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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Conference/Event Reports, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 36
1. SCBWI-NYC Takeaway #2: Meg Rosoff, children's books and changing lives

I loved Meg Rosoff's HOW I LIVE NOW, and I look forward to reading her other books. I had never seen Meg in person, so was looking forward to hearing her keynote at the SCBWI Winter Conference. Meg is wonderfully blunt, witty, opinionated. And very, very funny.

One of the things Meg said in her keynote really hit home: That sometimes we get so caught up in worrying about how to get published, promotion and sales figures that we forget to remind ourselves of how important our books can be to children, and how our books can change their lives.

To be clear: I want to make a living at creating children's books; it's not just a hobby for me, so I DO need to be aware of the market as well as doing what I can to help promote and sell the book. However, I think I also need to remind myself more often about one of the reasons I love children's books so much.

Books affect me as an adult, but not nearly as deeply as they did when I was a child. My view of the world and myself changed as a result of reading certain books. There were books that became part of me and are still part of me. Reminding myself of how important books were to  me as a young person will not only help motivate me to write better stories but also help me persevere when the publishing process gets difficult.

Something else that Meg said that I wish more aspiring children's book authors would understand: children are not dumbed-down adults. I've seen so many mss that talk down to young readers in a way that makes me wonder if the author has forgotten what it was like to be a child himself/herself.

---

For more info about Meg Rosoff and her work: http://www.megrosoff.co.uk/

For more info about the SCBWI: http://www.scbwi.org/

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2. SCBWI-NYC Takeaway #1: Sean Tan & The Importance of Maintaining A Bubble Of Delusion

For those who haven't yet heard the term, conference takeaways are generally regarded as insights or key points that someone who attends brings away from the event. It differs for everyone, based on their own level of experience and context. 

I'm going to be sharing some of my takeaways, starting with Sean Tan.

Untitled

I've long admired Sean Tan's work. The quirky/dark have always had a strong appeal to me (see my Little Nightmares Flickr set from ten years ago as an example), and someday I'm going to write and illustrate a picture book in this style. My main challenge: to figure out a way of doing dark without overwhelming the book with too much dark, if that makes any sense. Having a good story is the most important, of course. I've been working on ideas for ages but haven't been happy with any of them yet. Someday, though. These Little Nightmare guys keep bugging me to find the right story for them.

But I digress.

One of my biggest takeaways from the conference was Sean Tan's advice to artists about the necessity of creating a Bubble of Delusion in which they feel safe to create. This applies to writers just as much as illustrators, I believe. 

-----------------

A few of Sean Tan's thoughts on the Bubble Of Delusion:

(Please note that these are my notes taken during the Illustrators' Intensive, so are subject to interpretation/misinterpretation)

- Set up a safe space in which you feel positive about yourself and your work, and know that you will do great work.

- Surround yourself with encouraging people.

- Avoid negativity, and try to avoid it when you see it coming. Sean says he avoids reading reviews. I don't think I'd have the willpower to avoid reading reviews completely, but I avoid interacting with negative people. Sometimes it's unavoidable, of course, but I do what I can in the future to limit the interaction.

-----------------

I've experienced this myself recently, though it was necessary bad stuff (like getting an injured limb re-broken so it could heal properly).Trying to work on anything creative, however, was like walking against a gale force wind. Not good.

What I'm Doing To Help Maintain My Own Bubble Of Delusion:

1. Doodling something purely for the fun of it every day, no matter how busy I am. I used to draw for fun all the time! I need start doing that again. I'll post some of these daily doodles online (on DebbieOhi.com), but some I won't…these drawings are for myself.

2. Write something purely for the fun of it every day, no matter how busy I am. I'm getting back to my private journal again, my equivalent of Morning Pages.

3. Do what I can to avoid industry angst. I love social media and online communities, but sometimes I let myself get too caught up in worrying about sales figures, publishing politics, conflicting advice, peer envy.

