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1. Edwards Award: Who Was Margaret A Edwards?

If all these posts about the Edwards Award makes you want to know more about the woman the Award was named for, here you go!

At the YALSA website: Who Is Margaret Edwards and What Is This Award Being Given In Her Honor? by Betty Carter. This is an article that originally appeared in The ALAN Review, Spring 1992, 45 - 48.

And, also at the YALSA website, some Award Facts.



Amazon Affiliate. If you click from here to Amazon and buy something, I receive a percentage of the purchase price.

© Elizabeth Burns of A Chair, A Fireplace & A Tea Cozy

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2. Edwards Award: Winners!

So who has received the Edwards Award?

The 2015 Winner is Sharon M. Draper. And yes, my fingers are crossed that I'll be able to attend the Edwards Brunch in June.

And here is the list to previous winners:


1988 S.E. Hinton
1990 Richard Peck
1991 Robert Cormier
1992 Lois Duncan
1993 M.E. Kerr
1994 Walter Dean Myers
1995 Cynthia Voigt
1996 Judy Blume
1997 Gary Paulsen
1998 Madeleine L'Engle
1999 Anne McCaffrey
2000 Chris Crutcher
2001 Robert Lipsyte
2002 Paul Zindel
2003 Nancy Garden
2004 Ursula K. Le Guin
2005 Francesca Lia Block
2006 Jacqueline Woodson
2007 Lois Lowry
2008 Orson Scott Card
2009 Laurie Halse Anderson
2010 Jim Murphy
2011 Sir Terry Pratchett
2012 Susan Cooper
2013 Tamora Pierce
2014 Markus Zusak




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© Elizabeth Burns of A Chair, A Fireplace & A Tea Cozy

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3. Edwards Award: Selection, Administration, Publisher Solictation

And a little more about the Edwards Award, from the YALSA website.



Selection

A committee of five, including the chair, will be responsible for the final selection of the recipient of the Award. Input may be solicited from the field, including librarians and young adults, but the selection will be made by the committee. Input should be received by the chair of the committee by November 1. The selection of the winner award will be made at the ALA Midwinter Meeting preceding the Annual Conference at which the award is to be presented.

Administration

The five member selection committee is virtual and will serve an 18 month term. A new committee will be charged with the selection of the recipient for each annual award. Two members of the committee will be appointed by the YALSA President-Elect and three members will be elected from names placed on the YALSA ballot. The chair of the committee will be appointed by the President-Elect from among the five members. This appointment will take place immediately after the election results are known. Committee members are not eligible for consecutive reappointment but they can stand for election to the subsequent committee.

Publisher solicitation

The Ethical Behavior Policy for Volunteers and the Award Committees Conflict of Interest Policy outline appropriate interactions between committee members and publishers.

The chair and/or administrative assistant are responsible for contact with the publishers. Committee members must not solicit publishers for free personal copies of books. If members receive, or are offered, unsolicited copies of books from publishers, they may accept the titles.

Committee members must not solicit publishers for favors, invitations, etc. If members receive these, however, they will use their own judgment in accepting. Publishers understand that such acceptance in no way influences members' actions or selections.

So basically the time-frame means a lot of reading and rereading over the next few months, and then a decision next fall/early winter. So I'll be pretty busy!

Amazon Affiliate. If you click from here to Amazon and buy something, I receive a percentage of the purchase price.

© Elizabeth Burns of A Chair, A Fireplace & A Tea Cozy

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4. Edwards Award: Sponsor and Presentation

And a little more about the Edwards Award, from the YALSA website.



Sponsor

School Library Journal is the award's donor and funds the award and administrative cost. The recipient receives a cash prize of $2,000 plus an appropriate citation.

Presentation

The award (cash prize and citation) will be presented to the winning author at the YALSA luncheon or other gala affair at the ALA Annual Conference. The author is required to attend the event to accept the award and to make a short acceptance speech.

Currently, the presentation is made at a brunch during ALA. I've attended the event both as a lunch event and as the brunch, and both ways it's a great event.


Amazon Affiliate. If you click from here to Amazon and buy something, I receive a percentage of the purchase price.

© Elizabeth Burns of A Chair, A Fireplace & A Tea Cozy

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5. Edwards Award: Criteria

And a little more about the Edwards Award, from the YALSA website.

Last time, the definitions pretty much set what authors are books are eligible. But what is the criteria to make a selection?



