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Chris Barton writes about Chris Barton's writing ... and other, more fascinating elements of the world of children's book publishing.
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1. Don, Tom, and me

Don Tate, Tom Lichtenheld, Chris Barton

I had the great pleasure of serving on a panel at last month’s Austin SCBWI conference with illustrators Don Tate (shown on the left) and Tom Lichtenheld (the guy in the middle). If those names sound familiar, it’s because I’ve created a book with each of them.

In fact…

Today (no fooling) is the publication date not only of The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch, which Don illustrated, but also of the board book version of the Tom-illustrated Shark Vs. Train. Both books give readers something to chew on — one figuratively, one literally — so if you know someone with a big appetite for something new to read, won’t you please keep these in mind?

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2. Living symbols of the spread of freedom — and its opposite

Black Congressional representation from South

This graphic is from an upcoming presentation that I’ll be giving about The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch, and I thought a wider audience might appreciate it.

For context, here’s an excerpt from my Historical Note in the book:

During Reconstruction, approximately two thousand African American men served as local, state, or national officials. Some of them were freemen before the war, and others – including John Roy Lynch – were freed only as a result of the conflict. Those who held office in the South were living symbols of the spread of freedom. Most notably, between 1870 and 1877, there were 16 African Americans who served in the US Congress from former Confederate states.

But there were only six more who served between 1878 and 1901. And between 1902 and 1972, there were zero.

What happened?

In The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch, illustrator Don Tate and I have done our best to explain while telling the inspiring story of this one young man.

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3. Eric Foner on Reconstruction and The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch

“Citizenship, rights, democracy — as long as these remain contested, so will the necessity of an accurate understanding of Reconstruction.”

That quote comes from “Why Reconstruction Matters,” a new, short essay by Eric Foner, author of Reconstruction: America’s Unfinished Revolution 1863-1877 and the Pulitzer-prize-winning DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University. I can’t recommend enough taking a few minutes to read it.

While Don Tate was working on the illustrations for The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch, our publisher asked Professor Foner to have a look at the text. Here’s what he had to say about our picture book biography of this young man who went from teenage slave to U.S. congressman in ten years:

Like adults, young readers should know about the era of Reconstruction and the remarkable individuals who struggled to give real meaning to the freedoms blacks achieved during the Civil War. John Roy Lynch was one of them and he is brought vividly to life in this book.

I’m thankful to Foner not only for those kind words about our book, but especially for all the work he’s done to shape our modern understanding of the Reconstruction era.

“Preoccupied with the challenges of our own time,” he writes in this New York Times essay, “Americans will probably devote little attention to the sesquicentennial of Reconstruction, the turbulent era that followed the conflict.”

Not if I can help it.

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4. Bartography Express for March 2015, featuring The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch

This month, at least one subscriber to my Bartography Express newsletter — maybe more! — will win a copy of my new brand-new book.

To celebrate next week’s publication of The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch (illustrated by Don Tate, and published by Eerdmans Books for Young Readers), the children’s department staffers at Austin’s BookPeople came up with several questions for me to answer. I hope you enjoy my answers as much as I appreciate their questions.

If you’re not already receiving Bartography Express, click the image below for a look. If you like what you see, click “Join” in the bottom right corner, and you’ll be in the running for the giveaway next week. Good luck!

20150326 Bartography Express

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5. What we do for fun around here

Three of us, anyway — my 11-year-old human boy, our terrier-dachshund mix, Ernie, and yours truly.

We’ve been attending agility classes every week or two for the past year. Some days are more agile than others, though. The above video was from two weeks ago. The photo below is from this morning, when Ernie misjudged the dimensions of the pottery he was gratuitously leaping over.

Not so agile after all

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6. All the college kidlit conferences (as of March 2015)

Or, more formally, “A Comprehensive List of U.S. College- and University-Sponsored or -Hosted Children’s and Young Adult Literature Conferences, Festivals, and Symposia.” (All of them that I could find, anyway).

A few years ago, I was looking for such a list, wondered why I couldn’t find one, and decided to just go ahead and make one myself.

Since then, I’ve periodically updated and reposted it, and I plan to continue doing so. If I’ve missed any, or included some that no longer exist, won’t you please let me know in the comments section?

