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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Kickstarter, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 220
1. B is for Bicycle Picture Book Featured On Kickstarter

Scott and Jannine Fitzgerald hopes to raise $15,000 for B is for Bicycle. With this picture book, they want to share their knowledge about the benefits of a cycling lifestyle.

The funds will be used to cover the costs of hiring an illustrator, printing, and shipping. We’ve embedded a video about the project above; learn more from the Kickstarter page:

“With B is for Bicycle, we have created characters who have found the tremendous benefits of cycling: health, freedom, independence, self-reliance, self-confidence, and environmental stewardship. We want parents and children to fall in love with these characters and learn more about what makes bicycles so special.”

Welcome to our Kickstarter Publishing Project of the Week, a feature exploring how authors and publishers are using the fundraising site to raise money for book projects. If you want to start your own project, check out How To Use Kickstarter to Fund Your Publishing Project.

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2. Back This: ‘Moonshot’ – The Indigenous Comics Collection from Alternative History

by Zachary Clemente

moonshot1 Back This: Moonshot   The Indigenous Comics Collection from Alternative History

Original painting by Stephen Gladue.

Kickstarter has been the way for me to find new comic projects and boy am I glad to have come across this project. Moonshot from Alternative History Comics and edited by Hope Nicholson, is a 200 page collection of short stories from Indigenous creators across North America showcasing the rich heritage and identity of First Nations, Inuit, and Metis storytelling. Comics fan have been advocating for unique voices and creators in comics; now is a great time to show your support and back this project!

Here are some of the fantastic creators in Moonshot:

Claude St-Aubin (R.E.B.E.L.S., Green Lantern, Captain Canuck), Jeffery Veregge (G.I. Joe, Judge Dredd), Stephen Gladue (MOONSHOT cover artist), Haiwei Hou (Two Brothers),Nicholas Burns (Arctic Comics, Curse of Chucky, Super Shamou), Scott B. Henderson (Man to Man, Tales from Big Spirit), Jon Proudstar (Tribal Force), George Freeman (Captain Canuck, Aquaman, Batman), Mark Shainblum (Northguard, Corum: The Bull and The Spear),Elizabeth LaPensee (Survivance, The Nature of Snakes, Fala), Buffy Sainte-Marie (Fire & Fleet & Candlelight, Coincidence & Likely Stories), Richard Van Camp (Path of the Warrior, Kiss Me Deadly), Ryan Huna Smith (Tribal Force), David Robertson (The Evolution of Alice, Stone), Steve Sanderson (Darkness Calls, Journey of the Healer), Michael Yahgulanaas (RED), Michael Sheyahshe (Native Americans in Comic Books, Dark Owl), David Cutler (The Northern Guard), and more!

From the Kickstarter page:

Moonshot will be printed as a 200 page, full colour, high quality volume showcasing a wide variety of stories and artistic styles, highlighting the complex identity of indigenous culture from across North America. Most of the original stories created exclusively for this volume are between 5-10 pages, including pinup art and prose passages.

The traditional stories presented in Moonshot are with the permission from the elders in their respective communities, making this a truly genuine, never-before-seen publication!

moonshot2 Back This: Moonshot   The Indigenous Comics Collection from Alternative History

“Water Spirit” by Haiwei Hou.

Complete with exciting rewards, including beautiful stamps (mail from Canada only) from artist Jeffrey Veregge, prints, and a special hardcover edition, Moonshot is definitely a project to back, even if only to add to the growing part of your bookshelf for Kickstarted comics.

Take a look at MOONSHOT and find out more about Alternative History Comics.

0 Comments on Back This: ‘Moonshot’ – The Indigenous Comics Collection from Alternative History as of 12/12/2014 1:56:00 PM
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3. ‘The Story Project: West Coast’ Featured On Kickstarter

Cameron Murray hopes to raise $20,000 on Kickstarter for “The Story Project: West Coast.” Murray hopes to create a book inspired by the ongoing “Story Project.”

The money will be used to cover the costs of traveling and collecting the content from different contributors. We’ve embedded a video about the project above. Here’s more from the Kickstarter page:

“The Story Project: West Coast will feature stories of success, defeat, the highest of highs and the lowest of lows. This book will take the West Coast from a place or destination and turn it into a chronicle of those who inhabit it. This book will show you the downtrodden, beaten and broken and reveal to you how they became victors in their own way.”

(more…)

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4. Picture Book Starring Two Moms Featured On Kickstarter

Christy Tyner hopes to raise $13,000 on Kickstarter for a children’s book about a family with two mothers called Zak’s Safari. The funds will be used to cover the cost of printing, designing the artwork, and shipping.

The finished book will contain 34 pages of full-color illustrations. We’ve embedded a video about the project above. Here’s more from the Kickstarter page:

“When the rain foils Zak’s plan for a safari adventure, he invites the reader on a very special tour of his family instead. Zak shows us how his parents met, fell in love, and wanted more than anything to have a baby—so they decided to make one…It’s my hope that this book will provide a starting place for many future conversations with your kids about their donor and conception story.”

(more…)

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5. JImmy Palmiotti talks his new western Kickstarter Abbadon and working with Adaptive Studios

abbadon cover JImmy Palmiotti talks his new western Kickstarter Abbadon and working with Adaptive Studios

Kickstarter maestros Jimmy Palmiotti and Justin Gray of Paperfilms are at it again, this time with a Western, Abbadon, a tale of murder and mayhem  set in a town full of just about every vice you can imagine. As with previous projects, the book is being funded on Kickstarter, and as of this writing is a few thousand dollars from making its goal, with two weeks to go.

It’s only the latest in a series of successful crowdfunding ventures for the Paperfilms team—we spoke with Palmiotti previously about Sex and Violence Vol 2 here and Denver here. This one has a new wrinkle: A partnership with Adaptive Studios, a new company that rescues abandoned IP. Palmiotti graciously answered a few questions about the project and Adaptive for The Beat.

abbadon sample JImmy Palmiotti talks his new western Kickstarter Abbadon and working with Adaptive Studios

THE BEAT: Unlike some of your other Kickstarters this is an adaptation of an unproduced screenplay? Can you explain the origin of this tale?

JIMMY PALMIOTTI: Justin and I were introduced to the crew from Adaptive Studios by a mutual friend and I flew out to California to meet and talk to them about what our company, Paperfilms does, show them the books we have done and think about how we can work on some projects together. Since Paperfilms is just a couple of people, on our end, we can put books together, but we really don’t have time to do much else and we thought this partnership would be an interesting one since the crew at Adaptive specialize in a lot of multi media including publishing and have connections that we either don’t or don’t have the time to pursue since comics are a very labor intensive medium.

We spoke about a few projects while there, and one special one in particular; Abbadon. We read the screenplay a few times and after some back and forth, thought this would make a great graphic novel with us adding our take on it. Even more attractive to us was we felt it would be a great world building project since the bigger picture outside the graphic novel is the town itself and its place in history. So bottom line is we fell in love with the screenplay, did our take of it, built on it and then went out and put a team together to do the art on the graphic novel. What backers of the Kickstarter will get is a complete story, cover to cover, that has a bigger picture built into it that we hope to continue building on.

THE BEAT: Adaptive Studios’ business plan involving rescuing abandoned IP. What does that mean and how does your partnership work?