My advice to you all, especially those who are trying to find their own writing or illustration style: do what you can to create your own Bubble of Delusion. And then when you're doing something creative, stay in that Bubble.

For me, one of the keys is staying off the Internet. What do you do to maintain your Bubble? Feel free to post below. 

For more info about Sean Tan and his work, see his website.

For more info about the SCBWI, see the SCBWI website.

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3. Writer/illustrator conferences, good news and a new Pixel Shavings post

2012 03 25HazelRussNESCBWI

If I could give one piece of advice to my young writer/illustrator self, I would have said this: START ATTENDING CONFERENCES. And join organizations like the SCBWI and CANSCAIP.

I have learned so much, been incredibly inspired and met many creative kindred spirits because of these events. Not to mention three children's book contracts! (I'M BORED plus two more recently, yay!!). Speaking of good things happening at conferences...

Here's my post about Pixel Shavings friends Russ Cox and Hazel Mitchell, with their good news from the New England SCBWI Conference.

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4. Photos from SCBWI Summer Conference in Los Angeles 2012

SCBWI Summer Conference in LA 2012

Recently came back from the annual summer conference in LA held by the SCBWI (Society of Children's Book Writers & Illustrators). What an amazing, inspiring event! I'll be posting some personal takeaways and photo faces from the conference, but for now, here are links to my photo sets:

SCBWI Summer Conference in LA 2012

ON FLICKR:

SCBWI-LA 2012 photos - Part 1

SCBWI-LA 2012 photos - Part 2

SCBWI-LA 2012 photos - Part 3

ON FACEBOOK:

SCBWI-LA 2012 photos - Part 1

SCBWI-LA 2012 photos - Part 2

SCBWI-LA 2012 photos - Part 3

I've started to get a lot of requests for individual photos to be mailed -- I'm uploading my photos to both FB and Flickr, so please do feel free to scoop any for personal or self-promo use. If you post any publicly, I'd appreciate a photo credit (something like "Photo: Debbie Ridpath Ohi - DebbieOhi.com; or "Photo: Debbie Ridpath Ohi (DebbieOhi.com), illustrator of I'M BORED" or just "via @inkyelbows" on Twitter). Thanks! 

SCBWI Summer Conference in LA 2012

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5. Interview with TYPE Books owner + I'M BORED launch info

Thanks SO much to Type Books for hosting my illustrator I'M BORED Book Launch. The launch will take place this coming Tuesday: Sept. 18th, 6-8 pm at TYPE's Queen St. location (883 Queen St. W., 416-366-8973). You can find out more info and RSVP at the Facebook event page for the I'M BORED Launch. To Michael Ian Black fans: please note that the author will NOT be there -- it'll just be me. :-)

If you haven't seen it already, check out this wonderful stop-motion video that Sean Ohlenkamp (Lowe Roche) created, called "The Joy Of Books", with the help of 25 volunteers over four nights:

 Type Books owner, Joanne Saul, was kind enough to answer a few questions for me about the bookstore.

Q. How did TYPE Books get its start?

TYPE was started in 2006 by my partner Samara Walbohm and myself. We met doing our PhDs in CanLit at the University of Toronto. We would often daydream in the stacks at Robarts library about what we might do if we didn't go the academic route. TYPE was one of those dreams.

We call ourselves a friendly neighbourhood bookstore and we mean it. We stock local authors' books. We launch them too. We host events for local writers. We have strong relationships with local publishers. We have a gallery in our basement where we show the artwork of neighbourhood artists. We have a storytime for neighbourhood kids. We host a love of reading and writing program in our basemen called "Word-Play." We have kids from 4 local schools come to the store twice a week for a full program.

We're very proud of the work it does.

Type 883 Queen West

What's the best part of of being a bookstore owner? What's the most challenging?

The best part of being a bookstore owner is meeting new people and establishing relationships with customers (and authors and publishers). I love interacting with my regular customers and talking about what they're reading.