Criteria

The committee making its selection of nominees must be aware of the entire range of books for young adults and will take into account the following:

Does the book(s) help adolescents to become aware of themselves and to answer their questions about their role and importance in relationships, society and in the world?

Is the book(s) of acceptable literary quality?

Does the book(s) satisfy the curiosity of young adults and yet help them thoughtfully to build a philosophy of life?

Is the book(s) currently popular with a wide range of young adults in many different parts of the country?

Do the book(s) serve as a "window to the world" for young adults?


Amazon Affiliate. If you click from here to Amazon and buy something, I receive a percentage of the purchase price.

© Elizabeth Burns of A Chair, A Fireplace & A Tea Cozy

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6. Edwards Award: Definitions

And a little more about the Edwards Award, from the YALSA website.



Definitions

"Author" may be an individual or a co-author. The author must be living at the time of the nomination. In the case of co-authors, one must be living. If an author continues to write books of interest and appeal to young adults, then he or she may receive the award more than once as warranted, as long as it is not more frequently than every six years.

"Book or books" indicates either a title or titles written specifically for young adults, or those titles written for adults, which continue to be requested and read by young adults. The title or titles must be in-print at the time of nomination. Only those titles of an author's work which meet the criteria of the award will be cited.

"Over a period of time" means that the book or books must have been published in the United States no less than five years prior to the first meeting of the current Margaret A. Edwards Award Committee at the Midwinter Meeting. The five year period is stipulated so that the book or books have had enough time to filter down, i.e., reach a wide level of distribution, and to be accepted by young adults.

"Continues to illuminate their experiences and emotions" means that the book or books have become a literary cornerstone for young adults.

As you can see, the author must be living at the time of nomination; and that an author may receiver the award more than once.

Also, the books must have been published "no less than five years" prior to the first meeting of the Edwards Award.



Amazon Affiliate. If you click from here to Amazon and buy something, I receive a percentage of the purchase price.

© Elizabeth Burns of A Chair, A Fireplace & A Tea Cozy

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7. #rockthedrop 2015!

Today's the day, rgz! It's time for Operation Teen Book Drop, 2015, also known as #rockthedrop. April 16th is YALSA's Support Teen Literature Day

Quick! Print out a bookmark below, created by Little Willow. Place it in a favorite YA book, and leave the novel in a public spot to be found. Tweet or post a pic at our facebook page with the hashtag #rockthedrop. Show your love for YA lit and brighten someone's day. 

Off you go! Be sneaky. Be creative. Have fun! Oh, and if you find a book, let us know that, too! Drop a note in the comments. Alrighty. GO!


LorieAnncard2010small.jpg image by readergirlz

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8. Edwards Award: About and Justification

Why, what is the award about?

"The Margaret A. Edwards Award, established in 1988, honors an author, as well as a specific body of his or her work, for significant and lasting contribution to young adult literature. The annual award is administered by YALSA and sponsored by School Library Journal magazine. It recognizes an author's work in helping adolescents become aware of themselves and addressing questions about their role and importance in relationships, society, and in the world.  The Edwards award celebrated its 25th anniversary in 2013."

And the justification for the Award?

"ALA's Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), on behalf of librarians who work with young adults in all types of libraries, gives recognition to those authors whose book or books have provided young adults with a window through which they can view their world and which help them to grow and to understand themselves and their role in society."


You can see why the Edwards Award is sometimes referred to as a Lifetime Achievement award,

All quotes from the YALSA Website

Amazon Affiliate. If you click from here to Amazon and buy something, I receive a percentage of the purchase price.

© Elizabeth Burns of A Chair, A Fireplace & A Tea Cozy

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9. Margaret A. Edwards Award Committee

This year, I am on the Margaret A. Edwards Award Committee.

What this means for this blog: I will not be reviewing or writing anything about the Committee, books read, or authors considered. I will avoid reviewing or writing about any eligible titles or authors.

Given the scope of the Award, that means that there is still plenty of titles I can write about (especially new and recent titles).

I will also be blogging about the rules and polices for the Edwards Award.





Image from the YALSA Edwards page.


Amazon Affiliate. If you click from here to Amazon and buy something, I receive a percentage of the purchase price.