Arizona
University of Arizona Tucson Festival of Books

California
University of Redlands Charlotte S. Huck Children’s Literature Festival

Connecticut
University of Connecticut Connecticut Children’s Book Fair

Georgia
Kennesaw State University Conference on Literature for Children and Young Adults
The University of Georgia Children’s Literature Conference

Illinois
Northern Illinois University Children’s Literature Conference

Indiana/Kentucky/Ohio
Northern Kentucky University, Thomas More College, University of Cincinnati, and Xavier University Ohio Kentucky Indiana Children’s Literature Conference

Kentucky
University of Kentucky McConnell Conference

Maryland
Frostburg State University Spring Festival of Children’s Literature
Salisbury University Read Green Festival

Massachusetts
Framingham State University Children’s Literature Festival
Simmons College Children’s Literature Summer Institute

Minnesota
St. Cloud State University Children’s Literature Workshop
University of Minnesota Kerlan Award Ceremony
University of St. Thomas Hubbs Children’s Literature Conference

Missouri
University of Central Missouri Children’s Literature Festival

Mississippi
The University of Southern Mississippi Fay B. Kaigler Children’s Book Festival

Nebraska
Concordia University Plum Creek Children’s Literacy Festival

New Hampshire
Keene State College Children’s Literature Festival

New Jersey
Montclair State University New Jersey Council of Teachers of English Spring Conference
Rutgers University One-on-One Plus Conference

New York
Manhattan College 21st Century Children’s Nonfiction Conference
Stony Brook University – Southampton Southampton Children’s Literature Conference

Ohio
Bowling Green State University Literacy in the Park
Kent State University Virginia Hamilton Conference
Ohio State University 2016 Children’s Literature Association Conference (ChLA 2016)
The University of Findlay Mazza Museum Summer Conference and Weekend Conference
Youngstown State University English Festival

Pennsylvania
Kutztown University Children’s Literature Conference

Texas
Sam Houston State University Jan Paris Bookfest: Children’s & YA Conference
Texas A&M University – Commerce Bill Martin Jr Memorial Symposium

Utah
Brigham Young University Symposium on Books for Young Readers
Utah Valley University Forum on Engaged Reading

Virginia
The College of William and Mary Joy of Children’s Literature Conference
Longwood University Summer Literacy Institute and Virginia Children’s Book Festival
Shenandoah University Children’s Literature Conference

Washington
Western Washington University Children’s Literature Conference

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7. “Why Study Reconstruction?”

It’s still a month away from the publication date of my book with Don Tate​, The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch, the true story of a young man who rose from slavery to the U.S. Congress during the Civil War and Reconstruction.

About that latter, terribly overlooked period, I could not ask for a better summation of why it’s such an important era in U.S. history than this three-minute video published today by Facing History and Ourselves​. I hope you’ll watch it and be inspired to learn more.

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8. Bartography Express for February 2015, featuring Lynda Mullaly Hunt’s Fish in a Tree

This month, one subscriber to my Bartography Express newsletter will win a copy of Fish in a Tree (Penguin) by Lynda Mullaly Hunt.

If you’re not already receiving Bartography Express, click the image below for a look. If you like what you see, click “Join” in the bottom right corner, and you’ll be in the running for the giveaway at the end of this week.

20150224 Bartography Express

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9. A big giveaway by Two Writing Teachers

Two Writing Teachers giveaway

The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch is just one of ten titles (all shown above) that will be given away later this week at the Two Writing Teachers blog.

In addition to the giveaway, Stacey Shubitz provides a lot of thoughtful commentary on how each of these ten titles can be used to help young writers improve their skills. For example, here’s some of what Stacey says about The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch:

Like Seeds of Freedom, this book is also crafted with strong voice, which makes it worthy of studying. Sometimes the voice is created with variations in the print (e.g., italics). While many sentences tend to be longer, there are some places with short sentences which cause readers to pause. Often punctuation is used to create voice. For instance, Barton often uses dashes, instead of commas, emphasize, interrupt, or change thoughts in the middle of sentences. Barton also used dashes to create longer or more dramatic pauses in sentences. This picture book is 50 pages long, which means there are LOTS of things you can study alongside students in order to figure out what makes this text work well.

Thank you, Stacey — and good luck to all you Bartography readers who enter the giveaway!

