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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: book fairs, Most Recent at Top [Help]
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1. Bridging Stories and Communities: The Harlem Book Fair

summer internPia Ceres is LEE & LOW’s summer intern. She is a recipient of the We Need Diverse Books Internship Program grant. She’s a rising senior at Brown University, where she studies Education & Comparative Literature, with a focus in French literature. When she’s not reading, you can find her watching classic horror movies from under a blanket, strumming pop songs on her ukulele, and listening to her grandparents’ stories about the Philippines. In this blog post, she talks about her first book fair with LEE & LOW BOOKS.

By morning, a sticky summer swelter had set in, but the anticipation was unmistakable, electric in the air. They would be coming soon. Across two blocks, along 135th Street and Malcolm X Boulevard, booksellers, authors, and representatives from nonprofits fussed with tents and paraphernalia. Somewhere I couldn’t see, a live jazz band began to practice; its strident trumpet blared the beginning of a celebration. In moments, the hot asphalt would be teeming with families and lovers of literature from around the country gathering for the Harlem Book Fair.

The Harlem Book Fair is the largest African-American book fair in the country. With the aim of celebrating literacy within the Black community, the fair, held annually, offers a full day of presentations and rows of exhibition booths. Although it kicked off its 18th successful year last Saturday, this was my very first time participating in a book fair. Helping Keilin and Jalissa represent LEE & LOW and sell some of our books, I was open to every possibility.

The challenge came early on: Someone asked me to find a book for her niece, then added, “She hates reading.” Yikes. Sounds like a tall order, but not surprising. Most of the educators and families who stopped by our booth were concerned that their kids didn’t see themselves in the books assigned at school. It reminded me of when I was a kid and had to read about primarily white boys and the wilderness or dogs or something. For this woman, I suggested The Hula-Hoopin’ Queen. Maybe, I hoped, this would be the book that would start to change things.

At a book fair, one sees firsthand that books, particularly children’s books, are a meaningful part of relationships – an aunt wishing her niece a story that reflects her. I spoke with a dad who wanted an exciting bedtime story; a soon-to-be teacher, eager to fill her first classroom with books as diverse as her students; a mom who wanted to share her native language, and her young daughter who wanted to read it. As I listened to people’s requests, the book fair revealed a striking truth: For a lot of folks, books are expressions of love.harlem book fair

Of course, the day ended with a sudden and cinematic downpour, with jabs of wind that caused our white tent to take to the air like a storm-battered sail and had Keilin, Jalissa, and I drenched, scrambling to protect the books! Because if any day reminded us that books are precious, it was this one.

If books bridge worlds, then book fairs are a space for bridging those connections. The Harlem Book Fair allows diverse stories to come into people’s hands and helps create a world-full of readers – reflected, interconnected, loving and loved.

 

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2. You shall ride eternal. Shiny, and chrome….New York Antiquarian Book Fair 2016 closing arguments

book-of-eli-quote

Part of the experience of a book fair, and not one overly discussed for a reason, are the partnerships and the collaborative aspects of the book trade. You don’t necessarily have to go at this alone. Your comrades have your back (or your spine, [excruciating pun intended] which plays out when scouting or acquiring other material to add to the overall inventory.  How many times have you heard, “Oh, X, would love/need this!?” If you are willing and able, then serendipity has its moments, in addition to critical partnerships.

It was excellent for me to work along side Brian Cassidy, veteran bookseller and long-time Lux Mentis booth partner; Michael Laird, newly discovered witchcraft buddy; book goddess, Kara Accettola; the adorable and sharp, Jonathan Kearns; and equally as adorable and bright, Simon Beattie. I would also like to recognize, the entire Pirages team [good lord, ya’ll need a drink], Ed Sanders and Travis Low [horns up], Fuchsia Voremberg [hugs], Tom Congalton, and Ashley Wildes. I think Ashley encompasses the entire fair sentiment in one image:

Ashley diffuses the situation with mermaid-like qualities, as Kim wishes Ian to contract mind fleas.