PALMIOTTI: Adaptive studios is rescuing some IP as well as working with us to create new properties and exciting graphic novels. With anything I do in this business, it’s all about relationships and partnering with like minds that share similar goals. We do it on every single project when working with artists and designers, creating what we think are the perfect representation of the story we are working on. When I met and spent some time with the crew at Adaptive, I found that we had a lot of the same goals in common which was really exciting. Adaptive studios totally respected with Justin and I did, and since they didn’t do graphic novels themselves, this partnership made sense to us. The best part of working with them is that they really love graphic storytelling and like us, have a love of all genres, so partnering with them has been a no brainer. On Abbadon, they brought the project to us and we fell in love with the idea and built on it. Our next project together will be an original idea we had that they liked, and we are going to see how we can make it all come together. Partnering with anyone doesn’t make sense unless the other person can bring something to the table and we think by working together, we can do some pretty amazing things. Abbadon is our first project and right now, the focus is on us to put together a stunning graphic novel and hopefully a successful Kickstarter campaign.

abbadon sample2 JImmy Palmiotti talks his new western Kickstarter Abbadon and working with Adaptive Studios

THE BEAT: You’ve returned to the Western genre, where you told so many great stories with Jonah Hex—did you feel you had more Western stories to tell?

PALMIOTTI: For me, it’s a genre that will never get old because the classic storytelling elements are always at play. A successful genre always has certain elements to it that have universal appeal, and with Abbadon, it’s no different. With Jonah Hex, we based all of our stories around a main character and it was a fun ride, but with something like Abbadon, we can tell a ton of stories based on the set up in this graphic novel we couldn’t tell in a book like Jonah because we were always dealing with content specific guidelines. The book was basically an all ages one and with Abbadon, we are telling a more adult story with elements that we would never get away with in a million years in Hex. So, yes, we have more stories to tell, but we want to tell them as we see them.

THE BEAT: I assume Abbadon refers to the town this is set in—some people may remember it as the name of an enigmatic character from Lost, but it’s also a Biblical term for a bottomless pit. How does the story reflect that?

PALMIOTTI: The town name is based on the biblical name and what it represents. The story and main character is the lawless town itself, and how the people in it are tempting fate on a daily basis. It’s a town where lust, greed, pride, and madness are right at home. It’s the most fun place you can go and it may also be the last place you visit as well, depending on your deepest desires. We took the worst of the classic old west and created a lawless sin city that the reader will find fascinating on many levels. The main story about a killer on the loose has everything to do with the story itself and the characters involved with the hunting of the madman. There is a lot of character development within the 64 pages and its something we have a lot of experience with .

THE BEAT: Reading the description on the Kickstarter page, this sounds like a western detective story. What else should readers know about what this story is about?

PALMIOTTI: The graphic novel Abbadon is set in the late 1880’s American West and features some of the most intriguing characters we have ever had the pleasure to work on. This is the story of an expanding wealthy city steeped in sin, where anything is possible if you have the money, influence and power to obtain it. Poised to become the next boomtown, Abbadon is plagued by a series of grisly murders heralding the arrival of U.S. Marshall Wes Garrett.

A legendary lawman, Garrett’s claim to fame is that he killed a notorious murderer, who cut a bloody swath across the country and left scores of mutilated men, women and children in his wake. Garrett’s arrival exposes the secret that Abbadon’s sheriff Colt Dixon has desperately been trying to conceal – the victims have all been mutilated the same way they were by the killer Garret stopped – a man some called a monster, but the papers called him Bloody Bill.

Garrett and Dixon reluctantly join forces and have opposing ways of dealing with the situation at hand as they try to uncover the killer’s identity in a town so full of corruption that everyone is a suspect. It really is a great story because the characters themselves are really interesting.

THE BEAT: You worked with Fabrizio Fiorentino on All Star Western—what does his art style bring to a Western comic?

abbadon annabelle JImmy Palmiotti talks his new western Kickstarter Abbadon and working with Adaptive Studios

PALMIOTTI: Fabrizio knows his stuff and his illustrations and character drawings add a real world quality to the story and his storytelling and figure work breath life into our script in a way that is both beautiful and horrifying at the same time because of the subject matter. When we worked with him on All Star it was towards the end of the run and we wanted to find another project to work on together and this one was the perfect fit. The really cool thing about the book is each page is better than the last.

THE BEAT: The Western genre is considered kind of passe now, but western movies were once as popular as superhero movies are now. Do you think there could ever be a comeback for Westerns or has the time passed?

PALMIOTTI: I think there is always room for a quality story to be told no matter what the genre. Westerns are no different. I find it funny that the American western is a lot more fascinating to people living outside the U.S. and still has strong appeal.

THE BEAT: Any new features of your Kickstarter model with this project? It’s already more than half funded after a few days with minimal promotion (Editors note:  , so you must be doing something right!

PALMIOTTI: We tried something different with this Kickstarter and focused on our usual backers first, and now we are spending the next few weeks going out and promoting the book to everyone. Only the people that have done Kickstarters realize just how much work it is to not only create the book, but getting a campaign together and especially promotion is a full time job. With our past Kickstarters, they always start out strong out of the gate and it’s the last few weeks we have to really focus on. The fun part of this process is that if we hit the number we are asking for, we can get really creative with the stretch goals and offer some really cool things to everyone backing Abbadon. At the end of the day, the art and story are the real sellers for this project and its up to us to deliver the goods. I am happiest to see that a lot of people are buying the digital version, which is only $5. I can see that these pledges are coming in from all over the world and I find this all to be really exciting. A big thanks for all of you that have supported this and past projects and to those new to Kickstarter, go have fun and explore the site. There are so many amazing comics and graphic novels to choose from.

1 Comments on JImmy Palmiotti talks his new western Kickstarter Abbadon and working with Adaptive Studios, last added: 12/2/2014
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6. Fairy Tale Art Book Featured On Kickstarter

Corwin Levi and Michelle Aldredge hope to raise $25,000.00 on Kickstarter for a book entitled Mirror Mirrored: A Contemporary Artists’ Edition of 25 Grimm’s Tales. 27 artists have signed on to contribute to this project.

The finished book will feature paintings, drawings, sculptures, and video pieces. We’ve embedded a video about the project above. Here’s more from the Kickstarter page:

“Many of us were introduced to these stories as children, but the Grimms’ tales were always meant for grownups. They remain powerful and relevant today because they continue to speak to us across generations and cultures. Much like the Biblical stories remimagined by artists like Giotto and Caravaggio, these fairy tales are perfect for reinterpretation.”

Welcome to our Kickstarter Publishing Project of the Week, a feature exploring how authors and publishers are using the fundraising site to raise money for book projects. If you want to start your own project, check out How To Use Kickstarter to Fund Your Publishing Project.

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7. And oops, a Tezuka Kickstarter that ran into problems

2014102304041 And oops, a Tezuka Kickstarter that ran into problems

Speaking of manga, as we just were, and Tezuka and Kickstarter as we were yesterday, here is another Tezuka Kickstarter project that has kind of gone into the “Kickstarter failure” file.

Last June something called Kansai Club Publishing raised more than $52,000 to publish an English language version of Tezuka’s The Crater. This is a short story collection, originally published from 1969-1970, that the Kickstarter page says is “the perfect blend of mystery, suspense, horror, fantasy and comedy. This is the first time that one of Tezuka-sensei’s short story collections will be published in English.”

