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1. A Little Laugh

Because even a book on climate change needs a little humor:

Not surprisingly, the Kochs [siblings David and Charles, inheritors of the second largest privately owned company in the US, Tea Party supporters, and opposed to action on climate change] are the number-one hate figures of the progressive left and environmentalists alike, and the grinning brothers are often portrayed in activist literature as the twin heads of the “Kochtopus,” surrounded by the spreading tentacles of their gas, oil, and chemical interests. This is the latest in a long cartoon history of rampaging corporate cephalopods, which have included railroad monopolies, ice monopolies, Tammany Hall crooks, [and] Standard Oil.

Heh, rampaging corporate cephalopods. Makes me laugh every time I read it.

I have a few writing and reading commitments I must attend to this week so posts might be skimpy. If only there were enough time in the day to fit everything in! I’ll try, but, well, we’ll see.


Filed under: Books, In Progress

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2. Books Just Ruin Everything

Books have a way of wrecking a person’s life. Well, okay, not wrecking, that’s far too strong. Ruin maybe. Well, no not ruin either. Let me try again. Books have a tendency to keep a person from being settled in her opinion of things. The opposite could be true too, books could serve to always confirm a person’s opinions and beliefs. I guess it all depends on what sorts of books a person reads. For me, the first one tends to hold sway.

Most recently my opinion of Andrea Dworkin has been ripped to shreds. I am reading a book of essays called Icon edited by Amy Scholder to review for Library Journal and I just finished an essay in it by Johanna Fateman on Andrea Dworkin. I can’t say that I have ever read Dworkin. I have read bits and pieces, passages, quotes, never an entire book of hers. By the time I came along to college and took a women’s literature class, Dworkin had already pretty much been written off by feminists because of her anti-porn and, purported, anti-sex, stance. I wasn’t especially concerned with porn, but when you are twenty, the thought of being anti-sex, even if you weren’t having any, was preposterous. So I wrote off Dworkin too as a kooky feminist who had gone way too far. I was all, feminism yay! But I just didn’t see the reason it had to go to such extremes.

But this Fateman essay is forcing me to re-evaluate my opinion of Dworkin. To be sure she did go way out there, but she had reasons. And now, from the perspective of 20+ years, I can also understand that sometimes one needs to go to extremes in order to get any sort of attention on an issue that people don’t think is a problem or refuse to believe is anything to be concerned with.

And did you know Dworkin wrote novels? A couple of memoirs? And some supposedly excellent literary criticism? I certainly had no idea. And now this (not) stupid essay has made me want to go and dig some of those things up, especially the criticism, to discover for myself just what made her so known and influential before everyone turned on her.

If I hadn’t agreed to review this book for Library Journal, and if there hadn’t been an essay in it about Dworkin then I could still be going on my merry way with not a thought about the woman. But now, blast it all, I am not going to be able to let it go. I will have to investigate further. Darn books, why can’t you just let me be ignorant? I don’t have time for this. Books have to go an ruin everything.


Filed under: Books, In Progress Tagged: Andrea Dworkin

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3. Coming Home to Roost

The other day when I was talking about my July reading plans didn’t I say there would likely be a few surprises? Well those surprises arrived today at the library. Oh, you know, the usual routine: you place a hold request on a book a month, two months, three months ago. You are number 87 in line, number 50, number 48. And your turn comes up for every single one of them at the same time. The chickens came home to roost today.

I am already frantically reading two books I can’t renew, The Empathy Exams by Leslie Jamison and The Gardener of Versailles by Alain Baraton. Now add to that Gathering Moss by Robin Wall Kimmerer, Attracting Native Pollinators by the Xerxes Society, 3 Sections by Vijay Seshadri, and In Paradise by Peter Matthiessen.

I am well into The Empathy Exams and liking it very much. I am also a good way into The Gardener of Versailles, a fun book about gardening and the history of Versailles from the current gardener-in-chief who has been employed there for over 30 years. But because I have to finish these two books first, I will be delayed in starting the other books.

The other books, Gathering Moss is about moss. Attracting Native Pollinators is about what its title says and is much longer and in-depth than the filled with photos and lists gardening book I expected. 3 Sections is the poetry book that most recently won the Pulitzer Prize. I read the first poem and I think I am really going to like it. And In Paradise is Peter Matthiessen’s final book, a novel that takes place in 1996 at a weeklong retreat at a concentration camp where the 100 participants meditate on the train platform and offer prayer and witness at the crematoria.

I have my reading cut out for me!

Now if you’ll excuse me, I had better go get started.


Filed under: In Progress, Library

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4. August Reading

I didn’t plan to skip posting yesterday but after I got through all my email and myriad other tasks that I have been neglecting and could no longer put aside, I found myself out of time for blogging. Sure I could have skipped my nightly workout but when you work at a job where your day is spent mostly sitting, skipping a workout is not a good idea for both mental and physical health reasons. This evening I was going to tell you about a really good poetry book I just read but my commute home was rather sapping due to the Twins baseball game going in to extra innings and all of them trying to get home while all of us who worked all day were also trying to get home. Playing at sardines does not make for a happy metro ride home. But enough of all that, I’m going for easy tonight and what could be easier than talking about what I’d like to read in August?

Actually, it isn’t easy at all. I managed to read quite a bit in July including a book on growing your own mushrooms to review for Library Journal. I have a bunch of recently finished books to write about, but I didn’t really get to all that I had planned read. I didn’t once pick up the Judith Herzog book of poetry. Nor did I get to Medea or Angle of Repose.

After a three-week hiatus from My Struggle, Book One by Karl Ove Knausgaard because I had to return it to the library, no renewals, I managed to get a copy from the university library. I picked up where I left off a few nights ago and I dunno. The book started off great but the more I read, the more I began to lose interest. Then I had to take a break from it and now that I have it again I am finding it hard to care. I am well over halfway through the book, almost two-thirds of the way, and I have lost whatever point there might have been to the book. I have ceased to really care about Karl Ove and his struggles that aren’t really struggles at all but more like part of the middle class human experience. I know Knausgaard is being talked about as a kind of modern day Proust, but at least Proust turned his life into something interesting and he wrote a lot better too. So I am having a dilemma. I am so far committed to this book do I just give up on it? Or, if I stick with it until the end will it manage to redeem itself?

Gathering Moss came in for me at the library and I started reading that and will continue. My goodness moss is fascinating! I have some patches of moss growing in the shade under the apple trees in my front yard and this book makes me want to buy a magnifying glass and go out and peer at the them. My neighbors probably already think I am crazy so seeing me kneeling in the dirt with my face near the ground would likely only provoke a raised eyebrow.

My turn has also come up for Rebecca Solnit’s A Field Guide to Getting Lost. I haven’t had the chance to start it yet. Perhaps I should give My Struggle the heave ho and dive into this instead?

Meanwhile, Sheila Heti’s How Should a Person Be? is waiting for me to pick up at the library and The Memory Garden by Mary Rickert and Mindfulness in the Garden: Zen Tools for Digging in the Dirt by Zachiah Murray are both in transit to my library and will be ready for me to pick up in a day or two. So the more I think about it, the closer I am getting to returning My Struggle. Actually, I think I will unless one of you who have read it tell me I should stick with it because the funeral of Karl Ove’s dad and everything that comes after is that amazing. If no one tells me that, then back to the library it goes and Knausgaard gets a check in the overhyped book category.

