What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Posts

(tagged with 'article')

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: article, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 330
1. Starred reviews, March/April 2016 Horn Book Magazine

thunderboyjr

The following books will receive starred reviews in the March/April 2016 issue of The Horn Book Magazine:

Thunder Boy Jr. by Sherman Alexie; illus. by Yuyi Morales (Little, Brown)

When Spring Comes by Kevin Henkes; illus. by Laura Dronzek (Greenwillow)

School’s First Day of School by Adam Rex; illus. by Christian Robinson (Porter/Roaring Brook)

Twenty Yawns by Jane Smiley; illus. by Lauren Castillo (Two Lions)

Booked by Kwame Alexander (Houghton)

The Passion of Dolssa by Julie Berry (Viking)

Raymie Nightingale by Kate DiCamillo (Candlewick)

Burn Baby Burn by Meg Medina (Candlewick)

A Tangle of Gold by Jaclyn Moriarty (Levine/Scholastic)

Jazz Day: The Making of a Famous Photograph by Roxane Orgill; illus. by Francis Vallejo (Candlewick)

The post Starred reviews, March/April 2016 Horn Book Magazine appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Starred reviews, March/April 2016 Horn Book Magazine as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
2. Review of The Kid from Diamond Street: The Extraordinary Story of Baseball Legend Edith Houghton

vernick_kid from diamond streetThe Kid from Diamond Street: The Extraordinary Story of Baseball Legend Edith Houghton
by Audrey Vernick; 
illus. by Steven Salerno
Primary   Clarion   40 pp.
3/16   978-0-544-61163-4   $17.99   g

Edith Houghton was “magic on the field,” a baseball legend of the 1920s. Playing starting shortstop for the 
all-women’s professional team the Philadelphia Bobbies, she drew fans to the ballpark with her impressive offensive and defensive talent. Besides that, Edith was just ten years old; her uniform was too big, her pants kept falling down, and her too-long sleeves encumbered her play. But she was good, and the older players took “The Kid” under their wing. And that’s the real story here, told through Vernick’s conversational text. It’s not so much about the baseball action but the team — barnstorming through the Northwest U.S. playing against male teams; experiencing ship life aboard the President Jefferson on the way to Japan; playing baseball in Japan; and learning about Japanese culture. Salerno’s appealing charcoal, ink, and gouache illustrations evoke a bygone era of baseball with smudgy-looking uniforms, sepia tones, and double-page spreads for a touch of ballpark grandeur. An informative author’s note tells more of Houghton’s story — the other women’s teams she played for, her job as a major league scout for the Philadelphia Phillies, and being honored at the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2006. An engaging story that reminds readers that “baseball isn’t just numbers and statistics, men and boys. Baseball is also ten-year-old girls, marching across a city to try out for a team intended for players twice their age.”

From the January/February 2016 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of The Kid from Diamond Street: The Extraordinary Story of Baseball Legend Edith Houghton appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of The Kid from Diamond Street: The Extraordinary Story of Baseball Legend Edith Houghton as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
3. Review of The Smell of Other People’s Houses

hitchcock_smell of other people's housesThe Smell of Other People’s Houses
by Bonnie-Sue Hitchcock
Middle School, High School   Lamb/Random   228 pp.
2/16   978-0-553-49778-6   $17.99
Library ed. 978-0-553-49779-3   $20.99   g
e-book ed. 978-0-553-49780-9   $10.99

Through sensory details that viscerally evoke the story’s physical and emotional landscapes, readers are transported to 1970s Birch Park, Alaska, where hunting and fishing are both livelihood and way of life for most families. As the book’s title suggests, richly described scents are pervasive. Sixteen-year-old Ruth associates the smell of freshly cut deer meat with her happy early-childhood home, in sharp contrast to the clinical, Lemon Pledge–clean of Gran’s house, where she and her sister have been raised in rigid austerity since their father’s death. A wealthy family’s lake house smells of cedar, while the heavily trafficked Goodwill “smells like everyone’s mud room in spring…moldy and sweaty.” Four distinct first-person narrative voices — no small feat — breathe life into the adolescent protagonists, whose engaging individual stories, thematically linked by loss and yearning throughout the seasons, are enriched by their intersections. Escaping her alcoholic father’s abuse and mother’s neglect, Dora finds a welcome haven in the bustling energy of Dumpling’s family’s fish camp. A few stolen nights with handsome Ray Stevens lands Ruth scared, alone, and pregnant on a bus to Our Lady of Perpetual Sorrow, an abbey with unexpected ties to her family. While some character crossings strain credulity, all the story lines are grounded in emotional honesty.

From the January/February 2016 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of The Smell of Other People’s Houses appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of The Smell of Other People’s Houses as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
4. Review of Here Comes Valentine Cat

underwood_here comes valentine catHere Comes Valentine Cat
by Deborah Underwood; 
illus. by Claudia Rueda
Preschool   Dial   88 pp.
12/16   978-0-525-42915-9   $16.99   g

Valentine’s Day has its haters, and Cat (Here Comes the Easter Cat, rev. 3/14, and sequels) is one of them. Cat can’t think of anyone to grace with a Valentine, and new neighbor Dog doesn’t seem a likely candidate, what with all the bones he annoyingly keeps lobbing over the fence. Using this series’ trademark format — offstage narrator addresses nonverbal Cat, who responds with humorous placards and body language — the book shows Cat’s escalating plans against Dog (starting, but not ending, with a few not-so-sweet Valentines), and then shows that Dog may not deserve such poor treatment. Rueda’s ink and colored-pencil illustrations, surrounded by white space, once again convey lots of information via Cat’s facial expressions and other simple cues. Young listeners should enjoy the simply delivered misunderstandings, as well as the opportunities to yell emphatically at the main character (“You can’t send Dog to the moon!”).