Well that sounds great, and the money was raised. But then…this project fell into a crater. The usual foreign mailing costs hadn’t been factored in, and a rather glum update showed that this project was just too much for the organizer, Andrew Nevo, to handle:

Hello Everyone,
As some of you already know, the books are not yet ready to ship. We ran into a number of issues with the first batch that we received from the casebinder and needed to make various adjustments to the cover of the book and layout of a number of pages. The cover image is still the same and nothing was changed with the contents of the book, however, we felt that these adjustments were necessary in order to deliver the high quality book that we promised to all of our backers.
I wish that there was a way for us to provide everyone with additional compensation for the many delays that we have faced thus far in the book’s creation, however, there is little that we can do. We have already spent well over $30k and will spend another $40k plus on packaging, shipping and handling to send the books out to our Kickstarter backers only. All that we can do at this point is to make sure that our books come out perfectly and meet all of your expectations.
I cannot stress enough to everyone that we are making no money on this project. As everyone knows, this book was the first book that we have published and every step that we took to get to this point has been taken without guidance from industry experts. Sure, we started with extensive plans and deadlines for this book that we strongly felt could be met. However, our lack of knowledge and inexperience of the publishing industry has caused heavy delays throughout. Everyone who has worked on this book’s creation did so out of love for classic manga and without compensation. All help that we received came from people who work full-time jobs who took a few hours out of their weeks here and there to help bring this book to fruition.
I will be posting another update this week with the new dates for when the books will be shipped once we receive the updated schedule from our printer. I implore everyone to please stop contacting Tezuka Productions with angry complaints, sending me threatening emails and calling my house/cell phone. Tezuka Productions is just as angry with us as all of you are. I understand that your trust in us has been waning for some time and I simply cannot stress enough how sorry I am for not being able to provide everyone with a copy of the book on time. Please be just a little more patient.
This will likely be out first and last project. I hope that we have not discouraged others from trying their hands at legally printing classic manga themselves. If anyone believes that they can do a better job with future projects (as I’m sure many of you can) please feel free to reach out to me with any questions once this project has finished and I will be happy to help in any way I can. At least others who follow in our steps will not need to make the same mistakes that we made. Thank you again for your continual support, understanding and patience.

As of this date, no one has gotten books, and a 450 comment thread of complaints on the comment page has ensued. I’m not going to read through all of them, but the jist is mostly what I wrote above: the guy was in over his head. Here’s one representative one:

In all fairness this project did look amateur when it was live. I’m sure Osuma Tezuka’s name was the only reason this project got so much attention. This project, Kansai Club and Andrew all gave of signs that this project may be sketchy. I agree that Andrew mishandled pretty much everything on this project but we all took a chance and ignored the signs so now we are out our $ and this project is dead in the water. I wish there was more we could do to help remedy this but we will probably have to accept this as a failure.

Nevo hasn’t been heard from since June, and opinions seem to vary between being a conman and just naive. At any rate, we all know many Kickstarters do not come to fruition….and this seems to be another one. Caveat backer.

9 Comments on And oops, a Tezuka Kickstarter that ran into problems, last added: 10/25/2014
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8. And oops, a Tezuka Kickstarter that ran into problems

Speaking of manga, as we just were, and Tezuka and Kickstarter as we were yesterday, here is another Tezuka Kickstarter project that has kind of gone into the “Kickstarter failure” file. Last June something called Kansai Club Publishing raised more than $52,000 to publish an English language version of Tezuka’s The Crater. This is a…

And oops, a Tezuka Kickstarter that ran into problems was originally published on The Beat

0 Comments on And oops, a Tezuka Kickstarter that ran into problems as of 10/25/2014 12:39:00 AM
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9. Kickstarter alert: Comic Chameleon goes Android

3042d2a6613392420063e64fd4e44079 large Kickstarter alert: Comic Chameleon goes Android

While digital comics have changed the medium for good, individual comics apps haven’t really taken off as much as you might think. But there are some good ones out there: Comic Chameleon is a webcomic aggregator that actually picks up popular webcomics like  Questionable COntent, Girls with Slingshots and the like. And with permission. They’ve been around on iOS for a while, but now they’ve got a Kickstrter fo develop an Android version. It’s about halfway to a $13,000 goal, so it looks pretty solid to go all the way. But in a twist, some of the Kickstarter money will go to creators:

10% of the campaign will go to the artists of your choice

If you care about supporting independent webcomic artists as much as we do, you’ll be happy to know that when you contribute to our campaign, 10% of your pledge will go to up to 3 artists of your choice who publish with our app. We’ve always been as much about supporting artists as we’ve been about entertaining you, and our Kickstarter is no different.

We’ve talked to head guy Bersie Sou a few times and he seems like an on the level guy. This is another strong move.

How about it, Beaterati? Do you read comics on your phone via apps like Comic Chameleon? Why or why not?

 

0 Comments on Kickstarter alert: Comic Chameleon goes Android as of 10/29/2014 7:41:00 PM
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10. Activism-Themed Picture Book is Featured On Kickstarter

Jason and Danica Russell hope to raise $35,000 on Kickstarter for their alphabet-themed picture book, A is For Activism.

They hope to use this book to inspire their children and other readers to give back to the world. The funds will be used to cover the cost of self-publishing. We’ve embedded a video about the project above. Here’s more from the Kickstarter page:

“This book is not just for the earthy, the urban, the hipster, the hippy, the traveler, the militant extremist, the organic, the already active activists, but… for the cool kids all over the world, looking for a way to matter in that world. This book is for anyone who wants to get involved, and give back, but feels overwhelmed about where to start. We believe, it is never too soon for kids to start thinking about kindness, and pro-active problem solving in big and small ways.”

(more…)

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11. 2014 Halloween / Día de los Muertos

Denver's dead trick-n-treatin'. Students dead/Mexico rising from the dead? Not-voting suicide. Latino/a Rising will live.

The two holiday observances ironically portray death from two opposing perspectives, as Flo Hernandez-Ramos explained yesterday. Today's post relates to different news bits about "death." It ends with good news.

Denver's dead trick-n-treatin'

We're such a nation of scared sheep, I'm not surprised. For over a month the Colorado press and media, politicians, police and fear-mongers have been sensationalizing a Non-threat: "Denver Police Warn Parents About Pot-Laced Candy During Trick-or-Treat Season." Give me a break, with more than a Snickers.


We're a richly self-medicated nation, abusing a lot of prescription drugs. For decades we've had bathroom shelves of Oxycodone and Hydrocodone, given out for pain, so much that some is usually left over. Those are cheap compared to what THC spray costs. Were warnings issued every year about codone-laced candy?

When Denverites complained about the police's fear-mongering, the cops made a video posted on Facebook! They got slammed for that, too, but it was too late. At least in some Denver neighborhoods, on a Halloween night warmer than many previous, we had the lowest turnout ever. I'm guessing why. People in other areas report similar low turnouts, though not everywhere.

What will we hear next year to make us keep kids "safe" and inside and not walk the neighborhoods? ISIS terrorist sympathizers giving out hand-grenade treats! Disgruntled African immigrants giving out Ebola-licked gummy bears! Listen in to your fave shock-brained radio jock to find out. And be scared. It's as American as apple pie laced with GMOs. Oh, that's right--that's a real threat.