© Elizabeth Burns of A Chair, A Fireplace & A Tea Cozy

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10. rgz Newsflash: Get ready to #rockthdrop

It's under a month away! It's coming! Operation Teen Book Drop, 2015, also known as #rockthedrop. For right now keep an eye for that YA book, or several, you own and want to leave in a public place on April 16th. We'll be celebrating YALSA's Support Teen Literature Day. Happy finders will be enriched by your beloved reads.

This year instead of a book plate, we are going with a bookmark by Little Willow. Placed in the book, all will know you are leaving a FREE gift. You can print your own by right clicking one of the below and opening the image in a new tab.

So....go get ready!



LorieAnncard2010small.jpg image by readergirlz

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11. YALSA 2015 Great Graphic Novels for Teens list is out

FEB140918.jpg

The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) releases a yearly list of recommended graphic novels, and this year’s list is out, 79 titles from a diverse range of publishers, from Batman to the Kingsmen to Moonhead and the Music Machine.

The list celebrates “the enormous variety of the graphic format including tales about forgotten heroes and heroines, online rebellions, new takes on beloved characters, and so much more.” said Chair Marcus Lowry. “The richness of these titles will engage and delight teen readers for years to come.”

There’s also a Top Ten list as follows:

• Afterlife with Archie: Escape From Riverdale, by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa and Francesco Francavilla (Archie Comics)
• Bad Machinery Vol. 3: The Case of the Simple Soul, by John Allison (Oni Press)
• 47 Ronin, by Mike Richardson and Stan Sakai (Dark Horse)
• In Real Life, by Cory Doctorow and Jen Wang (First Second)
• Ms. Marvel, Vol. 1: No Normal, by G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona (Marvel)
• Seconds: A Graphic Novel, by Bryan Lee O’Malley (Ballantine Books)
• The Shadow Hero, by Gene Luen Yang and Sonny Liew (First Second)
• Through the Woods, by Emily Carroll (Margaret K. McElderry Books)
• Trillium, by Jeff Lemire (Vertigo)
• Wolf Children: Ame & Yuki, by Mamoru Hosoda and Yu (Yen Press)









Making the YALSA list is a good boost for a graphic novel, putting it on the radar of libraries across the nation. Library sales can add thousands of copies to a book’s bottom line and remain one of the great hidden sales outlets for comics that have fueled their growth in recent years.

Via Robot 6

http://robot6.comicbookresources.com/2015/02/yalsa-announces-2015-great-graphic-novels-for-teens/

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12. Talkin’ ’bout Collaboration

splcCollaboration. You know it’s good; you’re probably doing it. But are you taking the time to talk about it? In the holiday spirit of sharing, the AASL/ALSC/YALSA Interdivisional Committee on School-Public Library Cooperation encourages you to share the results and impact of your collaborations with your administration, stakeholders, and community, and with your professional peers as well.

Most of us may feel too busy to take the time – and we may think our experiences are no big deal, that they won’t be interesting or instructive to others. And certainly, we tend to keep our experiences to ourselves when they don’t meet our own high expectations.

But you may be surprised at who else would benefit, and how they will respond!

My colleague, author and educational consultant Cherie Pandora, and I surveyed Ohio public and school librarians in spring 2014 to learn about their collaborations, and how and with whom they share their results.

Our respondents offered up a fabulous array of collaborative projects and practices, including book clubs, Skype author visits, storytimes for kindergarten students, help with research assignments, sharing book collections and online research resources, and working together on summer reading lists. Some public libraries lend books via interlibrary loan, while others provide Book Looks for teachers, or share the 3D printer from their tech center or Makerspace, or host out-of-school social events for students.

We asked our survey respondents what groups and individuals they told about their collaborations:

• 92% of those who collaborated told their colleagues at their workplace.
• 64% told their direct supervisor.
• 45% told their school superintendent or library director.
• 45% shared with the local community (parents and students; library patrons)

Far fewer communicated with the school or library board, or with the professional library community. And very few reached out to local media, organizations or businesses, current or prospective funders, or elected officials.

Most librarians didn’t share the results of their collaborations beyond the network of their immediate coworkers and supervisors. Several respondents commented they wouldn’t get much more out of it than a “pat on the back.” But others who did share more widely gained significant benefits, from increased program attendance to enhanced community awareness of the library’s services. Annie Ruefle at St. Joseph Montessori School noted that “Parents always seem to like [it] when they discover their children are engaging with a wider community, and school administrators love [it] when their school extends beyond the school walls.” According to Becky Sloan at E.H. Greene Intermediate School, sharing the results of collaboration “convinces people that we are making the most of all our resources and informs them as to what is available outside of our school.”