From the January/February 2016 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of Here Comes Valentine Cat appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of Here Comes Valentine Cat as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
5. Review of What Are You Glad About? 
What Are You Mad About?: Poems for When a Person 
Needs a Poem

viorst_what are you glad aboutWhat Are You Glad About? What Are You Mad About?: Poems for When a Person Needs a Poem
by Judith Viorst; illus. by Lee White
Primary, Intermediate   Dlouhy/Atheneum   102 pp.
2/16   978-1-4814-2355-7   $17.99   g
e-book ed. 978-1-4814-2355-1   $10.99

Viorst’s most famous book is Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, and this collection of over fifty poems expresses the same wry humor and sharp observation about the range of feelings children experience in their everyday lives. Viorst plays with school subjects such as reading, writing, and “arithmetrick” (in the “School Stuff” section), and there are poems about competition with friends (the “Friends and Other People” section), bossy moms (“About the Family”), and the mystery of time sometimes seeming fast and sometimes slow. But the strongest poems go to the heart of feelings, such as worrying: “I like the sun hot on my back. / If killer sharks did not attack, / I’d like beaches.” One especially poignant piece deals with breaking up with a best friend: “We’ve never had an argument, or even a small fuss, / But I’m not my best friend’s best friend anymore.” White’s illustrations bring zany humor to the poems, and even sometimes add their own little twist, as in “Whoops,” where a poem about trying to reach something high up is pictured with someone reaching for a treasure chest on the back of a dragon. From a riff on The Sound of Music (“My Least Favorite Things”) to a clever poem pondering the purpose of toes, this collection will delight kids and the adults who read it aloud, too.

From the January/February 2016 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of What Are You Glad About? 
What Are You Mad About?: Poems for When a Person 
Needs a Poem appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of What Are You Glad About? 
What Are You Mad About?: Poems for When a Person 
Needs a Poem as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
6. Review of Carry On: The Rise and Fall of Simon Snow

rowell_carry onCarry On: The Rise and Fall of Simon Snow
by Rainbow Rowell
High School   St. Martin’s Griffin   522 pp.
10/15   978-1-250-04955-1   $19.99
e-book ed. 978-1-4668-5054-5   $9.99

In Fangirl (rev. 11/13), protagonist Cath wrote fanfiction for the fictitious “Simon Snow” fantasy series. Now Rowell has written a novel set in Simon Snow’s universe and using many conventions of fanfiction, most notably “slash” (in this case non-graphic), usually defined as a wish-fulfilling relationship between two characters of the same sex who, in the original work, are not a romantic couple. Simon, the most powerful mage in centuries, uncovers secrets during his final year at Watford School of Magicks that call into question his long-held beliefs about sharp lines between good and evil. He also begins to realize that his obsession with his probably-a-vampire roommate Baz may not be purely antagonistic. The novel is longer than it needs to be — just kiss already, Simon and Baz — and the many alternating narrators are a little dense when it comes to solving several related mysteries. But there’s plenty to enjoy along the way, including clever names for spells (“These aren’t the droids you’re looking for” makes oddities like dragon parts on a human unnoticeable) and plenty of wit. Reading Fangirl first isn’t strictly necessary — the brief author’s note covers the basics — and the metatextual concept is somewhere on the spectrum between confusing and fascinating, depending on one’s perspective. A working knowledge of the Harry Potter books and other popular fandoms isn’t absolutely essential either, but it makes this send-up a lot more fun.

From the January/February 2016 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of Carry On: The Rise and Fall of Simon Snow appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of Carry On: The Rise and Fall of Simon Snow as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
7. 2015 Boston Globe-Horn Book Awards Speeches

While you’re gearing up for ALA Midwinter — in Boston! Home of The Horn Book! Come say hi at our booth! — you can enjoy the complete 2015 Boston Globe-Horn Book Awards speeches. Click on the tags BGHB15 and HBAS15 for timelines, pictures, and more. Photos, judges’ intros, and other information can be found in the January/February 2016 Horn Book Magazine. And as a bonus, we’re including Susan Cooper’s wonderful Horn Book at Simmons Keynote on the theme Transformations: “The World That Changes.

rundell_cartwheelingFiction Award Winner
Cartwheeling in Thunderstorms by Katherine Rundell

Fiction Honor Books

 

Nonfiction Award Winner
fleming_family-romanov_170x249The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion, & the Fall of Imperial Russia by Candace Fleming

Nonfiction Honor Books

 

frazee_farmer-and-the-clown_17-x137Picture Book Award Winner
The Farmer and the Clown
by Marla Frazee

Picture Book Honor Books

The post 2015 Boston Globe-Horn Book Awards Speeches appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on 2015 Boston Globe-Horn Book Awards Speeches as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
8. Review of A Year Without Mom

tolstikova_year without momstar2 A Year Without Mom
by Dasha Tolstikova; 
illus. by the author
Middle School   Groundwood   168 pp.
10/15   978-1-55498-692-7   $19.95
e-book ed. 978-155498-693-4   $16.95

Tolstikova’s illustrated memoir recounts the time when her mother relocated to America for graduate school and she, twelve years old, was left in the care of her grandparents in Moscow. Through present-tense narration, readers follow Dasha’s experiences chronologically as she navigates both specific and universal rites of passage, including uncertainty during the 1991 coup d’état attempt and distress when she learns that her crush, older boy Petya, has a girlfriend (who smokes cigarettes, no less!). Pencil and ink illustrations, in mostly whites and grays, emphasize the chilly setting. Color is used sparsely but to great emotional effect: bright reds on cheeks represent characters’ embarrassment; dark, smudgy grays dominate in moments of heartache. Most of the dialogue is in the same type as the main narrative but separated from it through thin speech bubbles drawn around characters’ statements. Hand-lettered text (sometimes incorporating Cyrillic) evokes mood as well, as seen when Dasha listens to her mother’s words (a letter left for her as a cassette recording) and they surround her, reflecting her longing. The author includes authentic details (including how the Russian grading system works) and, with personality and sincerity, 
creates an accessible, truthful, and relatable record for readers of a different generation.