Ashley diffuses the situation with mermaid-like qualities, as Kim wishes Ian to contract mind fleas. [Note: drinks handled with appropriate care]

It would be remiss to not recognize some of the book artists and book binders, very important, as representing strong work is a pleasure and a privilege. Both Colin Urbina and Erin Fletcher make overwhelmingly inspiring work, glad to have them in both physical form and function appearing in New York; Michael Kuch, again mind-blowing work; Peter Bogardus; Russell Maret, exceptional new work; Nancy Loeber, representing both fairs [shadow fair]; Christina Amato; Leslie Gerry; Mindy Belloff; María Verónica San Martín; Peter Koch; newly acquired book artist Alexandra Janezic; and of course, the dynamic duo of Marshall Weber and Felice Tebbe at Booklyn. [Do I sound like a broken record or an Oscar speech? geez.]

So, what’s next? Fortunately, we were able to jump over to the “shadow” shows both uptown and across the street to visit both book artists and snap up some “brutally cool” items for down the road to make appearances in iterations of catalog lists forthcoming.  What did strike our fancy this year? A selection of things that caught our eye:

Book of Rates Vermeil, Francois Michel. Trial of an Accused Transsexual in 18th-century France, Mémoire pour Anne Grandjean.... White Stuff, Patti Smith fanzine, 1977-1978 Honey, that Ain't No Romance, Iggy Pop fanzine Edict Regulating Prices for Executions and also for Salaries of Hangmen, 1712 Plethora of dirty pulps and bondage rags Love Poems: Homage to Housman by Samuel M. Steward, queer poet and tattoo artist Photographs of Samuel M. Steward, including images of a young Steward and one photograph with Tom of Finland Kill Me, art book (zine) by Paul Robinson of the Diodes, 1978 Essay Upon Wind, one of 12 copies printed on vellum, c. 1785 Janezic, Alexandra. "Punctuated Weaving" artist book, 2015 Walter L. Main Circus promotional poster

 

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3. Survival and Spectacle: Highlights from New York Antiquarian Book Fair 2016

No. We're good. We fang it!

No. We’re good. We fang it!

Every fair set-up and break down is a challenge, an adventure, and a chore. In the art world, “installation” is where the vision becomes cemented for the curator or artist.  Without being to fussy, installation at a book fair is similar, in that, a bookseller has the option to design visual gestalt with a display, to tell a story, or even to offend, dazzle, and educate. With that, part of the concept is driving an aesthetic attachment for a potential person to immediately hone in on something they absolutely desire to acquire for personal or pragmatic reasons.

Again, the thematic diatribe of Lux Mentis to “mock conventionalism” emerges case by case with groupings of “sex, death, and devil,” artist’s books, fine press, esoterica, and other bits of seemingly harmless or seemingly objectionable material. The process can sort of look like this:

NYBFbefore NYBFduring NYBFafter

When it is all said and done, you can hear Ian blather on in a nice little package with sound and image! Useful words and phrases to add to your regularly rotated vocabulary: “brutally cool” “spectacular” “just exquisite” “interesting bits” “fabulous” “astounding”. You can also learn how to properly stroke your beard.

What is important to note is while we go gangbusters with stuff, selection is important, as well as time management, you can fiddle around with one shelf for hours, believe me.  That being said, all in all, installation was smooth and considerate, every shelf both notes and confronts a narrative.  See for yourself.

Thunderbook Front display case with miniatures, artist's books, and the illustrious "Thunderbook Fine bindings (top) and 'challenging' perspective material, artist's books, including Leslie Gerry Gisela and Dangerous Women Punk rock Miniatures Sex, gender, and sexuality Occult and Death Gallery of artist's books

 

Next time: Gettin’ granular, or how to give good looks and books.

 

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4. I’m in an Empire State of Mind*

Like my comrade, the illustrious scribe of Bibliodeviant, I will also traipse through a serial recount of *my* first New York ABAA Book Fair in a similar fashion and how the sideshow, that is Lux Mentis, embellishes the landscape of the book trade and book collecting like the carnival we seem to entertain. Inspired, though by the words of Mr. Kearns, I would like to address the idea of bookselling as identity and image briefly.