Currently on my Kindle, which has been very well behaved since I zapped it back to its original factory settings, I am reading Willa Cather’s book of short stories The Troll Garden published in 1905. I believe this is her first book of published fiction. I am enjoying it though if I hadn’t already read a number of Cather novels and fallen in love with her, I don’t think this book would make me want to read more. Not that it is bad, it is just very early and undeveloped.

With all those books on my plate and very likely a few that are not even on my radar at the moment, I won’t be surprised if come September I have a long list of books I didn’t manage to get to. But then who knows? Perhaps I will have a wild reading frenzy. It could happen.


Filed under: Books, In Progress

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5. Hardy Har Har

Almost two weeks ago now I started reading Thomas Hardy’s Far from the Madding Crowd. I’ve not ever read Hardy before. I know! I have seen a movie version of Tess a very long time ago, does that count? Anyway, whenever I’ve mentioned Hardy on this blog over the years I’ve gotten two reactions:

  1. He’s sooo good, you have to read him!
  2. He’s really depressing so be prepared

The so good and the really depressing even come from the same people, implying that depressing does not mean a bad book. So when I began Far from the Madding Crowd I was expecting a really good book that is also a downer. Maybe it’s me, or maybe this is Hardy’s only non-depressing book, but I’ve been laughing while reading it. Laughing a lot. This I did not expect and was confused at first, worried perhaps I was misreading or something. But no, Hardy is funny. How can this not make you laugh?

Oak sighed a deep honest sigh—none the less so in that, being like the sigh of a pine plantation, it was rather noticeable as a disturbance of the atmosphere.

Or this:

‘Come, Mark Clark—come. Ther’s plenty more in the barrel,’ said Jan. ‘Ay—that I will, ’tis my only doctor,’ replied Mr. Clark, who, twenty years younger than Jan Coggan, revolved in the same orbit. He secreted mirth on all occasions for special discharge at popular parties.

Or that one man in the neighborhood is known only as “Susan Tall’s husband” because he has no distinguishing characteristics of his own. I find myself giggling every time Susan Tall’s husband shows up, which isn’t often enough if you ask me, but I suppose you have to play lightly with that joke or it will wear itself out too quickly.

It’s not like Hardy’s humor slaps you in the face, it is pretty subtle most of the time. It doesn’t make me laugh out loud but it does make me grin. I’m far enough along to know there is trouble ahead for Bathsheba, but I’m not sure that it will be enough to turn everything depressing. Am I safe to put my hanky away or should I keep it in reserve?


Filed under: Books, In Progress Tagged: Thomas Hardy

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6. September Reading Plans

Here we are well into September already and I haven’t even stopped to take a breath and think about reading plans. It seems like I have just been grabbing whatever I feel like or whatever is due next at the library. It’s not a bad thing but it tends to distract me from books that are not of the moment that I really do want to read like Wallace Stegner’s Angle of Repose. It has been on my shelf for — we won’t say how long — and back in July I got all excited about it and was finally, finally, going to read it. It is still sitting on my reading table and has several library books piled on top of it. Maybe I should request a copy from the library and then I might actually read it! Now that is an idea with possibilities.

Only trouble is, I can borrow from the public library and the academic library at the university where I work. The public library comes with the standard 3-week checkout and three renewals as long as no one else wants the book for a potential borrowing time of twelve weeks. Because I am a staff person at the university, I can borrow a book for as long as four months with a renewal taking it to eight months. Such a long time tends to let me set these books aside. This means I am still meandering my way through the poems of But What by Judith Herzberg, the fascinating world of moss in Gathering Moss by Robin Wall Kimmerer, and I’ve had Medea all summer and still not even picked it up. Clearly I am highly motivated by deadlines when it comes to reading, or rather, library due dates.

I did finish Sheila Heti’s How Should a Person Be? and Willa Cather’s short story collection The Troll Garden. I have not written about these two books yet, posts on them coming soon.

For September, it looks like two books will be arriving for me at the public library, Don’t Even Think About It: Why Our Brains are Wired to Ignore Climate Change by George Marshall and Teach Us to Sit Still by Tim Parks, a book I requested on a whim after Ian mentioned how good it was in a comment about The Miracle of Mindfulness.

In the mail for reviewing for Library JournalI have on its way to me a book of essays called Icon which has a variety of writers considering various public figures from Linda Lovelace and Aretha Franklin to bell hooks and Andrea Dworkin. Sounds interesting, doesn’t it? Also on its way to me for review from the publisher is Hilary Mantel’s book of short stories The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher. How could I refuse that offer?

Then, of course, I am in the midst of Hardy’s Far from the Madding Crowd and She by H. Rider Haggard. I began reading Danielewski’s House of Leaves for the RIP Challenge yesterday.

And if that is not enough, I also have from the university library, so you know this one will be lingering for a while, The Selected Letters of John Keats. I can’t say why I all of a sudden wanted to read Keats’s letters but I did and do. I’ve not made it all the way through the long introduction yet, but it is serving to make me even more excited about the letters.

Gosh, all those books. And they are only the ones I currently know about. Who knows what might manage to slip in at the last second?

And now, I’d like to ask for a moment of silence for my dead Kindle. Yes, Kindle is truly gone. It is a hardware problem that cannot be fixed and I am so far out of warranty that I am out of luck. I am not yet out of luck when it comes to ereaders though. Earlier this year Bookman’s Kindle 1 appeared to die. It wasn’t charging and was acting all kinds of strange so he got himself a new basic Kindle, small, and light without a keyboard. After Bookman’s new Kindle arrived the old one revived and still works. So I am reading on the Kindle 1 now. I am not sure how long for this world it will actually be because while the battery does charge, it lasts barely a week before it needs to be recharged. And this is with the wifi turned off. While my Kindle 2 is dead, my decision about whether to buy a new ereader has been postponed until Bookman’s Kindle 1 ceases to limp along which could be tomorrow or next year; it’s hard to know for sure with these things.


Filed under: Books, In Progress

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7. Improving My Good Book Average

At last, I have made it through the Slough of Despond and have landed myself in a couple books that really caught my interest. Okay, Slough of Despond is a bit extreme. The set aside Prose book and the disappointing Cantor book were more like a slightly squishy ground that got my shoes muddy. But the ground has firmed up and I am happily striding along first enjoying Don’t Let Me Be Lonely and now embarking on The Flame Throwers by Rachel Kushner. I just started it a couple days ago and have been reading a little every night which means I’m at page 45. But it has been a good 45 pages! I like the style and the story is going somewhere even if I don’t know where that somewhere is.

Have you read the book? So far there are two narratives. It begins with WWI in 1917. A man named Valera is cutting a motorcycle headlamp off the bike of his dead friend who had just slammed into a tree in the woods because he was going too fast and lost control. The headlamp was salvageable, the bike, not so much. The pair are in the cycle battalion and had fallen a bit behind their squadron. Up comes a German soldier and Valera beans him in the head with the motorcycle lamp.