From the January/February 2016 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of A Year Without Mom appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of A Year Without Mom as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
9. Review of Murphy in the City

provensen_murphy in the cityMurphy in the City
by Alice Provensen; 
illus. by the author
Preschool, Primary   Simon   32 pp.
11/15   978-1-4424-1971-1   $17.99
e-book ed. 978-1-4814-1832-4   $10.99

The small, busy, curious, noisy farm terrier from A Day in the Life of Murphy (rev. 7/03) is on his way to the big city with his family for a day of adventures (visits to a dog park and a doggie boutique) and misadventures (wandering off and a resultant brief stay at the animal shelter). Murphy’s unbounded energy is reflected in bustling city scenes that often include multiple images of Murphy; one particularly effective 
double-page spread contains three stacked horizontal panels in which a progression of Murphys explores a crowded and fascinating sidewalk — humans seen only from the knees down — after his accidental escape out the back door of the doggie boutique. This sense of motion and energy is 
reinforced in the all-caps typeface and in the endpapers — a riot of paw prints going every which way — not to mention Murphy’s own spiky fur, hyper-alert gazes, and many BARK BARK BARKs. The arc of the story, from early-morning enthusiasm to late-night exhaustion, will be both satisfying and familiar to children, who often follow that same arc in their own lives. After such a hectic and exciting day full of new sights, sounds, and experiences, everyone will be happy that Murphy ends up back home, curled up in the hay in the barn with his familiar toys: “Dear sock, good old bone, good old stick. / Sigh. / Good night.”

From the January/February 2016 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of Murphy in the City appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of Murphy in the City as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
10. Review of Ling & Ting: Together in All Weather

lin_ling and ting together in all weatherstar2 Ling & Ting: Together in All Weather
by Grace Lin; illus. by the author
Primary   Little, Brown   44 pp.
11/15   978-0-316-33549-2   $16.00

In this fourth book in the sweet and funny easy-reader series (Ling & Ting: Not Exactly the Same, rev. 7/10, and sequels), six brief chapters take the twins through the 
seasons, together. In the first story, a thunderstorm finds them hiding under a blanket: they are not scared, just 
“surprised.” On a hot summer day they sell all their 
lemonade — to each other. Raking leaves has to be done all over again, since first Ting’s red hat and then Ling’s might be at the bottom of the pile (later in the book, Ling’s hat turns up, at first mistaken for an unusual spring flower). In the winter, Ting claims to be sick so she can avoid shoveling snow; Ling’s recipe for some “old Chinese medicine” (a smelly simmering of onions, ginger, dirt, an old sock, etc.) drives a suddenly recovered Ting out of bed, snow shovel in hand. The final story finds the twins looking for a rainbow and finding two. “They are twin rainbows!” says Ting. “Just like us!…We are so lucky to be together!” As always, the girls’ personalities shine through in both text and illustrations (and Ting is still differentiated by her jagged bangs). Each chapter employs a different-color border around the bold gouache illustrations, giving the book a predictable and unifying visual structure. An artist’s note says, “The color palette was inspired by the sudden appearance of a bright rainbow on a gray, glum day.” That’s how the whole book feels.

From the January/February 2016 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of Ling & Ting: Together in All Weather appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of Ling & Ting: Together in All Weather as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
11. Review of Amazing Places

hopkins_amazing placesAmazing Places
selected by Lee Bennett Hopkins; illus. by Chris Soentpiet and 
Christy Hale
Primary, Intermediate   Lee & Low   40 pp.
10/15   978-1-60060-653-3   $18.95

The amazing places mentioned in the title of this poetry collection are all in the United States, with their locations marked on a map on the endpapers. The specificity of the places is a real strength of this compilation, with each of the fourteen poems centering on one particular location and the experience of being there. The focus is as much on people as on scenery, with many of the poems written in the first person, as with Janet Wong’s “Campfire,” set in Denali National Park: “Just think— / when Mother was my age, / she could build a fire / with sparks from rocks.” The art shows the mountain range in sunset colors, with firelight creating a cozy spot for mother and daughter to connect. While some poems are set in nature (Prince Redcloud’s “Niagara”; Nikki Grimes’s “Tree Speaks,” about Grand Canyon National Park), others are about historical sites, like Joseph Bruchac’s poem set in a longhouse at the Oneida Nation Museum in Wisconsin. Soentpiet and Hale combine their talents to showcase the special elements of a place (size or majesty or vibrancy) as well as the response of people to it, conveying powerful emotion and interactions through facial expressions and body language. Hopkins has gathered together an impressively diverse and talented group of poets for this polished and inspiring collection, which concludes with additional information about the places in the poems and source notes.

From the January/February 2016 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of Amazing Places appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of Amazing Places as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
12. Review of The Red Hat

teague_red hatThe Red Hat
by David Teague; 
illus. by Antoinette Portis
Primary   Disney-Hyperion   40 pp.
12/15   978-1-4231-3411-4   $16.99

With a nod to Albert Lamorisse’s film The Red Balloon, and with much of its tenderness, this fable-like story tells of Billy Hightower, whose isolated life atop “the world’s tallest building” changes when another skyscraper is built alongside it and Billy catches a glimpse of “the girl in the red hat.” Billy longs to communicate with the girl, but his various attempts fail, repeatedly foiled by the wind. First the wind snatches away Billy’s words, then it derails his paper-airplane missive. Finally it pulls Billy himself (wrapped in a parachute-like red blanket) off his building and into the sky, and deposits the boy on a noisy, gritty, confusing city street. Undaunted, he finds his way to the girl’s tower and is united with her. The ever-present antagonist here is the wind, pictured as a glossy, lightly embossed, swirling pattern on each page, a turquoise line against the restrained palette of black, white, taupe, sky-blue, and crimson. Teague’s rhythmical and unadorned text is fleshed out by Portis’s graphically arresting compositions. The color red, for example, has its own character and plot: the temporary roadblock of a red light, the welcoming red carpet, the subtly recurring shape of a red heart. When this love story ends with the words “The Beginning,” we believe it.