I love the feeling of community in both the stores. It's a true joy to be able to put the right book in the right person's hands.

The worst part of owning a bookstore is paying the bills.

March Madness Window

Other than the I'M BORED launch :-), are there any other upcoming events and news you'd like to share?

We're so excited about the I'm Bored launch! We can't wait. It's a fabulous book - beautiful and funny too. My son just changed daycares and "I'm Bored" was his going away gift to his old centre! I'm also really thrilled to be part of the launch for Andrea Curtis' book, "What's For Lunch" at the end of the month. It's a fascinating look at what kids eat for lunch around the world.

Facebook Event Page for the I'M BORED Book Launch (Illustrator)

Where to find more info about TYPE:

Their website: http://typebooks.ca/

On Twitter: https://twitter.com/typebooks

On Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/typebooks/

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6. SCBWI-NYC Takeaway #1: Shaun Tan & The Importance of Maintaining A Bubble Of Delusion

For those who haven't yet heard the term, conference takeaways are generally regarded as insights or key points that someone who attends brings away from the event. It differs for everyone, based on their own level of experience and context. 

I'm going to be sharing some of my takeaways, starting with Shaun Tan.

Untitled

I've long admired Shaun Tan's work. The quirky/dark have always had a strong appeal to me (see my Little Nightmares Flickr set from ten years ago as an example), and someday I'm going to write and illustrate a picture book in this style. My main challenge: to figure out a way of doing dark without overwhelming the book with too much dark, if that makes any sense. Having a good story is the most important, of course. I've been working on ideas for ages but haven't been happy with any of them yet. Someday, though. These Little Nightmare guys keep bugging me to find the right story for them.

But I digress.

One of my biggest takeaways from the conference was Shaun Tan's advice to artists about the necessity of creating a Bubble of Delusion in which they feel safe to experiment and create. This applies to writers just as much as illustrators, I believe. 

-----------------

A few of Shaun Tan's thoughts on the Bubble Of Delusion:

(Please note that these are my notes taken during the Illustrators' Intensive, so are subject to interpretation/misinterpretation)

- Set up a safe space in which you feel positive about yourself and your work, and know that you will do great work.

- Surround yourself with encouraging people.

- Avoid negativity, and try to avoid it when you see it coming. Shaun says he avoids reading reviews. I don't think I'd have the willpower to avoid reading reviews completely, but I do what I can to keep from interacting with negative people. Sometimes it's unavoidable, of course, but I do what I can in the future to limit the interaction.

-----------------

I've experienced this myself recently, though it was necessary bad stuff (like getting an injured limb re-broken so it could heal properly).Trying to work on anything creative, however, was like walking against a gale force wind…I could do it, but it was an effort rather than the fun it usually is. Not good.

What I'm Doing To Help Maintain My Own Bubble Of Delusion:

1. Doodling something purely for the fun of it every day, no matter how busy I am. I used to draw for fun all the time! I need start doing that again. I'll post some of these daily doodles online (on DebbieOhi.com), but some I won't…these drawings are for myself.

2. Write something purely for the fun of it every day, no matter how busy I am. I'm getting back to my private journal again, my equivalent of Morning Pages.

3. Do what I can to avoid industry angst. I love social media and online communities, but sometimes I let myself get too caught up in worrying about sales figures, publishing politics, conflicting advice, peer envy.

My advice to you all, especially those who are trying to find their own writing or illustration style: do what you can to create your own Bubble of Delusion. And then when you're doing something creative, STAY IN THE BUBBLE. It's impractical and inadvisable to stay in the Bubble all the time, of course -- we all need to deal with the other Stuff in life, plus the other Stuff helps to inspire and motivate us.

For me, one of the keys is staying off the Internet when I'm trying to create. What do you do to maintain your Bubble? Feel free to post below. 

For more info about Shaun Tan and his work, see his website.

For more info about the SCBWI, see the SCBWI website.