Collaboration can even result in significant, high-level notice or additional funding when librarians make powerful stakeholders aware of their collaborations. Connie Pottle at Delaware County District Library reported that “the Library Board was surprised and pleased to hear about the ways we work with the schools. The Superintendent for the city schools is more aware of what the library offers and thinks of us for grant possibilities.” Kristi J. Hale at Washington-Centerburg Public Library wrote: “I was invited to work on an OELMA (state school library association) conference workshop; we have used this close relationship in support of a grant proposal; we have been able to show Ohio legislators that we are working closely together.”

The benefits are two-way – both sharing your own experiences, and learning from others. According to Elaine Betting at the Lorain Public Library System, “Reading about how other libraries make [school visits] work with staffing issues and difficult school schedules gives us ideas for new approaches or variations in offered programs.”

If you’re collaborating, please tell your local community and fellow librarians about it. Some ideas:

• Write a guest post for the ALSC blog or another library blog, or an article for a local newspaper or a professional journal.
• Propose a presentation to a local or national conference.
• Consider taking video at your collaborative events and posting to YouTube or TeacherTube.
• Easier yet, leverage Tumblr, Twitter or Facebook to spread the word about your projects. Post a status about the joint school/public library book discussion group. Snap a photo of the librarian-to-librarian booktalk session. Talk about the enthusiastic students who gathered for the pet care seminar at the public library.

Strategic communication about collaborations benefits advocacy efforts, creates positive PR opportunities, and contributes to the library and education professions. In addition, it allows you to shine; you deserve to brag about your efforts and to reap the rewards of “talking ’bout collaboration.”

*********************************************************************

Photo credit: Portrait Shoppe

Photo credit: Portrait Shoppe

Today’s guest blogger is Janet Ingraham Dwyer, posting on behalf of the AASL/ALSC/YALSA Interdivisional Committee on School-Public Library Cooperation (SPLC), of which she is a member. Janet is youth services consultant at the State Library of Ohio. This post is based on “Talking ’bout Collaboration,” an article written by Janet Ingraham Dwyer and Cherie Pandora for Ohio Media Spectrum: Journal of the Ohio Educational Library Media Association, Vol. 66, no. 1, Fall

The post Talkin’ ’bout Collaboration appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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13. Over at SLJ: The YALSA YA Lit Symposium 2014

Over at School Library Journal, I have an article up: Five Things to Love about the YALSA YA Lit Symposium.

Can you guess the five things?

One is the opportunity to present. This year, I was on a panel -- and here's a photo of me on the panel looking oh so serious. Thanks to @meghuntwilson for the photo.



Also pictured: E.M. Kokie (Personal Effects, Candlewick, 2012); Swati Avasthi (Chasing Shadows, Knopf, 2012), Steven Brezenoff (Guy in Real Life, Balzer & Bray, 2014) and E.M. Kokie (Personal Effects, Candlewick, 2012); along with Andrew Karre, editorial director at Lerner Publishing Group. Not pictured, the moderator Blythe Woolston (Black Helicopters, Candlewick, 2013).

Anyway, go over and read the whole thing and let me know what you think!


Amazon Affiliate. If you click from here to Amazon and buy something, I receive a percentage of the purchase price.

© Elizabeth Burns of A Chair, A Fireplace & A Tea Cozy

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14. Giving Tuesday -- YALSA

Tomorrow is Giving Tuesday!



From the Giving Tuesday website: "On Tuesday, December 2, 2014, charities, families, businesses, community centers, and students around the world will come together for one common purpose: to celebrate generosity and to give. It’s a simple idea. Just find a way for your family, your community, your company or your organization to come together to give something more. Then tell everyone you can about how you are giving. Join us and be a part of a global celebration of a new tradition of generosity."

YALSA is participating, for the third year in a row. From the YALSA blog: "This year will be YALSA’s third year in participating, and the Financial Advancement Committee’s (FAC) goal is to raise at least $4000 to send four...yes FOUR...YALSA members to National Library Legislative Day in Spring 2015." More details are at the YALSA blog.

And to cut to the chase, how to give? Again, from the YALSA blog: "YALSA has made it so easy this year!  Not only can you log onto the ala.org and donate the traditional way, but now you can text to donate! All you have to do is text ALA TEENALA to this number: 41518 to make a $10 donation to YALSA. It couldn’t be easier!"

