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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: AWARDS, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 26 - 50 of 2,647
26. Free Samples of NBA’s Longlist for Fiction

The National Book Foundation has revealed its Longlist for the 2014 National Book Award for Nonfiction for the National Book Award (NBA).

Below, we’ve collected free samples of all the books on the longlist for your reading pleasure. The finalists will be announced on October 15. Here’s more from the release:

The Fiction Longlist includes one book by a National Book Award Winner, two by former National Book Award Finalists, one by a National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 author, two by Pulitzer Prize Winners, and one by an author best-known as the lyricist and musician for the band The Mountain Goats. The backdrop of war and imagined dystopia is a focus of five of the ten. Three are collections of short stories, two of which are by first-time authors. (more…)

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27. Free Samples of NBA’s Nonfiction Longlist

nbaThe National Book Foundation has revealed its Longlist for the 2014 National Book Award for Nonfiction for the National Book Award (NBA).

Below, we’ve collected free samples of all the books on the longlist for your reading pleasure. The finalists will be announced on October 15. Here’s more from the release:

The Nonfiction Longlist includes the first cartoonist to be honored by the National Book Awards in the adult categories (three graphic novels have been Finalists in the Young People’s Literature category), a Pulitzer Prize Winner, and several distinguished historians. (more…)

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28. Roz Chast’s Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant on National Book Awards Longlist

chast Roz Chasts <em />Cant We Talk About Something More Pleasant</p> on National Book Awards Longlist

The National Book Awards longlist for Nonfiction has been announced  and it includes a graphic novel for the first time.  Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant, Roz Chast’s wry, honest memoir of her parent’s fading years, made the list; it was not only the only graphic novel but the only book by a woman to make the list.

The book is Chast’s first long-form comic—one can hope it won’t be her last—and has won both exemplary reviews and strong sales  since it came out in April.

Chast, best known for her New Yorker cartoons,  is only the second graphic novelist to make the NBA list; Gene Luen Yang was twice a finalist, for Boxers and Saints and American Born Chinese.

In case you haven’t noticed it, comics aren’t just for kids any more.

 

 

2 Comments on Roz Chast’s Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant on National Book Awards Longlist, last added: 9/19/2014
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29. Alison Bechdel wins a MacArthur Foundation Grant

 

bechdel 2014 hi res download 1 2 Alison Bechdel wins a MacArthur Foundation Grant

Alison Bechdel has been named one of this year’s MacArthur Foundation grant winners, often known as a genius grant.

Bechdel was cited for being

…a cartoonist and graphic memoirist exploring the complexities of familial relationships in multilayered works that use the interplay of word and image to weave sophisticated narratives. Bechdel’s command of sequential narrative and her aesthetic as a visual artist was established in her long-running comic strip, Dykes to Watch Out For (1983–2008), which realistically captured the lives of women in the lesbian community as they influenced and were influenced by the important cultural and political events of the day.

The grant confers not only recognition as a leading thinker, but a stipend of 625,000, paid in quarterly installments over five years. Recipients are chosen for their future potential and the grant allows is intended to “encourage people of outstanding talent to pursue their own creative, intellectual, and professional inclinations.”

Bechdel’s achievements in furthering the medium of the graphic novel—and her immense potential for future work—indeed makes her a worthy recipient. As if being a great cartoonist wasn’t enough, the musical adaptation of her book, Fun Home is coming to Broadway next April.

Cartoonist Ben Katchor was the first cartoonist to win a grant in 2000.

9 Comments on Alison Bechdel wins a MacArthur Foundation Grant, last added: 9/20/2014
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30. Free Samples of the NBA’s Poetry Longlist

nbaThe National Book Foundation has revealed its Longlist for the 2014 National Book Award for Poetry for the National Book Award (NBA).

Below, we’ve collected free samples of all the books on the longlist for your reading pleasure. The finalists will be announced on October 15. Here’s more from the release:

The Longlisted books range in style and content: from a single elegiac narrative poem to a provocative examination of race relations told in an experimental fusion of lyric, prose poems, and image. Among the poets on this year’s Longlist are two former National Book Award Finalists, two former Poets Laureate of the United States, a Pulitzer Prize winner, two Bollingen recipients, a Los Angeles Times Book Award winner, and a Whiting Writers’ Award winner.

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31. On-The Verge Emerging Voices AWARD

SCBWI Grant and Award Logos

The SCBWI established the On-The-Verge Emerging Voices Award in 2012 with funding from Martin and Sue Schmitt of the 455 Foundation. The grant was created to foster the emergence of diverse voices in children’s books.