43 Students dead / Mexico rising from the dead?

U.S. drug habits and drug laws, gun mania and shipments into Mexico are now responsible for the likely murders of 43 students from Ayotzinapa Normal teacher-training school, missing since Sept. 26th. Big deal. Drugs, drug lords, killings, kidnappings, decapitations, "disappearings", cartel-bribed politicians, police and soldiers are always in the news. That's the Mexico the U.S. helped create and we're not surprised to hear more. However, this time, more than mierda has hit the fan.

"Most of the students were in their teens, in their first semester, and from impoverished communities that a majority of Mexicans identify with. The voids in Mexico’s government are all too obvious now. The country seems to be trembling at the edge of a terrible cataclysm or, for the hopeful, an inspiring transformation.

Mexico City rally for the 43
"There will be a march in Mexico City on Oct. 31st, coinciding with the Day of the Dead, and a “mega march” is scheduled for Nov. 5th, the day Mexico’s universities and colleges are planning a national strike. How many universities, colleges, and institutes will stick with it, and for how long? Will it spread to other areas of society, to the high schools, for example, as recent student strikes in Chile did, bringing about significant changes in the country? When masses of students boycott classes, it fills a country with an air of emergency and danger.
"What many Mexicans have been telling me is this: It’s either now or never."

Chicanos, mexicanos, latinos from the U.S. will no doubt support as they can whatever arises from the probable deaths of the 43. A new Revolución, across the river from El Paso, San Diego and Brownsville? It wouldn't be sci-fi or fantasy to imagine how our government, politicians and military would react to that. Or the gun lobby and industry, anti-immigrant racists and radio shock-jocks. I can hear them now. But for the rest of the country, it would be a true gauge of a "commitment" to democracy. Maybe they'd be spared the agony of having to decide. Yo espero que no.


Not-voting suicide

Earlier this year, I was among those advocating NOT voting. I was wrong. "We" are not united enough for that to have an effect. A discussion about when that time might come doesn't matter at the moment.

In the meantime, I'm voting because the Koch brothers, the anti-science crazies, the pro-oil conglomerates and the anti-immigrant racists are trying to elect their kind. They're even going after judgeships so justifiable claims against corporations will be more frequently overturned by "their" judges in the future.

Wherever I look on the Internet, TV or the press, and whoever I talk to, I could almost believe Armageddon is here, and Dystopia is our only future. Many people (including me) are negative, bitter, even reverting to political hermits. For that reason, I have been Facebooking the points below--one per day--trying to answer typical reasons you hear about why somebody won't vote next week. Use them, elaborate and improve them, if you want.

Many idiots, but make sure they're yours
#1 - Why you don't have to vote: Because you don't believe in the lesser of 2 evils.
What! Satan's not worse than a demon?
Frostbitten's not worse than shivering?
The 1% has robbed us of plenty. Did they steal your vote yet?

#2 - Why you don't have to vote: Because you think corporate ads already bought yours.
What! You think the 1% can control and even predict the future?
Hiding your head in the sand is smarter than sticking it in a voting booth?
Yes, the 1% has bribed most politicians. But you go alone into the voting booth.

#3 - Why you don't have to vote: Because the polls already canceled out your vote.
What! You think pulling one lever matters less than 1,000 opinions?
Ask the condemned man who he fears more--the hangman or the mob out front.
No, you might not have much to pick from. But which end of the rope do you prefer?

#4 - Why you don't have to vote:  Because there's only a few hours left, and you've got too much to do.
What! You don't want to spend a few minutes to avoid years of suffering?
Only terminal cancer patients (my apologies) could say voting does them no good.
No, you never have enough time. But voting could make the future, worth living.

#5 - Why you DON'T have to vote: Because you only care about who the President is, not a bunch of politicians.
What! You think if your President is elected, he/she will take care of everything?
Congress or your state legislature make the laws. The Prez and governors sign them, or not.
Your vote next week adds or detracts from the next President's or governor's power; that's the math.


Latino/a Rising will live!

I apologize to everyone who this week received too many bits from me about funding and supporting the anthology, Latino/a Rising, the first collection of U.S. Latino/a science fiction, fantasy, and other speculative genres. I do believe it is worth supporting and buying copies of once it's published. And I did have a personal stake in it, since a story of mine might be included. Even if it's not, I expect it to be a precursor of latino contributions to come. Echando más salsa en la literature Americana.

The good news is that the Kickstarter campaign surpassed its $10,000 goal but there's still time, until midnight, for you to kick in and get some cool perks, like autographed copies, T-shirts and swag.

I was just one of many who participated in reaching that goal. At times, I felt ambivalent: Why do we Latinos have to ask for money for a first-ever anthology when so many are produced in the U.S. every year? That's a because that I won't get into. What made me feel better were the non-latinos who responded, sometimes directly, letting me know they had contributed. It made me remember that we're not alone. There are some progressive Anglos, and others, out there. We just need to re-educate more of them.

Es todo, hoy, ni un treat más,
RudyG, a.k.a. Rudy Ch. Garcia, Chicano spec author with too much left-over candy

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12. Laura Numeroff Turns to Kickstarter For the ‘Work for Biscuits’ Series

Laura Numeroff, the author behind the New York Times bestselling picture book If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, hopes to raise $100,000 on Kickstarter for the Work for Biscuits book series. The first installment, Raising a Hero story stars an eager-to-please service puppy in-training named Max.

The funds will be used to cover the cost of printing the hardcover edition and developing an interactive eBook version that will be be accessible to readers with special hearing and mobility needs. Artist Lynn Munsinger has signed on to create the illustrations.

We’ve embedded a video about the project above. Here’s more from the Kickstarter page:

“Laura has always wanted to write this series. Her publishers turned down an early manuscript about a therapy dog, one suggesting it was more suitable for the ASPCA to publish. Laura soon discovered Kickstarter through a friend, Sean Hanrahan, co-creator of theWork for Biscuits series.”

Welcome to our Kickstarter Publishing Project of the Week, a feature exploring how authors and publishers are using the fundraising site to raise money for book projects. If you want to start your own project, check out How To Use Kickstarter to Fund Your Publishing Project.

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13. Not a Drill! Cutest Show Ever ‘Bee & Puppycat’ Premiers Tomorrow!

by Zachary Clemente

bee and puppycat 300x169 Not a Drill! Cutest Show Ever Bee & Puppycat Premiers Tomorrow!

The number of Puppycats is how excited I am.

FREDERATOR STUDIOS DEBUTS PREMIERE SEASON OF EAGERLY ANTICIPATED ANIMATION HIT: BEE & PUPPYCAT

Created by Adventure Time Artist Natasha Allegri, Most Successfully Funded Animation Project in Kickstarter History, Premieres November 6 on Cartoon Hangover YouTube Channel

Now, this is super-exciting news! When the first two episodes (collected here) of Bee & Puppycat first hit Cartoon Hangover’s channel, people literally dropped on the floor and rolled around out of sheer glee with how good it was. I’m definitely not speaking from personal experience with this, I swear. After a ridiculously successful Kickstarter campaign, netting supporters (at least) 9 more episodes of the magical girl cartoon, it’s been in rapid production with only soft release dates promised, but now we have a date. IT’S TOMORROW 8PM EST.