From the January/February 2016 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of The Red Hat appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of The Red Hat as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
13. Review of Dylan the Villain

campbell_dylan the villainDylan the Villain
by K. G. Campbell; illus. by the author
Primary   Viking   40 pp.
2/16   978-0-451-47642-5   $17.99   g

“‘Congratulations,’ said the doctor. ‘It’s a healthy little super-villain!’” Sweet, unsuspecting new parents Mr. and Mrs. Snivels are surprised by this development (and by the fact that they just “happened to have a baby”), but not disappointed. They tell their son Dylan, born wearing a purple mask and a fiendish expression, that he’s “the very best and cleverest super-villain in the whole wide world!” Dylan thinks so, too, until he goes to school and meets Addison Van Malice (sporting blue Princess Leia–style hair and a swashbuckling eye patch), who out-evils Dylan at every turn. Campbell’s soft-focus illustrations — rendered in watercolor and colored pencil on tea-stained paper — give all the characters personality, even those without speaking roles. The classroom of small villains is a hoot, and there are lots of dastardly details in the not-at-all-villainous art. The well-paced narrative’s comedic timing reinforces the absurdity of the premise. When a “most diabolical robot”–building contest is announced, Dylan seizes the chance to prove he’s more fiendish than Addison: “That hideous trophy…will be mine! All MINE!” And it is, after Dylan accidentally-on-purpose sends Addison and her menacing robot into space. And that’s that…or is it? In a satisfying twist, the final pages give Addison the last “MU-HA-HA-HA!!”

From the January/February 2016 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of Dylan the Villain appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of Dylan the Villain as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
14. Preview March/April 2016 Horn Book Magazine

March/April 2016 Horn Book MagazneBeverly Cleary’s 100th birthday: To mark the occasion, publisher David Reuther; authors Elaine Scott, Varian Johnson, Kurtis Scaletta, Kate Messner, and Tony DiTerlizzi; and librarian Julie Roach reflect on Beverly Cleary’s work.

Ibi Zoboi on building a “Fine Bookshelf” of mirror books. Plus, her interview with authors Edwidge Danticat and Rita Williams-Garcia.

The Writer’s Page: Marc Aronson discusses writing narrative nonfiction (versus informational nonfiction) with his wife Marina Budhos.

Field Notes: Betty Carter wonders what new chapter-book readers miss from the picture-book section.

Spring 2016 Publishers’ Previews.

From The Guide: Narrative Nonfiction.

Audiobook reviews.

The post Preview March/April 2016 Horn Book Magazine appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Preview March/April 2016 Horn Book Magazine as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
15. Review of What Are You Glad About? 
What Are You Mad About?: Poems for When a Person 
Needs a Poem

viorst_what are you glad aboutWhat Are You Glad About? What Are You Mad About?: Poems for When a Person Needs a Poem
by Judith Viorst; illus. by Lee White
Primary, Intermediate   Dlouhy/Atheneum   102 pp.
2/16   978-1-4814-2355-7   $17.99   g
e-book ed. 978-1-4814-2355-1   $10.99

Viorst’s most famous book is Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, and this collection of over fifty poems expresses the same wry humor and sharp observation about the range of feelings children experience in their everyday lives. Viorst plays with school subjects such as reading, writing, and “arithmetrick” (in the “School Stuff” section), and there are poems about competition with friends (the “Friends and Other People” section), bossy moms (“About the Family”), and the mystery of time sometimes seeming fast and sometimes slow. But the strongest poems go to the heart of feelings, such as worrying: “I like the sun hot on my back. / If killer sharks did not attack, / I’d like beaches.” One especially poignant piece deals with breaking up with a best friend: “We’ve never had an argument, or even a small fuss, / But I’m not my best friend’s best friend anymore.” White’s illustrations bring zany humor to the poems, and even sometimes add their own little twist, as in “Whoops,” where a poem about trying to reach something high up is pictured with someone reaching for a treasure chest on the back of a dragon. From a riff on The Sound of Music (“My Least Favorite Things”) to a clever poem pondering the purpose of toes, this collection will delight kids and the adults who read it aloud, too.

From the January/February 2016 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of What Are You Glad About? 
What Are You Mad About?: Poems for When a Person 
Needs a Poem appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of What Are You Glad About? 
What Are You Mad About?: Poems for When a Person 
Needs a Poem as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
16. Review of A Song for Ella Grey

almond_song for ella greyA Song for Ella Grey
by David Almond
High School   Delacorte   268 pp.
10/15   978-0-553-53359-0   $16.99
Library ed. 978-0-553-53360-6   $19.99
e-book ed. 978-0-553-53361-3   $10.99

A celebration of the wonderful madness of youth, and of the bemusing, soul-confusing power of aesthetic experience, lies at the heart of Almond’s lyrical, contemporary-set take on the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice. Set on the northeast coast of Britain, Almond’s story echoes that of the myth: teen Ella falls in love with Orpheus; they’re wed; Ella dies; and Orpheus retrieves her from death only to lose her at the last minute. Almond’s narrator, Ella’s best friend Claire, takes up her pen to bring her “friend into the world for one last night then let her go forever,” recalling the spiky conversations, parental disagreements, and school assignments that are part of her life and Ella’s. But she strives most to convey the experience of hearing Orpheus’s music, the inchoate yearnings and ecstasy it evokes in herself and her friends: “It was like being blessed,” she writes. “Like truly becoming ourselves. Like being loved.” Almond’s prose has always been intense, sensual, and vivid: here his very subject matter is intensity of feeling with a capital F. Cumulatively, from one page to the next, physical, emotional, and aesthetic bliss becomes ever more potent: a foundation for adult awareness, for the joy that lies in art, nature, and love.