Deadline: 

Applications accepted between September 15th and November 15th, 2014

Award:

Two writers or writer/illustrators will each receive:

  • An all-expense paid trip to the SCBWI Summer Conference in Los Angeles August 1-4, 2015 (transportation and hotel)
  • Tuition to the SCBWI Summer Conference
  • A manuscript consultation at the Summer Conference with an industry professional
  • An additional meeting with an industry professional
  • Tuition to the Summer Conference Writers or Illustrators Intensive
  • A press release

 

Eligibility:

Any writer or writer/illustrator from an ethnic and/or cultural background that is traditionally under-represented in children’s literature in America. (American Indian, Asian, Black or African American, Hispanic, Pacific Islander)

The manuscript must be an original work written in English for young readers and may not be under contract.  The applicant must be over 18, be unpublished, and should not yet have representation.

Guidelines: 

All applications will be accepted via email only between September 15th and November 15th at Voices@scbwi.org and must include the following:

In the body of the e-mail:

1. An autobiographical statement and career summary in less than 250 words.

2. Why your work will bring forward an underrepresented voice in less than 250 words.

3. A synopsis of your manuscript in less than 250 words.

Attached to the e-mail:

4. A PDF of your entire manuscript.  If the manuscript is not complete, it is not eligible.

The winners will be announced December 19, 2014 and the award presented at the 2015 SCBWI Summer Conference in Los Angeles, August 1-4.

When your work is published the author/illustrator should include in the acknowledgement “This book was made possible in part by a grant from SCBWI”

VIEW PAST WINNERS

Questions? voices@scbwi.org

Good Luck! Remember you can not win if you don’t submit.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Filed under: authors and illustrators, awards, Competition, Contest, opportunity, Places to sumit, Publishing Industry Tagged: ethnic and/or cultural background, On-The Verge Emerging Voices AWARD, SCBWI, Two Awards

1 Comments on On-The Verge Emerging Voices AWARD, last added: 9/16/2014
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32. 2014 Ignatz Award Winners IN FULL

agnatz2 2014 Ignatz Award Winners IN FULLWe’re live blogging the 2014 18th Annual Ignatz Awards—there’s a palpable buzz in the air as not only the traditional agentry of the awards un rolls, but additional pageantry in the shape of a wedding and a prom are on tap. As a reminder, the Ignatzes are perhaps the ONLY awards in any medium where people race back from dinner just so they can attend! The secret? brevity and a chocolate fountain!

And with no further ado, let’s get to it. Warren Bernard started out thanking the alt.weekly crew, including Jules Feiffer, Lynda Barry and Charles Burns. Mike Thomas is our mc and will be officiating at the Hanselmann wedding.

IN 20145 the dates will be Sept. 18-19, and it will be a 21st Century focus with Michael DeForge, Matt Bors, Lilli Carre and Luke Pearson. In 215 will be choosing and with Bill K will be curating show at the Society of Illustrators dedicated to Alt.weekly cartoonists. The SOI has joined up with SPX! and what else can happen. Lynda Barry Ellen Forney, Millionaire, Knight, Sorenson, Derf and more will be in the show, the show will open in early March. BE THERE.

Sturm says there are the two reasons that the Ignatzes are the best awards; it’s the shortest and the coolest award—a brick.

IF we are in the glden age of comics, then all the cartoonists in this room are the gold,” says Sturm to an awwwwwww. And then I said…awwwwwww. “As an idle remember of this tribe I can tell you from experience it doesn’t get any easier, but that is why tonight is a night we revel. It’s important to take a break from our drawing boards and tablets to celebrate our accomplishments.”

Fabulous Sasha Steinberg Velour is out to present Outstanding Story to Meredith gran. “Comcis is the most fun thing I can imagine doing, I wake up thinking about them and go go bed thinking about them I can’t think of anything I want to do more.”

Chuck Forsman came out to Present outstanding Anthology to Qu33F edited by Robert Kirby. The Next presenter is is Alec Longstreth who presents Best Series to Jason Shiga who delivers an amusing speech plugging his Patreon campaign. GIVE TO JASON SHIGA. AND THE BEAT!

Sasha has taken over as host and delivers some fierce intros.

Brandon Graham presents Promising New Talent to Cathy G. Johnson. “I love coifs it’s a very imprint medium to me, I love this culture and this community that we’ve cerated I feel very welcome in it. It can also be frustrating. I feel like this year and many years in the past a lot of our peers have experienced harassment, esp. female peers and I think we need o work harder to reject this,” PREACH IT SISTER!