If you want to find out more about donating to YALSA, the Give to YALSA website has information about how to donate, what YALSA does with the donations, etc.

Edited to add: If donating online, there are a few ways to direct your YALSA donation. I checked with YALSA about which one to select, and they said "The Friends option will go towards funding the Legislative Day stipends."


Image from Giving Tuesday website

Amazon Affiliate. If you click from here to Amazon and buy something, I receive a percentage of the purchase price.

© Elizabeth Burns of A Chair, A Fireplace & A Tea Cozy

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15. Goodbye, YALSA! Hello, ILF and B&N!

There’s nothing better than a crowd of librarians and authors to remind me how lucky I am to be in this line of work, and to inspire me to keep on writing and earning my place among this bunch.

This past weekend, Austin hosted the annual YA symposium of the Young Adult Library Services Association. I participated in the Saturday evening Book Blitz — in which authors seated behind stacks of publisher-donated books get blitzed by librarians snagging their share of signed copies — as well as a Sunday-morning panel discussion including (left-to-right in Paula Gallagher’s photo above) Jonathan Auxier, Lisa Yee, Andrew Smith, moderator/organizer/wrangler Kelly Milner Halls, Bruce Coville, and Laurie Ann Thompson.

It’s going to be a full week, as I’ll also be speaking at the Indiana Library Federation’s annual conferenceShark Vs. Train is a winner of the Young Hoosier Book Award — and then reading Attack! Boss! Cheat Code! at a Barnes & Noble back here in Austin.

If you’re interested in hearing me talk for, oh, 27 minutes and 59 seconds, but won’t be making it to either of those events, I’m happy to offer a third option: this podcast interview that author Jason Henderson recorded with me last week. Enjoy!

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16. YALSA YA Lit Symposium 2015

This Thursday I will be heading out to the 2015 YALSA YA Lit Symposium in Austin, Texas!



Part of the reason I will be there is because I'll be presenting. I'm part of a panel, Whose Reality Gets Written?, on Sunday, 10:30am-12:00pm. Panelists are Svati Avasthi, Steve Brezenoff, Elizabeth Burns, E. M. Kokie, Andrew Karre, Blythe Woolston.

The full description: "The formula for YA fiction is no secret: Wrap a load of dysfunction in a layer of bleak despair and spice it up with little romantic angst. Problem is, that formula is a fantasy. Writers, editors, and readers are all making personal, particular choices. This panel will tackle these questions: Are certain realities over-represented? Are others under-represented? If so, why are some privileged while others are neglected? Does YA entail a different set of responsibilities than "adult" fiction? Who defines those responsibilities? Does narrow focus on a particular "here and now" doom books to irrelevance or rapid obsolescence?"

The hashtag, for those talking about this online, is #yalit14.

I haven't made up my mind about what programs I'll be attending, because they all look good.

I'll have some free time in Austin on Friday and Sunday afternoon. So, any suggestions for a first-time visitor in Austin?

And any dining recommendations?

I hope to see you there!






Amazon Affiliate. If you click from here to Amazon and buy something, I receive a percentage of the purchase price.

© Elizabeth Burns of A Chair, A Fireplace & A Tea Cozy

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17. Do you know about the MAE Award?

Many ALSC Members are also YALSA members. At the request of the Chair of the 2015 MAE Jury Award for Best Literature for Teens, here is information about an Award in which many of you might be interested.

***********************************************************************

YALSA members who have run an exceptional reading or literature program in the 12 months leading up to Dec. 1, 2014 are eligible to apply for the 2015 MAE Award for Best Literature Program for Teens, which recognizes an outstanding reading or literature program for young adults.

Do you run a spectacular teen book club that engages underserved audiences? Did your summer reading program or literature festival connect teens with literature in an innovative way? Is your Reader’s Advisory always three steps ahead of a trend? Have you connected teens to literature or helped them gain literacy skills via some other exciting means?  Whether the program was large or small, if it was good, you could win $500 for yourself and an additional $500 for your library by applying for this award!  Individual library branches may apply.

The MAE Award is sponsored by the Margaret A. Edwards Trust. Applications and additional information about the award are available online.  Applications must be submitted online by Dec. 1, 2014. For questions about the award, please contact the jury chair, Tony Carmack (tcarmac@yahoo.com).  The winner will be announced the week of Feb. 9, 2015.