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7. Comics for SCBWI conference newbies (or any writing/illustrating conferences)

I created this set of comics to help break the ice when I attended my first SCBWI conference (or at least the first in a long time) in 2009, knowing that 99% of the people there wouldn't know me. I was WAY nervous.

I'm reposting the comics here in case they help anyone else:

 My advice for anyone who feels nervous about attending for the first time, or is normally very shy and introverted and not great at meeting new people:

1. Be brave and make the first move. You'd be surprised at how many other attendees feel exactly the same way as you do. Introduce yourself to people you sit beside, stand in line with, notice standing alone. 

2. TAKE BUSINESS CARDS. Yes, even if you aren't published yet. We're all going to meet a lot of people over the weekend, and taking away a business card from an encounter or introduction will help the people you meet remember you.

3. Have realistic expectations. Don't expect to be "discovered" at the conference. 

4. In my experience, you're much more likely to meet new people if you're alone. If you're always chatting and hanging out with the same person or people, you're not as approachable. I'm not saying that you SHOULDN'T hang out with people you like, of course! Just keep in mind that as a group, you're probably not going to meet as many new people as someone who is by themselves.

Good luck!

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8. Comic: Back from a writer's conference…now what?

OHI0102 PostSCBWIconference v2flat600

 

Just posted a post-conference comic on the MiG Writers blog.

Still catching up on e-mail and other work but promise to post about my Simon & Schuster visit and the SCBWI conference very soon!

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9. One Of My Favourite New SCBWI Friends: Mike Curato

MikeCuratoElephant

 

Still catching up from my week-long trip in NYC. I've decided I'm more likely to actually post about the event if I write up some shorter pieces rather than attempt one mega-long report. So here's my first!

I love making new friends at these events, which is one reason I try very hard NOT to make too many plans in advance, or hang out with the same group of people throughout the weekend.

Anyway, thanks to my Pixel Shavings friend Russ Cox for introducing me to Mike Curato (who just launched a NEW BLOG).

Not only is Mike a funny and very sweet guy, he also won top prize in this years SCBWI Winter Conference Illustration Portfolio Showcase!

On the last day of the conference, I went out for lunch with Mike, Russ Cox, Fred Koehler, Robert Gallagher-Rivera and Wouter Brennel:

During the meal, I nagged (yes, I'm embarrassed to admit I did NAG) Mike to start a blog. I pointed out that with his award win, lots of people would be checking out his website after the conference. And look, he started one!!! And he gave me credit. :-)

I -love- Mike's work, and can't wait to see where his career takes him next.

Where you can find more info about Mike:

Mike Curato's website

Mike Curator's brand new BLOG

Mike Curato Illustration (Facebook Page)

Mike Curato Etsy Page

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10. Inspiration, Art and a 12-Course Susur Lee Dinner at the Autodesk SketchBook Toronto Event

Badge pick up at Autodesk

I have been a fan of the iPad since it first came out, and my favorite art app is Autodesk Sketchbook Pro (I've just started to learn the desktop version). A while ago, I posted a sketch that I did with the app on my iPad while waiting in an airport. I had noticed a little boy with his family nearby, and he noticed me sketching. Curious, he came over to look. I did a quick sketch of him, and he was delighted.

BoyAirport

I posted about the experience, pointing out how cool it was that a quickie little sketch could bridge the communication gap between different cultures. Chris Cheung, the SketchBook product manager at Autodesk, e-mailed me about the post; we kept in sporadic touch after that. Eventually we met in person, hit it off (we're both nerds and love SketchBook -- how could we not? :-)) and he invited me to speak at SketchBook's first dedicated Toronto event.

Nick Pagee from TIFF

Above: Nick Pagee, TIFF Consultant: Gaming & New Media

I HAD AN AMAZING TIME. First of all, the other speakers were fantastic. They included Skottie Young, Bobby Chiu, Nick Pagee, Miguel Sternberg, C.B. Cebulski, Francis Manapul and Benjamin Rabe, among others. You can read their bios on the the SketchBook blog.