Eleanor Davis says it’s great that everyone loves comics even though it strange that we all fell in love with it. But the nominees ensure that people will keep falling in love with comics. And the inner is Sam Alden who says merely Thank You. Aisha Franz from Germany present Best Minicomics to Sophie Goldstein, who thanks her teachers at CCS, a class of 2013 grad. A very strong year, it turns out. Sophie Yanow presents Outstanding ONline Comic to EVan Dahm a very popular winner. “This show is important to me, comics are my life so thanks for liking it.”

Paul Karasik presents Outstanding Graphic Novel. Karasik urges everyone to go around and find someone who is not busy and buying something from them. “I found some very storage things today for $3 so that’s your assignment.” He presents best Graphic Novel to Jillian Tamaki for This One summer. Finally John Porcellino come sour to give Outstanding Artist to Sam Bosma. Hey I voted for him! AND now, let’s have a wedding! And let’s all give all our love to COMICS!

Outstanding Story
*“Brownout Biscuit” (from Octopus Pie): Dead Forever, by Meredith Gran
“Destination X,” by Jon Martz
“The Grassy Knoll,” by Nick Drnaso
“Jobs,” Life Zone, by Simon Hanselmann
“Mom,” Viewotron #2, by Sam Sharpe

Outstanding Anthology or Collection
Amazing Facts and Beyond, by Kevin Huizenga and Dan Zettwoch
The End, by Anders Nilsen
Eye of the Majestic Creature (Vol. 2), by Leslie Stein
*QU33R, edited by Robert Kirby
Sock Monkey Treasury, by Tony Millionaire

Outstanding Series
The Black Feather Falls, Ellen Lindner
*Demon, by Jason Shiga
Powdered Milk, by Keiler Roberts
Sky in Stereo, by Sacha Mardou
Towerkind, by Kat Verhoeven

Promising New Talent
Luke Howard — Trevor
*Cathy G. Johnson – Jeremiah; Boy Genius; Until It Runs Clear
Nick Offerman — Orange; Onions
Keiler Roberts — Powdered Milk (series)
Daryl Seitchik — Missy

Outstanding Comic
Blammo #8, by Noah Van Sciver
Cosplayers, by Dash Shaw
It Will All Hurt #2, by Farel Dalrymple
Misliving Amended, by Adam Buttrick
*Wicked Chicken Queen, by Sam Alden

Outstanding Minicomic
The Grassy Knoll, by Nick Drnaso
*House of Women, by Sophie Goldstein
Never Forgets, by Yumi Sakugawa
Test Tube #1, by Carlos Gonzales
Up to the Top, by Ian Sampson

Outstanding Online Comic
Band for Life, Anya Davidson
Big Dogs at Nite, Dane Martin
Demon, Jason Shiga
On Hiatus, Pete Toms
*Vattu, Evan Dahm

Outstanding Graphic Novel
The Amazing, Enlightening and Absolutely True Adventures of Katherine Whaley, by Kim Deitch
The Boxer, Reinhard Kleist
Boxers & Saints, by Gene Luen Yang
*This One Summer, by Jillian Tamaki and Mariko Tamaki
War of Streets and Houses, Sophie Yanow

Outstanding Artist*Sam Bosma — Fantasy Basketball
Kim Deitch — The Amazing, Enlightening and Absolutely True Adventures of Katherine Whaley
Sophie Goldstein — Darwin Carmichael Is Going to Hell; Edna II; House of Women
Ed Piskor — Hip Hop Family Tree (Vol. 1)
Jesse Reklaw — Coach Tag

2 Comments on 2014 Ignatz Award Winners IN FULL, last added: 9/15/2014
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33. Ursula LeGuin to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award

Ursula K. LeGuinSci-fi novelist Ursula K. Le Guin will received the National Book Awards 2014 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. Le Guin will be honored at the 65th  National Book Awards Ceremony and Benefit Dinner in New York on November 19th. Author Neil Gaiman will present her with the award.

“Ursula Le Guin has had an extraordinary impact on several generations of readers and, particularly, writers in the United States and around the world,” stated Harold Augenbraum, Executive Director of The National Book Foundation. “She has shown how great writing will obliterate the antiquated—and never really valid—line between popular and literary art. Her influence will be felt for decades to come.”

The award was created in 1988 and Le Guin will be the twenty-seventh author receive the honor. She joins Toni Morrison, E.L. Doctorow, John Ashbery, Joan Didion, Elmore Leonard, Norman Mailer and Tom Wolfe among others.

