RSS.
Subscribe to only law and politics articles on the OUPblog via email or RSS.
Subscribe to only VSI articles on the OUPblog via email or RSS.

Image Credit: Martin Schulz during the election camapign in 2009. Creative Commons Licence – Mettmann. (via Wikimedia Commons)

The post Does the state still matter? appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Does the state still matter? as of 12/7/2012 3:49:00 AM
Add a Comment
10. Should we be worried about global quasi-constitutionalization?

By Grahame Thompson


Have we seen a potentially new form of global governance quietly emerging over the last decade or so, one that is establishing a surrogate and informal process of the constitutionalization of global economic and political relationships, something that is creeping up on us almost unnoticed?  This issue of ‘global constitutionalization’ has become an important topic of analysis over recent years. Its development is most obvious in the case of business and corporate activity but I suggest it has a much wider provenance and is threatening to encompass many other aspects of global governance like human rights, security and warfare, environmental regulation, and more besides. One difficulty in analyzing this trend is to define its characteristics and parameters since it represents a rather loose configuration, one that is not easy to pin down.

Quasi-constitutionalization is a surrogate process of constitutionalization, not a coherent program with a rounded set of outcomes but full of contradictory half-finished currents and projects: an ‘assemblage’ of many disparate advances and often directionless moves – almost an accidental coming together of elements. So it does not amount to a ‘system’ in any conventional sense. This means it marshals together a complex bricolage of resources: material techniques and devices like models, documents, court decisions, legal statutes and treaties; institutional orders like legal apparatuses, bodies  and governance organizations; and discursive expertise, theoretical knowledges and instruments. But it is a process nonetheless: it is building norms of conduct, rule-making, and a distribution of powers in a ‘global polity’.

I call this a quasi-constitutional process because while it resembles a constitution in many respects it is difficult to transpose constitutionality directly into an international environment where there is no single competent authority that might foster or enforce such a constitution.

In turn, this connects to various senses of the juridicalization of international corporate and other affairs, where new or revitalized types of law are increasingly being brought into play as the mechanisms for resolving disputes or organizing governance. This involves new forms of public law, private law, customary law, regulatory and administrative law, all of which are rapidly evolving in the international arena alongside traditional international law. Institutions that embody such a process are the WTO, various agencies of the UN, the OECD, Bilateral Trade and Investment treaties, and a huge number of standard setting and benchmarking organization many of which are private in character but which both claim and exercise a public power at the global level. This is the site of a reinvigorated private law and private authority operating in the international domain. In the case of companies, they are increasingly adopting the language of global corporate citizenship to characterize their activity as civic actors in this evolving quasi-constitutional environment, and they are being addressed as such by bodies like the World Economic Forum and the UN’s Global Compact. Bilateral trade and investment treaties have mushroomed over recent years. Investment treaties are an example of global private administrative law in action.

On the other hand we have the OECD in its capacity as sponsor of socially responsible conduct by multinational companies (Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises) which has become an instrument of global public administrative law. John Ruggie’s recent attempt to introduce a comprehensive regime of human rights into the business world (the UNs Protect, Respect and Remedy Framework) is another case in point of the creeping quasi-constitutionalizing process.

But a major issue of concern is whether quasi-constitutionalization leads to the Rule by Laws (RbLs) rather than the Rule of Law (RoL) in the international system? The RoL may be being given away as RbLs replace a comprehensive system of democratically constituted judicial review, which cannot happen in the case of global quasi-constitutionality.

Thus in this evolving environment, instead of the rule by elected and accountable political officials we are seeing the emergence of rule by lawyers and by aged judges and law professors in international commercial and other matters. These are the actors that are leading the process of institutional rule-making. Public and particularly private elites are making-up the rules as they go along, arbitrarily and on an ad hoc basis. I call this a rule by a new self-appointed Guild of Lawyers on the one hand and a new Clerisy of the Law on the other. In effect, we are giving up any form of democratic legitimacy and accountability with this introduction of global quasi-constitutionalization.

Grahame F. Thompson is Professor of Political Economy at the Copenhagen Business School (Denmark), and Emeritus Professor at the Open University (England). His research and teaching interests have been in international political economy matters, and globalization; with a recent focus on the role of business organization in the context of international economic matters. He is the author of The Constitutionalization of the Global Corporate Sphere? (OUP, 2012).

Subscribe to the OUPblog via email or RSS.
Subscribe to only articles on law and politics on the OUPblog via email or RSS.
Subscribe to only business and economics articles on the OUPblog via email or RSS.
Image credit: Cover of U.S. Constitution by giftlegacy via iStockphoto

The post Should we be worried about global quasi-constitutionalization? appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Should we be worried about global quasi-constitutionalization? as of 1/2/2013 5:13:00 AM
Add a Comment
11. YALSA @ Midwinter 2013: What’s Going On

I’m en route to Seattle even as I type this! What will the board and I be up to at the 2013 Midwinter conference? Keep reading to find out.

It’s going to be an awesome conference. We’ve got programs, meetings and activities everywhere. We’ll be talking about advocacy, collaborations, books and reading, the future of teen services in libraries and more.

First, I’ll be helping YALSA host the first National Forum on Teens & Libraries on January 23 and 24. This is the first summit of its kind, and we’ll be bringing leaders on youth development, libraries, technology, publishing, everything. The goal is figure out where teen services is going and where it needs to be in the 21st Century. ALA President Maureen Sullivan will be the lead moderator, and we’ve got some amazing special guest stars, including Lee Rainey, head of the Pew Internet and American Life Project, Mizuko Ito, Professor in Residence and MacArthur Foundation Chair in Digital Media and Learning at the University of California, Irvine, Renee Hobbs, Director of the Harrington School of Communications & Media at the University of Rhode Island and George Needham, Vice President for Global and Regional Councils at the Online Computer Library Center. We’ll be talking lots of teens, literacy, library, technology and more. I’ll even be leading the Youth Panel portion of the forum with special awesome teens from YALSA President-Elect Shannon Peterson. We’ll be tweeting, blogging and posting the entire time, so check out our social media channels to find out what’s going on.