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10. “5, 4, 3, 2, 1″ with Nerdy Book Club co-founder Colby Sharp

54321-InterviewMichigan teacher, Nerdy Book Club co-founder, and Attack! Boss! Cheat Code! enthusiast Colby Sharp has a nifty series on his sharpread blog called the 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 Interview. Last week, I had the opportunity to answer his five questions with ever-briefer answers — though, to be honest, I sort of gamed the system with lots of long, dash-enhanced sentences. Have a look!

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11. A starred review from Publishers Weekly for The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch!

John Roy Lynch final cover

You know, when you spend the better part of a decade working on a 50-page picture book, I suppose it’s OK to get a little excited when Publishers Weekly both gets and appreciates what you were going for all those years:

The whole thing is available here, but this is my favorite part:

Barton offers an immersive, engaging, and unflinching portrait of the difficulties of the Reconstruction era, while Tate’s cartoonlike artwork softens moments of cruelty and prejudice without diminishing them.

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12. The stunning cover of ‘The Nutcracker’ Comes to America

Sometimes my dog will be sitting in my lap, being hugged and petted on, and he will begin to whine and whimper as if there’s still not enough affection getting expressed, as if it’s impossible that there could ever be any demonstration that would measure up to the love he feels.

It has long seemed absurd to me, but I think I finally get it. I do.

Because, y’all, I just can’t love this enough:

Nutcracker_frontcover

This is what the front of my upcoming book with Millbrook Press, ‘The Nutcracker’ Comes to America: How Three Ballet-Loving Brothers Created a Holiday Tradition, will look like. It’s illustrator Cathy Gendron‘s first picture book, and I think she’s done just an astounding job.

I love how Willam, Harold, and Lew Christensen pop right off the page even amid the terrific onstage action. I love the shade of blue that the scene is bathed in. I love the swords. I love everything about this cover.

The book will be out this coming fall, and I hope to be able to share with you some of the interior illustrations soon. (If you’re at the Texas Library Association conference in April, maybe you can even see an advance copy in person.)

But in the meantime, here’s what the entire jacket — front, back, and flaps — looks like:

Nutcracker_jacket

Whine. Whimper.

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13. Win a limited-edition poster for The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch…

…and a copy of the book! But you’ve got only a few days to enter. Get the details here.

AmazingAgePoster

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14. John Roy Lynch, and the 100th anniversary of The Birth of a Nation

Rather than share the Klan-glorifying poster for The Birth of a Nation, here's a depiction from The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch.

Rather than share the Klan-glorifying poster for The Birth of a Nation, I thought I’d offer this depiction from The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch.

There’s been lots published this weekend about the 100th anniversary of D. W. Griffith’s film The Birth of a Nation — about how its technical greatness and unprecedented box-office success were at least matched and arguably surpassed by the vileness of its racist depictions of African Americans.

From Vulture:

By one way of reckoning, this week — February 8, to be exact — can be called the 100th birthday of the medium that many of us have spent our lives enthralled with: the feature film. But don’t expect any parades, fireworks, grand speeches, or other shows of celebration. That’s because the film that premiered at Clune’s Auditorium in Los Angeles on February 8, 1915, was D. W. Griffith’s The Clansman, soon to be retitled The Birth of a Nation — the most virulently racist major movie ever released in the U.S.

From A.V. Club:

Birth Of A Nation is the movie where many of the values associated with American filmmaking—complex intercutting, massed crowds of extras contrasted with close-ups of actors, carefully edited suspense and chase scenes—get their first really clear, fully formed expression. It’s also unquestionably white supremacist and racist. It represents a key point in the history of American art, and is animated by some of the ugliest rhetoric America ever produced.

From the BBC:

The film is credited with reviving the racist KKK, who adopted it as a recruitment tool. “The Ku Klux Klan had been kind of a dead organisation by 1915, but when the film [came out and became a hit] the KKK was refounded, capitalised on [the film’s success] and in the 1920s became a massive organisation at the peak of nativist fervour in the United States,” says Paul McEwan.

From The Record:

“The Birth of a Nation” was the last straw for [William Monroe] Trotter. A proud intellectual (Harvard’s first black Phi Beta Kappa student) and a proud “race man,” Trotter was appalled, like many African-Americans, by Griffith’s film. And he was appalled that President Woodrow Wilson, whom he had rallied black voters to support, had screened “The Birth of a Nation” in the White House — the first film to be shown there.