St. Catherine of Alexandria

Girl, get a grip

After working over 20 years in library land and visual arts culture, I’ve worn several hats. However, not just one will underscore my identity, which to some I apparently wear openly and ripe for criticism. We can model ourselves in such a way that the world might fantasize about librarians in that perverse and/or cryptic and ‘monkish’ kind of way, or we can shine bright like a diamond* with a freak flag of superb owning up to our singular individuality, our own individual prowess to flourish and thrive in this profession.

tumblr_lvkaagiufj1r6msmho1_500-1

Basically, the same perception applies to hungry, curious, and experienced visitors at your book fair booth, in your house, your library, your bookshops. You never know what they might bring to the table. Same goes for your fellow booksellers. So, regardless if you have marked skin, blue hair, fancy tweeds, tortoise shell glasses or honest awkwardness, we corral a fierce sense of advocacy for printed and written matter that gives these manifestations of glory multi-generational lives that are passed through a series of hands, hearts, and minds. We have the opportunity to support and create libraries, research, passions, and histories for people, otherwise drowning in the mediocrity in the world. We will find success in those connections, rather than in a litany of judgment based on gender, appearance, and other personal identities.

I could further throw a tirade of shade*, but rather, let’s tunnel into the rabbit hole of New York. As others have mentioned, New York is on fire with grit and action, unlike any other metropolitan in the US, however like I mentioned in a previous blog, the city is a hotbed for bibliophilic intellectualism and performative ingenuity. The New York Antiquarian Book Fair is a force and now I know compared to the somewhat laissez-faire attitude of California (as least Pasadena), I understand why it operates as such. The Park Armory building is a gorgeous architectural example of late 19th century Gothic revival design suitably fitting to encase a labyrinthine maze of booksellers. I felt sort of enveloped in a skeletal shell, ironically housing the biblio-madness for the next few days.

Before set-up started on Wednesday, I can’t slide by without saluting a few notable events and people. Through a blizzard (ha!), we made our way through the quiet snow of Massachusetts to the insanely talented home of Michael Kuch, artist, to pick up the latest iteration of work debuting at the fair [images to follow]. We also lavished in the presence of Marvin Taylor and Charlotte Priddle at the Fales Library & Special Collections, NYU where I pawed around the stacks a bit, as well. Lastly, I would be lying if I wasn’t fidgeting like a 3 year old needing to pee, because I was able to see the Mystery and Benevolence exhibit at the American Folk Art Museum. Get your secret handshake on.

IMG_2511 IMG_2508 IMG_2506 IMG_2509 IMG_2514 IMG_2513 IMG_2507 AFAM

To be continued…[Next up, witness me!*]

*If any of you get my pop culture references, you are Gucci. Yes, I am a metalhead who listens to Ri-Ri.

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5. Booth Tour of the 2016 NYC ABAA Book Fair

We are pleased to offer a (reasonably) brief tour of our booth at the 2015 ABAA book fair. It was a great weekend (report and images to follow).

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6. Good News When You Least Expect It...


Life is a constant roller coaster and I'm blown away by two exciting offers this week...


The first offer through the Greenwich Academy via Izabela O'Brien, parent volunteer chairing the Greenwich Academy book fair on April 12, 2015. They have asked me to appear as their guest author.

The second offer...


I reached out to the Collingswood Book Festival after participating as an exhibitor October 11, 2014 as to their application process to be an invited/featured author for their 13th book festival to be held October 3, 2015. After receiving the details, I eagerly filled out the application and low and behold I heard from the Author Selection Committee and I am now a confirmed featured author.

Please know I'm not bragging, I'm just sharing how networking and assisting others on their road to publication and beyond is essential in getting your name out there! I implore you to do the same, you never know what doors will open.

Here's to your inspiration!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Best wishes,
Donna M. McDine
Multi Award-winning Children's Author

Ignite curiosity in your child through reading!

Connect with

A Sandy Grave ~ January 2014 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ 2014 Purple Dragonfly 1st Place Picture Books 6+, Story Monster Approved, Beach Book Festival Honorable Mention 2014, Reader's Favorite Five Star Review

Powder Monkey ~ May 2013 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ Story Monster Approved and Reader's Favorite Five Star Review

Hockey Agony ~ January 2013 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ New England Book Festival Honorable Mention 2014 Story Monster Approved and Reader's Favorite Five Star Review

The Golden Pathway ~ August 2010 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ Literary Classics Silver Award and Seal of Approval, Readers Favorite 2012 International Book Awards Honorable Mention and Dan Poynter's Global e-Book Awards Finalist

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7. Books and stuff

It’s that time of year again. Book fair time.

“Miss Hewes! Look at the figurines I bought! Aren’t the polar bear and the penguin so cute?”