The YALSA Executive Committee will also be meeting with the executive committees of our sister divisions, AASL and ALSC. The three divisions traditionally meet every Thursday before Midwinter and Annual conferences. This time we’ll be talking about our Joint School/Public Library committee, a new Common Core taskforce and a whole lot more.

The YALSA Board will also be pretty busy this conference. Not only will you see us at Leadership Development (coffee and carbs!!!) and the YALSA Happy Hour (free drinks and apps!!!) on Saturday, feel free to drop by our meetings from 1:30-5:30 on Saturday, 4:30-5:30 on Sunday and 1:30-3:30 on Monday, all in room 309 of the convention center. You’ll also see us at the Youth Media Awards and the Morris and Non-Fiction awards ceremony on Monday.

What will the Board be talking about? Lots of stuff. In thinking about how YALSA can help its members advocate for teen services in libraries, the Board will be having a major discussion on how to reach library administrators to help them understand the importance of teen services.

We also know that members want to learn more about teen programming in libraries. So we’ll be voting to establish a new taskforce of programming best practices and replicable program examples for members. Interested in serving on the taskforce? Hit me up after Midwinter!

We also know how much everyone loves our biennial YA Lit Symposium. In fact, we know ya’ll love it so much that we’re going to be considering whether or not we should do it every year as opposed to every other year. Got an opinion? Let us know what you think.

Also back by popular demand is the YALSA Road Trip. We know from the member survey and from my virtual town halls that members really want to find better ways to connect to one another on a regional or state-by-state basis. The board will be brainstorming new ways that YALSA can reboot this exciting project.

We’ll also be exploring lots of other new ways for members to connect with one another, both virtually and in-person. We’ll be talking about a new student chapter proposal as well as a cool new idea on how members who love teen books can better connect with one another.

Finally, we’ll be at the Coffee with the Candidates, which is a great opportunity for members to meet this year’s candidates for President-Elect as well as the Board. This is your chance to get up close and personal with the candidates and let them know your concerns and ideas. I know I’ll be there with plenty of questions of my own.

All in all, it’s gonna be a super busy conference, and I’m looking forward to seeing everyone there. I’ll be the guy with the crazy socks. Over and out. See you there.

bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark

Add a Comment
12. August President’s Report

The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) is a national association of librarians, library workers and advocates whose mission is to expand and strengthen library services for teens, aged 12-18. Through its member-driven advocacy, research, and professional development initiatives, YALSA builds the capacity of libraries and librarians to engage, serve and empower teens.

  • Held a conference call with Ritchie Momon of the Road Trip Taskforce and Elizabeth Hanisian of the State Association Outreach Taskforce about the Board decision at the Annual conference to merge those two groups into one superdynamo. Many thanks to both Elizabeth and Ritchie for their dedication to helping move these important member engagement opportunities forward. Be on the lookout for a YALSA presence at a state conference near you! And in the meantime, why not use these free materials to share information and organize a meetup in your own area?

  • Appointed members to serve on vacated committee positions and newly formed taskforces on  MakerSpaces, Professional Values, Administrator Resources, and Student Member Engagement.  There are still several slots available, feel free to let me know if you  have the time and inclination.

  • Finalized a list of  amazing YALSA members to serve as representatives to seventeen ALA committees and assemblies.

  • With YALSA Executive Director Beth Yoke, finalized agendas and documents for the August Board Conference Call.  The bulk of this call is to discuss Chair reports and  assess  progress of the annual task list. 

  • Held a Board chat on “best practices” and what is needed by members on a national level.  If approved by the board this month, the  standing committee on  research and best practices will make recommendations on the ideas discussed in this forum, as well as those collected during the YALSA membership meeting at ALA Annual.

  • Discussed digital trends in libraries  for a story in EdWeek.

  • With the Executive Director and with feedback from the Executive committee,  interviewed and selected a candidate for the  Hub Manager position.  Many thanks to the amazing group of people that applied and congratulations to  the talented Allison Tran, who was selected.

  • Discussed a plan of action for the year with the President’s Program Planning Committee Chair, Linda Braun.  Many thanks to Linda and the rest of the committee for their willingness to  jump in and think outside the box for what I’m sure will be  a thought-provoking process and program.

  • With President-Elect, Chris Shoemaker, planned the September Board chat on member recruitment and engagement.

  • Mark your calendars! The Board will be hosting a discussion with members on Wednesday, October 2nd at 2 p.m. EST.  More information can be found on the YALSA Blog.

YALSA News

  • Teen Read Week is right around the corner! Connect with colleagues and plan your programs by registering at the official Ning.

  • Voting has begun for Teen’s Top Ten! Vote for your faves through October 19th and check out the TTT Tumblr.

  • The YALSA Advocacy page is looking more inspiring than ever, especially with the inclusion of the recently updated Advocacy Toolkit!

Gratitude

Thanks again to all of our generous Teen Read Week partners including Soho Teen, Blink, Dollar General, Scholastic, and ALA Graphics.

Thanks to our incoming process committee Chairs and committee members for starting your terms strong!

And thank you to our YALSA and Hub bloggers!  I never fail to be energized by the content that  you share on these amazing resources.

Add a Comment
13. A crisis of European democracy?