And then we get a chapter in 1975 and we meet Reno, a young woman and artist riding her Valera motorcycle to the Salt Flats in Nevada to participate in time trials there and at the same time create what she hopes will be some interesting Land Art. It is an exhilarating chapter, first as she speeds down the highway and then later as she speeds across the salt flats at 148 miles and hour. On a motorcycle. But before we know exactly what happens we are back to Valera in 1917 who then flashes us back to his childhood in Alexandria, Egypt and a bit later to 1912 Rome where he is about to finish his university degree and where he rides his first motorcycle.

Kushner is thus far showing herself to be skilled at pacing and character development, letting Reno and Valera reveal who they are through their actions and thoughts. No paragraphs long info-dumps telling the reader about them or having some other character tell us. Nope, it is character development as it should be, a gradual getting-to-know-you.

I have no idea what the book is about. I have read good things about it without managing to retain any sort of plot summary and I have avoided reading the synopsis on the dust jacket. All I know is that I am a happy camper at the moment. Amazing what a couple good book can do for a person.


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8. Is Shakespeare Unequaled?

You know, when it has been a span of time since I have read or seen a Shakespeare play I begin to wonder why he is considered the pinnacle of English literature. I mean surely there have been other writers who are his equal? And I think and think and no names pop into my head, but I still believe there should be at least one writer, but who? Eventually I get distracted and am left with only a vague sense of I’m not sure what — disbelief perhaps — that there is no one else? Or is it unease? Because really, in 400 years for there never to have been a writer in English as good, as inventive, as influential seems impossible and rather sad for literature as though we’ve been in a state of slow decline ever since. And while I am sure there are plenty of people who would say English literature has gone downhill from Shakespeare, I am not among them. I hope I never find myself in old age, sitting in a rocking chair with my teeth in a glass on the table next to me telling some young whipper-snapper that literature just ain’t what it used to be, and when I was your age blah blah blah. Please, if this happens to me, someone hit my over the head with The Luminaries or other equally large tome.

Where was I? Oh yes, I forget, after being away from Shakespeare for awhile, how marvelous he is. I began reading King Lear the other day and have been reminded — My God! This man is brilliant! In the first two scenes he effortlessly sets everything in motion, Cordelia, her sisters, Lear, Edmund. Yes, yes, France takes Cordelia for his wife even without a dowry — so romantic! — but you know, even if you have never read/seen the play before, you know that things are going to go wrong, that Lear has thrown away everything he holds most dear and there will be no happy ending. And it is delicious, this knowing, this dread, this watching and not being able to look away, and always hoping that maybe something will happen and disaster will be narrowly averted.

It’s good stuff.

Is there any other English writer the equal of Shakespeare? I don’t know. Does it really matter?


Filed under: Books, In Progress, Plays, Shakespeare

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9. May Reading Plans

Happy May Day! My French American coworker tells me they give flowers, lily of the valley to be exact. When I was a kid we’d leave baskets or bouquets of flowers on the porch, ring the doorbell and run away. The flowers were generally made of paper, a craft project at school, or they were dandelions picked from yards on the way home from school. And my mom, bless her, would always be surprised, “who cold have given me flowers?” And her daughters, arriving home suspiciously close to when the flowers were left on the porch, were surprised too, “Mom got flowers from a secret admirer!” Of course we couldn’t keep our secret long but my mom managed to continue the charade and act surprised and delighted that the wilting dandelions or oddly shaped construction paper flowers were the most delightful surprise she had ever had. Those were the days.

May is a good month in Minneapolis. It is the month when gardening begins in earnest and there is a rush to get seeds planted. There is also much time spent worrying over the weather. Our average last frost day is May 15th but with climate change the last frost date moves around leaving me wondering whether it is safe to plant out the tomatoes on May 9th or do I wait another week and pretend like I don’t hear the root-bound cries of desperation emanating from them. The time in the garden takes time away from reading but I don’t regret it at all.

The gardening intrusion began a bit in April so I didn’t read as much as I had planned. Knowing May will be busier do you think I can lay off piling on the books? Of course not!

I do plan on concentrating on Pere Goriot by Balzac. I’ve been dragging this one along since February. I don’t know why it is taking me so long to read it. It isn’t a bad book. But then it isn’t a book that sweeps one up either. I’m on page 193 of 303, so a little over halfway. Even though it took me three months to get that far, surely I can finish by the end of May?

King Lear I began reading late in the month, around Shakespeare’s birthday actually. Bookman and I will be going to see the National Theatre Live broadcast at a local movie theater on June 1st and I plan to have finished reading the play by then.

For some reason I went on a library book request spree mid April. Only one of the books was actually immediately available, Teaming With Microbes by Jeff Lowenfels. It is the book on soil health that was recommended at the gardening class I took. I haven’t managed to open the cover yet, but I plan on getting started on it in May. Of course several books I didn’t think I’d get for some time have already arrived or are on their way or will be sometime during the month. No renewals. Yikes!

My turn just came up for The Luminaries as an ebook. I have it downloaded and on my Kindle and as long as I remember to not turn on my wifi, it will stay on my Kindle for as long as it takes me to read it. Thank goodness I don’t have to rush through that one! Also as an ebook from the library is the most recent book by Nicholas Basbanes On Paper, which is a history of paper. On its way to me from the library as I type is The Word Exchange by Alena Graedon. I don’t even remember how I found out about this one. It is a dystopian novel about the dangers of technology and the power of the printed word. I will spare you the list of other books that might arrive for me from the library later in the month because if I detail them I might begin to panic.

But before I can get to those library books I have two that I am in the midst of that I can’t renew and have to finish first. I am still enjoying The Flamethrowers by Rachel Kushner. It’s a good story set in the 1975 art world. The other book is nonfiction, Out of the Woods: A Memoir of Wayfinding by Lynn Darling. Darling is middle-aged, widowed, and her daughter has just left home for college. She leaves New York, buys herself a quirky house in the woods of Vermont near Woodstock hoping to figure out who she wants to become now that she is alone. It’s pretty good so far.

Whew. Clearly my time management skills when it comes to reading this month will be strained. But hey, there are worse things in the world than to be buried under a pile of books!


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10. Had to Have It

At the end of April I came across an essay by Rebecca Solnit that made me so very excited. Woolf’s Darkness: Embracing the Inexplicable made me say wow! And then I saw it was going to be in a soon to be published new book by Solnit so I immediately ordered the book because I had to have this essay!

The book has arrived. I have not reread the essay or begun reading the book yet. I am buried beneath no-renewal wait-listed library books at the moment and I have been given another Library Journal review assignment. But the book is on my reading table and at the earliest opportunity I am looking forward to diving in. I especially want to reread the Woolf essay with a pencil in hand. It sparked all sorts of thoughts when I read it online and I hope it does so again when I read it on paper.

I am very close to being done with Rachel Kushner’s The Flamethrowers which is good since it is due Friday. And I have begun reading The Word Exchange by Alena Graedon. I’m enjoying it very much so far. It is Graedon’s first book and the narrative is charging along. I will be curious to see if she can keep up the pace.

So I know you’ll understand when I say, gonna go read now.

Hope all of you are in the midst of a good book or two or three!


Filed under: In Progress, New Acquisitions

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11. Long Weekend Ahead

I just spent all day in a faculty and staff retreat at work and even if it was one of the better ones we’ve had it is still tiring which means my brain is not firing on all cylinders at the moment. Really all I can think about is that tomorrow is Friday and then I get a three-day holiday weekend and then I get lost in thought about how I will spend those three lovely work-free days. There will definitely be time spent reading. So then I have to think about what I might read. Thinking about reading is all part of the pleasure of the reading experience, isn’t it?