I’ll be honest – yes, little rubberized figurines in the likenesses of polar bears are cute. I understand the appeal of such items to young children. However, I am less sure that these proclamations should follow a trip to our school’s book fair.

Without fail, however, my students bound into my room following their trip to the library (home base of our commercial book fair) eager to show off their novelty erasers, pencils, figurines, and posters.

“Those are nice,” I always reply. “But what books did you see that excited you? What book did you choose to take home with you?”

Then, my students usually get quiet. “Well, I couldn’t get this eraser shaped like a cell phone and a book. I ran out of money.”

And there’s the rub. At the school where I teach, the bi-annual book fair is a big deal. My students get all jazzed up when they see the rolling metal carts and book boxes start to accumulate in our hallway prior to one of the sales. Their parents, many of whom feel a financial crunch, work hard to ensure that their children have a small amount of money to spend at the book fair. And yet, despite this excitement and noble intentions, too many students are leaving my school’s book fair with nothing but cell phone erasers and penguin figurines.

Despite the potential arguments that could be raised about school-sanctioned consumerism and the stress that this event may cause for already cash-strapped families, I am generally in favor of the book fair. I teach in a very rural area and the book fair is one of the only affordable alternatives to purchasing books at Walmart or the grocery store — and the titles available there are likely not the ones receiving rave reviews from The Horn Book.

This is not to say, however, that the offerings at the book fair are necessarily any better than those at Walmart. Publishers like Scholastic do publish extraordinarily rich, engaging, and substantial titles. But often, at our school’s book fair, even if kids look beyond the staggering assortment of novelties, their eyes land on a book about the latest pre-teen celebrity icon or the latest series that has more to do with the economics of churning out multiple volumes than about substance or quality.

I don’t think it has to be this way. Yes, commercial book fairs do raise money for schools, and yes, molded plastic does sell. But I think kids would still nag their parents to buy them things even if the book fair didn’t have the novelty items spilling over near the register. As educators, parents, and community members, we should demand more — particularly in communities where the budget for and access to books can restrict the quality of reading materials that kids have to explore.

I optimistically imagine a day when the engrossing and constructive books aren’t lurking in the shadows of a book fair and when the opportunities these events could provide are more fully leveraged to benefit children and their positive reading development.

 

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8. Bay Area Book Festival to Launch Next Year

A new book festival is launching next year in the San Francisco area called the Bay Area Book Festival.

Headed up by Cherilyn Parsons, the former director of development and strategic initiatives at the Center for Investigative Reporting, the festival will have a wide scope with content from Nobel laureate writers and the National Book Award winners to popular genre writers including science fiction and fantasy and romance authors. The festival will take place in the East Bay and all of the events will be located nearby so that attendees can walk.

Parsons told SF Gate that she expects the event to draw 100,000 attendees. ”Other cities around the world have big public, weekend, free book festivals that cover all different kinds of writing,” Parsons explained to the paper. “But the Bay Area, strangely, despite being a literary mecca, doesn’t have one of these. So I thought, it’s time someone starts one.”

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9. The Children’s Italian Book Fairs in the San Francisco Bay Area | October 2013

Every year Elisabetta Ponti organizes The Children's Italian Book Fairs in the Bay Area. Hundreds of Italian books for children (0 to 13 years old) selected from some of the most distinguished Italian publishers.

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10. Frankfurt--Day After And Then Some

STATUS: Went to Frankfurt with a cold. Had the cold during all of the Frankfurt Book Fair. Brought the cold home with me. Truly, I like to hang on to things.

What’s playing on the XM or iPod right now? SHE'S NO LADY by Lyle Lovett

I figured blog readers would get a kick out of this. Agents Agents! As far as the eye can see… Kind of like Water Water everywhere and not a drop to drink.


Jamie Ford, who was there at the Fair meeting with his many foreign publishers, said it looked like a sweat shop and wondered where the sewing machines were. Rather apt.

It's definitely not romantic in any way shape or form. Agents sit down with scouts, territory co-agents, and editors to highlight frontlist titles as well as nice selling backlist titles that are available for translation sales. It's not unusual for a rights person to have 12 to 18 appointments in a day, back-to-back, and in thirty minute intervals. Lunch is often optional.