Not a member of YALSA yet? It’s not too late to join so you can be eligible for this award. You can do so by contacting YALSA’s Membership Marketing Specialist, Letitia Smith, at lsmith@ala.org or (800) 545-2433, ext. 4390. Recognize the great work you are doing to bring teens together with literature and apply today!

 

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18. Happy Teen Read Week, rgz!

 
LorieAnncard2010small.jpg image by readergirlz

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19. Teens, Technology, and Literacy Author Panel #alaac14

Lindsey Leavitt, Scott Westerfeld, and Neal Shusterman talk about writing for teens and how technology plays a part in YA fiction.

Moderator Jack Bauer asks the panel why they write for teens.

“Writing for this age group gives teens perspective on the way they see themselves and the world.” Neal Shusterman

image

 

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20. Marcus Sedgwick Accepts the Printz Award #alaac14

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21. Teens Get Brutally Honest about YA Books #alaac14

Teens express their opinions about YALSA’s Best Fiction For Young Adults.  There were some intelligently thought out opinions- some good and some bad. If they didn’t think the book should be on the list, they defiantly said so!

image

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22. Free Books! Apply for the Great Books Giveaway

Need some new books for your YA collection? Consider applying for the Great Books Giveaway administered by YALSA. Each year, the YALSA office receives approximately 2000 newly published books, videos, CDs and other materials targeted primarily towards young adults. These are awarded to libraries that submit winning applications to the Great Books Giveaway. For more information, visit this page and review the guidelines below.
Guidelines

  1. Applicants must be personal members of YALSA as well as ALA. Organizational members are not eligible.
  2. All applications must be received complete in the YALSA office no later than December 1.
  3. All entries must include the cover sheet provided by YALSA.
  4. The application must be signed by the director of the public library, the superintendent of schools, the building-level administrator or the director of the institution.
  5. Applicants must agree to accept all the materials, understanding this collection is material targeted primarily for young adults, ages 12-18.
  6. The cover sheet, supplementary materials and an electronic copy of the current, board-approved collection development policy must be submitted via email by December 1. Incomplete applications will not be considered.
  7. Shipping and handling charges are the responsibility of the institution selected to receive the award.

This content originally appeared in an email from YALSA.


Filed under: Grants Tagged: free books, yalsa

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23. It’s All in the Cards: School-Public Library Collaboration

Remember the credit card ad campaign that asked TV viewers, “What’s in your wallet?” It had a bunch of Viking-types doing all sorts of bold and daring stuff, empowered by a piece of plastic that put the world at their fingertips. Oh, the adventure! Oh, the intrigue!

Oh, I can do you one better:

Imagine those Vikings are the kids and teens we see every day at our libraries. When we shout out, “What’s in your wallet?” to their sea of smiling faces, and each and every one of them proudly exclaims, “My library card!”

Awesome, right? Now that’s an ad I’d watch the Super Bowl to see.

As public library professionals, we know we’re handing kids the world when we hand them library cards. The best part? Our school library colleagues know that, too. That makes September the perfect time to collaborate with the schools in your community. It’s more than just back-to-school business. It’s Library Card Sign-Up Month!

SPLC Committee WordleThe AASL/ALSC/YALSA Interdivisional Committee on School-Public Library Collaboration (SPLC Committee for short) presents this Top Ten list of ways you can work with your school library colleagues this September to make sure it’s all in the cards for kids:

  1. Schedule classroom visits at local schools to give kids the low-down on library card ownership. They’ll love seeing you in person on their turf!
  2. Arrange to send a library card application and welcome letter from the public library in every student’s take-home folder or backpack in early September.
  3. Coordinate library card sign-up events at schools, and make them a Big Deal. Think open houses, back-to-school nights, and book fairs where you’ll see lots of families as well as students.
  4. Create Library Card Walls of Fame at both school and public libraries. Incentivize sign-ups by posting the names of new library cardholders on dedicated “I Got My Library Card!” bulletin boards.
  5. Organize a library card photo shoot, snapping shots of students holding their brand-new library cards. Arrange to have the photos displayed in their school libraries. (Get signed photo release forms from parents if you want to use the photos at your public library.)
  6. Hold “How Many Ways?” contests in both school and public libraries, challenging kids to list as many ways as they can to use their library cards. See which library can come up with the most ideas!
  7. Arrange library card issue through elementary-grade teachers. Ask them to collect completed library card applications for you and verify students’ addresses through school records to make issuing cards a breeze.
  8. Target middle and high school students at lunchtime by passing out library card applications in the cafeteria or other areas where students gather during free periods.
  9. Invite students, teachers, and school staff members to share their “My First Library Card” stories at all-school assemblies or Family Reading Nights. Ask school librarians or even principals to emcee the events with you.
  10. Throw a Library Card Sign-Up Month celebration at the end of September, inviting all new library cardholders—and your local school librarians—to attend the festivities at the public library.