Susur Lee talks about inspiration

One surprise guest (above): renowned Toronto chef Susur Lee, who talked about inspiration and food. After Susur's talk, he went back to his restaurant to prepare a 12 course meal for all of us (!).

C.B. Cebulski (Marvel)

Above: C.B. Cebulski from Marvel.

The event was invite-only, and apparently even the waiting list filled up quickly. The speakers could invite a few people, so I sent invites to my sister (a children's book writer and illustrator) and Patricia Storms (cartoonist and children's book writer/illustrator). Sadly, Ruth couldn't come and I knew Chris Cheung (the organizer and SketchBook Product Manager at Autodesk) was interested in th

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11. Pay It Forward: Global Book Reading Flash Mob Event Today at 4 pm (your timezone)

I've never participated in a flash mob event before but was so intrigued by a BOOK-focused event that I can't resist.

You can find out if your city has organized an event at:

http://www.pifexperience.org/pifflashmob/

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12. Pay It Forward: Sharing The Books at Union Station in Toronto

LindaGranfield PIF 600labelled

Above photo courtesy author Linda Granfield.

Thanks to writer and librarian Nancy Runstedler for organizing the Toronto PIF (Pay It Forward): Sharing The Books event at Union Station yesterday. Similar events took place around the world at 4 pm including Thailand, England, Germany, Wales, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Spain, Denmark, Scotland, Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovenia, Serbia, Australia, Brazil, Belgium, other cities in Canada and the U.S.

I've heard of flash mob events before but never participated. The basic idea of a flash mob: a group of seemingly random people assemble suddenly in a public place, perform a seemingly pointless act for a brief time, then disperse. Our group was more of a smart mob because we did have a purpose:

The purpose of this Book Reading Flash Mob is to create an awareness of the Pay It Forward Organisation and the work that they do globally, as well as the impact that books have on our lives.

NancyeexplainsPIFgroup

Above: Organizer Nancy Runstedler explains the basic rules of the event.

We were each encouraged to bring a book that inspired us, kept us company during a long journey, brought tears to our eyes, or got us thinking about things in a different light. I brought Ray Bradbury's DANDELION WINE because it was the first book that ever made me really aware of style in writing.

DandelionWine

I've always been a huge Ray Bradbury fan. His autograph had a prominent page in my collection as a teenager:

RayBradbury autograph sm

I also wrote a song called "Homecoming" based on his short story, "The Rocket Man". You can hear "Homecoming" on my music group's live performance album. I'm playing the rhythm guitar part on this track, Allison Durno plays lead guitar bits and Jodi Krangle sings lead. Allison and I sing some backup during the chorus. You can read my lyrics to "Homecoming" on the Urban Tapestry site.

Even before I experienced family loss myself, I was deeply moved by this story and others by Ray Bradbury. His writing affected me in so many ways, and was a maj

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13. My National Library Week Drawing

BookGardenLibraryWeek v2flat600

It's National Library Week! You can find out more info about National Library Week at AtYourLibrary.org.

Librarians should visit the National Library Week event page on the ALA (American Library Association) site.

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14. National Library Week: April 8-14, 2012

OHI0050 WRI LibraryTheft sm400

It's National Library Week! You can find out more info about National Library Week at AtYourLibrary.org.

Librarians should visit the National Library Week event page on the ALA (American Library Association) site.

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15. NYC Trip Report (Part 1): Mark Fowler, Rights Of Writers, and The Center For Fiction

Not sure how many of you used Inkspot or subscribed to Inklings back in the early days of the Web (whoa, that sounds so ANCIENT now, doesn't it?) but one of my columnists was Mark Fowler. Mark did the ASK THE LAWYER column. SOOOO great to finally meet Mark in person.

With Mark Fowler in NYC

Mark is an attorney at Satterlee Stephens Burke & Burke LLP, and also blogs at RIGHTS OF WRITERS: A Blog About Writing And The Law.