It’s finally here! Following the breakout success of its pilot that sparked a record breaking Kickstarter campaign with nearly $900,000 raised to fund new episodes, the first season of the hugely original Bee & PuppyCat will debut November 6 on Channel Frederator’s Cartoon Hangover YouTube channel. Created by Adventure Time artist Natasha Allegri, one of the freshest new voices in animation, and produced by Frederator Studios, the studio headed by animation icon Fred Seibert (Adventure Time, The Fairly OddParents, Powerpuff Girls), Bee & PuppyCat originally debuted on Cartoon Hangover in July 2013 as a 2-part 10-minute short and became an immediate hit, amassing more than 4 million views.

Bee & PuppyCat follows Bee, an out-of-work twenty-something, who has a life-changing collision with a mysterious creature that she refers to as PuppyCat, because she is not sure if it is a dog, cat, or both. Between space and time, Bee & PuppyCat take intergalactic babysitting gigs to pay another month’s rent, and embark on adventures that include betrayal, intrigue, and magical transformations. As a “traditionally animated” series, all elements of Bee & PuppyCat are drawn by hand. The new season will feature 10 six-minute episodes with several animation and YouTube stars providing guest voices including Hannah Hart (My Drunk Kitchen, I Heart Harto), Stephen Root (The Office, Finding Nemo), Kent Osborne (Adventure Time, SpongeBob SquarePants).

Bee and puppycat part 1 on cartoon hangover 004 0012 300x168 Not a Drill! Cutest Show Ever Bee & Puppycat Premiers Tomorrow!

Oh yes.

With its distinct look and feel, stylistically unlike anything currently seen on the animation landscape, and outlandishly original characters and storytelling, Bee & PuppyCat is poised to become the series that defines a new breed of animation. The initial short struck a chord outside the traditional animation fanbase, with a huge female audience gravitating to the content along with a strong male demographic. The appeal has also sparked an avid fan following of Bee & PuppyCat cosplayers who show up in droves at comic conventions, and drive sold-out merchandising lines of t-shirts, comic books and plush. Amazing for a property that to date exists as just a 2-part 10-minute short!

Fred Seibert, head of Frederator Studios, said, “Bee & PuppyCat is one of those series that comes along only once in a long while. It’s such a singular vision and we couldn’t be more proud of the direction its taken. Natasha is a distinctive voice in animation and we can’t wait for fans to see what she’s done with this first season of episodes. There is no doubt in my mind that Bee & PuppyCat will establish itself as a true defining moment in animation.”

Natasha Allegri added, “I’m super excited to finally put more Bee & PuppyCat out in the world. The response from fans has already been so humbling and inspiring. I just hope this series satisfies them as much as it does me.”

Bee & PuppyCat debuts on Cartoon Hangover, Channel Frederator Network’s flagship channel, which boasts more than 430 million views and 11.6 million subscribers who tune in for such signature franchises as Bravest Warriors, Simon’s Cat, and David Firth’s Salad Fingers.

Frederator Studios raised $872,133 in funding from a Kickstarter campaign backed by more than 18,000 people to produce the first season of episodes. The campaign exceeded its goal of $600,000 and now ranks as Kickstarters’s most funded animation project and the fourth biggest Video and Film campaigns to date – alongside the Veronica Mars movie, projects from Spike Lee and Zach Braff, and ahead of the digital sensation Video Game High School 2.

CARTOON HANGOVER YOUTUBE CHANNEL

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14. ‘The Circus’ Hits Kickstarter

Artist Sarah Kaufman created a series of paintings and became inspired to use her pieces for a new children’s book entitled The Circus. She hopes to raise $9,000 on Kickstarter to cover the cost of self-publishing.

Kaufman’s artwork features whimsical subjects including a floating ship, flying dogs, and elephants walking on stilts. We’ve embedded a video about the project above. Here’s more from the Kickstarter page:

“The book will also be submitted for consideration for major children’s book awards (Newbery Medal, Caldecott Medal, Boston Globe-Horn Book Award and Moonbeam Children’s Book Award). The design and layout of the book has already begun. It will be approximately a 12X12 hardcover with nice, big illustrations for the kids to enjoy, and maybe the grown ups too.”

(more…)

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15. A New Orleans Pop Up Travel Book is Featured On Kickstarter

Artist Jamie Hayes hopes to raise $50,000 on Kickstarter for New Orleans Pops Up. The funds will be used to cover the cost of printing this travel guide book.

With this book, Hayes will share history, personal stories, restaurant recommendations, and secrets about New Orleans. We’ve embedded a video about the project above. Here’s more from the Kickstarter page:

“There will be lots of new illustrations designed specifically to ‘pop up.’ It’s going to be fantastic. It is not only a labor of love but quite different from printing a ‘regular’ book.”

(more…)

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16. Jimmy Palmiotti on Kickstarting Sex and Violence II and why women are reading Harley Quinn

Sex and Violence 2 Cover Jimmy Palmiotti on Kickstarting Sex and Violence II and why women are reading Harley Quinn

Everyone should  “Listen to JImmy” Palmiotti that is. The veteran writer, artist editor and publisher is one of the most knowledgeable comics people out there.  With his collaborators from Paperfilms, Justin Gray and Amanda Conner, he’s made a small publishing enterprise out of kickstarting a series of graphic novels based on the European album format. The seventh, Sex and Violence  Vol. II is ending in a few days and we advise you to get in on the Amanda Conner/Dave Johnson action as soon as possible — the books will not be sold in any other way. We talked to Palmiotti a few months ago when he was Kickstarting the SF tale Denver and got his overall thoughts on using Kickstarter as a platform. This time out we talk about the storytelling process,finding artists and also find out how Harley Quinn, which he co-writes with Amanda Conner, has become one of DC’s bestselling titles, with a huge female fan base. 

The Beat: Sex and Violence is billed as stories of “crime, lust, and redemption.” Are  these stories that you carried around for a while or did you sit down to think of  them just for this volume? 

3047913 jimmy3 12 300x281 Jimmy Palmiotti on Kickstarting Sex and Violence II and why women are reading Harley Quinn

Photo by Seth Kushner

Palmiotti: I can’t speak for Justin, but I have had the FILTER story idea for a while and was  at one point going to pitch it as a series, but never got around to it. I reworked  it so it can be enjoyed as a single story with a beginning and an end. The other  short story was something I came up with and thought it might fit perfectly into  the book. A lot of the time story ideas hit me and I keep files on them, waiting for  the right time or opportunity to place them. I have another story that I want to do  and hope we can get to a volume 3 of this series.

The Beat: I know Justin Gray wrote one of the stories, but can you tell us a little about  each of the three stories, and what interested you enough in your two to tell the  tale?

Palmiotti: Justin’s is called RED DOG ARMY and its based on actual history. Hitler  launched a full-scale invasion on Russia called Operation Barabossa, and Stalin,  reacting to this, authorized a special unit to train dogs as anti-tank weapons, sort  of a suicide dog squad. It’s a real interesting setting to tell a story and beautifully  illustrated by Rafa Garres whom we worked a number of time with on Jonah Hex.  The next story is called DADDY ISSUES and is about a mother and daughter  living in a trailer park dealing with the men in their lives. Its got a very tales from  the crypt feel but works perfectly here. Romina Moranelli illustrated it and it’s  just beautiful. The last story is called FILTER and it’s a look back on a killer’s life  and the things he has done to get to where he is today. It’s dark and cruel and  will stay with you for a while, I think. Vanesa R. Del Ray illustrates that story, an  art student I met a couple of years ago that is making a name for herself all over  now. All three stories work together pretty nicely.