And from The New York Post:

What makes “Birth’’ most offensive is its depiction of its black characters — all of the prominent ones performed by white actors in blackface — during Reconstruction. Griffith depicts defeated Southerners being terrorized (and even disenfranchised from voting) by illiterate, corrupt and uncouth former slaves (seeking interracial marriage) under the influence of white Northern carpetbaggers. (A view still held by many 1915 historians, but long ago discredited).

“Long ago discredited,” yes, but still at least indirectly influential. Modern historians have given Reconstruction a bit of the attention that it deserves, but there’s been exactly one hugely commercially successful depiction of that period in the American story, and it’s Griffith’s movie.

Whether audiences at the time of The Birth of a Nation‘s release accepted Griffith’s vision, or whether they were repulsed by it and just wanted to forget the whole thing, it’s not hard to see how those attitudes could get passed along — through families, and through our schools, and through our culture in general. And with no competing mainstream force to counter the impressions left by such a film, what’s to stop them from lingering among us?

John Roy Lynch final coverWhich brings me to The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch. More specifically, it brings me to a period in Lynch’s long life not covered by the main text in my upcoming book with Don Tate.

Our book focuses on his early years — his rise from slavery to the U.S. House of Representatives in just ten years. But after his stints in Congress, and after his service as a major in the Army during the Spanish-American War, Lynch became a historian. He had a central goal in mind: “placing before the public accurate and trustworthy information relative to Reconstruction” in the wake of much misinformation about that period.

From the timeline in The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch:

1913 — Writes The Facts of Reconstruction to correct racist distortions put forth by white historians.

1915 — The Birth of a Nation, a Hollywood film misrepresenting Reconstruction and glorifying the Klan, becomes wildly popular and warps Americans’ views of history for generations to come.

His timing, you can see, wasn’t great. And, more crucially, and his medium was no match for Griffith’s.

But John Roy Lynch had — and has — history on his side. And I remain optimistic that his vision can ultimately win out.

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15. Comment on Bibliography for The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch by John Roy Lynch, and the 100th anniversary of The Birth of a Nation | Bartography

[…] ago discredited,” yes, but still at least indirectly influential. Modern historians have given Reconstruction a bit of the attention that it deserves, but there’s been exactly one hugely commercially successful depiction of that period in the […]

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16. My conversation with Matthew Winner on the Let’s Get Busy! podcast

Lets Get Busy logoI love Matthew Winner’s podcast to pieces. Listening to Let’s Get Busy! is a highlight of my week, every week, and I’m so honored to be the guest on his latest episode. If books for young readers play any significant role in your life, there’s a good chance you’ll love the conversations that elementary teacher librarian Matthew has with the creators of those books.

In this episode, we discuss how Tom Lichtenheld and I adapted Shark Vs. Train for “board-book-chewing enthusiasts,” finding a way in The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch to let some light shine through the dark legacy of Reconstruction, and why it’s important to write awful stories.

I also take a swing (a kick? a boot?) at Matthew’s traditional episode-ending stumper: In an all-star, dream-team, kidlit kickball tournament, what one figure from the world of children’s books would I want to make sure was on my team?

The whole experience has been lots of fun, and Matthew’s enthusiasm is infection. I hope you’ll give us a listen!

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17. Bibliography for The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch

John Roy Lynch final coverThe back matter for The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch includes a historical note, a two-page timeline, my author’s note, Don Tate’s illustrator’s note, suggestions for further reading, and a couple of maps.

With all that Eerdmans Books for Young Readers did squeeze into those final pages, it’s not surprising that there wasn’t room for us to include a bibliography of the sources I consulted for the book. So, I’m presenting them here (along with a shout-out for Douglas R. Egerton’s 2014 book The Wars of Reconstruction, which came out after my text was finished but which I’m currently reading and finding fascinating):

The American Experience: Reconstruction: The Second Civil War. Produced and directed by Llewellyn M. Smith and Elizabeth Deane. DVD, 2003.

Bell, Frank C. “The Life and Times of John R. Lynch: A Case Study 1847-1939.” Journal of Mississippi History, Volume 38, February 1976.

Campbell, Tracy. Deliver the Vote: A History of Election Fraud, an American Political Tradition — 1742-2004. New York: Carroll & Graf, 2005.