One thing I definitely have to read is my latest Library Journal review assignment. I was hoping to catch a break for a month or two but nope. When I applied to do reviews I had to indicate what categories of books I wanted to review and among my choices was literary biography. In my mind it was a very narrow category that included writers like Henry James and Elizabeth Bishop. Turns out literary biography is a big category that pretty much means biographies about writers, which is totally fine just not what I expected.

My assignment is an authorized biography of the crime writer Anne Perry. I don’t read much in the genre of crime or mysteries and I have never read an Anne Perry novel, though I have seen the movie Heavenly Creatures about when she and her childhood friend committed murder. I was worried I wouldn’t like the book and was psyching myself up for it — it doesn’t matter if I like Perry the writer, what matters is the book and whether or not it is well-written and something a library might want to consider buying. I started reading the book the other day and, while I haven’t gotten very far in it, I can say that it gets off to great start that made me want to keep reading. So Anne Perry fans, you just might have an interesting biography to look forward to when it is published in July.

I will also be reading King Lear. I’ve started it but haven’t gotten far. I’d like to read as much of it over the weekend as I can because next weekend on June 1st, Bookman and I will be going to see the National Theatre Live broadcast of it at a local movie theater. I’ve read the play before but I have never seen it acted so I am looking forward to that. When I see a Shakespeare play I do like to have read the play beforehand so it is fresh in my mind and I don’t have to spend time sorting out who is who and what is going on but instead just sink into the performance.

I’m also in the middle of The Word Exchange by Alena Graedon. It’s a strange book, kind of surreal sometimes and other times realistic but I am thus far enjoying it. I have it from the library with no renewals because there is a waiting list so it has high priority on the reading pile. But if I get the chance, I’d like to start reading the new Rebecca Solnit book, Men Explain Things to Me.

It is only a three-day weekend though and there will also be time spent gardening. I should probably give Waldo and Dickens some attention too. And my husband. Bookman would probably like it if I said more to him than what’s for lunch and dig me a hole for the pond there. It’s a cut into my reading time but some sacrifices are worth making.


Filed under: Books, In Progress

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12. June Reading

Did Jen break the internet?

There seems to be only select sites working at the moment from both my cable connection and my wireless iPad connection. Of course WordPress is one I can’t get to but the Apple website loads up quick as can be. Hmm, perhaps there is a conspiracy afoot? I’m going to ignore the internet for now and hope that by the time I am done writing this in TextEdit on my Mac, things will be hunky-dory again. (Since you see this posted, things are working again, sort of. Thanks Moss and Roy!)

Let’s talk about reading plans for June!

May reading went pretty well. I have King Lear carrying over but will be finished with him by the weekend. I am also just over halfway through The Luminaries. Goodness, is this a long book! I am enjoying it, don’t get me wrong, but sometimes I wish it weren’t so wordy. For those of you who have read it, I am past the first long part where the men at the Crown are telling various parts of their stories and am just hours away from the seance. Except the time it is taking to get there seems like it is moving in real time and not book time.

Oh, yes, I am also still reading Teaming With Microbes. It is a very science-y book and sometimes my eyes glaze over just a bit but other times it is fascinating. I learned last night that bacteria make soil alkaline and fungi make soil acidic. So how do I get fungi to thrive in my blueberry beds? I haven’t learned that yet but I hope I will. I will be very disappointed if the book doesn’t go there.

Besides these carry-overs, I have just started Founding Gardeners by Andrea Wulf. It focuses on George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison and how their passion for gardening and agriculture shaped America from its very beginning. I am reading this along with Danielle who actually got to hear Wulf speak not long ago. I am supremely jealous about that.

I also started reading Men Explain Things to Me by Rebecca Solnit. It is a collection of essays. I have thus far read the titular essay and found it both funny and sad. Though Solnit did not invent the word, nor does she particularly like it, the term “mansplaining” came into existence because of this essay which was first published on the internet.

I had planned on reading Euripides’ play Medea sometime over the summer, but after seeing the preview for the upcoming National Theatre production of it, I decided I had to read it now. So from the library I borrowed a more recent translation by Michael Collier Georgia Machemer. It looks like it has a good introduction and lots of notes. I’m really looking forward to it!

I will be getting a book of poetry in the mail soon, a review copy, that sounded too good to resist. The Antigone Poems by Marie Slaight in collaboration with artist Terrence Tasker, was created in the 1970s. I’m not certain that it has ever been published before. I love it when artwork and poetry are combined plus, it is inspired by the Sophocles play. I’m excited to read this.

Another poetry book I have on hand is But What by Dutch poet Judith Herzberg. Recommended by my friend Cath, I am excited to read this one too.

No doubt with all my various hold requests at the library at least one or more have to read now because I can’t renew it books will arrive for me and throw all my carefully laid plans by the wayside. But at least, as I look back over my plan, I see I am excited by and looking forward to reading and/or already enjoying every book I mention. That makes me happy.


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13. Dangerous

I am merrily reading The Founding Gardeners by Andrea Wulf and let me just say that approaching history through gardening is absolutely delightful! I always thought George Washington was a pretty righteous dude, but knowing he shivered in his tent during the revolution and distracted himself by thinking of his garden at Mount Vernon and writing letters to his estate manager telling him what to plant and where, well that just endears him to me all the more.

Picturing Jefferson and Adams going on a whirlwind tour of English gardens over the course of a week while waiting for the British parliament to decide whether or not they would sign a trade treaty (they declined) is a hoot.

And learning that delegates at the Constitutional Convention enjoyed talking gardening during breaks and over meals and, when they had reached an impasse, took a day’s break to go visit Bartram’s garden, well that just tickles me. Imagine all these important men hopping into their carriages to go make an impromptu visit to William Bartram.

Who is William Bartram you ask? He was a famous naturalist, plantsman and gardener and son of John Bartram a man equally famous for the same thing. Except William hobnobbed with Jefferson and Washington and Adams and the like, and received requests from England and Europe for American plants and seeds. He also published a number of books about his travels and produced some gorgeous botanic and ornithological drawings and paintings.

And while it is all so very interesting reading about America’s founders and their passion for plants, I have suddenly found myself fascinated by William Bartram, a man I had never heard of before. And so today I had a little bit of a flurry requesting books from the library about and by Bartram. I don’t know why Bartram has wiggled my imagination and interest, but he has.

And this, my friends, is the danger of reading. You read happily along and then, wham! You are struck by a sudden need to know more about someone or something in your book. And the reading pile grows ever taller.

So consider yourselves forewarned, you’ll be hearing more about William Bartram in the coming weeks. And if you have ever been to Bartram’s garden, feel free to tell me how wonderful it is so I can envy you and curse your good fortune.


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14. July Reading

It was not the garden I disappeared into last night, Bookman and I had an evening out! We saw Move Live on Tour, a ballroom and contemporary dance performance/concert starring brother and sister Derek and Julianne Hough. It was sold out and even though we bought tickets the afternoon they went on sale, our seats were in the middle of the very last row, so high up we were looking down on the stage. It was still lots of fun though and the dancing was amazing. But you aren’t hear to read about that so let’s talk books!