By Sara B Hobolt and James Tilley


During November 2012 hundreds of thousands of people across Europe took to the streets. The protesters were, by and large, complaining about government policies that increased taxes and lowered government spending. This initially sounds like a familiar story of popular protests against government austerity programmes, but there is a twist to the tale. Many of the people protesting were not aiming their ire at the national governments making the cuts in spending, but rather at the European Union. In Portugal, people carried effigies of their prime minister on strings and claimed he was a ‘puppet of the EU’; in Greece people burned the EU flag and shouted ‘EU out’; and in Italy people threw stones at the European Parliament offices. It was, at least for some people on the streets, not the incumbent national politicians in Lisbon, Athens, and Rome who were to blame for the problem of the day, but rather politicians and bureaucrats thousands of miles away in Brussels.

The economic crisis in Europe has illustrated that citizens are increasingly blaming not just their national governments, but also ‘Europe’ for their woes. This raises the question of whether citizens can hold European politicians to account for the outcomes for which they are thought to be responsible. The notion of democratic accountability relies on the critical assumption that voters are able to assign responsibility for policy decisions and outcomes, and sanction the government in elections if it is responsible for outcomes not seen to be ‘in their best interest’. This process, however, is clearly complicated in the multilevel system of the European Union where responsibility is not only dispersed across multiple levels of government, but there are also multiple mechanisms for sanctioning governments.

Symbolique 2006

Democratic accountability in multilevel systems can be viewed as a two-step process, where specific requirements need to be met at each step to allow voters to hold governments to account. The first step is one where voters decide which level of government, if any, is responsible for specific policy outcomes and decisions. This depends on the clarity of institutional divisions of powers across levels of government, and the information available about the responsibilities of these divisions. The second step is one where voters should be able to sanction the government in an election on the basis of performance. This depends on government clarity: that is the ability of voters to identify a cohesive political actor that they can sanction accordingly.

Both of these steps are important. Assignment of responsibility to a particular level of government is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition to be able to punish an incumbent at the polls. To do so, voters also need to know which party or individual to vote for or against. Yet, the EU lacks a clear and identifiable government. Executive power is shared between the European Council and the European Commission, and legislative power is shared between the Council of the EU and the European Parliament. The primary mechanism through which citizens can hold EU institutions to account is via elections to the European Parliament. Unlike in national parliamentary systems, the majority in the European Parliament does not ‘elect’ the EU executive, however. Despite the formal powers of the European Parliament over the approval and dismissal of the European Commission there is only a tenuous link between the political majority in the Parliament and the policies of the Commission, not least since there is no clear government-opposition division in the Parliament. Despite current attempts to present rival candidates for the post of Commission president prior to the European Parliament elections in May, there is still no competition between candidates with competing policy agendas and different records at the EU level. Without this kind of politicised contest it is simply not possible for voters to identify which parties are responsible for the current policy outcomes and which parties offer an alternative.

As a consequence, the classic model of electoral accountability cannot be applied to European Parliament elections. Even if citizens think the EU is responsible for poor policy performance in an area, they find it difficult to identify which parties are ‘governing’ and punish, or reward, them at the ballot box. This has broader implications for trust and legitimacy. When people hold the EU responsible for poor performance, but cannot hold it accountable for that performance, they become less trusting of the EU institutions as a whole. Thus the danger for the EU is that every time the system fails to deliver — such as during the Eurozone crisis — the result is declining levels of trust and a crisis of confidence in the regime as a whole, because voters lack the opportunity to punish an incumbent and elect an alternative. In other words, the lack of mechanisms to hold EU policymakers to account may lead to a more fundamental legitimacy crisis in the European Union.

Sara Hobolt and James Tilley are co-authors of Blaming Europe? Responsibility without accountability in the European Union. Sara Hobolt is the Sutherland Chair in European Institutions at the European Institute of the London School of Economics and Political Science. James Tilley is a university lecturer at the Department of Politics and International m Relations at the University of Oxford and a fellow of Jesus College, Oxford.

Subscribe to the OUPblog via email or RSS.
Subscribe to only history articles on the OUPblog via email or RSS.
Image credit: Photo credit © European Union, 2014 via EC Audiovisual Service.

The post A crisis of European democracy? appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on A crisis of European democracy? as of 3/4/2014 4:54:00 AM
Add a Comment
14. Look beneath the vote

OUP-Blogger-Header-V2 Flinders

By Matthew Flinders


Hands up if you’ve heard of National Voter Registration Day? And in the somewhat unlikely event that you have, did you realise that it took place last month?

If this momentous milestone passed you by, you’re not alone. Whatever 5 February means to the people of the United Kingdom, it’s safe to assume that electoral participation doesn’t figure prominently. This is not a surprise; it reflects a deep-seated public disengagement from politics, as indicated by the fact that only two thirds of eligible voters in the 2010 general election actually voted. Throughout the twentieth century, general election turnouts almost always exceeded 70%, but that’s a level of participation that has not been seen since 1997. Incidentally, the highest turnout since 1900 was 86.8% in January 1910, though only rate-paying men over the age of 21 could vote.

Low voter turnout is clearly a problem, but arguably a much greater worry is the growing inequality of that turnout. As a recent report from the Institute for Public Policy Research makes clear, the United Kingdom is very much a ‘divided democracy’, with electoral participation among the young and the poor declining dramatically. In the 1987 general election, for example, the turnout rate for the poorest income group was 4% lower than for the wealthiest. By 2010 the gap had grown to a staggering 23 points. A similar pattern is observable in relation to age groups. In 1970 there was an 18-point gap in turnout rates between 18–24-year-olds and those aged over 65; by 2005 this gap had more than doubled to over 40 points, before narrowing slightly to 32 points in 2010. ”If we focus on participation within these age-groups,” the IPPR report concludes “we can see that at the 2010 general election the turnout rate for a typical 70-year-old was 36 percentage points higher than that of a typical 20-year-old.”

If this isn’t bad enough there is little evidence that young people will simply start voting as they get older. On the contrary, the IPPR’s research suggests that “younger people today are less likely than previous generations to develop the habit of voting as they move into middle age.” These trends mean that politicians tend to address themselves to the older and richer sections of society – the people, in other words, that are most likely to vote. This, in turn, reinforces the views of the young and the poor that politicians don’t care about them. And that, naturally, leads to even greater political estrangement.

So what’s the solution? How do we re-establish a connection between ordinary people and politicians? In particular, how do we persuade the young and the poor that the political system really does have something to offer them?

Blue checkmark on vote checkbox, pen lying on ballot paper

The answers lie not in quick fixes or technological solutions – such as the introduction of compulsory voting, changing the ballot paper or promoting ‘digital democracy’ – but in adopting a fundamentally deeper, richer and more creative approach to democratic engagement. People will only vote – be they young or old, rich or poor – when they understand why democratic politics matters and what it can deliver. Therefore, to increase electoral participation we must focus on promoting the public understanding of politics from all perspectives (conservative, traditional, radical, etc.) in a way that demonstrates that individual responses to collective social challenges are rarely likely to be effective. It’s this deeper understanding, this notion of political literacy promoted by Sir Bernard Crick and defined as ‘a compound of knowledge, skills and attitudes’ that citizens can use to navigate the complex social and political choices that face us all. Political literacy can be seen as a basic social requirement that empowers people to become politically aware, effective, and engaged while also being respectful of differences of opinion or belief.

In this regard, the message from survey after survey is a dismal one. Large sections of the British public appear to know very little about the political system. Even relatively basic questions such as “What do MPs do?” or “What’s the difference between Parliament and the Executive?” tend to elicit a mixture of mild embarrassment and complete bafflement.

Given that levels of political literacy are so low, it’s little surprise that many people choose not to vote. They’re unaware of the very real benefits the political system delivers for them (clean water, social protection, healthcare, education, etc.) and they no longer believe that they can become the engine of real social change. And yet they can. Worse, by opting out of elections they risk diminishing their representation as politicians focus their messages on the groups that do vote. Young people are constantly reminded that to be “uneducated” – let alone innumerate or illiterate – is to risk deprivation and vulnerability, but in many ways to be politically illiterate brings with it exactly the same risks. Moreover, the impact of declining political literacy isn’t only felt at the individual level. With so many people in society alienated from politics, democracy itself is weakened

Such arguments are by no means abstract concerns. On 7 May 2015, a General Election will be held on the basis of individual voter registration rather than the previous system of household voter registration. Research suggests that although this transition is likely to increase electoral security it may also result in a considerable decline in levels of electoral participation amongst – yes, you’ve’ guessed it – the young and the poor.  This is not a reason to turn back from individual registration but it is a reason to step-back and acknowledge that if we’re really serious about healing a divided democracy, then we need to focus on promoting engaged citizenship through different channels and processes. We need to take some risks and stir things up, but most of all we need a long-term plan for fostering political literacy.

Matthew Flinders is Founding Director of the Flinders author picSir Bernard Crick Centre for the Public Understanding of Politics at the University of Sheffield and also Visiting Distinguished Professor in Governance and Public Policy at Murdoch University, Western Australia. He is the author of Defending Politics (2012). 

Subscribe to the OUPblog via email or RSS.
Subscribe to only politics articles on the OUPblog via email or RSS.
Image credit: Blue checkmark, photo by NFSphoto, via iStockphoto.

The post Look beneath the vote appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on Look beneath the vote as of 3/5/2014 3:42:00 AM
Add a Comment
15. YALSA President’s Report – October 2011

Monthly President’s Report – October 2011

October was a busy month for me and for all YALSA members, as we celebrated Teen Read Week™ October 16-22. It was great to see all the creative projects that members did with their teens to celebrate TRW. Over 9000 teens voted in the Teens’ Top Ten.

Below is a summary of activities that I have completed or am working on.

Completed Tasks

  • Fall Executive Committee meeting
    • Chaired YALSA’s Fall Executive Committee meeting. The EC had a “mega issue” discussion about advocacy. We considered roadblocks members may face in doing advocacy and what YALSA could do to assist members in this area. The major work of the meeting was to begin creating an action plan from the strategic plan objectives that had previously been approved. As we began to work on the objectives, we realized that many of them were already strategies, so we drafted changes and added strategies that will go back to the Board for approval. There were a number of other items that the EC discussed that will go to the Board for consideration at Midwinter or before, including a proposal for a Junior Board, a proposal for piloting a virtual award or selection committee, a proposal to create curriculum and instructional kits, and a proposal to create a YALSA Academy on YouTube.
    • The YALSA Executive Committee had a two-hour meeting with the ALSC Executive Committee to discuss service to middle-schoolers (12-, 13-, and 14-year-olds). We talked about the services both associations already provide for that age group, and we brainstormed some things that we could collaborate on in the future. Our next step will be to look over the transcript from the meeting and decide on some areas to move forward on jointly.
  •  Committee Chairs: Had phone conversations with several YALSA committee chairs about the work of their committees.
  • Board Activities: Along with YALSA Secretary Sarajo Wentling, facilitated a Board chat on the Board’s role in using social media to advance the activities of the Board and YALSA.
  • Writing: Worked with YALSA Web Services Manager Stevie Kuenn to prepare an article on Teen Read Week™ for parenting.com, and an article on digital badging.
  • Committee/Jury/Taskforce Appointments:
    • Appointed members to fill vacancies on several committees.
    • Appointed members to several new task forces.

 Works in Progress

  • Continuing to appoint members to new committees and task forces
  • Continuing to work with Board members on their self-assessments and learning plans.

Strategic Planning. The Strategic Planning committee incorporated member comments into the draft plan, and the Board approved it. However, at the Fall Executive Committee meeting, the Executive Committee made some changes, in an attempt to distinguish objectives from strategies. The Board has begun to work on specific action items (tactics) that go with each of the strategies.

Media & Outreach

16. YALSA President’s Report – November 2011

Monthly President’s Report – November 2011

November was a somewhat quieter month for me—the lull before the storm of preparing for Midwinter, perhaps!

Below is a summary of activities that I have completed or am working on.

Completed Tasks

  • Committee Chairs: Had phone conversations with several YALSA committee chairs about the work of their committees.
  • Board Activities:
    • Participated in Board Chat on the Strategic Plan (see below for details).
    • The Board voted to spend the $10,000 BoardSource Innovation Prize money as follows: $1,000 to support the 2012 Board Fellowship and $9,000 to be added to the Leadership Endowment.
  • Writing: Wrote and submitted President’s column for the Winter issue of YALS.
  • Committee/Jury/Taskforce Appointments:
    • Appointed members to fill vacancies on several committees.
    • Appointed members to several new task forces.
  • Continuing Education 
    • Attended Social Media for Nonprofits conference in San Francisco
    • Attended California Library Association Conference in Pasadena

Works in Progress

  • Continuing to appoint members to new committees and task forces
  • Continuing to work with Board members on their self-assessments and learning plans.

 Strategic Planning. The Board held an online chat to work on creating tactics to go with the approved goal items for the strategic plan. The Executive Committee also met by phone to work on tactics for the plan, and are now working online to prioritize the tactics.

 Media & Outreach

  • Interviewed by NPR about teen literature for upcoming online piece
  • Hosted YALSA Happy Hour at California Library Association Conference

 Important YALSA News & Reminders

  • Apply for a 2012 summer reading mini grant ($1,000) now through Jan. 1, 2012. Twenty libraries will receive these grants, sponsored by YALSA and the Dollar General Foundation.
  • Apply now for a Teen Summer Intern Grant from YALSA and the Dollar General Literacy Foundation. Forty libraries will receive $1,000 to support internships for teens to assist in 2012 summer reading programs. Deadline January 1, 2012.
  • Buy your 2012 Printz Calendar at the ALA Store. Proceeds support the Friends of YALSA. Buy them for friends and family who love YA literature. Committee chairs—buy one for each of your committee members! Or if you are looking for other gift ideas, check out YALSA’s Café Press Store.
  • In early 2012, look for several new YALSA initiatives, including the YALSA Academy on YouTube, and a new YALSA book award iPhone app!
  • If you’re looking for continuing education, check out YALSA’s Webinars-on-demand, free to YALSA members.
  • Sign up for YALSA’s December 15 webinar, “Graphic Novels for Tween Readers” presented by Robin Brenner. Group rates available.
  • Sign up for YALSA’s new self-paced online course, “ Add a Comment
17. Empowering Librarians: Youth Council Caucus

“What do you say to a Librarian that might not feel empowered to advocate for library services to their legislators or local community?” Rhonda Puntney Gould, ALSC Division Councilor who led the Youth Council Caucus meeting asked this difficult question this morning.

We’ll get to a few of the suggestions at the end of this post.

Youth Council Caucus is made up of ALA Councilors who are also members of one of ALA’s youth divisions; AASL, ALSC, and YALSA. To be a member of the YCC, you need to be on ALA Council and a Youth Division member. To attend a meeting, being an ALA member is all that is needed. Because issues involving youth often overlap divisions, it makes sense that there is a forum to come together for these discussions.

Topics addressed during the meeting included:

Youth Division Updates

YALSA: Nick Buron, YALSA ALA Councilor shared that the division is exploring more ways to connect with members not able to attend conference in person while keeping in mind to still be supportive of the association of ALA. He also made note of the November 2012 Young Adult Literature Symposium in St. Louis.

ALSC: Rhonda noted that the 2012 ALSC National Institute will be held in September in Indianapolis.

AASL: Sara Kelly Johns, AASL ALA Councilor shared that the 2012 Fall Forum will be held in October in Greenville, SC with Henry Jenkins as the keynote.

There was also some discussion around the Whitehouse.gov School Library petition and some of the difficulties people have had in setting up an account to be able to vote. ALA has released a press release regarding the petition. A wiki has been set up for resources on petitioning the government including a lesson plan to be used with students.

Sara also noted that the SKILLS Act has been introduced in both the House and Senate.

Sara advised to keep the accreditation issue with AASL/ALA and NCATE on our radars as it’s likely to come up again during ALA Annual in June.

Lastly, in regards to updates on AASL, an attendee reminded us that ALA President Molly Raphael has developed a 2011-2012 Special Presidential Task Force on School Libraries.

Note: During ALA Council after the YCC meeting, Council passed a resolution to add a non-voting representative from the AASL Educators of School Librarians Section to the Committee on Education.

State Youth-related News Shared by Attendees:

New York:A newly created Senate Select Committee on Libraries was formed.

Tennessee:

Add a Comment
18. Support Effective School Library Programs

There has been ample buzz at Midwinter regarding signing an online petition initiated by Carl Harvey, 2011-2012, AASL president to “ensure that every child in America has access to an effective school library program.” As of this post, over 14,000 signatures are still needed by February 4 in order for the petition to be viewed by White House Staff.

The petition in its entirety can be read and signed here: Ensure that every child in American has access to an effective school library program. A blog post on AASL with comments about the petition can be viewed here.

Feel free to share your thoughts on the petition as well as how the word can be shared with colleagues and other library supporters. Note that anyone 13 or older can create or sign a petition. This is a great advocacy project for your teens to sign on to!

bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark

Add a Comment
19. ALA Midwinter: Observations from a First-Time Attendee

My colleague, YALSA member, ALA Emerging Leader, and first time conference attendee agreed for me to post her observations of Midwinter. I’ve no doubt we’ll be hearing from her more often! A warm welcome to Catherine Haydon!