As usual, GalleyCat will be reporting live from the awards event, check back in November for our live coverage.

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34. Fantoche Winners: ‘Bigger Picture’ Takes Top Prize

Daisy Jacobs' "The Bigger Picture," a graduation film from Britain's National Film and Television School, won the top prize at the 12th annual Fantoche animation festival, which wrapped up last Sunday in Baden, Switzerland.

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35. Booktrack & Hugh Howey Reveals Winners of Writing & Sound Design Contest

Unknown1Author Hugh Howey, digital writing community Wattpad and eBook soundtrack company Booktrack have revealed the winners of their collective new writing and audio production contest.

Elodie West has won the prize for best work of fan fiction based on Howey’s recent bestseller Half Way Home for her submission World EaterJamie Terry has won the  prize for the best soundtrack to accompany a chapter from Howey’s book. Both creators will receive $5,000 for their winning submissions. In addition, Terry has earned the opportunity to co-produce a soundtrack for Howey’s latest novel The Hurricane. Howey will also give West editorial feedback on up to 10,000 words of original writing.

More than 200 people entered during the two-month contest period. The judges narrowed it down to 10 finalists. All finalists will receive $1,000 prizes for their submissions. Here is more about the finalists from the press release: (more…)

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36. 2014 Harvey Awards unspool

photo

 

Live from Baltimore, the 2014 Harvey’s are unspooling. Will our computer battery hold out? Will our attention span survive? I’m not sure, but we’ll give it a try.

uslan

This year’s mc is Michael Uslan who claims that everything he learned about dating came form Archie Comics, leading to disappointment when his hometown had no malt shop. Uslan mentions Stan Lee and Marvel comics and being at the growing world of fandom and writing for fanzines 50s years ago. Uslan recalls as a teen seeing Otto Binder at a sketchy bar following a local NYC con. Binder offered to introduce them to the creator of Batman and then said “Boys, this is Bill Finger.”

“Thank god, thank god, we’re cool at least,” Uslan says after tracing the history of the growing rise of comics. “Today we are geek bearing gifts and our gift to the world is comics.”

Gail Simone is the keynote speaker! She says she had a speech prepared but decided not to give it. “Because of recent events in the comics and gaming industries I want to talk about women in comics.”

 

 

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37. Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Shortlist Revealed

shortlistThe Center for Fiction has unveiled the annual shortlist for the Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize, a prize that carries $10,000 for a debut novel. Seven first-time novelists made the list. Judges this year include last year’s winner Margaret Wrinkle, as well as David Gilbert, Tayari Jones and Sigrid Nunez.

All of the short-listed authors will give a reading at the Center for Fiction on December 8th. The winner will be announced the next night at The Center for Fiction’s Annual Benefit and Awards Dinner in New York. Wrinkle will present the award. All of the runners up will receive a $1,000 prize.

Explore the shortlist after the jump. (more…)

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38. LeVar Burton Wins the Geek of the Year Award

LeVar Burton has won in the “Geek of the Year” category at the 2nd annual Geekie Awards. He received a special limited edition Gibson guitar as his prize.

The video embedded above features Burton singing the Reading Rainbow theme song and delivering his acceptance speech. What do you think? (via Tech Times)

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39. Two Awards and Apologies for the Long Silence

Inspiring Blogger Award from
Julia Hones

Liebster Award from Sandra Cox
See below the info that comes with
the Inspiring Blogger Award















First the apologies for not blogging. 
1.) I've been busy working on my mystery. My goal is to finish this draft by mid-September. There's 24-25 chapters in mind, and I'm on chapter 17 so far. 
2.) We've had company and made a couple of out-of-town trips to visit folks we hadn't seen for a long time, due to travels. 
And 3.) We are getting ready for another long trip to Spain and Portugal. (I haven't even finished blogging about the last trip, but that's how it goes sometimes. Oh, the stories I'd like to tell!)

Meanwhile, two very nice blog friends gave me awards that you can see at the top of this page and read about below. Thank you so much, ladies!

Julia Hones gave me the Inspiring Blogger Award, which I find quite an honor. Julia has a marvelous blog called My Writing Life that I love to read and find inspiring in its own right, and you will too, so do check it out. She's also had many short stories and poems published and is the poetry editor of Southern Pacific Review

As a recipient of the award, I'm supposed to reveal 7 things about myself and then pass the award on to others whose blogs I find inspiring. Hmm. 7 reveals . . . Okay, here we go.