I strongly advise you to check out Mark's blog, which has a ton of great info for writers. Mark says he is also open to suggestions about topics he should blog about, but says that he's unable (for legal reasons) to answer questions that are specific to your own situation e.g. individual advice.

CenterForFiction

Mark is also on the board of The Center For Fiction, the only nonprofit in the U.S. solely dedicated to celebrating fiction, working every day to connect readers and writers.

Anyway, check out the view from the floor where he works:

View from Mark's office floor

THANK you, Mark, for taking the time to get together!

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16. My two main takeaways from the SCBWI conference in NYC

SCBWI NYC Takeaways

When I first saw the word "takeaways" in people's conference reports, I was confused. What were takeaways? Were they giving out free food?!? I was even MORE disappointed that I had missed the event!

But no, takeaways are key messages you've learned at a conference. They can vary from person to person, depending on their own situations and experiences.

I'll be posting more details about my takeaways from various panels and workshops, but overall my main takeaways were:

1. What's most important: STORY and CHARACTERS. Some panelists listed both while others just listed story, but the message was the same. It doesn't matter what format a book is in if the story sucks. Voice and style can help make good writing, but aren't nearly as important as having a story and characters that the reader cares about.

2. Do the work. Get it written. Don't get too obsessed with the process, or networking and promoting, or all the other extras that can be good but NOT if they're keeping you from doing the work. This is something that has really hit home for me, which is why I'll probably be easing back somewhat from social media. (Ok, I'll still be posting a lot compared to some people, but it'll be easing back for me!)

Both of these apply to both writers AND illustrators -- I'll be interpreting the takeaways from an illustrators' point of view and posting them in the SCBWI Illustrators' Mentees Blog soon.

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17. Writers For The Red Cross

Screen shot 2011 02 24 at 5 21 41 PM

 

I'm participating in Writers For The Red Cross, and am donating a selection of my writer greeting cards as well as a hand-drawn doodle and handwritten instapoem to the winner of the bid. Read more here. Bidding doesn't start until the event officially kicks off on March 1st.

About the event, from the site:

This online event celebrates Red Cross Month (March 1-31). It is intended to raise funds and awareness for the Red Cross and its work in communities across the country. We’re auctioning off publishing-related items and services donated by authors, publicists, agents, and editors. We’ll also have daily guest posts from authors about “What the Red Cross Means to Me.” All donors who give over $25 will also be able to select one free book from a range of books donated and shipped by publishers for the event.

To find out more about Writers For The Red Cross and about the other participants, organizers and bookstore partners, please visit the Writers For The Red Cross site.

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18. Torkidlit Tweetup: May 4th

Torkidlit2011 05 Collage 010

I had a lot of fun at last night's tweetup of the Toronto Area Middle Grade & Young Adult Author Group. We've moved to a new location: The Bedford Academy near Avenue Road and Bloor. The place has a laid-back pub atmosphere; I recognized it from when I attended the National Cartoonists' Christmas party (Canadian chapter) a couple of years ago.

Claudia Osmond, Nelsa Roberto, and I treated Maureen McGowan to dinner in celebration for her birthday before the official tweetup started. I think I might make a habit of showing up early for the tweetups to have dinner with other earlybirds; I find it gets a bit noisy later (I sometimes found it a challenge hearingthe person across the table).

BookCollage 001Anyway, here's a list of the people at last night's gathering:

Claudia Osmond

Maureen McGowan

Megan Crewe

Adrienne Kress

Nelsa Roberto

Humberta Araujo - Humberta's first tweetup! Great to meet her.

Patricia Storms

Jo Karaplis

Anna Humphrey

To find out more about upcoming author events and more about each author, see our Facebook page:

Torkidlit News: Toronto Area Middle Grade & YA Author Group

If you're a middle grade or young adult writer in the Toronto area who are interested in attending our monthly get-togethers, join our Facebook group:

Toronto Area Middle Grade & YA Author Group

 

 

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19. Cheering For Books at the Festival Of Trees / Forest Of Reading (Ontario Library Association project)

Thanks to author Lois Peterson for inviting me as a guest to the Festival Of Trees event today.  I had a ton of fun wandering around the event, seeing authors give workshops and talks, attending some of the awards ceremonies, chatting with other attendees.