I’ll admit that I’m a bit jet-lagged, over-caffeinated, and used every ounce of remaining energy I had to be enthusiastic and on-point for an outreach visit to a local middle school once I returned from Dallas– but today’s slugglishness was definitely worth the amazing experience attending my first ALA Midwinter Conference. I’m participating in the 2012 ALA Emerging Leaders Program and had the opportunity to learn more about the organizational structure of both ALA and YALSA, as well as observe ALA and YALSA leaders in action throughout the conference. I sat in on a YALSA Board of Directors meeting and was pretty impressed with our leaders. Connecting with and providing support for librarians, whether in school or public libraries, in order to ultimately engage and empower teens was kept at the core of every topic they discussed; I observed a particularly engaging discussion on ways YALSA can partner with state library associations in order to have the greatest impact on teen-serving library staff.

While in Dallas, I also braved a chilly morning walk and attended “YALSA 201,” a short session that provided information on how members can get more involved in YALSA. I’ve been a YALSA member for five years and have relied on programming, technology and advocacy resources developed by various YALSA Committees and Taskforces to get me through my day-to-day work with teens. I’m sure it was the buzz and excitement that came with finally being at an ALA Conference, plus all the friendly encounters I had with YALSA folks, but I got the final push I needed and feel that it’s now my time to contribute to YALSA. I’m excited to work on YALSA’s project through the ALA Emerging Leaders Program and hope to serve on a committee or two in the next few years.

Now that I’m back at home, several colleagues have asked me about my favorite experience at Midwinter. I’ve shrugged some folks off or just replied that I enjoyed the entire experience, but when I thought a bit harder there’s one moment that really stood out. It was Monday morning during the ALA Youth Media Awards, and specifically when they were announcing the Morris Award finalists and winner. A group of librarians several rows in front of me jumped up and screamed loudly when YALSA President Sarah Flowers announced Where Things Come Back by John Corey Whaley

as the winner; while my attention was initially focused on the group of excited librarians ahead, I was distracted by the librarian sitting directly in front of me who leaned over to her neighbor and whispered, “That’s it! That’s the book I was telling you I wanted to recommend to Drew. He comes by the library every afternoon and I know he’d love it.” Miles away from home and sitting in a theater with hundreds of fellow librarians so focused on the books, this librarian remained focused on the teens she served. As the next award was announced, I smiled and silently thanked the librarian for reminding me why I was there – to connect teens with books. I spent the remainder of the awards presentation thinking about these new award-winning titles and the ways in which they would engage, inspire and challenge the teens at my library.

Was this your first time attending an ALA Conference? If so, I’d love to h

Add a Comment
20. Midwinter YALSA Board Decisions

The YALSA Board of Directors had a jam-packed agenda at Midwinter. Minutes will be available soon, but meanwhile, here are some of the major decisions that we made.

Note that the Board voted to establish several new task forces. If you are interested in being on any of these task forces, please submit a volunteer form right away. 

  • Voted to name a new scholarship the Dorothy Broderick Conference Scholarship for Students, and directed the President to appoint a jury to vet the applications. The scholarship will be awarded for the first time this spring, for attendance at ALA Annual Conference 2012.
  • Confirmed Carrie Kausch as the first YALSA Board Fellow.
  • Approved funds for a marketing consultant to evaluate YALSA’s current marketing strategy and develop new marketing strategies.
  • Approved the use of the interest from the Morris Endowment for FY12-FY14 to promote YALSA’s book and media lists and awards.
  • Directed the President to establish a task force to explore the feasibility of increasing the frequency of the YA Lit Symposium to a yearly event, beginning in 2014.
  • Directed the President to establish a task force to create advocacy benchmarks.
  • Approved using Friends of YALSA funds in 2012 to support the “YALSA Box” resource to provide and promote materials free to members to host a YALSA-related event in their community.
  • Directed the President to establish a task force to monitor trends in e-content, including apps and enhanced e-books. Some of the task force’s tasks might include creating tip sheets related to teens and e-content; keeping members up to date on e-content news via the blog; and suggesting topics for webinars and e-courses.
  • Established an ad-hoc Board subcommittee to explore the feasibility of converting one or more award or selection committee to an all-virtual committee.
  • Directed the President to establish a task force to develop a manual for the Excellence in Nonfiction Award committee.
  • Established an ad-hoc Board subcommittee to create a menu of options to explore how YALSA could easily involve teens in the work of YALSA.
  • Directed the President to establish a task force of members from the school library community to make recommendations to the Board for engaging school library members and raising awareness of YALSA’s resources and services among school librarians.

Sarah Flowers

YALSA President

 

bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark

Add a Comment
21. YALSA President’s Report – February 2012

Monthly President’s Report – February 2012

March kind of sneaked up on me, I guess because February is a short month. Below is a summary of activities that I have completed or am working on. Happy Teen Tech Week!

Completed Tasks

  • Committee Chairs:  I had phone conversations with several YALSA committee chairs about the work of their committees.
  • Board Activities:  
    • The Board had an online chat on February 1. Board members offered suggestions for the content of the selection and award committee chair and member webinars.
    • The Board met by telephone on February 29 to discuss chair quarterly reports and to take action on two requests for Board action that came from committees.
    • The Board voted to accept a proposal from the Morris Award committee to amend the eligibility rules to exclude self-published and e-book only books from consideration. The new rule will be re-evaluated after the 2013 award.
    • The Board voted to change the publication schedule of the Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults (JRLYA) from quarterly to a rolling schedule, pending receipt of a new ISSN.
  • Committee/Jury/Taskforce Appointments:
    • I appointed members to fill vacancies on several committees.
    • I continued appointing members to fill new task forces created by Board action at Midwinter
    • I presented a webinar for new selection and award committee chairs on February 1.
  • Committees:
    • I presented a webinar for new selection and award committee members on February 8.

 

Partnerships.  I am participating in an ALA-wide School Library task force. Members include AASL, ALSC, and PLA members, as well as people from the ALA Washington Office and others. I participated in a conference call on February 27. The task force is working on ways to bring the plight of school libraries to the attention of legislators and other decision-makers.

 

Writing:

  • Submitted the president’s column for the Spring issue of YALS.
  • Wrote a post on the YALSA blog to explain changes in YALSA’s website.
  • Wrote a post on the YALSA blog to encourage members to have their libraries fill out the young adult services portion of the PLDS survey.

 Media & Outreach

  • Along with YALSA Membership Coordinator Letitia Smith, staffed the YALSA booth at the Beyond School Hours conference in Burlingame, CA, February 16-17.
  • Spoke with Jennifer Fink, a freelance writer doing a piece for Scholastic Instructor, about ways teachers and parents can use new media to encourage reading and writing.
  • Spoke with Rocco Staino, from School Library Journal about YALSA’s Booze for Books initiative.
  • With help from YALSA’s Web Services Manager, Stevie Kuenn, submitted a letter to Chris Dodd, Chairman of the MPAA, to encourage a PG-13 rating for the upcoming film version of Stephen Chbosky’s The Perks of Being a Wallflower.

 Important YALSA News & Reminders

  • Don’t forget to vote! ALA (and YALSA) elections are from March 19-April 27. You will be receiving an email from ALA with a lin

    Add a Comment
22. YALSA President’s Report — March 2012

Monthly President’s Report – March 2012

Below is a summary of activities that I have completed or am working on.

Completed Tasks

  • Committee Chairs: I had phone conversations with several YALSA committee chairs about the work of their committees.
  • Committee/Jury/Taskforce Appointments:  I  appointed members to fill vacancies on several committees and continued appointing members to fill new task forces created by Board action at Midwinter.

 Partnerships.  

  • YALSA is working with the American Camp Association and ALSC to create nature-focused lists of recommended reading for tweens and teens.
  • YALSA teamed up with the Miami Dade Public Library to co-host the Wrestle Mania Reading Challenge Championships on March 31.
  • YALSA received $75,000 from the Digital Media Learning Competition to implement a new effort to create badges for continuing education, so we’ll be working closely with HASTAC, Mozilla, MacArthur and Badgeville. You’ll be hearing much more about this in the months to come!

 Media & Outreach.

  • I attended a meeting of BAYA (Bay Area Young Adult librarians) on March 27, to discuss YALSA and writing for the profession. It was great to hear them talk about their creative Hunger Games programs, too!
  • I spoke with Cristina Merrill of the International Business Times about YA books.
  • I attended the Public Library Association conference, where Mary Hastler and I presented a program on YALSA’s competencies and Evaluation Tool. I also spent some time helping to staff the ALA booth, along with other YALSA members and members and staff of other ALA divisions. It was a great opportunity to visit with members and get feedback about YALSA’s services.
  • Also at PLA, I had a great time at the YALSA Happy Hour, where I had a chance to meet and chat with YALSA members.
  • I contributed statements for YALSA news releases about Teen Tech Week, Support Teen Literature Day, and Summer Reading Program Grants.

 Important YALSA News & Reminders

  • Don’t forget to vote! ALA (and YALSA) elections are from March 19-April 27. You will be receiving an email from ALA with a link to the online ballot. Information on all the candidates appeared in the blog during February.
23. YALSA President’s Report – April 2012

Monthly President’s Report – April 2012

April was a very interesting month for me on the YALSA front. I’m just back from a week in Washington, D.C. On Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday of last week, YALSA Executive Director Beth Yoke and I, along with several hundred other library supporters, attended National Library Legislative Day. Beth and I had eight separate meetings over two days, with legislators’ staff members, and with representatives from other organizations that have similar interests to YALSA, such as the Afterschool Alliance, the Center for Excellent Education, and the International Reading Association. We talked about how we could support one another’s missions.

Then on Friday and Saturday of the same week, I staffed the YALSA booth at the USA Science and Engineering Festival at the Washington Convention Center. Along with DC-area YALSA members, I handed out bookmarks and flyers, showed the demo of the YALSA Teen Book Finder App (available in May—we hope—from Apple’s App Store), chatted with teens, parents, teachers, and librarians, and did some on-the-fly readers’ advisory. We encouraged teens to participate in this year’s Teens’ Top Ten, and there was a lot of interest and enthusiasm.

Below is a summary of activities that I have completed or am working on.

Committees

  • Committee Chairs:
    • I had phone conversations with several YALSA committee chairs about the work of their committees.
  • Committee/Jury/Taskforce Appointments:
    • I appointed members to fill vacancies on several committees.
    • I continued appointing members to fill new task forces created by Board action at Midwinter

Board Activities

  • I participated, with other Board members, in an online chat about recruiting and engaging members.
  • I worked with Board members on their self-assessments.
  • I worked with Executive Committee members to create an agenda for the Spring Executive Conference Call, to be held on Thursday, May 3.
  • Board members, for National Volunteer Week, wrote thank-you notes to YALSA committee members.

Partnerships.  

  • Mary Fellows, ALSC President, and I, along with our Presidents’ Program co-chairs, have been making final arrangements for our combined Presidents’ Program at ALA Annual. I hope many of you will be able to join us bright and early Monday morning to hear Dr. Michelle Poris of SmartyPants and Stephen Abram of GaleCengage share their insights on the Digital Lives of Tweens and Young Teens.
  • I continue to participate in the School Libraries Task Force with members of other ALA divisions.

Writing.

 Media & Outreach.

  • Spoke with Jeff Rivera, for Entertainment Weekly, about trends in YA literature.
  • Spoke with Carlie Geisinger, of the Gilroy (CA) Dispatch about teen spaces and the value of having teen rooms in libraries. The occasion of the article was the opening of a new library building in a community that had never had a separate teen room.
  • For National Volunteer Week,

    Add a Comment
24. YALSA President’s Report – May 2012

Monthly President’s Report – May 2012

May is all about getting ready for ALA Annual. Also, I’m very excited that YALSA’s free Teen Book Finder iPhone/iPad app is now available in Apple’s App Store. (An Android version will be coming later this year.) If you have an iPhone or iPad, download it and check it out!