1. In my junior year in college, after finals, I let a girlfriend talk me into bleaching my hair blonde. (She was bleaching her hair, and we were hyper from finals, so I thought, "Why not?") Because I have a lot of red in my hair, it went red instead of blonde. Because I have a few freckles, everyone who met me as a redhead thought I really was a redhead -- to the point that when I got tired of it and decided to dye it back to dark brown, I was told, "No, don't do that, it won't look natural."

2. My favorite dessert is a cookie. Forget pies, cakes, and rich creamy custards. Give me a cookie. Any cookie, although I like sugar, shortbread, oatmeal, or peanutbutter the best.

3. I am a crossword puzzle nut. I love the New York Times crossword puzzle. I can't always finish it (Fridays and Saturdays), but I usually start the day with it. For one thing, it wakes me up and gets the wheels turning for writing later in the day.

4. My husband and I met through a cat named Meathead. That is a ve-r-r-r-y long story, that only some of our friends know and would take up too much space here. But we have very fond feelings for our feline cat-alyst from long ago.

5. I used to write everything in longhand first, but the computer has spoiled me. Cut and paste is so convenient. Even so, I miss that feeling of connection between pen or pencil and heart, and I still write my poetry first in longhand.

6. This is probably a horrible confession for an author to make, particularly one who writes children's books, but . . . I never liked The Wind in the Willows. I know, I know, one of the world's great classics. What's wrong with me! But I never could get into it, no matter how many times I tried. 

7. I loved Edith Nesbit and Edgar Eavers, though. And they stand the test of time. I re-read a couple of their books recently and still found them so funny.

And now the nominees:
1. Keith Wynne has a truly inspiring blog called Musings of an Unapologetic Dreamer . He'll also send a little blurb via email called Thought of the Day, if you sign up for it at his site. I bookmark nearly everyone of these blurbs, as they are quite pithy and inspiring.

2. Catherine Ensley is an author of inspirational romance novels and is writing a four-part series. On her blog she "shares her thoughts on country life, simple living, adventure, reading, writing and faith that transforms." I think you will find it very enjoyable. 

3. Victoria Lindstrom's Writ of Whimsy blog is rich with Middle Grage book reviews, poetry tidbits, thoughts on writing, and a section I love, "Whimsical Word of the Week." Check out her site; it's great fun.

4. Lynda Young has a wonderful blog called W.I.P. It: an Author's Journey in which she addresses many issues for writers with insights and reminders that are so helpful to all of us on this common journey. 

5. Check out Carol Riggs, a published YA author with a personable writing style. Her blog, Artzicarol Ramblings, is full of writing tips, YA book reviews, and shares of her own personal journey with agents and publishers. 

6. Renee Hand's The Crypto-Capers Review is a children's book review blog as well as a platform for her radio show, Stories from Unknown Authors. Renee also writes winning interactive mysteries. How cool is that? Check out her site, and you may find yourself being interviewed if you've written a children's book.

7. Mark Noce has a rather eclectic blog, sharing news about his flash fiction publications, gardening, music he likes, and news about other writers. It's always a feel-good experience to read one of his posts. 

On to the Liebster Award, which Sandra Cox kindly gave to me. Sandra's blog is called, not surprisingly, Sandra's Blog  . Sandra is a prolific blogger as well as a prolific author. Spend a little time at her site. Her pictures will make you smile. Meanwhile, the Liebster Award is given to bloggers with less than 200 followers, ferreting out blogs you think are worthy of more followers. (Thank you, Sandra!) The rules for accepting the award are to share 11 random facts about myself, answer 11 questions posed by the blogger who nominated me, nominate 11 bloggers who qualify, and pose 11 questions to them. Happily, Sandra modified the rules, asking 6 questions, and nominating 5 newbies. So I am following her lead:

The questions she asked:
1. If you were an animal, what would you be? Probably a dog. I love animals, but dogs have a special place in my heart. They are so loving and loyal.
2. What is your favorite genre? That's a hard one. Mysteries and historical novels are about equal.
3. When reading, do you prefer paper or a hand held device? Paper, for sure!
4. What's your favorite vacation spot? Galicia, Spain. 
5. What's your favorite charity? Another hard one. We contribute to a number. I suppose Southern Poverty Law Center, a remarkable organization that goes after hate groups in this country and prosecutes hate crimes.
6. If given the choice, where would you live? Right where we live now. As a runner up, Galicia would be next, but we are quite happy where we are.

Okay, my nominees are:
Richard Hughes at Writing and Living by Richard P. Hughes , is an eclectic blogger, sharing thoughts about writing, art, life in general, publishing issues. Right now he's running an interesting series of interviews with other bloggers, called, "Where I Live and Why I Like It.

Rosi Hollinbeck at The Write Stuff reviews children's books, interviews authors, and does a wonderful job of culling and sharing links to help writers in every sphere of writing. I always look forward to her posts, and you will too.

Kenda Turner at Words and Such post book reviews, interviews, and shares rich thoughts about the writer's journey. Always a good read.

Loretta Proctor at Books and Other Things blogs about books, art, and music, "and all things creative and beautiful." Her current post is about Seamus Heaney, one of my favorite poets.

Jeanmarie Anaya's delightful blog, Jeanmarie Anaya is definitely worth your while. Humorous, pithy, eloquent. She writes about a number of writing issues, and wrote a lovely tribute to Robin Williams. 

And here are my six questions for these worthy recipients:
1. Where is your favorite place to read a book?
2. When beginning a new W.I.P., do you write by hand or wordprocess?
3. What are three of your favorite books? 
4. If you could be a character in a novel you've read, who would you be?
5. Which author, living or dead, do you wish you had the opportunity to meet?
6. When did you begin to write for yourself (as opposed to doing early homework assignments)?

And that's it, folks. I look forward to your comments, (feel free to answer any of the questions I posed for the nominees), and I do hope you check out the blogs in both sections of this post.

Ciao for now . . .

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40. Pen Center USA Unveils 24th Annual Literary Award Winners

PEN Center USA has unveiled some of the winners of the 24th annual literary awards. Each writer will receive a one thousand dollar cash prize.

At this point in time, the Graphic Literature Award winner and the recipient of the organization’s Award of Honor have not yet been revealed. The group will be honored at the 24th annual literary awards festival. Check out the list of winners below.

(more…)

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41. 2014 American Poets Prize Winners

The Academy of American Poets has revealed the winners of the 2014 American Poets Prizes. The organization will give out more than $200,000 to poets in award money.

Robert Hass has won the Wallace Stevens Award, an honor which recognizes “proven mastery in the art of poetry” and comes with a $100,000 stipend. Hass is the author of a number of collections of poetry including The Apple Trees at Olema: New and Selected Poems. Tracy K. Smith has received the Academy of American Poets Fellowship, which recognizes ”distinguished poetic achievement” and comes with a stipend of $25,000. Her most recent collection, Life on Mars, won the Pulitzer Prize

Rigoberto González’s book Unpeopled Eden has received the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize, which includes a $25,000 purse. The award  ”recognizes the most outstanding book of poetry published in the United States in the previous year.” Brian Blanchfield’s book A Several World  has been awarded the James Laughlin Award, a prize for a “superior second book of poetry by an American poet,” which carries a $25,000 prize. (more…)

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42. The Empire Strikes Back

No Fighting1 The Empire Strikes BackALSC Past-President Starr LaTronica responds to my July editorial. Incidentally, we’re publishing a terrific piece in the November issue by Thom Barthelmess (former ALSC prez and BGHB chair) about how to conduct oneself in a professional book discussion. Thom is far more temperate about these things than am I.

share save 171 16 The Empire Strikes Back

The post The Empire Strikes Back appeared first on The Horn Book.

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43. The Voice of Reason

Thank you for the opportunity to respond to The Horn Book’s July/August 2014 editorial (“Don’t Speak!”) regarding the ALSC Policy for Service on Award Committees that was revised during the 2014 ALA Midwinter meeting.

In response to the ever-increasing number of requests regarding the appropriate use of social media from conscientious award committee members wishing to respect the code of confidentiality that has sustained the stature of these venerable awards well, the ALSC Board of Directors established a task force (TF) to examine the current policies and bring forth recommendations. The TF was intentionally designed to include a range of member and stakeholder thinking, and consisted of a representative from the publishing profession and four past or current award committee chairs; one of whom is a reviewer and blogger of national reputation, another of whom has served as consultant to the award committees for the past three years and has grappled with the queries and concerns from circumspect members and chairs. The issue of confidentiality within the changing landscape of electronic communication and social media was carefully considered. Many colleagues, including children’s librarians and publishers beyond those who actually served on the TF, were surveyed and consulted.

The TF and the ALSC Board absolutely acknowledge and respect the role that social media play in the professional responsibilities of librarians. We recognize their benefits and power in accessing, assessing, and promoting books and information to our colleagues and to our clientele. We value the dynamic discussion that they facilitate amongst passionate professionals. We appreciate the possibilities for enriching our service and our lives. However, we recognize that there are pitfalls as well. As former Horn Book editor Paul Heins observed in a School Library Journal letter to the editor from May 1972, “Twentieth Century life has become overorganized and overcomplex,” and that was over forty years and several eons ago.

Privacy is a price one may pay for public dissemination of information and opinion. As information professionals we have always worked to balance the public’s right to know with the individual’s right to privacy. ALSC award committee members value the confidentiality that guards the privacy of all committee discussion and fosters an environment of candor, honesty, and flexibility. Indeed, the preservation of this policy has kept the awards, as noted in your editorial, “admirably if boringly scandal-free.” Committee members are free to speak frankly, ask questions, and change their minds without worry that their comments will be repeated or even implied beyond that meeting room. If these confidences are compromised, and the effects compounded through global dissemination by electronic means, it could have a chilling result. This courtesy also extends to authors and illustrators whose work is under consideration. Many have heard Lauren Myracle speak of her public embarrassment when Shine was mistakenly announced as being on the short list for the National Book Award. When committee conjecture or inside information is released, it travels far and fast and can never be fully retrieved, much like the old folktale of gossip and feathers in the wind. Such a situation would undermine both the process and the perception of these prestigious awards. Committees of the present and future deserve the same protections and considerations as committees of the past.

A receptive atmosphere is also cultivated when members enter into the discussions with an open mind and without taking an official, public position on any title prior to discussion. Such a stance, whether endorsement or indictment, does have an influence on the ensuing deliberations, where every title should begin on level ground. While committee members are encouraged to discuss their opinions verbally (despite the title of the editorial), when commending or condemning an eligible title in writing via blog post, tweet, email, or signed review, a member is establishing a viewpoint from which the rest of the committee must then work. Readers of blogs and recipients of email are not under a confidentiality agreement and not constrained from forwarding on a committee member’s opinion, thus increasing the influence exponentially. As Miss Cary exhorts Benji in Christopher Paul Curtis’s novel The Madman of Piney Woods, “The written word is different. Once you commit something to print, you are, in effect, chained to it. It is always available to be looked at again and traced back to you.” That is true more than ever these days.

Despite the assertions of your editorial, librarians (and editors of review journals) who serve on award committees are still “able to promote good books” and fulfill their professional responsibilities (and pleasures) in many ways:

• Members of all committees may write and publish unsigned reviews of any book.

• Members of all committees (except the Batchelder) may write signed reviews or discuss via social media any book previously published in other countries, or by an author or illustrator who is not an American citizen or resident.

• The Batchelder committee members may write signed reviews or discuss via social media any book that has not been translated.

• Books with no illustration provide a wide field for members of the Caldecott committee.

• Books with no text are available for Newbery committee members (and seeing that all three Caldecott Honor Books qualified for that category this year, it would seem a rich field).

• The Belpré committee members are welcome to write signed reviews or discuss via social media any books by non-Latino authors and illustrators.

• Members of the Sibert committee may write signed reviews or discuss via social media all works of fiction.

• Geisel committee members may write signed reviews or discuss via social media any books beyond the scope of a beginning reader.

• The wide and wonderful world of YA literature is available to all of us who value and evaluate literature for older youth.

The editorial calls for “more fresh air” in the awards program. Luckily, there is a plethora of blogs and discussion lists offering ample opportunity to follow the thoughts and insights of well-read colleagues who are not serving on award committees and to engage in communal speculation and promotion of worthy titles — combining electronic communication and professional expertise for the best possible advantage and allowing us to participate vicariously without jeopardizing the purity of the process and dissipating the distinction of the awards, as with the editorial’s example of the Children’s Choice Book Award, where too many voices can crescendo into cacophony.

I confess that I am perplexed by the comment that impugns the integrity of members who contribute unsigned reviews “and remain free to revel in the attentions of publishers eager to wine and dine them.” The implication is that attending a publisher’s event without making a public declaration about a book is somehow unethical. I know of no member, reviewer, or editor of a review journal, whether penning an opinion or not, who would be influenced in such a manner. While some committees and individual committee members occasionally do decide to forego such invitations, that is their prerogative.

I am indebted to award committee members for their dedication to service and for requesting clarifications that have led to examination of the policy. I honor their concern and commitment to maintaining the ethical standards that underpin the eminence of these awards, and their understanding that awards of distinction (e.g., the National Book Award, The New York Times Best Illustrated Children’s Books, etc.) carry a commitment to a certain level of comportment. They have our complete trust and confidence.