We bet you’ve got lots more creative ways to celebrate Library Card Sign-Up Month with your local schools. Let us know what we missed by leaving your comments below!

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Today’s guest contributor is Jenna Nemec-Loise, Member Content Editor of the ALSC Everyday Advocacy website and Chairperson of the AASL/ALSC/YALSA Interdivisional Committee on School-Public Library Collaboration (SPLC). E-mail her at alsc.jenna@hotmail.com and follow her on Twitter (@ALAJenna).

 

0 Comments on It’s All in the Cards: School-Public Library Collaboration as of 9/4/2014 3:02:00 AM
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24. READERGIRLZ ROAR FOR BANNED BOOKS WEEK

Adult/Teen Librarian Danielle Dreger-Babbitt from Mill Creek Library WA is here to Roar with readergirlz for Banned Books Week
Welcome Danielle.


Tell us about Banned Books Week
Banned Book Week was started 32 years ago to celebrate the freedom to read after more and more books were being challenged in libraries and schools. According to the American Librarian Association, over 11,000 books have been challenged since 1982. Over 200 of them happened in 2013! You can learn more about Banned Book Week on the ALA website.


What do you do to spread the word about Banned Books Week and Intellectual Freedom Issues?
I do a banned book display each year.  My favorite displays are the ones I did in 2011 when library patrons wrote about their favorite banned books and the 2012 display that took up a whole shelving unit. I love being able to showcase these banned and challenged books.

 
Along with each year’s display, I include Banned Book lists and pamphlets as well as bookmarks and buttons for library customers to take home. We’ve had essay contests where readers write about their favorite challenged or banned books and win copies of banned books. When I visit the middle schools to talk about books in the fall I often bring along books that have been challenged from other parts of the country and have the students guess why they might be banned or challenged.


Readers Roar: (Let’s hear what teens have to say about banned books)
“If people read the books before they banned them, they might have a better understanding of why the book is important. If you ban a book, it only makes me want to read it more.”- Jessica, Grade 11

 
Any Banned Books you would like to highlight?
Some of my favorite banned and challenged books include Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi, Shine and TTYL by Lauren Myracle, and 13 Reasons Why by Jay Asher.  And my absolute favorite banned/ challenged book is Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins. Most teens are amazed to hear that it has been taken out of some schools and libraries!
What can readergirlz do to celebrate Banned Books Week?
Check out the activities on the BannedBooksSite . Readergirlz can celebrate their freedom to read by reading one or two banned or challenged books during Banned Book Week. Bonus points for reading these all year long, not just in September and for sharing these titles with their friends and family.
 
More ideas from readergirlz diva Janet Lee Carey: Grab your favorite Banned Book and RIP = Read in Public. Do a selfie while reading your favorite banned book and post it on your favorite social networks. Use twitter hashtag #BannedBooksWeek and @readergirlz when you post on twitter.
Use the site Support Banned Books Week  to add a temporary banner below your profile photo. Divas Janet Lee Carey and Justina Chen's photos:  

 

ONE LAST BIG ROAR from guest poster, Danielle
The best way to support libraries is to use them! Check out books and DVDs and CDs, use the databases to find information, and attend as many library programs and events as your schedule allows. By doing these, you are showing us that you think libraries are important. There are many ways to give back to your library. Consider becoming a volunteer or join the library board or Friend’s Group.  Teens can join the library’s Teen Advisory Board and help make decisions about future library programs and purchases. You can also donate books to the library for the Friends of Library Book Sale. The money from these sales supports library programs and special events!
About Danielle Dreger-Babbitt
I’ve been a teen librarian for over 10 years and have worked in libraries in Massachusetts and Washington. I’ve been an Adult/ Teen Librarian at the Mill Creek Library for over 5 ½ years. I’ve been active in ALA’s YALSA  (Young Adult Library Services Association) for the last decade and have served on committees including Outreach to Teens With Special Needs, The Schneider Family Book Award, and most recently The Alex Awards, for which I was the 2014 committee chair.