Carey, Charles W. Jr. African-American Political Leaders. New York: Facts on File, 2004.

Christopher, Maurine. Black Americans in Congress. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1976.

Clay, William L. Just Permanent Interests: Black Americans in Congress: 1870-1992. New York: Amistad Press, 1992.

Davis, Jack E. Race Against Time: Culture and Separation in Natchez since 1930. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2001.

Davis, Ronald L. F. The Black Experience in Natchez, 1720-1880. Mississippi: Natchez National Historical Park, 1993.

Dray, Philip. Capitol Men: The Epic Story of Reconstruction Through the Lives of the First Black Congressmen. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2008.

Foner, Eric. A Short History of Reconstruction. New York: Harper Perrenial, 1990.

Foner, Eric. Freedom’s Lawmakers: A Directory of Black Officeholders During Reconstruction. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1996.

Foner, Eric. Reconstruction: America’s Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877. New York: Harper & Row, 1988.

Gerteis, Louis S. From Contraband to Freedman: Federal Policy Toward Southern Blacks 1861-1865. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1973.

Graham, Lawrence. The Senator and the Socialite: The True Story of America’s First Black Dynasty. New York: HarperCollins, 2006.

Holzer, Harold. Lincoln President-Elect: Abraham Lincoln and the Great Secession Winter 1860-1861. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2008.

“John R. Lynch and the Reconstruction,” The Chicago Defender, November 18, 1939.

Jordan, Winthrop D., editor. Slavery and the American South. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2003.

Kennedy, Randall. Interracial Intimacies: Sex, Marriage, Identity, and Adoption. New York: Pantheon Books, 2003.

Knox, Thomas Wallace. Camp-Fire and Cotton-Field: Southern Adventure in Time of War. Life with the Union Armies, and Residence on a Louisiana Plantation. New York: Da Capo Press, 1969.

Lemann, Nicholas. Redemption: The Last Battle of the Civil War. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2006.

Lemire, Elise. “Miscegenation”: Making Race in America. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2002.

Lynch, John Roy, “Speech on the Civil Rights Bill,” accessed at http://www.blackpast.org/?q=1875-john-r-lynch-speech-civil-rights-bill on May 3, 2013.

Lynch, John Roy, edited by John Hope Franklin. Reminiscences of an Active Life: The Autobiography of John Roy Lynch. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1970.

Lynch, John Roy. Letter to Dr. William R. Johnston, December 27, 1937. William T. Johnson and Family Memorial Papers, Mss. 529, 561, 597, 770, 926, 1093, Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, LSU Libraries, Baton Rouge.

Lynch, John Roy. Letter to Dr. William R. Johnston, September 16, 1934. William T. Johnson and Family Memorial Papers, Mss. 529, 561, 597, 770, 926, 1093, Louisiana and Lower Mississippi Valley Collections, LSU Libraries, Baton Rouge.

“Major Lynch Buried with Military Rites,” The Chicago Defender, November 11, 1939.

“Major Lynch Will Be 89 on Thursday,” The Chicago Defender, September 12, 1936.

Mann, Kenneth Eugene. “John Roy Lynch: U.S. Congressman from Mississippi.” Negro History Bulletin, Volume 37, April/May 1974.

Martis, Kenneth C. The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts, 1789-1983. New York: Free Press, 1982.

McLaughlin, James Harold. “John Roy Lynch, the Reconstruction Politician: A Historical Perspective (Thesis).” Muncie, Indiana: Ball State University, 1981.

Menn, Joseph Karl. The Large Slaveholders of Louisiana, 1860. New Orleans: Pelican Publishing, 1964.

Middleton, Stephen, editor. Black Congressmen During Reconstruction: A Documentary Sourcebook. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 2002.

Montgomery, Frank A. Reminiscences of a Mississippian in Peace and War. Cincinnati: The Robert Clarke Company Press, 1901.

Morris, Robert C. Reading, ’Riting, and Reconstruction: The Education of Freedmen in the South, 1861-1870. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1976.

Nelson, Stanley. “Black, 15 & free in 1863: John Roy Lynch & Mary Reynolds,” Concordia Sentinel, May 4, 2011.

Nelson, Stanley. “Civil War in Vidalia: Views of 1863 battle from Rosalie mansion, Tacony quarters,” Concordia Sentinel, April 27, 2011.

Nelson, Stanley. “Despite deathbed promise, Lynch & family return to slavery,” Concordia Sentinel, April 6, 2011.

Nelson, Stanley. “John Roy Lynch: Love at Tacony, heartbreak at Whitehall,” Concordia Sentinel, March 30, 2011.

Nelson, Stanley. “Natchez in Union hands; John Roy Lynch leaves Vidalia to reunite with mother,” Concordia Sentinel, April 13, 2011.

Nelson, Stanley. “Plantation life, burning cotton and slavery’s end in 1863,” Concordia Sentinel, May 11, 2011.

Nelson, Stanley. “The Greshams come to Natchez; Lynch is free at 15,” Concordia Sentinel, April 22, 2011.

Newton, Michael. The Ku Klux Klan in Mississippi: A History. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, 2010.

Office of History and Preservation, Office of the Clerk, U.S. House of Representatives. Black Americans in Congress, 1870-2007. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2008.

Oliver, Nola Nance. This Too Is Natchez. New York: Hastings House, 1953.

Power, Steve. The Memento: Old and New Natchez, 1700-1897. Natchez, Mississippi: Myrtle Bank Publishers, 1984.

Rabinowitz, Howard N., editor. Southern Black Leaders of the Reconstruction Era. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1982.

Roberts, Evangeline. “Major Lynch Tells of Days in Congress,” The Chicago Defender, May 12, 1928.

Rose, Willie Lee. A Documentary History of Slavery in North America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976.

Scarborough, William Kauffman. The Overseer: Plantation Management in the Old South. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1966.

Schafer, Judith Kelleher. Becoming Free, Remaining Free: Manumission and Enslavement in New Orleans, 1846-1862. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2003.

Schafer, Judith Kelleher. Slavery, the Civil Law, and the Supreme Court of Louisiana. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1994.

Sewell, George Alexander. Mississippi Black History Makers. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1984.

Townsley, Luther. “Major John R. Lynch,” The Chicago Defender, April 29, 1939.

Turkel, Stanley. Heroes of the American Reconstruction: Profiles of Sixteen Educators, Politicians and Activists. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, 2005.

Wayne, Michael. Death of an Overseer: Reopening a Murder Investigation from the Plantation South. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.

Wayne, Michael. The Reshaping of Plantation Society: The Natchez District, 1860-1880. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University, 1983

Winters, John D. The Civil War in Louisiana. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1963.

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18. Comment on “For More About Reconstruction” by Bibliography for The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch | Bartography

[…] note, a two-page timeline, my author’s note, Don Tate’s illustrator’s note, suggestions for further reading, and a couple of […]

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19. Q&A with Trent Reedy, author of Burning Nation

Burning NationThis month’s edition of Bartography Express features a Q&A with Trent Reedy, author of the second book in the Divided We Fall trilogy, Burning Nation (Scholastic). It also includes a giveaway of a copy of Burning Nation — please see the newsletter for details.

The formatting of my newsletter made it unwieldy to include Trent’s complete answers to my questions, so I made a few edits for space. As I promised my subscribers, though, I’m including the full text here.

CB: What drew you toward the story you’re telling in the Divided We Fall trilogy?

TR: I wrote the Divided We Fall trilogy because I love stories about nightmare futures where everything we rely on to maintain our safe, comfortable lives fails us: government, law enforcement, food distribution, the electrical grid… Stripped of these systems we’ve come to depend on, would our society descend into total violent chaos, or is there enough kindness in humanity to offer hope? These sorts of narratives are great venues for action and adventure, but they also raise fascinating issues about the human condition and the nature of our contemporary society.

Some of my favorite post-apocalyptic/dystopian stories are The Walking Dead, The Hunger Games, Divergent, and The Giver — just to name a few. But the thing about these books and TV shows is that we usually don’t see much of the story about how the world arrived in such a dire situation. I wanted to do something different, where the focus was on what led to the collapse and on the collapse itself. So I decided to write the story of the fall of the United States.