I am proud to be a member of this passionate profession and am grateful to all those who have added their voice to this discussion. Even when we may differ in opinion on process, I know that ultimately we all agree in principle — we want the very best for children. I invite any interested parties to peruse the official documents.

Roger Sutton responds:

I also encourage Horn Book readers to examine ALSC’s award guidelines and commentary at the link Starr provides, as well as to look at my editorial and the (sometimes heated!) comments it engendered.

From the September/October 2014 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

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44. Maxine Hong Kingston & Julia Alvarez Honored as Recipients of the National Medal of Arts

Writers Maxine Hong Kingston and Julia Alvarez have been awarded the National Medal of Arts.

Here’s more from the press release: “The National Medal of Arts is the highest award given to artists and arts patrons by the federal government. It is awarded by the President of the United States to individuals or groups who are deserving of special recognition by reason of their outstanding contributions to the excellence, growth, support, and availability of the arts in the United States.”

President Barack Obama himself presented all the recipients with their medals in a ceremony at the White House. Follow these links to check out podcasts featuring Kingston and Alvarez. (Photo Credit: Jocelyn Augustino)

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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45. ‘Bob’s Burgers,’ ‘Mickey Mouse,’ Harry Shearer Win Primetime Emmys

Last night was a night of cartoon firsts at the 2014 Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards as "Bob's Burgers," "Disney's Mickey Mouse" shorts, and "Simpsons" voice actor Harry Shearer each won an Emmy Award for the first time.

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46. Sample the Best Science Fiction of 2014

The 2014 Hugo Award winners have been revealed. Below, we’ve linked to free samples of the winning books for your reading pleasure.

The winners were introduced at Loncon 3, the 72nd World Science Fiction Convention.

A total of 3,587 ballots were cast this year. (more…)

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47. Daniel Hannan Has Won the Paolucci Book Award

British politician and journalist Daniel Hannan has won the  2014 Henry and Anne Paolucci Book Award for his book Inventing Freedom: How the English-Speaking Peoples Made the Modern World. The award honors “the best work of conservative scholarship published in the previous year.”

Hannan was selected from a shortlist of five writers who were also nominated for the award including: Mary Eberstadt (How the West Really Lost God: A New Theory of Secularization); Samuel GreggBecoming Europe: Economic Decline, Culture, and How America Can Avoid a European FutureArthur Herman (The Cave and the Light: Plato versus Aristotle) and Yuval Levin (The Great Debate: Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine, and the Birth of Right and Left).

Hannan will receive a $5,000 cash prize. He will also deliver a public lecture on the book and do a book signing on Wednesday, October 8, at 5:30 p.m. at The University and Whist Club in Wilmington, DE.

 

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48. Academy Reveals 21 Contenders for 2014 Sci-Tech Oscars

Last Friday the Scientific and Technical Awards Committee of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced a list of 21 scientific and technical achievements in 16 different areas, which have been selected for further awards consideration.

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49. Mishra and Shakeen win CRNI’s 2014 Courage in Editorial Cartooning award

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Michael Cavna has details on the winners of this year’s Award for Courage in Editorial Cartooning presented by the Cartoonists Rights Network International. The award is presented to “a cartoonist in great danger who has demonstrated exceptional courage in the exercise of free-speech rights under extraordinary circumstances.”

The winners this year are Kanika Mishra from India and Palestinian Majda Shaheen.

In the face of death threats against her and her family, the Mumbai-based Kanika Mishra took on the “outrageous hypocrisy” of popular religious leader Asaram Bapu, who was accused of raping a 16-year-old, CRNI says. Bapu was eventually arrested and jailed.

“Kanika, like some cartoonists who find themselves under pressure, refused to bend or compromise her art,” Russell tells The Post’s Comic Riffs. “With every new phone threat or attack, her cartoons just got stronger and stronger.”

Through her cartooning, Shaheen “depicts her view on the relationship between Ismail Haniyeh [senior political leader of Hamas] and the Al-Quds Brigades,” says CRNI, noting that she also faced threats of violence for her commentary.


They are the first women to win the award.

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50. Mimi Pond wins Pen Center Award

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Pen Center USA has presented its 24th annual Literary Awards and Mimi Pond won the award for Graphic Literature Outstanding Body of Work, with a special mention for Over Easy, her debut graphic novel. The blue tinted memoir was published earlier this year by D&Q—and recently went to a second printing. Her previous work includes cartoons for National Lampoon, the Village Voice, The New York Times, and Seventeen, and, most famously, writing the first episode of The Simpsons.

Previous winners include Gilbert Hernandez, Daniel Clowes, Joe Sacco and Matt Fraction.

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