From the November/December 2015 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of A Song for Ella Grey appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of A Song for Ella Grey as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
17. Review of Oskar and the Eight Blessings

simon_oskar and the eight blessingsOskar and the Eight Blessings
by Richard Simon and Tanya Simon; illus. by Mark Siegel
Primary, Intermediate   Roaring Brook   40 pp.
9/15   978-1-59643-949-8   $17.99

In 1938, the last night of Hanukkah coincided with Christmas Eve, and for a young Jewish refugee in Manhattan, both holidays provided blessings. Following Kristallnacht, Oskar’s parents had put him on a boat to New York with just the name and address of his aunt; his walk from the harbor takes him more than a hundred blocks up Broadway. Along the way he encounters friendly and helpful strangers, Macy’s Christmas windows, and Count Basie and Eleanor Roosevelt (whose historical presence in the city that night is confirmed in an author’s note). The changing light of the day and developing snow are beautifully conveyed in the illustrations, an engaging blend of large and small panels paced to echo the starts and stops and blessings of Oskar’s (successful) journey. An appended map of Manhattan details the route and visually reprises the gifts Oskar receives along the way.

From the November/December 2015 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of Oskar and the Eight Blessings appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of Oskar and the Eight Blessings as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
18. Shelf Lives: From Bookseller to Bestseller

The Books of Wonder mafia: George O'Connor, Julie Fogliano, Neal Porter (editor), Philip and Erin Stead, Nick Bruel with daughter Izzy, and store manager Jennifer Lavonier. Photo: Carina Vocisano.

The Books of Wonder mafia: George O’Connor, Julie Fogliano, Neal Porter (editor), Philip and Erin Stead, Nick Bruel with daughter Izzy, and store manager Jennifer Lavonier. Photo: Carina Vocisano.

When Brian Selznick first applied to work at Eeyore’s Books for Children on New York’s Upper West Side, he was given a children’s literature test by store manager Steve Geck. “I knew Where the Wild Things Are, the Remy Charlip book Fortunately, and some Dr. Seuss,” recalls Selznick. “One of the questions was, ‘What book would you recommend for a ten-year-old?’ and I think I wrote down a Dr. Seuss title. Steve basically told me to go away.”

Selznick got himself to a library, immersed himself in children’s books, and re-applied for the job — this time successfully. “I still didn’t know a huge amount, but Steve would send me home with a bag of books every night.”

Starting out as an author or illustrator can be difficult, but many aspiring children’s book creators have been able to delve deep into the world of kids’ books while working at stores such as Eeyore’s (which closed in 1993). Learning the trade of bookselling has taught them about both the economics and, indirectly, the craft of children’s books — and often gave them a community of like-minded souls. Thankful for both the bags of books he read and the people he met, Selznick — illustrator of the Caldecott-winning Invention of Hugo Cabret, Wonderstruck, the Doll People series, and, most recently, The Marvels, among many others — says, “It’s very easy to draw a line from Eeyore’s to everything I’ve done since.”

While talking to a selection of booksellers-turned-book-creators, I found that the lessons they learned from their time working at bookstores range widely, from the highly conceptual to the very practical. But everyone agrees that a central benefit stems from having ready access to many great children’s books.

Nick Bruel, creator of the Bad Kitty series of picture books and chapter books, was starting out as a cartoonist when he took a job at Manhattan’s Books of Wonder and became immersed in “this rich history of illustration. Your job is to get as many books as possible into the hands of children. To do that, you have to read a lot of children’s books. You have to figure out what works and why.” Bruel says he submitted material to publishers for four or five years “before I created something that was viable as a children’s book.”

Two-time Newbery Medal winner Kate DiCamillo (The Tale of Despereaux, Flora and Ulysses) worked at a Minneapolis book warehouse, the Bookmen, early in her career. As a “picker,” she had to pull books off the shelves and transport them from one floor to another for shipment. “I read a lot on the job. Is that terrible to say? I did. I read one miraculous book after another.” At Half-Price Books, the new-and-used-bookstore where she subsequently worked, she remembers

…mothers coming into the store clutching copies of Louis Sachar’s Holes and saying, “My son read this. He loved it. My son needs another book just like this one. Help me.” I remember standing there and saying, “Well, there isn’t another book just like this one. But let’s see, how about The Westing Game?” I loved it. All of it. All those people who read books and talked about books. Working [at those two places] gave me permission, hope, inspiration, an education.

It is hard to keep up with all the books published every year, even if that is your job. But Leo Landry (Eat Your Peas, Ivy Louise!), who worked at The Children’s Book Shop in Brookline, Massachusetts, for twenty years and now works at An Unlikely Story Bookstore and Café in Plainville (opened in 2015 by Diary of a Wimpy Kid creator Jeff Kinney and his wife, Julie), says: “Reading that many picture books helped me figure out their pacing, as an author and illustrator. It also really helped me find my own style as an artist. I learned what I liked.”

* * *

Interacting with children in bookstores has also influenced the work of children’s book creators. Franny Billingsley’s first novel developed from overhearing girls talking about books they loved.

These were upper elementary and middle-school kids, and they loved books about friendship. I don’t know how clearly I thought about it then, but Well Wished is about a complicated friendship, with a fantastical element. It’s the friendship that makes one protagonist do a really dangerous thing, which provides the catalyst for the main part of the plot.

Billingsley also conducted “about a million story-hours” during her twelve years at Chicago’s 57th Street Books. Although she considers herself a novelist at heart, she says that “because I read picture books aloud so often, I got them into my blood and my bones. I would see what made the kids laugh and what made them yawn, and I wrote a picture book [Big Bad Bunny], which was published after I left the store.”

Novelist Jenny Han (The Summer I Turned Pretty), too, saw the value of firsthand experience with her future audience. She was a graduate student in writing at The New School in New York when she started working at Books of Wonder. “It was a way to find out what was popular with kids, not just adults,” she says.