Can you believe it is July already? We are over halfway through the year. It feels like I have read hardly anything but I know that is not true. In spite of all the time spent in the garden in June, reading went fairly well. I am about to begin chapter seven of Founding Gardeners. I am enjoying the book very much and it is hard to not rush right through it. It is such a fascinating way to look at history, I never imagined how much a person’s theory about gardening and agriculture could affect one’s politics but there is is at the very beginning of the United States. Actually, when I think about it I am surprised that I am surprised because my gardening practices and political views are indeed linked. I, however, am not founding a country so haven’t spent much time thinking about the broader picture like Washington and Jefferson did.

I didn’t get far in But What by Judith Herzberg in June. Reading Antigone Poems through a couple times put a damper on reading other poetry. But Herzberg will get attention in July for sure.

I had also planned on reading Euripides’ play Medea in June but that didn’t happen either. I got sidetracked by a few books I’d been waiting for in the library hold queue coming in and demanding my attention. July might not be any less crowded with must read library books, but I will certainly try to keep Medea in view.

One of those have to read books is My Struggle: Book One by Karl Ove Knausgaard. It gets off to a great start and then gets a bit boggy in the middle before it begins to pick up again. Just at that point I had to return it to the library because I was out of time! The book is much longer than I expected. But I immediately requested another copy and with luck I should have it again next week after only a two week break.

Another of the have to read library books that arrived last week is The Empathy Exams by Leslie Jamison. It is an essay collection that actually made it onto the bestseller lists for a few weeks. It is also published by Graywolf Press, a local independent publisher. It is a series of essays that explore the concept of empathy. I have read the first one and, wow, was it ever good. I have high expectations for the rest of the book.

About a week and a half ago I also started reading Perdido Street Station by China Mieville. This is only the second Mieville book I have read and I am enjoying it quite a lot, which means I will have to gradually work my way through reading all of his books. One of the things I really enjoy is that he just starts telling the story without a huge world-building info-dump. You are suddenly in this very alien world with all sorts of real alien beings and you just have to go with it and trust the author won’t let you down. And he doesn’t let you down. Eventually all begins to make sense and the more sense it makes the weirder it is which is interesting and exciting as the story veers into unforeseen directions.

I am expecting another have to read library book in the next few days, Gathering Moss: a Natural History of Mosses by Robin Wall Kimmerer. I read and loved her book Braiding Sweetgrass earlier this year. I have been waiting patiently for Gathering Moss since April. Who would have thought a book about moss would be so popular? But there you go.

And if I can manage it, I hope to get to a book from my own shelves that I have meant to read for ages: Angle of Repose by Wallace Stegner. I was inspired to finally pick it up after Whispering Gums wrote a wonderful blog post on Stegner’s Crossing to Safety, a book I have read a very long time ago. I almost tossed over Stegner for Woolf, but Woolf will wait patiently until August.

So there is July. And no doubt there will be a few unplanned books that make their way in but that is all part of the fun.


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15. September Reading

Ah, September. Back to school, shorter days and longer nights, migrating geese and monarch butterflies, the stuttering transition to autumn. I am ready for cool, crisp days and chilly nights, chilly nights where I can sit beneath the glow of a lamp with a book while sipping a cup of hot chocolate. I will no longer feel guilty about drinking hot chocolate because it is scientifically proven to be good for me. So bring on the cold weather!

When those chilly nights do arrive, what might I be reading? At the rate I’m going it will still be Crisis of the European Mind. It’s not a bad book, it really isn’t. Though I’ve been talking about it for so long you all are probably beginning to suspect I am not telling the truth. I had hoped to finish it by now and I have made progress. I’m almost two-thirds of the way through. The book just resists being read fast. But I am sure September will be the last month I tell you I am still reading it. Of course I said that last month too, but this time I really mean it!

I will still be reading the Collected Poems of Edward Thomas as well. I have made progress here too. But it is fat for a poetry book (collected poems means every single poem the guy wrote and he wrote a lot!) and while the poems aren’t especially difficult, they are poems that ask you to be in the moment, to hear the wind in the trees and feel the sun on your face, and smell the fresh mown meadow. You cannot rush something like that.

Those two books are my only carry overs from last month so in spite of everything I am feeling pretty good about my reading. Which means I have been suffering major temptations to request a bunch of books from the library and start them all in addition to several already on my shelves. But so far I have mostly resisted and I must say it pains me a little.

Two books I have brought home from the library are Russell Hoban’s The Mouse and His Child and Trojan Women and Other Plays by Euripides. I have two copies of the Hoban, one with the original drawings by Hoban’s wife and one with more recent illustrations. I thought it would be fun to compare. And since this is a children’s book, I don’t expect it to take so very long to read once I start it. And Euripides, well, I realized with guilt the other day that I have not read a single play this year and my plan to have most all of Euripides read by the end of the year was not going to happen unless I actually had a few plays on hand demanding to be read. So there it is.

Then, of course, there is the RIP Challenge to keep in mind. I am about two-thirds of the way through Northanger Abbey and am having so much fun. The book is hilarious. Austen was a comic genius. I’ve been having so much fun reading it Bookman has even started it and has also been enjoying it very much. Also for RIP, I just began The Infernals by John Connolly. I was laughing in delight in less than two complete sentences.

I’ve been in the mood to read essays but haven’t had a chance to squeeze in a book yet. I have the Julian Barnes essays I bought the other day and I have come very close to requesting other books of essays from the library. But I realized I have Auden’s essays that I started so very long ago and haven’t picked up since I don’t know when, so I expect I will be doing that sometime this month.

Then there is Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam that will be landing in my mailbox tomorrow from Barnes and Noble. I am very much looking forward to it and reviews have so far been pretty positive, at least from what I have glanced at because I haven’t read one in full not wanting to know too much about the book be fore I dive in. I’ve read and enjoyed the first two and that’s all I need to know.

There we go, September’s reading card, all filled up.


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16. October Reading

In light of my recent list-making musings and the myriad ways TBR lists fail, I am going to attempt an experiment! Get out your bunsen burner, sytlish safety goggles and lead apron and stand back! No, never mind, explosions are not likely to happen and if they do they will be small so maybe just stand back a little.

You know once a month or so I like to post about what I am reading and what I hope to read in the next few weeks? You know it’s always a lot of books. And you know I am usually in the middle of reading them all at once. You are probably now thinking that my experiment is going to be to read one book at a time. *shudder* No, I said I was going to do an experiment not attempt the impossible. The experiment part is in prioritizing, limiting my choices, and making a commitment.

So here goes.

  • The Selected Poems of Edward Thomas. Ha! I am still reading this one. Whatever possessed me to think I could whip through a book of poetry? No, poetry is never, ever to be rushed. So, no more guilt about this long lingering book. I am reading it, just a few poems at a time. I will continue reading it but commit to ten poems a week. My bookmark is currently at poem number 49 and there are 144 poems in the book which means there are 95 poems left for me to read. At ten a week that’s nine weeks which puts me at finishing up the first week of December. Doable!
  • Mysteries of Udolpho by Ann Radcliffe. I am about 80% of the way through the book and reading it regularly since it is my commute and lunchtime reading during the week. It is quite marvelous and I am enjoying it immensely. I am currently amused by how one is supposed to be able to tell a person’s character by his or her countenance. A beautiful face equals a good character and vice versa. Except our heroine Emily has found evidence that this is not always the case but she manages to ignore the evidence nonetheless.

    The other thing that is occupying my thoughts as I read the book at the moment is what happened to her beloved little dog? After her father died and she had to move to her aunt’s house she took her father’s favorite dog with her. He shows up a few times but has now disappeared entirely. I am surprised the dog lasted as long as it did really as it never seemed to be fed or taken outside to do its doggie business somewhere other than the carpet. Poor pup.

Anyway, this book will be finished probably by the end of next week.

  • I finished reading The Other by Thomas Tryon over the weekend. So good! A full post on that tomorrow. I had begun reading my next NYRB subscription book from July a week or so ago but it has been pushed aside temporarily for the NYRB October selection: The Black Spider by Jeremias Gotthelf. It’s a classic horror story and I just have to read it this month because of the RIP Challenge and because it is such a perfect time of year for it. The book is slim and I am certain I will have no trouble finishing it by the end of the month.
  • Now comes the hard part: prioritizing and making realistic choices for books I have not yet begun reading.

    • Enquiry Into the Sublime and Beautiful by Edmund Burke. I would like to read this to go along with Mysteries of Udolpho and all of its sublime this and sublime that. It may end up being more of a skim, if one can skim Burke. Dipping in might be a better way to put it.
    • The reading list for the Plagues, Witches, and War historical fiction mooc class I am taking (starts in 2 weeks!) is up and there is lots of reading. I do not plan on reading all the novels but even just reading the assigned excerpts will take much of my time. Then there is the supplemental reading, the articles and essays that go along with the main course. I do want to read all of that. For eight weeks then the reading for this class will be my main focus.
    • Should I have time amidst all that — you never know, it could happen! — I will embark on reading Hecuba by Euripides. I am not expecting to have time, but just in case.

    There is the reading plan for October into early November. I am unsure whether I will be able to stick to it or not. Time will tell. If it is a success I will try again in November. If it fails, I’ll just pretend like it never happened. Plan, what plan? The one I posted about? Oh that! That wasn’t a plan, that was just — I don’t know what it was exactly but I’m sure it wasn’t a plan. See what I am up against? I am already attempting sabotage!


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    17. Happy Halloween!

    Ah, my first day back to work after my mini-vacation. Am I allowed to be really glad tomorrow is Friday? In honor of Halloween I “dressed up” with cat ears. One of my coworkers told me I should get some brown ones (the ones I wore today were black) and I could wear them everyday. She said my curly hair hides the headband so the ears just stick up and look like they belong. So apparently I rock the cat ears. Who knew.

    I read Hecuba yesterday by Euripides. What an awesome play! Don’t have the brain power to write about it tonight though but soon!

    I had to give up on one of the books for my historical fiction MOOC. The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane was going just fine. I wasn’t enamored but it was enjoyable and then there was such a big mistake in it. The mistake? The main character, Connie, at the request of her mother out west, drives to a small town an hour away from Boston to clear out and try to sell the abandoned for twenty years house of her grandmother. Connie takes a friend with her and her friend asks if she knew her grandmother very well. Connie says she has no real memories of her, that her mother said the grandmother visited frequently when she was a child but she died before Connie was old enough to get to know her. Then not ten pages later Connie is recalling a Christmas when her grandmother came to visit and brought her a handmade sweater with one arm longer than the other. Say what? I thought she didn’t have any memories of her grandmother? I am so annoyed by this that I can’t continue with the book. So I am going to move on to Fever by Mary Beth Keane and hopefully have better luck.

    In honor of the day, enjoy some photos of literary pumpkins. And if you, like me, prefer your pumpkins carved, here are a few more.


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    18. November Reading Plan

    Happy November! Did October just fly by? Why is it spring arrives so slowly and fall careens in, teeters for a moment on the precipice, and then plunges right into winter? Winter hasn’t arrived just yet but my local weather forecaster reminded me the other day that we average 9 inches (23 cm) of snow in November. We did have a little snow a week and a half ago but it melted as soon as it hit the ground so I just pretended it was really thick rain.

    Autumn’s arrival in early October and the end of gardening did help my reading speed along. Once the snow becomes something more than thick rain, imagine all the reading I will be doing! My October reading plan was a great success. I read everything I planned to and even read Hecuba, my reserve book in case I finished all the others. This also allowed me to get back to my NYRB subscription books and read the July book, In Love by Alfred Hayes, which I just finished this afternoon. Woot! Look at me go!

    Now, planning for November, here is what’s in store:

    • The Selected Poems of Edward Thomas. Last month the plan was to read ten poems a week and finish up the book the first week of December. I am right on track. I have also read some really lovely poems. I am looking forward to sharing this book in more detail with you.
    • My MOOCs are still going. I am in deep right now with T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land. Including this week there are seven more weeks to go, I think. So that will continue for November. Also continuing for the month is my historical fiction class. I am in the middle of Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks and at the beginning of Fever by Mary Beth Keane. Both of these books will be finished this month.
    • Alexander’s Bridge by Willa Cather is also in the cards this month. I will be reading it along with Danielle. I suspect I will be starting in on it sometime next week.
    • I also plan on reading The Man Who Planted Trees by Jean Giono. The book is a gift from my friend Cath. It is the story of Elzeard Bouffier who moves to southeastern France with his sheep and dog and plants one hundred acorns a day. I am really looking forward to reading this one.
    • Since I get a four-day holiday at the end of November for Thanksgiving and won’t be traveling over the river and through the woods to anyone’s house nor will anyone be traveling to mine, I will have some extra time to indulge in reading and have high hopes of being able to partake of MaddAddam by Margaret Atwood. I am very much looking forward to this and finding out how the story begun in Oryx and Crake ends.
    • And, should I have another blockbuster reading month, I will plunge into The Bridge of Beyond by Simone Schwarz-Bart. This is my August NYRB subscription book. It is, according to the back of the book, “an intoxicating tale of love and wonder, mothers and daughters, spiritual values and the grim legacy of slavery on the French Antillean Island of Guadeluope.” Sounds good, doesn’t it?

    So there is the November plan. With that my mind has skipped over December entirely and has already begun thinking about next year. I know! But I can’t help myself!


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    19. December Reading Plans

    Where did December come from? What happened to May? July? September? Did I do a Rip Van Winkle? The year can’t be almost done already!

    So far setting monthly reading priorities has gone pretty well. I thought when I sat down to write this that November had gone terribly but looking back there is only one book I didn’t read, The Bridge of Beyond by Simone Schwarz-Bart. My excuse? A library book I had on hold came my way. That’s valid, right?

    I am usually up to date with writing about books I have finished but there are two books from November I haven’t written about yet: Steppenwolf by Herman Hesse and MaddAddam by Margaret Atwood. The Atwood was fantastic. The Hesse, I am still trying to puzzle it out. I think I should have read it while under the influence of mind-altering drugs and it would have made more sense. Write ups about each of the books are forthcoming.

    Books for December. I am having trouble putting together my priorities. I have the week of Christmas and the week of New Year’s off from work, that’s two full weeks, and I am inclined to cram it full with books. But I know I have a tendency to cram it too full so I back off and then worry that I haven’t planned enough. What the heck. Let’s cram!