The Beat: Your two stories sounds like they have fairly unsympathetic protagonists,  which I know can be a challenge. How do you make dark characters like this  compelling enough for the reader to want to follow along?

Palmiotti: Well, with Daddy Issues, you sort of understand what they are going through, but  in the end, these are killers and you should be scared to be around them. With  Filter, I set out to give the reader an understanding of how someone goes from  bad to worse. The interesting aspect of the story is there is a level or redemption  to the character that makes him a bit more sympathetic. I think the trick is to  humanize the situation into something we can relate to so we understand the  extreme reaction the character takes. Honestly, all of these characters are scary  on their own level.

The Beat: How do you find artists for these? You’ve said it’s like casting, and as a  sometimes editor, I know exactly what you mean. Sometimes you think of an  element of a comics story and an artist just pops into your head with just the  qualities that will make it work. Do you keep a physical or mental folder of artists  you want to work with?

Palmiotti: I actually meet most of them at conventions. They come by and show me  their work and I can feel the enthusiasm. I keep a file and also give them my  contact and hope they follow through and we chat again. The people that I end  up working with are the ones that stay after me and keep sending their latest  samples. I try to stay up as well on who is new and exciting in the field best I  can. I buy just about every new book that comes out, which my local retailer,  Emerald City loves. The casting thing is a perfect way of explaining what I do for  each story, It’s one of the most important parts of the job. I always say the Marvel  Knights gig was all about casting the right people with the right characters. The  magic happens after that.

The Beat: Do you ever write a story for a specific artist?

Palmiotti: All of the time. All three of the stories in Sex and Violence are catered to the  artist. I may have an idea, but once I know who the artist is going to be, I change  it to fit their style. In the case of All Star Western and Jonah Hex, we always  wrote for the artist. I think that’s how we got their best work. Issue 34 of All Star  was made for Darwyn Cooke and once we knew G.I.Zombie was going to be  Scott Hampton, the book took a creepier, grounded tone. I didn’t want to fight  against his style. I also think the work is better for it.

The Beat: I talked with you a few months ago for your Denver Kickstarter and it  sounds like you really have crowdfunding down to a science.   Were there any tweaks to the model this time?

Palmiotti: Yes, I did a few after the Denver Campaign. The first thing I did is stop  offering the expensive packages overseas because we felt the price was  too high to ask for the shipping and to be honest, a lot of the packages got  lost or damaged pretty bad. The next thing was limit the prints because we  felt there wasn’t as big a need for them this time, and last, since this is a  follow up of a series of books, we went back to press and reprinted the first  book with two brand new covers by Amanda Conner and Dave Johnson,  knowing a lot of people did not get the first one that might be backing the  new one.

The Beat: Your Kickstarter books seem to have a very European feel to them and  not just because you often use foreign artists. Is that part of the inspiration  for these books?

Palmiotti: It’s based on my love of European comics and artists. I grew up on Heavy  Metal and with that steady diet; it was bound to have its influence. I also  like to make the books mature audience books, again, a very European  thing. I feel I do a ton of all ages work for the mainstream, so we get to  unleash ourselves here and do whatever works for the story.

 Jimmy Palmiotti on Kickstarting Sex and Violence II and why women are reading Harley QuinnThe Beat: On another note, Harley Quinn has been a huge hit for DC and for the  Paperfilms crew. I saw you talking recently about the fact that it has a lot  of women readers. I know it’s all still anecdotal for DC but this audience  seems to be one that is really growing quickly. Can you talk about your  own experiences with that?

Palmiotti: Amanda and I have had a very busy year of conventions and signings and  the thing we noticed from working on the Harley book is that the majority  of the people coming up to us are females of all ages. We have only had  this happen once before and it was for the Painkiller Jane series. The cool  thing about this group is that we’ve had a large percentage telling us it’s  the first comic book they ever bought and thanking us for not weighing  down the title with continuity. They say they love that they can just pick up  an issue and enjoy it without going broke or feeling left out and confused  because they haven’t bought 15 other books. It’s something I am always  aware of on all my books because I’m one of those people that, if I feel  lost picking up a book, I never go back to it again.

What we are learning is that the traditional idea of done–in-one stories  not selling in comics just doesn’t apply to the new audience buying the  books, and believe me, most of that new audience are female. I think the problem right now is we have some people running the companies that just aren’t going out and trying new comics or interacting with the next wave of readers and keep pushing things the traditional way they did years ago. The retailers themselves are seeing this happening daily now and I feel it’s the reason Image comics will continue to grow and eventually outsell the big two, unless they start thinking outside the box and just make superheroes a PART of their publishing plan and not the entire thing and start looking at the different ways a superhero type of book can be done. Harley is one example , Hawkeye is another . The traditional graphics people associate comics with have been changing for years now and the market is embracing different looks and styles that are outside the house style and its pretty cool to see.

The thing that keeps me interested in comics is the prospect of new  ideas, new voices and especially new methods of applied technology and  connecting with the audience. It’s what keeps the Paperfilms crew and I  trying new things all the time. As an example, we had a soundtrack scored  on our last book DENVER and people loved it. That and the fact that  people can go to Paperfilms.com and get digital downloads of our books,  prints of Amanda’s work and copies directly from us is the next big for  creators these days. That thing is the connection between the creator and  the fan; something bigger companies have no real interest in promoting.  This is also happening in all media. Things are changing fast, and for me,  all for the better.

The Beat: You’ve made your Kickstarters a real cottage industry, What are your  plans going forward? How many a year do you foresee doing and how long  are you going to keep at it?

Palmiotti: I will keep making Kickstarters for as long as we have an audience for  them. The people that back our Kickstarters are a lot of repeat customers  and we are growing that fan base with every project. Our plans going  forward are to do more of them and take on less work that we just do to  pay the bills. Kickstarter has been a huge learning experience for us in so  many ways. Each project teaches us what the audience wants from us. We  look at the hard numbers, the comments and all the interaction and fine  tune each and every new project to be able to connect better with the fans.  We have only a few days left on SEX AND VIOLENCE VOL. 2 and after  this, we have another book ready to roll that is a western graphic novel,  something you would think we had enough of…but this one is different in a  number of ways and we are super excited to announce it in a few weeks.

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17. A Book of Pun Poetry is Featured On Kickstarter

Emmy Award-winning artist Llyn Hunter hopes to raise $11,000 on Kickstarter for a book of visual puns. The funds will be used to cover the costs of self-publishing and printing.

The finished full-color coffee table book, entitled Punnies, contains pun-themed illustrations and poetry. We’ve embedded a video about the project above. Here’s more from the Kickstarter page:

“Punnies all started with a Catfish. When I work on storyboarding for animation, I regularly take a breather and create silly watercolor paintings. When I decided to do a cat as a fish chasing his dinner – Catfish – I just couldn’t stop.”

(more…)

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18. Crowdwatching: Last Gasp is Kickstarting its fall season


Here we go again: another alternative publisher has turned to crowdfunding to stockpile some scratch for an upcoming list. This time it’s Last Gasp, the venerable SF institution that published some of the great foundational underground comics and now publishes and distributes art book,s comics and lovely ephemera, has a campaign for its fall list.

The Kickstarter has been running a little while but has a ways to go, so it’s a good time to get in on it. Rewards include books by Camille Gargia Rose, Ron English, Henry Sultan, t-shirts, Weirdo magazine bundles and all kinds of good stuff. If you like Undergrounds/Juxtapoz/pop surrealism or just eccentric amazing things, this is for you.