Terra Elan McVoy has worked at Little Shop of Stories in Decatur, Georgia, for ten years. The author of seven YA and middle-grade novels, including The Summer of Firsts and Lasts and Being Friends with Boys, McVoy says that running book clubs for girls has made her more aware of her audience. “As I am writing, I know that my middle-school girls may be reading my books. I don’t want to put anything in there that I wouldn’t be willing to talk about with them.”

Marika McCoola (Baba Yaga’s Assistant), who works at Porter Square Books in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has also found the feedback from young customers useful: “Watching elementary-school girls get excited about graphic novels made me excited that there was a place for my graphic novels.” McCoola’s Porter Square Books colleague Mackenzi Lee (This Monstrous Thing) says that her bookselling experience has given her an appreciation of the way good YA books develop exposition, story, and characters very quickly. “If readers are not hooked in the first few pages, they will put the book down.”

* * *

George O'Connor and Nick Bruel at Books of Wonder.

George O’Connor and Nick Bruel at Books of Wonder. Photo: Miriam Parnes.

Authors and illustrators who have worked in bookstores (and libraries, no doubt) are well aware of the gatekeepers who connect their books to young customers. Says Caldecott-winning illustrator Erin Stead (A Sick Day for Amos McGee), “You do realize that you have to get the books past the adults some of the time. But I don’t make books for adults. I mean, I don’t want an adult to read a book of mine and want to kill me, but they are not my main concern. I just want to make a good book.”

Stead worked at Books of Wonder at the same time as Nick Bruel and became part of a group that editor Neal Porter later called the “Books of Wonder mafia.” Surrounded by classics and out-of-print books, Stead found that many of “the illustrations are amazing but that the storytelling could be dated. A lot of the stories are basically about conforming. Books now show that kids can be different — they should be proud of it, that it makes us better.”

Other classics, though, provided invaluable lessons to up-and-coming creators. Books of Wonder mafia members Julie Fogliano (And Then It’s Spring, illustrated by Erin Stead) and Jason Chin (Redwoods; Gravity) both mention Ruth Krauss as inspiration. Krauss’s books made Fogliano “realize you don’t need characters and stories with a beginning, middle, and end.” And although Krauss’s I’ll Be You and You Be Me, illustrated by Maurice Sendak, is not one of Chin’s own personal favorites, he saw how it “speaks directly to kids. It’s a very tender book but not sentimental.”

Plus, these aspiring creators were surrounded by a constant stream of new, sometimes innovative books being published that offered them creative inspiration. Nick Bruel cites I Stink by Kate and Jim McMullan as one of the books that impressed him for not following a formula.

Right in the middle of these anecdotes about a truck, there’s an alphabet of all of the disgusting things that this truck wants to eat. The alphabet is not important to the story, but critical to the book as a whole. Picture books don’t necessarily have to be storybooks. Or rather, you can tell a story in myriad ways. I didn’t appreciate that until I was working at the store.

Peter Glassman, co-founder of Books of Wonder as well as an author himself (The Wizard Next Door; My Working Mom; My Dad’s Job), says that he doesn’t set out to hire talented writers and illustrators. He says the most important qualification is “an ability to communicate a love of books. If you can’t sell books, we have to close the store.” Elizabeth Bluemle has run The Flying Pig Bookstore in Vermont (with co-owner Josie Leavitt) while also writing several picture books (Tap Tap Boom Boom; Dogs on the Bed), but she keeps the roles very separate. “They are completely different zones of the brain. When I look at my work after it’s done, I think from a bookselling and teaching point of view about whether it has a resonance with an audience.”

Peter H. Reynolds (The Dot) had established himself as an author and illustrator before opening the Blue Bunny Bookstore in Dedham, Massachusetts, in 2003. Since then, the store has grown up with its audience. Having started with board books and picture books, it now includes a café and books for adults. “Being in touch with the front line — seeing how kids light up when a book is special — definitely inspires me,” says Reynolds.

The Blue Bunny Bookstore. Photo courtesy of Peter H. Reynolds.

The Blue Bunny Bookstore. Photo courtesy of Peter H. Reynolds.

* * *

Several authors and illustrators have also mentioned the benefit of knowing the behind-the-scenes maneuvering that goes into bookselling. While working on the Books of Wonder website and newsletter and on the sales floor, Jason Chin learned the nuts and bolts of how bookstores operate. Among other things, “I understand when I go to an event now that I should always thank the booksellers. It’s a lot of work.”

“It’s physically grueling,” agrees Bruel. “You are on your feet for hours a day, hauling boxes of hardcovers around. I think everyone in publishing needs to spend at least a month working in retail because you need to see what becomes of the end product you create.”

One of Brian Selznick’s duties at Eeyore’s was painting art on the store windows. “I would change them every couple of weeks. They had to look good from across the street and up close, and this training was helpful when it came to doing book covers because you want to grab people’s attention.”

George O’Connor, creator of The Olympians graphic novel series, was an illustration student at Pratt Institute when he started working at Books of Wonder. He credits the bookstore, rather than his schooling, for teaching him about the publishing industry. “There wasn’t much taught about the business side in my program. I got to meet tons of illustrators, authors, editors, and marketing people through the store.” He followed the advice that Shel Silverstein, a frequent customer, gave him: “Write your own books. Editors are looking for reasons to reject you and they might not like the writer you teamed up with. Plus, you get paid twice.”

Bluemle says she is “more realistic about some things,” such as book tours, because she has been a bookseller. “I didn’t have the illusion that I would have a hundred people at my readings in places where I didn’t have family and friends.” On the other hand, she says, “one of the great gifts [of being a bookseller] is that I know there is room enough for every good book to find its home.”