    So while others binge on food this month, I’ll binge on books. Here’s the meal plan:

    • Bicycles: Love Poems by Nikki Giovanni. She will be giving a reading at the public library on December 12th and I am planning to go. While I know who she is a search through my reading history revealed I have never read her. I began the book the other day and what a delight! I look forward to hearing her speak.
    • Burning the Midnight Oil edited by Phil Cousineau. The publisher offered this to me and I couldn’t refuse. It’s a little anthology of prose and poetry, fiction and nonfiction about the night. The book is being published on the winter solstice. It is one of those perfect dipping books that has so far been very enjoyable.
    • Vital Signs, this is a book of essays on psychological responses to ecological crisis. I am not planning on rushing my way through this and finishing by the end of the month. I am taking my time and plan on finishing in January so this one is a more long-term book.
    • Singing School by Robert Pinsky. This is a book about poetry. I am next up in the hold queue at the library and it looks like my turn will come around the 17th.
    • To the Letter by Simon Garfield is another book I am waiting for at the library. The library just purchased it and as soon as they have it cataloged a copy will be mine.
    • The Cusanus Game by Wolfgang Jeschke. This is the book that came in from the library that kept me from reading The Bridge of Beyond last month. It is a chunkster but so far so good. It is a science fiction novel that involves time travel and climate change. Bookman decided to read it too. One book, two readers. Watch us juggle and negotiate!
    • Reaper Man by Terry Pratchett. I started this on my Kindle a week or so ago and am enjoying it very much. A nice antidote to the Hesse.
    • The Stupidest Angel by Christopher Moore. Another book of comedy, this time Christmas comedy. Bookman read it last year and laughed all the way through and then foisted it on me. Seems like a good time to read it.

    And if I manage all of that, there will also be The Bridge of Beyond and Trojan Women to dive into. Also on the back burner is Four Quartets by T.S. Eliot and a biography about him by Peter Ackroyd.

    It’s a good thing reading binges are calorie-free!


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    20. Guilty

    I’m a little over 80% of the way through David Copperfield. I give you a percentage because I am reading it on my Kindle and I have no idea what this looks like in terms of the print book. I am enjoying the book very much but I have come to a place where I feel guilty.

    You see earlier in the book David met and fell in love with Dora. Dora is an affectionate airhead and so completely the wrong woman for David. But youth and love and youth in love don’t always make the best choices. And so David marries her in spite me repeatedly telling him not to. It is so frustrating when characters do not obey one’s wishes! And of course the marriage is a disaster, though David doesn’t realize it at first while in the clutches of newlywed bliss. But as time goes on and Dora refuses to act anything other than a child, he regrets his choice. He loves her still, but he wishes he had someone with sense with whom he could actually talk about things.

    While David continues to love Dora in spite of all, she is nails on a chalkboard to me and I just want to slap her. Hard. I, of course, know exactly who David should marry. And so I have been reading and hoping that maybe something will happen to Dora. I thought she could die in childbirth and that would be just fine.

    Then we are told she has a baby, but the baby was sickly and dies very soon after birth. Dora, however, never quite recovers and she begins a slow decline. I almost cheered. Dora’s going to die and David can marry the right person, hooray! And then I felt really, really guilty. As Dora goes downhill she makes me feel worse and worse for wishing her dead. For in her decline she remains cheerful, sunny, and affectionate which shows she has some strength of character in there after all. In my wish for her demise I am no better than the wicked Uriah Heep!

    If Dora’s death turns out to be an affecting scene that brings tears to my eyes I am not sure if that will mean I can be forgiven for wishing her ill or that I am being punished for it by being made to cry in public (this being my commute book I am always in public while reading it). Perhaps I should start carrying a handkerchief I can throw over my face like they do in the book. No one will know what I am doing under that handkerchief! I might even frighten enough people that the transit police will show up to talk to me. Wouldn’t that be exciting? They’d haul me off for a psych eval if I tell them I am upset over my book. Would serve me right I guess for wishing Dora dead.


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    21. March Reading

    Happy March! Was February a really long month for you? It was for me. And March continues on just like February. It was -4F (-20C) while I waited for the bus this morning. We have now managed to gain the rank of ninth coldest winter on record in the Twin Cities. We have more snow than average and we have had 50 days so far where temperatures have fallen below zero (-18C). So in celebration of this lovely weather, here is some Minnesota poetry for you:

    It’s winter in Minnesota
    And gentle breezes blow
    Seventy miles an hour
    At thirty-five below.

    Oh, how I love Minnesota
    When the snow’s up to your butt
    You take a breath of winter
    And your nose gets frozen shut.

    Yes, the weather here is wonderful
    So I guess I’ll hang around
    I could never leave Minnesota
    I’m frozen to the ground.

    At least with the weather so cold February was a good month for reading. I am almost done with David Copperfield. Will be done by the end of the week I suspect. Then my next fat book is A Feast for Crows by George R.R. Martin, the third book in the Game of Thrones series.

    I am still reading Vital Signs: Psychological Responses to Ecological Crisis. I am close to being done though, just four more essays. It’s a really good and thought provoking book.

    Old Goriot by Balzac is still on the go too. The book does not allow one to read it very quickly, which is fine especially since I am enjoying it. I am up to the part where Rastignac has just found out that Goriot is not spending all his money on keeping mistresses but from paying his daughters’ debts. The cruelty of everyone in the boardinghouse toward Goriot is astonishing, I feel so sorry for the poor man.

    I did finish reading Memories of the Unknown by Rutger Kopland. It is a wonderful poetry collection I will write about tomorrow.

    What’s ahead for March then aside from finishing those books I have already mentioned? I began reading Landscape with Rowers, a small poetry anthology/selection of Dutch poets put together by J.M. Coetzee.

    Because of Grad I started reading The Country Diary of an Edwardian Lady. It’s a beautiful nature journal and artist’s notebook that helps me mentally escape winter for just a little while.

    I also have from the library Don’t Let Me Be Lonely by Claudia Rankine, a multi-genre work I am excited about reading. And sometime during the month my turn will come up at the library for Wendy Lesser’s new book Why I Read: The Serious Pleasure of Books. Really looking forward to it!

    That should keep me busy in March. And with luck, the month will end much warmer than it has begun and perhaps actually start to feel like spring.


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    22. Happy Spring!

    Happy first day of spring! And to those of you south of the equator, happy first day of autumn!

    While February crept along, March is flying by. My reading has gotten a bit discombobulated. Over a year ago I applied to review books for a library publication and didn’t hear anything from them. Then early last week I got an email to tell me a book was on the way and I have to have it read and reviewed by April 1st! The book didn’t arrive until the end of the week. And while it is not a big fat novel, it is a just over 200 page book of essays about the history of the modern critic. The author and I aren’t getting along from the get go which doesn’t make the reading easy. Good thing I have a deadline or I would take forever to finish this book.

    Of course this book came at the same time my turn for Wendy Lesser’s new book came up. And of course I am enjoying Why I Read so much more than my assigned book that I will be having to do some assigned reading cramming over the coming weekend.

    Waiting in the wings after these is a review copy of the new Francine Prose book, Lovers and the Chameleon Club. Prose will be in town in early May doing a reading at the public library so I figured this was one review copy I could agree to reading.