And Frankfurt is not London, Paris, or Rome (not to offend any German blog readers!) but the downtown area is probably the least charming European city I've been to. I imagine outside of the city centre there are lots of nice spots but considering what was available within walking distance of the hotel, it was slim pickings.

To offset the rather bland Frankfurt, a day trip to Heidelberg was in order! From Left: Jamie Ford, Me, Luceinne Diver (also a client of mine) and Elaine Spencer of The Knight Agency.

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11. Frankfurt Book Fair - Day 1

STATUS: All last week I was knocked out of commission by a nasty head cold. Winter hasn't even begun. Like the overachiever I am, just getting it done early.

What’s playing on the XM or iPod right now? MR. JONES by Counting Crows

This week begins the madness that is the Frankfurt Book Fair and guess where yours truly happens to be.

For the last three years, I've made a point of attending each of the main book fairs: London, Bologna, and now Frankfurt. I have a foreign rights person so it's not imperative that I go specifically so you might be wondering why I pursued this goal.

You can't best support someone who is representing your authors until you've seen for yourself what the fairs are all about. It's helps significantly to prepare the rights and press sheets so that foreign editors can best utilize them if applicable to their markets.

Also, if an editor has bought a lot of your clients, nothing beats a face-to-face meeting simply to connect on a personal level.

For this year's fair, I have two authors with me: Gail Carriger and Jamie Ford. Both have sold tremendously abroad and have been bestsellers in several other countries besides the US.

So what does one do at Frankfurt? Lots and lots of meetings in the agents' centre which is about the size of two football fields. And I'm not exaggerating here.

The Fair is so big, it can literally take 30 minutes to walk from an appointment at one hall to another.

To put this in perspective, it only takes me 15 minutes to walk from my hotel to the Fair.

Tonight I attended two parties--one at the German publisher S. Fischer Verlag and the other held by Hachette at the Hessischer Hof.

The Hachette party was so packed, I literally walked in and had to stifle the urge to turn around and walk back out. Elbow to elbow. I thought the chances of my finding anyone for whom I might be looking would be slim but oddly enough, it worked.

The undefinable magic of Frankfurt.

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12. Guys Lit Wire Hosts Book Fair for Ballou High School

Guys Lit Wire (GLW) is currently hosting its annual book fair, helping Ballou Senior High School in Washington D.C. buy 900 books for its half-filled shelves.

Readers can contribute by buying books for the library through Powell’s Books. The video embedded above shows the actual library. The book fair runs until May 18th.

GLW  contributor Colleen Mondor explained in a post: “Ballou is very special to me as school librarian Melissa Jackson made such an eloquent case for her students’ need for more books. Her video, which shows so many empty shelves, really gave me reason to pause. There are probably more books in my house then Ballou has in this video and that is wrong in so many ways that I don’t even know where to begin. At the time the video was made early this year there were just over 1,150 books on the shelves at Ballou; there are over 1,200 students in the school. So there was barely one book for each student (the ALA standard is 11:1).”

 

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13. Scholastic Books - Shark vs. Train

I was browsing the Scholastic Book Fair at my grandson's school searching for something to suit his  energetic, enthusiastic, imaginative and self-confident four-year-old brother. I fondly call him "Full-throttle." The title and cover illustration of this book intrigued me. "That looks like something that might hold his interest for more than 45 seconds," I thought. So I thumbed through it. Then

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14. Spring 2011 Book Fairs and Book Festivals Authors & Book Lovers Should Attend

Guest Expert: Scott Lorenz

The winter and spring seasons are great times of the year for book fairs and festivals. Authors can combine a little travel with a little book marketing and book promotion. Book fairs are wonderful places to interact with fellow authors, publishers, network with book industry leaders, locate a book publicist or book editor, and learn what’s new in the marketplace.

The major book conferences and conventions involve travel expenses such as airlines and hotel lodging, and a week’s investment of your time. But book fairs can be found close to home, easily accessed by car and are often only one or two days. A typical regional book fair will have 1,000 or more attendees and 100 or more exhibitors, providing a realistic exposure of 300 visitors a day. Why would an author not want to spend a Saturday and Sunday within 100 miles of home to meet 600 readers or a reporter, editor or book reviewer?