And WOW, I've never seen kids SO EXCITED ABOUT BOOKS. Seriously. The audience reaction reminded of a rock concert crowd...except these kids were cheering and screaming about BOOKS. How cool is that? So inspiring and exciting.

Also great to finally meet Arthur Slade, Monica Kulling, Christie Harkin and Sharon Jennings in person after exchanging tweets/posts with them online, meeting Jill Maclean, Eric Walters and Sylvia Olsen.

For those who aren't familiar with the Forest Of Reading project, it's a program where students read a selection of books nominated by professionals from schools and public libraries across Ontario, and then vote for their favorite. Unlike most literary awards, these awards are chosen by young readers.

Congrats to all the Forest Of Reading nominees and winners!

You can find out more about this Ontario Library Association project at www.accessola.com/reading.

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20. Torkidlit Bedford Academy Meetup: Nov/2011

Had fun with the Toronto Middle Grade And YA Authors group at the Bedford Academy: dinner, drinks and lots of kidlit/YA talk!

We talk about everything from the craft and business of writing to renovation hell stories and family updates. Plus a whole lot of other stuff that I can't possibly post publicly, of course. :-) Anyway, I asked the attendees of last night's get together what they were working on or if they had any news to share, and here's what they told me:

MaureenMcGowan

Maureen McGowan

http://www.maureenmcgowan.com

Maureen just found out that one of her short stories is appearing in a McGraw-Hill anthology in May 2102.

 

ClaudiaOsmond

Claudia Osmond

http://claudiaosmond.com/

Claudia's moving ahead with her new middle grade novel.

 

JoSwartz 200

Jo Swartz

http://www.littlejolit.com/

Jo says she's finished and submitted her IZZY GOURMET picture book and she's now working on a wordless graphic novel.

 

CherylRainfield

Cheryl Rainfield

http://cherylrainfield.com/

In addition to being excited about getting the ARC for her new teen paranormal, HUNTED, Cheryl has just launched her Pro Page on Facebook

Joceylyn Shipley

http://www.jocelynshipley.com

Jocelyn just won the Writing For Young People Award at the Surrey International Writers Conference.

Karen Krossing

http://www.karenkrossing.com

Karen's been getting lots of great reviews for THE YO-YO PROPHET (Orca).

Megan Crewe

http://www.megancrewe.com

Megan's going to be presenting with Lena Coakley at the November CANSCAIP meeti

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21. CANSCAIP - Packaging Your Imagination

Had so much fun at CANSCAIP's Packaging Your Imagination Conference at Victoria College in Toronto yesterday!

I didn't take many photos, but you can scroll through the ones I did take by hovering your mouse over the right-hand area of each photo and clicking on the right-arrow.

Highlights included keynotes from Sarah Ellis and Kathy Stinson, a Master Writing Class from Sarah Ellis (whose slideshow included a book cover that my KidLitArtists pal Andrea Offermann illustrated!), a picture book craft class by my Torkidlit author friend Frieda Wishinsky, and a Master Illustrating Class from my sis, Ruth Ohi.

So great to see old writer friends again as well as make some new ones.

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22. Torkidlit Bedford Academy Meetup: Nov/2011

Had fun with the Toronto Middle Grade And YA Authors group at the Bedford Academy earlier this week: dinner, drinks and lots of kidlit/YA talk!

We talk about everything from the craft and business of writing to renovation hell stories and family updates. Plus a whole lot of other stuff that I can't possibly post publicly, of course. :-) Anyway, I asked the attendees of last night's get together what they were working on or if they had any news to share, and here's what they told me:

MaureenMcGowan

Maureen McGowan

http://www.maureenmcgowan.com

Maureen just found out that one of her short stories is appearing in a McGraw-Hill anthology in May 2102.