    I must say though that I am surprised I made it this far into the year before my multitude of books in progress have made me feel a bit overwhelmed. My month-to-month planning is working pretty good. Once I get my assigned review book done I will feel much better again. I am grateful that it is only a short review of 200 words I have to write — piece of cake! I hope.

    Now I want to leave you with a good laugh in case you missed the story. A man in Bristol discovered he’d been scammed by a man who sold him a PS3 console online which never was delivered. To get back at the scammer, he copied the complete works of Shakespeare and pasted them into one giant text message. You know how long text messages get broken up? Well, the scammer will be getting about 29,305 texts. It’s brilliant!


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    23. April Reading Plans

    Happy April! March roared by, didn’t it? We had our first April shower this morning. Of course it came down in the form of snow but we didn’t get much and it has melted away already. We still have snow on the ground though. It takes a long time to melt that which has accumulated since November of last year. But it is going fast.

    Love is also in the air. On my way home from work my bus stopped for a light and I looked out the window to see five boy robins and one girl robin in a tree. All but one boy seemed more interested in trying to chase the others away than getting the girl. The one robin focused on the girl did not make a good impression because as soon as he landed on her branch she flew away. You could see all five disappointed robin heads looking wistfully at her tail feathers disappearing through the trees.

    Also in the air is poetry. Happy National Poetry Month! I have mixed feelings about poetry month. I love it because poetry. I hate it because poetry should be read and celebrated all year, not just in April. I’m going to celebrate the month by kidnapping Patrick Stewart from the Poetry and the Creative Mind Gala in New York on the 24th. I’ll be taking him to an undisclosed location also known as my basement where I will keep him prisoner and make him read poetry to me until his voice gives out or I get arrested whichever comes first.

    Reading plans for April do involve poetry though. I started reading Landscape with Rowers last month. The book is a slim collection of Dutch poets put together by J.M. Coetzee. It has six poets and each poet is represented by one long multi-part poem. I am reading the book along with my friend Cath who lives in the Netherlands and I am very glad to be sharing it with her. She is an insightful reader who helped me make sense of Gerrit Achterberg’s “Ballad of the Gasfitter.” We will likely finish this book before the end of the month. I am not sure what poetry collection I will take up after that. Perhaps I will finally get to T.S. Eliot’s Four Quartets.

    I started reading A Feast for Crows by George R.R. Martin about the middle of last month and I am about halfway through. After the previous book in the series which was momentous event after momentous event, this one seems rather tame. But at the same time I am enjoying it immensely because many of the women in the series are making their own bids for power.

    I am also still in the midst of Old Goriot by Balzac. I didn’t give it much time in March. I am blaming the unexpected review assignment I was given. All I can say is, I am enjoying it. I am reading it along with Danielle and bless her, she has been as distracted from it lately as I have so I don’t feel so very guilty.

    New books I will be starting during the month include Francine Prose’s newest Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932. This is a review copy. Prose will be coming to Minneapolis in early May so I figured I’d read her book before I see her.

    I also hope to read Don’t Let Me Be Lonely by Claudia Rankine. It is a mixed genre book of poetry, essay, and I think, memoir published in 2004 by the Twin Cities’ own Graywolf Press.

    And finally, because I am so very greedy when it comes to just one more book to read, Bookman and I are going to read King Lear together. It will be a reread for me and a first time for him. And if I still have Patrick Stewart in my basement he will be forced to read some of Lear’s awesome speeches. After we finish reading the play we plan on watching a movie of it so if you have a favorite film version let me know!

    That’s enough reading for April. I will be lucky if I get through half of it but I’m willing to give it a try.


    Filed under: Books, In Progress

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    24. It’s Not a Slump, Just a Breather

    Since I finished Wendy Lesser’s book and returned it to the library and The Critic in the Modern World and submitted my review, I have been relieved and happy to be out from under the pressure of deadlines. Now, I can read whatever I want to! Except I haven’t been reading.

    That’s not exactly true. I have been reading, only it’s not been throw-myself-into-a-book reading. It has been reading on my public transit commute and during my lunch break at work and for 15-20 minutes in bed before turning out the light. I have been reading only George R.R. Martin’s Feast for Crows (my commute and lunch book) and Jo Walton’s What Makes This Book So Great (one or two essays before bed). I am enjoying both of them very much, don’t get me wrong, but when I think, oh I will start that Francine Prose book, I can’t bring myself to do it. I pick it up, I look at it, and then put it back down. Maybe tomorrow, I tell myself.

    I worried a little yesterday and today that I have fallen into a reading slump. I’ve not had one of those in a very long time. But it doesn’t have the feel of a slump. It is more like a breather. A few days to catch my breath before launching into a new book or two. And with just that little change of framing, I feel so much better. Silly as it sounds, the thought of a slump was kind of making me a little stressed. But this being a breather and not a slump, well, that’s no big deal. The weekend is coming and there will be lots of time to spend reading lots of different books.

    There was a slight moment of panic when I got home from work and checked my email to see I had one from Library Journal informing me I had a new review assignment. I just turned in a review and figured it would be quite some time before my turn came around to do another review. And of course, it is another short due date: April 24th. And I have not received the book in the mail yet (it’s on the way the email assures me). But this book will be a piece of cake. It’s a gardening book! An entire book on seed saving. That should be pretty good. I hope.

    And after writing about my breather I actually feel like doing some reading. Off I go while the mood is still upon me.


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    25. What to Make of It?

    I’m seventy-five pages into my review copy of Francine Prose’s new book Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932 and I’m just not sure what to make of it. It is one of those novels told in multiple voices with sometimes very distant perspectives to the main course of the plot. Most of the telling happens through documents — letters, chapters from a biography, newspaper stories, chapters from a memoir of some kind — but sometimes there is a chapter of regular narrative storytelling. This sort of approach I generally have no issues with, I often like the variety of perspective such a style has to offer. But this time I am struggling with it.

    My struggles aren’t because I am having trouble following along or keeping things straight. My struggle comes from how contrived and same-y it feels. Prose can’t seem to find different voices for the different perspectives so they all come across as too much alike. And the letters, ugh! The letters are being written by only one character to his parents, a young man from Hungary who has gone to Paris to try and make his name as a photographer. This is 1924 and the guy is writing stuff to his parents that I wouldn’t write to mine in 2014! Plus the style in which he writes is not a correspondence style, or rather, each letter begins that way but as soon as he starts telling his parents what he has been up to it turns into a regular prose narrative with dialogue conversations that end with a plea for money and a sign off from the loving son. In addition, there are so many different narratives it is getting a bit cacophonous.

    And now I find myself wondering if I should even keep reading. The story isn’t bad but it hasn’t grabbed me either. It is all just so-so. I am on the fence over whether I should give it another twenty pages or if I should call it quits because so-so isn’t good enough at the moment and King Lear is taunting me because I know I will love it since it is a reread that I loved the first time around. It is easy to give up on bad books or good books I am definitely not getting along with, but giving up on so-so books is harder because there is still the hope that maybe it will get better in ten more pages. But that can end up being a trap when after ten pages it still isn’t getting better but maybe in ten more. See me talking myself into making this book a DNF? The fence is starting to wobble.


    Filed under: Books, In Progress Tagged: Francine Prose

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