Book fairs are often attended by best-selling authors who will be willing to spend time with you sharing tips on writing, on how to be successful, and advice on where to find the help you need. For more information about book marketing visit http://www.book-marketing-expert.com and for upcoming book events on C-SPAN2 visit: http://www.BookTV.org

Here’s a list of Winter/Spring book fairs and book festivals worthy of your attendance:

1. London Book Fair, www.londonbookfair.co.uk, April 11-13, 2011 Earls Court, London, global marketplace for sale and distribution of content across print, audio, TV, film and digital channels
2. Philadelphia Book Festival, libwww.freelibrary.org/bookfestival/ April 11-16, 2011, Parkway Central, Benjamin Franklin Parkway, attended by 35,000 and more than 50 authors, performers
3. 2011 Dayton Book Expo, Christian Writers Marketplace, www.Daytonbookexpo.com, April 30, 2011, Sinclair Community College, Dayton, Ohio, a great opportunity for authors of books on Christian topics.
4. Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, www.latimes.com/extras/festivalofbooks/ a big festival attracting 150,000 readers, April 30-May 1, 2011
5. South Carolina Book Festival, www.scbookfestival.org/, May 14-15, 2011, Colombia Metropolitan Convention Center, Columbia, SC, more than 6000 attend
6. BookExpo America, www.bookexpoamerica.com, May 23-26, 2011, Jacob Javits Center, NYC, the premier North American publishing event of the year

The bottom line: Make it a priority to visit a book fair in the coming weeks and months. You’ll be glad you did!


Book publicist

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15. Scholastic Books - Rhyming Dust Bunnies

Oh, this book is way too funny! Kindergartners and first graders love this one, I'm sure. I bought Rhyming Dust Bunnies by Jan Thomas for my grandson. But I think I'm going to tuck it away on my own bookshelf and forget to send it home with him! The illustrations are bold, graphic, energetic and hilarious. The 221 words of text be-bop around the four expressive dust bunnies. The two components

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16. Julianne Moore, Jim Lehrer & Mindy Kaling to Host Book Expo America Breakfasts

Oscar-nominated actress Julianne Moore, Emmy-nominated comedian Mindy Kaling, and journalist Jim Lehrer will host breakfast events at this year’s Book Expo America.

Moore, author of picture book Freckleface Strawberry, will preside over the children’s writers’ breakfast. Kaling (a writer at The Office)  and Lehrer (author of both fiction and nonfiction) will host two adult writers’ breakfasts.

Here’s more from the press release: “The other speakers who will be joining the hosts for these popular events include Sarah Dessen, Roger Ebert, Anne Enright, Jefferey Eugenides, Charlaine Harris, Kevin Henkes, Diane Keaton, Erik Larson, and Brian Selznick.  In addition, Katherine Paterson, who is the current Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, will be saying a few words at the Children’s Breakfast on behalf of the Children’s Book Council.”

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17. Madeline Stars in L.A. Times Festival of Books Artwork

Children’s book character Madeline stars in this year’s L.A. Times’ Festival of Books artwork. The illustration celebrates the new book, Madeline at the White House by John Bemelmans Marciano.

Marciano is the grandson of original Madeline author/illustrator, Ludwig Bemelmans. Jacket Copy reports: “He never met his grandfather, but he uses the same materials Bemelmans did, including gouache and ‘pens that you have to dip in ink.’ Ludwig Bemelmans started with a pencil sketch and then did an ink drawing over that — as does Marciano.”

In this video, the author explains that the new book was inspired by his grandfather’s friendship with former First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy. In total, Marciano has published five Madeline titles, continuing the six-book series created by his grandfather. Marciano has also written Bemelmans: The Life and Art of Madeline’s Creator and stand-alone titles like Harold’s Tail and There’s a Dolphin in the Grand Canal.

continued…

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18. Cape Town Book Fair Canceled Until 2012

There will be no Cape Town Book Fair this year. The organizers explained in a website announcement: “The reason for this new move is that publishers in South Africa have voiced their support for a bi-annual Fair, starting in 2012.”

Last year, the event was held at the Cape Town International Conference Centre (CTICC). It boasted over 240 events, 273 exhibitors, and 33,488 visitors. The next festival is scheduled for June 12th-14th, 2012.

In addition, iafrica.com theorized that the organizer scrapped the event because only four out of South Africa’s “Big Six” publishers  (NB, Jonathan Ball, Jacana, and Pan Macmillan) participated in the 2010 book fair.