I was also inspired to write the trilogy by watching the news, so much of it bad. I think many Americans are frustrated with a political system that seems to celebrate arrogant, divisive partisan politics more than it seeks to work toward compromise and solving our collective problems. I think many believe that if they can only help their party to defeat the other, then America might be saved, but I’ve come to believe that this rivalry, the divide itself, is America’s biggest problem. I’ve written Divided We Fall and Burning Nation to show what happens when the bitterness over that divide is carried out to its most disastrous potential.

CB: Tell me about the kind of kid you think Burning Nation will appeal to the most.

TR: When I began writing the trilogy, I thought that most of my readers would be high school students. However, I have received letters from readers as young as ten years old and e-mails from readers in their forties or fifties. I’ve heard from girls as well as boys. Veterans. Children of veterans. Teachers and librarians.

Burning Nation maintains an exploration of a lot of the socio-political issues in Divided We Fall, but it cranks up the action even more and runs the protagonist PFC Daniel Wright and his friends through even harder circumstances.

When I was a combat engineer in the Army National Guard, I learned a lot about weapons and explosives. I brought that knowledge to my work during my year in the war in Afghanistan, and now, I’ve used it to bring authenticity and visceral details to this trilogy. So I’d say that readers who are interested in action or military stories would enjoy Burning Nation.

But Burning Nation isn’t merely an action story. As a veteran who is writing war stories marketed toward younger readers, I am acutely aware of my responsibility to avoid glorifying war or violence. I try to be as honest as I can about war and its effects on the soldiers and civilians trapped in the middle of it. We Americans are used to thinking of war as something we’re rather distanced from, even though we’ve been at war now for over a decade. Divided We Fall and Burning Nation bring a recognizable near-future war to our back yards.

It’s an action story, a war story, but it’s a thinking-reader’s war story, a cautionary tale for us all, and a reminder of the need to get better at working together to overcome our shared problems and to bring unity to our country.

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20. Bartography Express for January 2015, featuring Trent Reedy’s Burning Nation

This month, one subscriber to my Bartography Express newsletter will win a copy of Burning Nation (Scholastic), the second book in Trent Reedy’s Divided We Fall YA trilogy

If you’re not already receiving Bartography Express, click the image below for a look. If you like what you see, click “Join” in the bottom right corner, and you’ll be in the running for the giveaway at the end of this week.

20150122 Bartography Express

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21. Five answers about The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch

John Roy Lynch final cover

Eerdlings, the nifty new blog from Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, asked me to answer a few questions about my upcoming book with Don Tate, The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch.

So, if you want to know the two reasons why January 16, 2007 was a momentous day for this project, have a look!

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22. A little John Roy Lynch, and a lot of Poet

Don TateFor a generous glimpse of the art from Don Tate’s upcoming book Poet: The Remarkable Story of George Moses Horton of Chapel Hill, as well as from our collaboration The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch, head on over to Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast.

Don’s been my friend for many years, but I learned a lot about him from his interview with Jules, and now I like him better than ever.

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23. Presentations come, and presentations go

The presentation that yielded these thank-you notes went over well. I think I'll keep it.

The presentation that yielded these notes went over well. I think I’ll keep it.

I’ve updated the list of presentations I offer when I visit professional conferences, schools and libraries, writing workshops, book festivals, etc.

So, if you’ve seen me in action before and now wonder “Does he still offer that one?” or “Does he have anything new?” or “Good heavens, is he STILL talking about that?” — well, now you’ve got your answer.

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24. Bartography on Pinterest

Pinterest_Badge_RedJust a reminder, for those of you on Pinterest, that I’ve got pages there for each of my books:

The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch
Attack! Boss! Cheat Code! A Gamer’s Alphabet
Can I See Your I.D.? True Stories of False Identities
Shark Vs. Train
The Day-Glo Brothers

You can also see which books I’ll be giving away in coming months to Bartography Express subscribers (if you liked Lynda Mullaly Hunt’s One for the Murphys, you’ll love the February giveaway!), as well as images from my school visits and other appearances.

And you guys, the art I’ve seen from Cathy Gendron for our fall 2015 book, ‘The Nutcracker’ Comes to America: How Three Ballet-Loving Brothers Created a Holiday Tradition, is flat-out gorgeous. I can’t wait to start pinning images from that, so keep an eye out, OK?

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25. Comment on Mayes’ days by Chris Barton

Gina and Steve, I’ve done my best to get word to Robbie about your kind comments. He so clearly made a great impression on many of us during his time in publishing.

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