In my spare time I write for children and teens. I love to read YA and MG fiction and cooking memoirs/ cookbooks. I own two cats and two badly behaved (but adorable) dogs. I also love to travel and recently visited Uruguay, Brazil, and Argentina.

Let’s Link:
Sno-Isle Teen Blog 

Thanks again for the terrific Banned Books post for readergirlz, Danielle!

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25. Watch for it: HIT


 
Lorie Ann Grover swings by readergirlz to chat with Janet Lee Carey  about her new book HIT on its launch day! Welcome Lorie Ann.


JLC -- HIT is a riveting read! Tell us what inspired you to write it.

LG -- Thank you, Janet! HIT was inspired by a true story. Ten years ago, my daughter's best friend was hit in a crosswalk on the way to school. With her life threatened, her urgent brain surgery sent her family and friends spinning through a dark wait. Inspired by her experience, my novel tells the story of one girl struck down by the very grad student she is crushing on. Plans, goals, and dreams are shattered, as everything comes screeching to a halt. 

JLC – You chose to write the book in two viewpoints: Sarah, the girl who’s struck by a car, and Mr. Haddings, the young man who was behind the wheel. I was amazed by your choice which worked beautifully! Can you tell us when you decided to write the book this way and share some of the challenges faced?  

LG -- Well, it was originally six voices!

JLC -- Wow, six?

LG -- :~)

JLC -- Who were they?

LG -- Sarah, Haddings, Cydni, Luke, Janet, and Mark. Different editors along the publishing journey suggested reducing it to four, then finally two. Without introducing some sort of fantastic element, like Sarah wandering the hospital in spirit form, I needed at least two voices to tell the story as she is so long in surgery.

JLC – You write so deeply and truly about family and family relationships in HIT. Can you give us a peek into your process for this?

LG -- I think the real event was so charged and poignant, gestures, words, and phrases became haunting notes in my mind. It was simple to stream those straight into the novel. I also include the struggles I’m having or have had in the past: how to mother and let go, how to love the right person, how to separate your identity from another, etc. By digging deeply and bringing battles to light, there’s a chance the work will ring with a reader.

JLC—They say every story is about character change. Sarah’s accident forces not only the central characters but every character in the book to change. How did you determine the way each of these unique personalities would change through the events of the story?

LG -- Thank you for noticing, Janet! I started from a place where everyone was caught up in the everyday. They were selfishly focused. The accident arrests each of them, giving them a chance to stop and assess where they are and what is important. So often, this is one of the gifts within a hardship. I naturally landed on their starting points, riffing off my friends and my own traits. I amplified every facet to better the tale. Seriously, my friends are blessed with so much grace, I had to work hard to weaken them. :~)

JLC— What would you like readers to take away from this book?

LG --’d really like readers to consider the concept that within every hardship there are sweet red seeds. Like Dottie tells Sarah, under the leathery pomegranate skin, there is beauty. We just have to look for it. The truth lines up beautifully with Hit-and-Run: the Gratitude Tour. We're doing. Both Justina Chen and I tend to write about this.

JLC-- The tour will bring out HIT and Justina Chen's A BLIND SPOT FOR BOYS.
 
 
JLC -- Tell us more bout the tour!
 
Hit-and-Run: The Gratitude Tour:
When trials hit, how do we run in triumph? When we have a blind spot for blessings, how do we embrace gratitude? Award-winning authors and readergirlz co-founders, Lorie Ann Grover and Justina Chen, share the trials and triumphs within their own lives and their books’ characters, inspiring teens and adults to #hitwithgratitude.

 
What we now realize is that our message is going to stretch beyond this tour across four states. We will continue to hit the road, encouraging readers to #hitwithgratitude now and in the years to come. For example, how about a 30 Day Challenge to #hitwithgratitude daily through the month of November? Why not tweet, fb, and Instagram shout-outs for those you are grateful for? Who are the people who have crossed your life that you’d like to #hitwithgratitude?

JLC -- I love this idea!

LG -- There are so many ways we can encourage each forward, right? Let’s do it.
I officially #hitwithgratitude: readergirlz and Janet Lee Carey!

 

JLC -- :~) 
Hit 
By Lorie Ann Grover
Blink, 10/07/2014

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