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19. Bologna Children’s Book Fair Pics (Take 2)

STATUS: Fighting the flu. Kristin—0 Flu—10 I’m getting my you-know-what kicked.

What’s playing on the iPod right now? NOTION by Kings of Leon

As you can imagine, the first week back in the office after being gone for 2 weeks is a bit chaotic. In fact, today I didn’t even make it there thanks to being sick. I really had no desire to pass this lovely illness on to Anita or Sara. If I don’t have a fever tomorrow, maybe I’ll go in but I’m thinking it will be more like Wednesday.

As promised (since blogger is no longer acting up) I can finally share pics from the Bologna Children’s Book Fair so you can get a visual—a little snippet of what it was like to be there. Besides, this is all my brain is capable of doing at the moment.


Here I am sitting at my table in the Agents Center. Behind me is Riley Ellis from 20th Century Fox Studios.


Out to dinner. Author and Agent comraderie! Starting from left: me, clients Sarah Rees Brennan and Ally Carter. Next to Ally is Cassandra Clare's husband Josh, Cassie Clare, Maureen Johnson and her agent Kate Testerman. Cassie's agent Barry Goldblatt is taking the picture.


Jamie Ford's HOTEL ON THE CORNER OF BITTER AND SWEET, an Italian bestseller, in the front window of the main bookstore in Bologna. That was so cool to see in person.



In the Agents Centre. From left: me, Irene Calpe of Versatil Spain. Next to her is Sarah Rees Brennan. Irene is Sarah's Spanish editor for THE DEMON'S LEXICON. Standing next to her is Consuela, Editorial Director of Versatil.

More pics tomorrow!
9 Comments on Bologna Children’s Book Fair Pics (Take 2), last added: 4/7/2010
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20. Update Potpourri

STATUS: Today I worked on finishing a contract (pre-new boilerplates) which did conclude. I really tackled emails in my inbox as well. Now I just have to tackle the slew of royalty statements we get in April.

What’s playing on the XM or iPod right now? GREETINGS TO THE NEW BRUNETTE by Billy Brag

Today is a little potpourri of things.

1. Penguin Australia issued a more formal apology for Cookbook misprint. Sounds like a PR person got a hold of the situation. Grin.

2. Foreign rights co-agent did not make it to London (as you probably have already guessed). On the upside, perhaps more folks will come to BEA at the end of May. As you can imagine, reports from the LBF floor have been quiet. Great for the folks who did make it there though. Will the lack of a robust LBF deter foreign sales? Well, nothing beats conveying enthusiasm for a title in person so that’s the downside for sure. On the whole, I don’t think so. It will be hard to have the “big book of the fair” but I imagine most sales will get done via email and phone.

I don’t envy their journey home…

3. Business has resumed in Poland. We’ve been careful about waiting but today we got emails from folks in that territory so we felt comfortable resuming communication, negotiations, etc.

4. In watching Deal Lunch for the last couple of months, I’m starting to see quite a few more sales listed than I have in the past months. This is a good sign as I take it to mean that editors are starting to get back to buying.

6 Comments on Update Potpourri, last added: 4/21/2010
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21. The LA Times Book Fest

by Chasya

It brings us no greater pleasure than when we see tangible examples that prove that the bookpocalypse that is constantly being predicted is not imminent. Hence my joy at this wonderful PW article citing that this weekend’s Los Angeles Times Festival of Books was a great success that drew record crowds of 130,000 attendees. Nice going LA! The Huffington Post has a good recap of the events--uh, including a seemingly unrelated Tetris flash mob at the festival. But who am I to complain? I love a good flash mob almost as much as I love Tetris.

What’s your favorite thing about book fairs, readers? Aside from mingling with like-minded book lovers, of course!

4 Comments on The LA Times Book Fest, last added: 4/27/2010
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22. Book Expo 2010

STATUS: Ready to shut it down for the night.

What’s playing on the iPod right now? YOU AIN’T THINKING (ABOUT ME) by Sonia Dada

You guys can’t possibly have missed that Book Expo is next week in New York. Yes, I’ll be heading there on Sunday. Y’all know what this means. Spotty blogging unless they’ve got good free wireless from the fair floor.

I’ll have my netbook handy just in case so I can blog at a moment’s notice.

So you tell me, what do you want your intrepid literary agent blogger to report from the floor?

I’ll try and accommodate.

21 Comments on Book Expo 2010, last added: 5/23/2010
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23. More Than 200 Book Bloggers to Read

blogger con.jpg

When it comes to creating a buzz about books, book bloggers are definitely an appreciated group within the industry. Immediately after BEA 2010, the first Book Bloggers Convention took place in New York City's Javits Center.

As a wonderful resource for publicists, agents, and authors, the convention site offers a directory with all the book bloggers who attended as well as links to their respective blogs. Follow this link to explore the list.

The event boasted an attendance of almost 250 book bloggers who heard speakers discuss topics such as ethical professionalism, marketing, the author-blogger relationship, and a keynote speech given by Maureen Johnson.

(Via Publishers Weekly)

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24. September 2010: KidLit Events in Southern California

Support Your Fellow Kidlit Authors and Illustrators! Event, readings, and signings in Southern California for the month of September are as follows:

SEPTEMBER KIDLIT EVENTS:

Thursday, Sept 9th

7 pm: Kathy Charles presents and signs John Belushi is Dead at Book Soup 8818 Sunset Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90096  Phone: (310) 659 3110

Friday, Sept 1oth

4 pm: Nancy Holder presents and signs her new YA Fantasy Crusade at Mrs. Nelson’s Toy and Book Shop located at 1030 Bonita Avenue, La Verne, CA 91750.

Saturday, Sept 11th

10:30 am: Naomi Howland reads from and signs Princess Says Goodnight at Vroman’s Bookstore, 695 E. Colorado Blvd, Pasadena, California 91101

11 am: Lee Wind, M.Ed. present SMASHING STEREOTYPES! Writing Workshop with author Francesca Lia Block at Book Soup 8818 Sunset Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90096 Phone: (310) 659 3110.

11 am: Jamie Lee Curtis signs her newest book My Mommy Hung the Moon at A Whale of a Tale Bookstore at 4199 Campus Drive Suite A, Irvine, CA 92612.

Thursday, Sept 16th

4 pm: Brian Lies shares his children’s book Bats at the Ballgame at Mrs. Nelson’s Toy and Book Shop located at 1030 Bonita Avenue, La Verne, CA 91750.

Friday, Sept 17th

6:30 pm: Vroman’s Young Adult Book Group discusses The Looking Glass Wars by Frank Beddor at Vroman’s Hastings Ranch 3729 E. Foothill Blvd, Pasadena, California 91107

Monday, Sept 20th

4 pm: Adam Jay Epstine and Andrew Jacobson share their book The Familiars at A Whale of a Tale Bookstore at 4199 Campus Drive Suite A, Irvine, CA 92612.

4 pm: Jennifer Fosberry reads and signs her picture book My Name is Not Isabella at Mrs. Nelson’s Toy and Book Shop located at 1030 Bonita Avenue, La Verne, CA 91750.

Thursday, Sept 23rd

10:30 am: Sara Penny Packer and Marla Frazee read and sign the new book in the Clementine Series at Children’s Book World at 10580 ½ W. Pico Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90064.

4:30 pm: Sara Penny Packer and Marla Frazee read and sign the new book in the Clementine Series at A Whale of a Tale Bookstore at 4199 Campus Drive Suite A, Irvine, CA 92612.

Saturday, Sept 25th

11 am: Jamie Lee Curt

0 Comments on September 2010: KidLit Events in Southern California as of 9/10/2010 12:38:00 AM
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25. George W. Bush to Open Miami Book Fair; Tickets Cost $40

bushbook.jpgAccording to Book Signing Central, former President George W. Bush will make an appearance on November 11th at the National Museum of the US Air Force. Next, Bush will open the Miami Book Fair on November 14th.

The Washington Post reports: “Bush is scheduled to speak at the 27th annual Miami Book Fair International, which runs from Nov. 14-21. The former president will present his memoir ‘Decision Points,’ on Nov. 14 at 4 p.m. Book fair organizers told The Associated Press that tickets to Bush’s presentation are $40. That includes a presigned copy of the book.”

The Drudge Report revealed a few passages from the Bush memoir last week. Matt Lauer will be airing an interview with Bush on November 8th and Oprah Winfrey will interview the former President the next day. (Via Huffington Post)

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