Do you want to live in a world filled with beautiful art books and bizarre printed matter? Of course you do! 
Join us – be a part of Last Gasp’s fall publishing season and help launch the next fleet of twisted art books into laps, coffee tables, and bookshelves worldwide. 

The book business is changing. In the past, it was “difficult” to publish unusual books. Now it is nearly impossible. To cover the costs of printing we need up-front support from people who love books. 

The money you contribute will go directly into the printing and production costs of these forthcoming publications.

About Last Gasp:

Since 1970, Last Gasp has been an axis of the art and counterculture communities in San Francisco and beyond, publishing both emerging and established artists. 

From our early years publishing underground comix to more recent art books, we’ve tried to publish unusual artists whose artwork moves us on a visceral level. In more than four decades we have published books with artists such as Robert Crumb, Mark Ryden,Camille Rose Garcia,Gary Baseman, Robert Williams, Junko Mizuno,Trina Robbins, S. Clay Wilson, Justin Green, Spain Rodriguez, Keiji Nakazawa, Suehiro Maruo, Elizabeth McGrath, Timothy Leary, Todd Schorr, Ron English, Laurie Lipton, Diane DiPrima, and countless others.

In addition to publishing, Last Gasp is a distributor, selling books from small and independent publishers to a network of booksellers worldwide.

Choose a reward and help us ensure this weirdness lives on!

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19. SPX: Hana Doki Kira – A Beautiful Homage to Shōjo

 

by Zachary Clemente

photo main SPX: Hana Doki Kira   A Beautiful Homage to Shōjo

While at SPX this year, I was able to grab a quick word with seven amazing cartoonists about their work in Hana Doki Kira, a Shōjo comic and illustration anthology released earlier this year after a rather successful Kickstarter campaign. Not only filled with gorgeous work inspired by Shōjo – a sub-genre of manga covering a wide variety of subjects, often with a strong focus on human and romantic relationships. As the anthology itself describes:

Shōjo is known for its distinctive use of flowery imagery, magical plot devices, and romantic themes. Out book takes its title from three key elements of the Shōjo world: Hana meaning flower, Doki echoing the sound of a pounding heart, and Kira – the impression of sparkling beauty.

Contributors to Hana Doki Kira in attendance at SPX were: Alice Meichi Li, Carey Pietsch, Kris Mukai, Megan Brennan, Rebecca Mock, Tim Ferrara, and Annie Stoll – who served as “art director” on the project. I asked each their introduction to Shōjo, how it has influenced their work, and what working on an anthology was like.

captiverosesalice SPX: Hana Doki Kira   A Beautiful Homage to Shōjo

Captive of the Roses by Alice Meichi Li

One of the most popular and influential Shōjo series, Sailor Moon was named as a gateway for many not only into the genre, but into comics in general.

When I was very young, one of my babysitters introduced me to Sailor Moon and at the time I had a serious need for stories about ladies and stories about girls who are fully-realized characters who got to be silly and dumb and got to express their wants and needs; but also be powerful and have agency in their own world. That started a life-long love affair. [...] I love stories about girls, about things girls love by women – it’s a wonderful thing. – Carey Pietsch

Megan Brennan: I wasn’t really into comics until some of my friends started reading Sailor Moon and other Shōjo comics and I realized that comics could be something completely different and I connected with it [Shōjo] really strongly. It was the only comics I read for a really long time because it was telling these stories I couldn’t get elsewhere; girls were the main characters, girl-things were important, and the things they cared would we life-changing and monumental; it was great. – Megan Brennan

Someone handed me Sailor Moon volume 10 in middle school at a school dance; I sat down, read the whole thing, my life was changed forever and I never looked back. – Rebecca Mock

It’s an understatement that there’s a drought in comics for stories starring or aimed at girls and it seems that many readers left wanted found what they needed in Shōjo such as Sailor Moon. Though he didn’t interact directly with Shōjo until later, Tim Ferrara remarked on how it informs his current work:

I didn’t actually grow up reading Shōjo; it was always a genre I thought should exist but I never knew that it did. [...] I’m glad it exists; it’s a needed genre – especially here in the States where we don’t have a lot of things that are representative for that demographic. – Tim Ferrara

janet sung 1000x839 SPX: Hana Doki Kira   A Beautiful Homage to Shōjo

Art by Janet Sung

Each artist is influenced or at least informed by Shōjo, many in the depiction of specific themes or use of ornate illustration.

There’s a lot of tropes that I use – a lot of decorative elements, lots of flowers, lots of sparkly things. [...] I also focus a lot on the clothing design and the hair. In Shōjo manga, there’s always beautiful, gorgeous, flowing hair. I love putting that in my art. – Alice Meichi Li

An untranslated copy of Candy Candy volume 10 was one of the earliest comics that I read and absorbed – and since I couldn’t read it, all I could do was look at their facial expressions and try to understand what was going on through the artwork alone. [...] One of the earliest things I learned from that was how to do was how to convey an emotion in a comic. – Kris Mukai

I think the themes and the beautiful linework have always been a big influence on me. My style is very sketchy and bold – you might think I would be more drawn to Shōnen, but there’s something beautiful about personal relationships as well as flowing lines that have always captured my heart. You may not think I’m a very Shōjo-inspired person, but I’m always thinking about beautiful lines and interesting stories. – Annie Stoll

It’s easy to latch onto the evocative beauty of how the work, but the influence Shōjo has had goes beyond that – granting an underserved readership access a necessary more.

It’s made me more conscious of writing all characters with agency; that’s something Shōjo manga does well – expanding beyond a traditional, mainstream narrative. I think some of the aesthetic seeps into my work too, I’m a fan of expressive faces and the ability to show emotion very clearly. – Carey Pietsch

It was a way for me to connect with comics. There’s a void in comics. [...] There’s comics for young kids and comics for young adults; but theres a gap there for pre-teens and young teens; there aren’t comics that speak to them and specifically not a lot of American comics that speak to girls. Shōjo fills that void, even if it’s cultural appropriation. These comics are coming from Japan – it’s an entirely different culture, we don’t really understand it, but even then there’s something there that we connect to viscerally and you can see how much they’ve caught on in a culture that they weren’t made for; there was such a hunger for that kind of comic. – Rebecca Mock

joyce lee SPX: Hana Doki Kira   A Beautiful Homage to Shōjo

Art by Joyce Lee

Lastly, I was happy to hear that all were pleased with the process of working towards an anthology and though many only had the responsibility of working on their own pieces, they came together and pulled off the project with aplomb, befitting an homage a spectrum of manga.

I do participate in a lot of anthologies; I take it as a way of making new friends. I love getting to know new artists and just getting to be part of that group is an honor. – Alice Meichi Li

It was so cool seeing the final book come together because everybody else’s stories fit together but they were all so different. You could see completely different perspectives of the same basic ideas. – Megan Brennan

It was at times exhilarating; we felt very powerful with all the possibilities available to us. At other times, it was very stressful because we were taking on a huge responsibility for no reason other than we sat down one day and decided we wanted to do this. We had to commit to this idea that you just come up with without any set due date, nobody backing you; it was really empowering to know that we were able to create something from nothing. – Rebecca Mock

It was so much fun; we really lucked out with Rebecca [Mock] and Annie [Stoll], and the Year 85 Group is so wonderful. It was so excited to get to see other artists talk about their themes and show sneak-peaks of their process along the way, and they did a wonderful job putting it all together. – Carey Pietsch

It was good having that initial group of six people who were really interested in helping out; everyone had a very unique job or position – it was a little bit like a Shōjo manga honestly. [...] It was a really good balance of personalities that all worked together – it never felt like a competition. – Annie Stoll

On the actual process of putting together the Hana Doki Kira anthology, Stoll described how it was born out of love for Shōjo.