 

ClaudiaOsmond

Claudia Osmond

http://claudiaosmond.com/

Claudia's moving ahead with her new middle grade novel.

 

JoSwartz 200

Jo Swartz

http://www.littlejolit.com/

Jo says she's finished and submitted her IZZY GOURMET picture book and she's now working on a wordless graphic novel.

 

CherylRainfield

Cheryl Rainfield

http://cherylrainfield.com/

In addition to being excited about getting the ARC for her new teen paranormal, HUNTED, Cheryl has just launched her Pro Page on Facebook

Joceylyn Shipley

http://www.jocelynshipley.com

Jocelyn just won the Writing For Young People Award at the Surrey International Writers Conference.

Karen Krossing

http://www.karenkrossing.com

Karen's been getting lots of great reviews for THE YO-YO PROPHET (Orca).

Megan Crewe

http://www.megancrewe.com

Megan's going to be presenting with Lena Coakley at the November

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23. Back from my trip but am still catching up...

Painting Session at David Diaz's During Lost Weekend

Just got back from a 10 day trip to California and Texas. In California, I attended Lost Weekend: an amazing creative weekend hosted by Caldecott-winning illustrator David Diaz (see above photo). After that, I attended BoardGameGeek with my husband: a five day (yes, I said FIVE DAYS) board gaming convention.

I'll be posting more about Lost Weekend here in Inkygirl, and am posting about BGG in my board gaming blog.

Right now, however, I need to unpack and then catch up with some e-mail...

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24. Lost Weekend with David Diaz (Part 2): Art, Food & Friendship

Lost Weekend group with David Diaz

(Continued from Part 1: Lost Weekend with David Diaz)

Another highlight from Lost Weekend: the conversations. They sprung up everywhere and without warning, while we were painting, sitting by the fire, helping David in the kitchen, over meals, while we were out walking.

Topics frequently revolved around children's book illustration but also writing, family, food, travel, other work…in other words, LIFE.

As the weekend progressed, it became clear to all of us that this was about so much more than just kidlit illustration info and new business contacts. It was also about mutual encouragement and sharing, bonding and appreciation.

And um, food. Lots and lots of good food. :-)

Each of us ended up taking away something different. One aspect I especially enjoyed: getting to spend more time with people I knew mainly online. Some of the newer Mentees I had only been in contact with via Facebook and had only met briefly in person.

And it was such a treat to finally spend time with Bonnie Adamson, co-founder of Kidlitchat and founder of the KidLitArt chat on Twitter. We had run into each other at SCBWI conventions, but usually only had time to exchange a few words before hurrying off to the next workshop or keynote talk.

And that was another thing I LOOOVED about Lost Weekend. We had a chance to slow down and get to know each other in a much more casual environment than a convention. Although David had some activities planned for us, the schedule was flexible, adjusting to the group dynamic.

Another of many highlights: getting to know David's son Ariel. Not only is Ariel a talented artist but his quirky humour and dry wit enhanced the weekend for all of us. You can see samples of his work at his site, Snakepig.com.

I can't imagine what it must have been like, having a horde of women descend on your house for an entire weekend! Ariel handled it well. :-)

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25. Photos from the Torkidlit Holiday Party

Thanks so much to Claudia Osmond for hosting the holiday meet up for the Toronto Middle Grade & Young Adult Author Group! I had a fantastic time: so many great conversations, good food and lots of kidlit/YA talk.

For more info about what Torkidlit members are up to, please do visit the Torkidlit News Facebook Page.

Click the right- and left- arrows to see the slideshow of my iPhone photos:

 

Hm...just noticed that Squarespace's Gallery feature forces ALL the photos in horizontal mode, which means you're not seeing the full photo in some cases. To browse all the photos, do visit my 2011-12 Torkidlit Holiday Party Flickr set.

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