From the January/February 2016 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Shelf Lives: From Bookseller to Bestseller appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Shelf Lives: From Bookseller to Bestseller as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
19. Review of Courage & Defiance: Stories of Spies, Saboteurs, and 
Survivors in World War II Denmark

hopkinson_courage and defiance 2Courage & Defiance: Stories of Spies, Saboteurs, and 
Survivors in World War II Denmark
by Deborah Hopkinson
Middle School   Scholastic   339 pp.
9/15   978-0-545-59220-8     $17.99   g
e-book ed. 978-0-545-59222-2   $17.99

When Germany invaded Denmark in April 1940, the Nazis believed their small neighbor to the north would be a pushover. The Germans were partially right: the Danish government pretty much rolled out the red carpet for Hitler’s army. What no one foresaw was the way many Danes, angered by their leaders’ capitulation, would fight back. Some, like Tommy Sneum, spied on the Germans and fed intelligence to the British; others, like Niels Skov, sabotaged German vehicles and weapons; countless others worked together to warn and aid Danish Jews before they could be rounded up by the Nazis. Hopkinson pulls together these narratives, and others, with some truly propulsive storytelling (just try to put the book down during the tale of Sneum’s harrowing night flight across the English Channel) and great attention to the humanity involved. This will surely garner comparisons to Hoose’s The Boys Who Challenged Hitler (rev. 7/15), and while there is plenty of overlap between the two in terms of subject matter, Hopkinson’s account is a little broader in scope; where Hoose keeps a tighter narrative focus, Hopkinson opts for multi-player storytelling (and two helpful sections in the excellent back matter — “About Danish,” a pronunciation guide; and the self-explanatory “People in this book” — help readers navigate the material). Well-balanced and attractively designed (save for a few too many segments of text interrupted by full-page photo spreads), this is another strong showing from the reliable Hopkinson. A selected chronology, maps, bibliography, source notes, and photo credits are appended; index unseen.

From the November/December 2015 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of Courage & Defiance: Stories of Spies, Saboteurs, and 
Survivors in World War II Denmark appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of Courage & Defiance: Stories of Spies, Saboteurs, and 
Survivors in World War II Denmark as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
20. Review of On the Ball

pinkney_on the ballOn the Ball
by Brian Pinkney; illus. by the author
Preschool, Primary   Disney-Hyperion   32 pp.
9/15   978-1-4847-2329-6   $17.99

Pinkney’s latest picture-book offering begins on a soccer field, then takes flight as a young boy’s imagination soars. The opening text reads, “Owen loved playing ball,” and the accompanying illustrations show a boy first dribbling and then tripping over a soccer ball, because “playing ball…didn’t always love Owen.” Pinkney employs loose black ink brushstrokes accented with swabs of color that recall the style of his contemporary Chris Raschka to visually convey movement. This sense of motion is crucial to the success of the story, which has the intrepid Owen “chase down” the ball when it gets away from him. Fantastical scenarios show the ball floating away through the water, as Owen transforms into a merman; next rolling into “tangled bushes” with a now tiger-shaped Owen pursuing it. When the ball bounces off a cliff, Owen sprouts wings and flies after it, then finally brings it (and himself) back down to earth on the soccer field. Triumphant, a “fierce” and loose Owen now floats and flies through the game, having learned a lesson about focus and determination through a story that also offers an artful, subtle message about the importance of perseverance in life.

From the November/December 2015 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of On the Ball appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of On the Ball as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
21. Review of City of Halves

inglis_city of halvesCity of Halves
by Lucy Inglis
Middle School, High School   Chicken House/Scholastic   361 pp.
11/15   978-0-545-82958-8   $17.99   g
e-book ed. 978-0-545-83054-6   $17.99

While on reconnaissance for her lawyer father in the City of London, sixteen-year-old Lily is viciously attacked by a two-headed dog and discovers the existence of the other half of the City she thought she’d known all her life. Tall, “eerily beautiful” Regan saves her life with a transfusion of his blood, which miraculously heals her wounds. Lily is plunged into the world of the City’s unseen, inhuman inhabitants, the Eldritche, at a dangerous time when young girls are disappearing and monsters are at large; an ancient prophecy concerning Lily and Regan is coming to pass. The historically distinct City of London, surrounded by an ancient Roman wall and gates, is a perfect setting for Inglis’s credible blending of the mythological and modern and her appealingly extraordinary protagonists. A deft hacker, Lily follows leads for the missing girls into dangerous situations, from which Regan, Guardian of the Gates, rescues her more than once. Slowly unraveling mystery, fast-paced action, and preternatural romance will leave readers eager for the clearly projected sequel.

From the November/December 2015 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of City of Halves appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of City of Halves as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
22. Review of Game Changer: John McLendon and the Secret Game

coy_game changerGame Changer: John McLendon and the Secret Game
by John Coy; illus. by Randy DuBurke
Primary, Intermediate   Carolrhoda   32 pp.
10/15   978-1-4677-2604-7   $17.99
e-book ed. 978-1-4677-8810-6   $17.99

Based closely on a 1996 New York Times article by Scott Ellsworth, this picture book tells the dramatic story of an illegal college basketball game planned and played in secret in Jim Crow–era North Carolina. On a Sunday morning in 1944, while most Durham residents, including the police, were in church, the white members of the Duke University Medical School basketball team (considered “the best in the state”) slipped into the gym at the North Carolina College of Negroes to play the Eagles, a close-to-undefeated black team coached by future Hall of Famer John McClendon. What happened when “basketball of the present” (Duke’s three-man weaves and set shots) met “basketball of the future” (the Eagles’ pressure defense and fast breaks) is suspenseful, dramatic, and telling: the Eagles beat Duke 88–44. Afterward, pushing the boundaries even further, the players evened up the teams for a friendly game of shirts and skins. Coy’s succinct narrative is well paced, compelling, and multilayered, focusing on the remarkable game but also placing it in societal and historical context. DuBurke’s illustrations can be static at times but nicely capture the story’s atmosphere, from the tension of the Duke players’ covert arrival to the basketball action to the post-game geniality and then back to tension (since all parties, including several newspaper reporters, had to pledge to keep the day’s events secret to protect themselves and Coach McClendon). A fascinating story, with appeal far beyond sports- and history fans; appended with an author’s note, a timeline, and a brief bibliography.