There was a core six of us who hung out and drew and once we realized that we all loved Shōjo manga and started talking about making some kind of anthology. We ended up structuring it kind of like a pyramid scheme where each of us would invite two or three more people into it, so before you knew it, we had 26 amazing artists that were all making new friends and talking about Shōjo. – Annie Stoll

Stoll is a seasoned veteran in the world of comic anthologies, contributing in the astronomically successful Valor campaign, actively working on the second volume of Hana Doki Kira, and launching an extraordinarily ambitious project, 1001 Knights - a people-positive, feminist bent collection, aimed at making a tome of illustrations, comics, and unconventional art representing no less than 1001 characters.

hdkgif SPX: Hana Doki Kira   A Beautiful Homage to Shōjo

Here is the full list of the Hana Doki Kira contributing artists: Aimee Fleck, Alex Bahena, Alice U. Cheong, Alice Meichi Li, Anna Rose, Annie Stoll, Becca Hillburn, Carey PIetsch, Catarina Sarmento, Catherine, Chelsie Sutherland, Elisa Lau, Endy, Janet Sung, Kaitlin Reid, Kelly / Hkezza, Kris Mukai, Lindsay Cannizzaro, Megan Brennan, Rebecca Mock, Sarah O’Donell, Shelly Rodriquez, Sloane Leong, Stefanie Morin, and Tim Ferrara. For more, check out their Facebook and Tumblr pages!

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20. 50 hours/$450 to go for Sparkplug’s Fall Kickstarter

8ef7a49fe4320a059127a0fad53f7e28 large 50 hours/$450 to go for Sparkplugs Fall Kickstarter

Actually $440 since I just pledged $10 for a copy of Elijah Brubaker’s Reich #12. If there is any company which deserves the preordering help that Kickstarter uses its Sparkplug, now run by Virginia Paine following the tragic death of founder Dylan Williams. The Kickstarter covers Reich #12 and a collection of William Cardini’s Vortex.

7e962cb23a3ceed4e49d9090f38ee6d6 large 50 hours/$450 to go for Sparkplugs Fall Kickstarter

Paine writes:

 

Hi all! This is Virginia, owner/showrunner of Sparkplug Books.  I’ve been managing Sparkplug since I took over ownership a year and a half ago.  It’s been fun/busy/hard but I’ve had a lot of help.  And now we need YOUR help.  Sparkplug needs funds to publish our next two books I’ll get to those later and so, we are kickstartering our fall publications.  If it goes well, we may even be able to fund a third!

I know Sparkplug has meant a lot to a lot of people over the years.  I’ve done my best to keep Dylan William’s vision alive and publish underappreciated, idiosyncratic comics by really awesome folks.  We’ve been struggling financially since Dylan passed, but I think it’s important to keep going and finish at least one of his projects, and create another that he would approve of.  With your contribution, you can be a part of this legacy of amazing comics.

 

The two books offer something for everyone.

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Brubaker’s Reich is a meticulously drawn and researched biography of psychologist Wilhelm Reich, inventor of Orgone and many other crazier than fiction theories.

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Vortex, by contrast is a crazier than life fantasy epic told in the Fort Thunder style. They’re both the kind of bold projects Sprakplug has always been known for. And some good rewards, like an acrylic painting by Cardini:

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21. ‘Snap Judgment’ Storytelling Show is on Kickstarter

Glynn Washington, the host of NPR‘s Snap Judgment, hopes to raise $150,000 on Kickstarter.

The funds will be used to cover the cost of producing the storytelling radio show’s sixth season. We’ve embedded a video about the project above. Here’s more from the Kickstarter page:

“Snap was born of love, and we have balanced on a razor’s edge since the very beginning. Your contribution goes directly toward making the most amazing season of Snap the world has ever known. Together, we’ve surmounted the obstacles before, and created the first five seasons of Snap. Let’s do it again.”

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22. 31 Days of Halloween: Bobby Timony’s Monster Pin Up Girl Playing Cards

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Kickstarter alert! Bobby Timony (The Night Owls, The Horror Lovers, Detectobot and Goblin Hood) is Kickstarting a deck of playing cards adorned with cute monster girl pin-ups.
That says it all right?
Timony’s cartoon-esque art is just right to present monsters girls who are sexy without being over the top, and just the right sense of humor as well. If the Kickstarter succeeds (only $8000, so let’s do it!) it’ll also be presented as a hardcover with a foreword by Molly Crabapple. Timony’s doing 54 different illustrations for the set, which is perfect for playing all your scary Halloween card games like Go Monster Fish and 21 Devils on Horseback.
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4 Comments on 31 Days of Halloween: Bobby Timony’s Monster Pin Up Girl Playing Cards, last added: 10/8/2014
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23. Evan Dahm’s Illustrated Edition of ‘The Wonderful Wizard of Oz’ is On Kickstarter

Comics artist Evan Dahm hopes to raise $15,000 on Kickstarter for his illustrated edition of L. Frank Baum’s The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Click here to to download a free digital copy of the original book.

The funds will be used to cover the cost of printing Dahm’s book in hardcover format. Follow this link to check out the “Baum by Dahm” creativity blog. We’ve embedded a video about the project above. Here’s more from the Kickstarter page:

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a beautiful, dreamlike book, and it’s very different from the adaptations that are more widely-known. In the illustrations, I’ve tried to emphasize the strange atmosphere of its setting, and the sense of being lost and overwhelmed by an otherworldly place. I made almost 100 illustrations for the book: 24 of them are full-page illustrations that begin each chapter.”

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24. An Anthology of ‘Outsider’ Fiction Stories is Featured on Kickstarter

Writer Steven Saus hopes to raise $7,000 on Kickstarter for a fiction anthology, Not Our Kind: Tales of (Not) Belonging. The finished book will contain 19 stories.

Saus plans to use the funds to compensate the contributors, pay the editor, and hire a designer to create the cover. We’ve embedded a video about the project above. Here’s more from the Kickstarter page:

“When you talk about outsiders, it’s easy to think about that sense of isolation when you’re not one of the ‘popular kids’ in high school, when you’re the new person on the job, when you stand out in a bad way. But there’s more than that. There’s the sense of wonder at a new, alien place. There’s seeing everything you know through a new, different point of view. These stories defy expectations and easy genre boundaries.”

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25. Book Discovery App Featured On Kickstarter

Jef Van der Avoort and Serie Wolfe hopes to raise $75,000 for a book discovery application called “Squirl.” With this app, users can check in to a literary-themed location, initiate conversations with fellow authors, and discover related content.

The funds will be used to develop the project. We’ve embedded a video about the project above. Here’s more from the Kickstarter page:

“Squirl bridges the gap between books and the real world. With the Squirl app you will bump into existing locations from captivating novels, life changing biographies and thrilling mysteries. Imagine passing by a street corner in New York City or a cafe in Paris and suddenly an excerpt from a book pops up on your phone. Literary serendipity!”

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