Below is a summary of activities that I have completed or am working on.

Committees

  • Committee Chairs:
    • I had phone conversations with several YALSA committee chairs about the work of their committees.
  • Committee/Jury/Taskforce Appointments:
    • I appointed members to fill vacancies on several committees.
    • I continued appointing members to fill new task forces created by Board action at Midwinter

 Board Activities

  • I participated, with other Board members, in an online chat about YALSA’s relationship with “Big ALA.”
  • I worked with Board members on their self-assessments.
  • I worked with Executive Committee members to create an agenda for the ALA Annual and for the Board Meeting by Conference call on June 1.

Partnerships.  

  • Mary Fellows, ALSC President, and I, along with our Presidents’ Program co-chairs, Sarah Couri and Tessa Michaelson, had a conference call to make the final arrangements for our combined Presidents’ Program at ALA Annual.  I hope many of you will be able to join us bright and early Monday morning to hear Dr. Michelle Poris of SmartyPants and Stephen Abram of GaleCengage share their insights on the Digital Lives of Tweens and Young Teens. If you can’t be there, follow us on Twitter by following the hashtag #tweentech.
  • I continue to participate in the School Libraries Task Force with members of other ALA divisions.
  • I am working with Carl Harvey, AASL President, and Mary Fellows, ALSC President, to plan for the joint AASL/ALSC/YALSA Executive Committee meeting to be held at ALA Annual.

Writing.

  • I wrote a post for the YALSA Blog on access to YALSA’s selected lists and awards.
  • I wrote my final President’s Column for YALS, which will appear in the Summer issue.

 Media & Outreach.

  • I spoke with Linda Jacobsen, a freelance writer who is working on a piece for the Greatschools.org about boys and reading.
  • I contributed statements for YALSA press releases.

 

Important YALSA News & Reminders

  • If you are going to Anaheim for ALA Annual, don’t forget to register for special events. If you did “bundled registration” last fall, you will need to go back in to your registration for to add special events, such as:
    • Two great half-day preconferences: Books We’ll Still Talk about 45 Years from Now and Source Code: Digital Youth Participation.
    • The Margaret Edwards Award luncheon, featuring author Susan Cooper.
    • The YA Author Coffee Klatch—your chance to get up close and personal with 35 YA authors, including Printz award and honor authors Corey Whaley, Maggie Stiefvater, Craig Silvey, Daniel Handler, Christine Hinwood, and more!
    • The Printz Award Program and Reception, with speeches from all of the honored authors.
    • To add these events if you’ve

      Add a Comment
25. YALSA Board at Annual

Although the YALSA Board of Directors does a lot of work online and on the telephone throughout the year, our face-to-face meetings at ALA Midwinter and ALA Annual are big occasions for us to have some weighty discussions and make some major decisions. The agenda and board documents for Annual are now available online at www.ala.org/yalsa/workingwithyalsa/governance/board/annual2012. All members are welcome to attend any Board meeting.

The YALSA Board meeting at Annual is actually three separate meetings:

  • Saturday, from 2:30-5:30, in the Convention Center, Room 211A
  • Sunday, from 4-5:30, in the Convention Center, Room 211B
  • Monday, from 1:30-3:30, in the Convention Center, Room 212 B

The Board allots 10 minutes at the beginning of each session for visitors or Board members to share information. This is just to keep us all up to date on any information that affects YALSA or our members. In addition, there is always time allotted to hear from our ALA Executive Board rep (Steve Matthews) and our ALA BARC (Budget Analysis and Review Committee) rep (Alex Villagran). In addition, we will receive a report from our Emerging Leaders group. Other than that, we take agenda items in roughly the order they appear on the agenda, but we may move things around in order to finish a topic before the end of a session, or accommodate a member who is making a report to the Board.

The first session usually begins with the adoption of the “consent agenda.” These are items such as reports that do not require discussion or action, or items that the board has already discussed and voted on in ALA Connect. Any item may be pulled from the consent agenda for full discussion and separate vote if a Board member requests it.

The rest of the agenda is divided into action items (which require action), discussion items (which may generate action, but don’t have to), and information items. This meeting’s action items include:

  • Approving an Odyssey Award Committee manual
  • Establishing a “365 Days of YA” task force to crowdsource a list of 365 tried and true, easy to implement teen services activities and create an online calendar to promote them.
  • Establishing a State Association outreach task force, to strengthen ties with like-minded organizations, such as YA sections of state library associations.
  • Piloting a virtual selection committee so that members who cannot come to conferences will have an opportunity to serve on a selection or award committee.
  • Forming a Youth Engagement Committee that would identify and implement projects in conjunction with teen advisory groups, as a way to get teen involvement in YALSA governance.
  • Approving sponsor and partner guidelines

Discussion items include:

  • Looking at the latest draft of a new manual for the Nonfiction Award Committee
  • Discussing strategies for boosting YALSA’s revenue streams
  • Discussing the Board member self-assessment process—what were the results, and what should change in the future
  • Discussing how to go forward in evaluating the success of the Strategic Plan
  • Looking at a report on the evaluation of the interest groups and discussion groups and deciding where to go from here
  • Discussing a report from the Division and Membership Promotion committee about how best to achieve local presence for YALSA

The Monday afternoon meeting will include finishing up any discussion or action items that weren’t completed on Saturday or Sunday, adopting and presenting resolutions in honor of retiring board members, and installing new board members.

The YALSA Board has a lot of items to cover in a relatively short amount of time, so if you do attend a meeting, it may seem like things are moving at a rapid pace. Fortunately, the Board members take their responsibilities seriously, and h

Add a Comment

View Next 15 Posts