From the November/December 2015 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of Game Changer: John McLendon and the Secret Game appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of Game Changer: John McLendon and the Secret Game as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
23. Horn Book Magazine – January/February 2016

January/February 2016 Horn Book Magazine

Table of Contents


Features

Horn Book Fanfare by Horn Book editors
Our choices for the best books of 2015.

Boston Globe–Horn Book Award Gallery 2015
Celebrating the year’s winners and honorees.
Fiction
Nonfiction
Picture Book

“The World That Changes” by Susan Cooper
Horn Book at Simmons keynote address on the theme “Transformations.”

“Shelf Lives” by Abby McGanney Nolan
From Bookseller to Bestseller.


Columns

Editorial
“Climbing the Walls” by Roger Sutton
YA that trusts its readers.

The Writer’s Page
“On Writing the American Familia” by Meg Medina
Addressing the complexity of Latino identity in children’s literature.

Cadenza
“Storyland: You Don’t Know Jack” by Ron Koertge
Jack be nimble, Jack be quick! Jack’s a brand now. Make it stick!

From The Guide
“Spanish-Language and Bilingual Books”
A selection of reviews from The Horn Book Guide.


Reviews

Book Reviews


Departments

On the Web
January/February Starred Books
Impromptu
Index to Books Reviewed
Index to Advertisers


Cover © 2016 by Marla Frazee. Page 1 art from My Bike. Illustration © 2015 by Byron Barton.


Subscribe

The post Horn Book Magazine – January/February 2016 appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Horn Book Magazine – January/February 2016 as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
24. Editorial: Climbing the Walls

Last month, while reading and re-reading books for The Horn Book’s annual “Fanfare” discussion, I teased followers of the Read Roger blog with mention of a book that had me excited for YA publishing all over again: “Granted, the half-dozen books I have to get through before [the meeting] are themselves already separated from the herd, and granted that you can still find plenty of formula in YA publishing, but at this minute I am feeling very proud of all you YA writers and editors and publishers.”

The book — now it can be told — was Nova Ren Suma’s The Walls Around Us, which is just one of several excellent YA novels to make our list of the best books of 2015, beginning in this issue on page 12. While I had known before reading it that the book was being passed around the Horn Book offices with fervent recommendations, I confess that overhearing the words ballet and horror had made me quietly resolve to ignore it if I possibly could. My mistake, and one fortunately rectified via professional obligation.

The Walls Around Us, along with A.S. King’s I Crawl Through It, Neal Shusterman’s Challenger Deep, and Tim Wynne-Jones’s The Emperor of Any Place, all also on the Fanfare list, are recommended for high school readers. This is not to say that younger readers should be steered away from these titles, simply that the books’ complexities will probably be best and likeliest approached by sixteen-year-olds rather than the twelve-year-olds who, twenty-five years ago, were in the sweet spot of YA publishing. And by complexities I don’t mean sexual material; while contemporary YA does sometimes make me blush, none of the four books I mention is notably juicy in that regard. Rather, the challenges they present are narratorial, each of them employing shifts in point of view, register, and timeframe, along with an elastic sense of realism, to tell their stories. While these novels are very different from one another, they are united in the generous trust they have in their readers to navigate the unexpected: a helicopter you can only see on Tuesdays (I Crawl Through It)? An island where you’re haunted by your future descendants (The Emperor of Any Place)? Is he on a boat, or what (Challenger Deep)? Wait, who’s dead (The Walls Around Us)? These writers do not hold our hands through the strangenesses but instead encourage us, through confident prose, to stay with them because we don’t want to be left behind.

We have known for a while that many, maybe most, readers of contemporary YA are adults. Nothing wrong with that in itself, of course, and these four books are evidence that such readers are not necessarily looking for something easy. (I believe I have said in the past that they were and herein Take It Back.) But, except insofar as their dollars might allow YA publishing to take risks, I don’t care about adults reading YA, do you? And what I love best about our Fanfare YA choices is that none of them is an adult book in disguise; each one approaches young adulthood from the inside — even if it’s from the inside of an invisible helicopter.

From the January/February 2016 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Editorial: Climbing the Walls appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Editorial: Climbing the Walls as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
25. Review of I Hear a Pickle (and Smell, See, Touch, 
and Taste It, Too!)

isadora_i hear a pickle2I Hear a Pickle (and Smell, See, Touch, and Taste It, Too!)
by Rachel Isadora; illus. by the author
Preschool   Paulsen/Penguin   32 pp.
1/16   978-0-399-16049-3   $16.99   g

Starting with a clever, attention-grabbing title, Isadora’s book about the five senses is aimed perfectly at another sense — kids’ sense of humor. Separate sections, beginning with sound and ending with taste, visit each sense in double-page spreads that contain small vignettes of children exploring their world, both indoors and out. Brief sentences describe what each child hears, smells, sees, touches, or tastes. Frequent statements about what the child doesn’t sense add levity: “I see the turtle’s shell but I don’t see the turtle”; “I don’t smell. I have a cold.” Interjections throughout, printed in italics, add read-aloud pleasure: “I touch my brother’s foot. Hee-hee. / I don’t touch my boo-boo. Ouch! / I don’t touch the plug. No-no!” Certain items are revisited in different sections: “I don’t hear the snow falling…I see the snow. I don’t see my mitten.” Delicate ink and watercolor illustrations on white backgrounds nicely elicit a young child’s point of view, such as when a girl peering over a counter can just barely see the pizza she smells. The final page wraps things up by going back to the titular pickle in all its sensory glory: “I taste the pickle. / It’s sour,” and so on until “I hear the pickle…CRUNCH!” Be sure to have a jar of baby dills on hand for this one.

From the January/February 2016 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

The post Review of I Hear a Pickle (and Smell, See, Touch, 
and Taste It, Too!) appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of I Hear a Pickle (and Smell, See, Touch, 
and Taste It, Too!) as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts