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1. Rebellious reading and other audiacious acts

If you were trying to support and encourage a young environmentalist, feminist or …anarchist (!) what books would you suggest for them?

I might give the newly re-issued Barbapapa’s Ark, or the simple but very effective What are you playing at?

Or if you were simply looking for a great read for your kids about making the world more peaceful and fairer where would you turn?

I might suggest The Arrival or The Island.

And if I were looking for more thought provoking books (as indeed I always am), I’d turn to the Little Rebels Children’s Book Award. Now in its second year, this is an award for radical fiction for children aged 0-12. Last year’s winner was the marvellous and moving Azzi in Between by Sarah Garland (my review can be found here), and this year’s winner will be announced in just a couple of week’s time.

The books shortlisted for this year's award

The books shortlisted for this year’s award

The books, authors and illustrators in the running of the Little Rebels Children’s Book Award 2014 are:

  • The Promise by Nicola Davies, illustrated by Laura Carlin
  • After Tomorrow by Gillian Cross
  • The Middle of Nowhere by Geraldine McCaughrean
  • Moon Bear by Gill Lewis
  • Real Lives: Harriet Tubman by Deborah Chancellor
  • Rosie Revere, Engineer by Andrea Beaty, illustrated by David Roberts
  • Stay Where You Are and Then Leave by John Boyne
  • I recently put a pretty tricky question to those authors who made it onto the shortlist:

    If it were possible with a wave of a wand what would you change about the way the world works, to make it either more inclusive, less discriminatory, or a place which was more just and equitable?

    Here’s how they replied…

    Nicola Davies
    Tricky. I have one practical thing and one that you really would need a magic wand for. The practical one is to make sure that every girl on the planet gets and education; women with confidence, education and power are the single biggest force for change.

    And the magic wand one is to give all bankers, politicians, drug lords…all those in positrons of power over others to see the consequences of each of their actions on the wider world, as clearly as a movie and to feel them, as physical pain. I think that might be really helpful.

    Deborah Chancellor
    This one’s easy. I’d make sure half the people in every single profession were women. With my magic wand, fifty percent of all politicians, judges, business chiefs, religious leaders, generals (etc) would be female. Without a doubt, the world would be a fairer, more inclusive and generally more harmonious place. Perhaps one day we’ll make this utopia happen, but we’re still a long way off.

    Andrea Beaty
    I would create shoes that would transport people into the lives of others to show how their actions and attitudes affect other people. Many of the world’s problems would quickly straighten out if people who take advantage of others or inflict suffering upon others would have to walk a mile in the shoes of the people they disrespect, harm, or disregard. Perhaps Rosie Revere could invent the walk-a-mile shoes. She is very clever! Until we have walk-a-mile shoes, though, we have literature. It lets us each see the world through other people’s eyes. To walk a mile in their shoes. It gives us empathy. And that is more powerful than any magic wand.

    An interior spread from Rosie Revere Engineer

    An interior spread from Rosie Revere Engineer. Click for larger image.

    Gillian Cross
    If I could take one action to make the world fairer and more equal I would make education available and affordable for all children across the world, especially girls.

    Gill Lewis
    I would wave wand to enable us to be able to change our skin with people and animals…to walk a mile in their shoes…or hooves!

    In Harper Lee’s story, To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus gives Scout a piece of moral advice;
    “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view…until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.”

    Most prejudice or discrimination is born of ignorance, indifference and fear of the unknown. To truly understand another’s situation is to live their life, to see the world from their point of view. I would extend this to animals too, for us to live an animal’s life; to live as elephant, an eagle or a honeybee and to be able to see the adverse effects we humans have on the natural world and to understand the consequences of our actions.

    Unfortunately we don’t have magic wands, but we have the next best thing…books!

    Books transport us into other worlds and give us some insight and understanding of others’ lives.

    Until I find that magic wand, I’ll keep reading and writing books!

    ************

    Unfortunately Geraldine McCaughrean and John Boyne were not able to take part; I would have been very interested to hear what they might have chosen to do with a wave of a wand.

    And as for me? What would I magic up? I found myself nodding wildly at all the responses above, but if I were to offer something different here’s what I might conjure up: If looking just at the bookworld, I’d get rid of gendered marketing and watch with great interest to see how it shakes up (or otherwise) book sales. On a bigger scale, I’d ban private car ownership, and invest massively in public transport. It would do wonders for not only environmental health, but also personal well being I believe. And if I could move mountains, I’d change how economies work so they don’t have to be predicated on consumption.

    What would you do with a wave of your wand to make the world a better place?

    If you are after further interesting reading matter to foster your own little rebels, you might enjoy looking through this list of books for children and young people as compiled on the Marxist Internet Archive. “Some of these books were written to be expressly radical, and others need a stretch to find political implications.” Thanks go to Betsy Bird for alerting me to this bibliography.

    Little Rebels Children’s Book Award
    is given by the Alliance of Radical Booksellers and administered by Letterbox Library and the winner will be announced at the London Radical Bookfair on May 10th 2014.

    1 Comments on Rebellious reading and other audiacious acts, last added: 4/24/2014
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    2. Saga, Foglio Nominated for Hugo Awards

    Girl GEnius Volume 13

    The Hugo Award nominations, which honor the best in science fiction, were announced over the weekend, and the graphic story nominees are

    BEST GRAPHIC STORY (552 ballots)
    Girl Genius, Volume 13: Agatha Heterodyne & The Sleeping City written by Phil and Kaja Foglio; art by Phil Foglio; colors by Cheyenne Wright (Airship Entertainment)
    “The Girl Who Loved Doctor Who” written by Paul Cornell, illustrated by Jimmy Broxton (Doctor Who Special 2013, IDW)
    The Meathouse Man adapted from the story by George R.R. Martin and illustrated by Raya Golden (Jet City Comics)
    Saga, Volume 2 written by Brian K. Vaughan, illustrated by Fiona Staples (Image Comics )

    “Time” by Randall Munroe (XKCD)

    This is a little interesting, since The Foglio book won the first few times this category was added to the Hugos and I think they had informally pulled out or something – but no, they are back! Saga Volume 1 won the award last year. I’m glad to see Munroe’s immense Time nominated as it is one of the most daring and unique comics-related achievements of the last 12 months.

    Some other comics germane categories:

    BEST PROFESSIONAL ARTIST (624 ballots)
    Galen Dara

    Julie Dillon

    Daniel Dos Santos

    John Harris

    John Picacio

    Fiona Staples

    BEST FAN ARTIST (316 ballots)
    Brad W. Foster

    Mandie Manzano

    Spring Schoenhuth

    Steve Stiles

    Sarah Webb

    BEST DRAMATIC PRESENTATION (LONG FORM) (995 ballots)
    Frozen screenplay by Jennifer Lee, directed by Chris Buck & Jennifer Lee (Walt Disney Studios)

    Gravity written by Alfonso Cuarón & Jonás Cuarón, directed by Alfonso Cuarón (Esperanto Filmoj; Heyday Films; Warner Bros.)

    The Hunger Games: Catching Fire screenplay by Simon Beaufoy & Michael Arndt, directed by Francis Lawrence (Color Force; Lionsgate)

    Iron Man 3 screenplay by Drew Pearce & Shane Black, directed by Shane Black (Marvel Studios; DMG Entertainment; Paramount Pictures)

    Pacific Rim screenplay by Travis Beacham & Guillermo del Toro, directed by Guillermo del Toro (Legendary Pictures, Warner Bros., Disney Double Dare You)

    And in the Hugo Controversy category, after avowed feminist Jonathan Ross was publically bounced as host of the Hugos (held this year in London), the avowed racist/misogynist Vox Day was nominated for best short story. You win some, you lose some.

    5 Comments on Saga, Foglio Nominated for Hugo Awards, last added: 4/22/2014
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    3. 2014 Inkwell Award Nominees announced

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    The nominees for the Inkwell Awards, which recognize the stars of inking, have been announced and they are below. You can find out more about the awards, which will be presented at this year’s Heroes Con, at their website.

    Inking may be one of the more fragile vocations in the comics ecosystem, but these talenetd people deserve all the recognition they can get.

    FAVORITE INKER: Favorite ink artist over the pencil work of another artist from ’13 cover-dated interior American comic book material

    Richard Friend (Forever Evil, Justice League of America, Green Lantern, Legion Lost, World of Warcraft: Bloodsworn(OGN))
    Jonathan Glapion (Batman, Birds of Prey, Action Comics, Batgirl)
    Wade Von Grawbadger (All-New X-Men, Green Lantern, Legion Lost , X-Men: Battle of the Atom)
    Jay Leisten (Uncanny X-Men, Avengers Assemble, Gambit, Mighty Avengers, X-Factor, Iron Man)
    Danny Miki (Batman, Uncanny X-Force, Wolverine & the X-Men)
    Norm Rapmund (Action Comics, Forever Evil: Arkham War, Ravagers, Teen Titans, Justice League of America, Nightwing, Superman)

    MOST-ADAPTABLE: Ink artist showing exceptional ink style versatility over other pencil artists in ’13 interior cover-dated American comic book material

    Juan Castro (G.I. Joe, G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero, G.I. Joe: Special Missions, Team 7, Molly Danger(FCBD))
    John Dell (Uncanny Avengers, Superior Spider-man, Guardians of the Galaxy)
    Jonathan Glapion (Batman, Birds of Prey, Action Comics, Batgirl)
    Scott Hanna (Avengers Assemble, Adventures of Superman, Green Lantern Corp, Once Upon a Time (OGN), Iron Man, Team 7, Supergirl, Teen Titans, Uncanny X-Force, Wolverine & the X-Men, X-Men, Legion Lost)
    Jay Leisten  (Uncanny X-Men, Avengers Assemble, Gambit, Mighty Avengers, X-Factor, Iron Man)
    Walden Wong (Wolverine & the X-Men, Batwoman, Catwoman, Justice of League America, Minimum Carnage: Omega, Red Hood & the Outlaws, Scarlet Spider, Wolverine Max, X-Men: Legacy, X-Treme X-Men)

    PROPS: Ink artist deserving of more attention for their work over other pencilers from ’13 interior cover-dated American comic book material

    Juan Castro (G.I. Joe, G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero, G.I. Joe: Special Missions, Team 7, Molly Danger(FCBD))
    Richard Friend (Forever Evil, Justice League of America, Green Lantern, Legion Lost, World of Warcraft: Bloodsworn(OGN))
    Scott Hanna (Avengers Assemble, Adventures of Superman, Green Lantern Corp, Once Upon a Time (OGN), Iron Man, Team 7, Supergirl, Teen Titans, Uncanny X-Force, Wolverine & the X-Men, X-Men, Legion Lost)
    Mark Irwin (Batgirl, Justice Leauge of America’s Vibe, Green Lantern, Nightwing, Star Wars: Darth Vader & the Ninth Assassin, Uncanny X-Men, )
    Bob Smith (Life with Archie)
    Walden Wong (Wolverine & the X-Men, Batwoman, Catwoman, Justice of League America, Minimum Carnage: Omega, Red Hood & the Outlaws, Scarlet Spider, Wolverine Max, X-Men: Legacy, X-Treme X-Men)

    S.P.A.M.I.: Favorite Small Press And Mainstream-Independent ’13 interior cover-dated American comic book ink work over another pencil artist (Non-Marvel or DC work)

    Juan Castro (G.I. Joe, G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero, G.I. Joe: Special Missions, Team 7 and Molly Danger(FCBD))
    Stefano Gaudiano (Walking Dead, Bloodshot, Lazarus)
    Phyllis Novin (G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero, Simpsons Comics, Transformers: More Than Meets the Eye, Sonic Universe)
    Andrew Pepoy (Simpsons Comics: fur Umme!, Danger Girl: Trinity, Protectors, Inc., Simpsons Illustrated, Simpsons One-Shot Wonders: Mr. Burns, Simpsons One-Shot Wonders: Professor Frink) 
    Cliff Rathburn (Invincible, Super Dinosaur, Walking Dead)
    Bob Smith (Life with Archie)
    Keith Williams (Uber)

    ALL-IN-ONE: Favorite artist known for inking his/ her OWN pencil work in ’13 interior cover-dated American comic book material

    Francesco Francavilla (Afterlife with Archie, Batwoman, Black Beetle, Guardians of the Galaxy, Hawkeye)
    Stan Sakai (47 Ronin, DHP,  Mouse Guard)
    Chris Samnee (Adventures of Superman, Batman Black and White, Daredevil)
    Fiona Staples (Saga, Batman Beyond, )
    J.H. Williams (Batwoman, Sandman: Overture)

    THE JOE SINNOTT HALL OF FAME AWARD: A hall of fame designation for an inking career in American comic books of outstanding accomplishment (lifetime achievement, 25-years minimum- two winners chosen annually)

    *Since 2013 this award category has been decided on internally by the Inkwell Awards Hall of Fame Nomination Committee. From these nominees two award recipients have been chosen and will be announced at the annual awards ceremony held this year at the Heroes Convention (http://www.heroesonline.com/heroescon/) on Saturday at 12:30pm on June 21st.

    Dan Adkins
    Violet Barclay (aka Valerie Smith)
    John Beatty
    Tony Dezuniga
    Frank Giacoia
    Bob McLeod
    Tom Palmer 
    Mike Royer
    Josef Rubenstein 
    Joe Simon 
    Bernie Wrightson 

    0 Comments on 2014 Inkwell Award Nominees announced as of 4/16/2014 8:53:00 PM
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    4. Words with Wings, by Nikki Grimes -- powerful novel in verse (ages 9-12)

    Kaiyah C., a fourth grader at Emerson, came to me last week asking to write a review of Nikki Grimes' Words With Wings. You have to know that it takes something special for a kid to ASK to write a review. This book is truly special, and it has found a home in Kaiyah's heart.
    Words with Wings
    by Nikki Grimes
    WordSong, 2013
    2014 Coretta Scott King Author Honor Award
    your local library
    Amazon
    ages 9-12
    Review of Word with Wings
    by: Kaiyah C.

    I just read Words with Wings by Nikki Grimes and I really liked this book because I related to Gabby (Gabriella). We both daydream to keep our lives/minds magical so we can throw all our ideas out and put it on paper.

    Gabby especially daydreams when her parents are fighting. This helps her forget. Gabby and her mom are very different. Gabby’s favorite word is pretend and her mom’s is practical . Gabby is just like her dad. Sometimes Gabby’s mom stops her from daydreaming because she does not want her to be just like her dad. In the end Gabby becomes an author and her mom starts daydreaming too.

    I enjoyed reading this book because of the way it was written in poetry. I think you would especially like it if you daydream. It would be awesome if we could have 15 minutes of daydreaming, just like Gabby’s teacher told her to do. But I don’t think that will really happen for us. This was a really heartwarming book.

    This was the best book I’ve ever read.
    -------------------------------------
    I think Kaiyah will be interested in reading Ms. Grimes' reflections on her own childhood and the importance of daydreaming to her personally, over at the Teaching Books blog. Ms. Grimes writes:
    Daydreaming becomes a strong muscle if you exercise it often enough. By the time I was ten, I could lasso a daydream and ride the wind. Who wouldn’t want to do that?
    There were no lassos where I grew up in the inner city, of course, but there were daydreams to be had, if you knew where to look. That’s the secret I shared with Gabriella, the main character in Words with Wings (Wordsong, 2013). Like Gabby, I was a girl who lived inside her head.
    - See more at: Teaching Books blog
    Thank you, Nikki Grimes, for writing such wonderfully powerful stories that speak to my students. Thank you, Kaiyah, for such a heartfelt response to Words With Wings.

    The review copy came from our school library. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.

    ©2014 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books

    0 Comments on Words with Wings, by Nikki Grimes -- powerful novel in verse (ages 9-12) as of 4/16/2014 9:53:00 AM
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    5. 2014 Eisner Nominations: It was the DeFractions year…and a lot of other great things too

    Hawkeye 011 000 e1372785848612OKay I had to only take a quick look at these but wow…looks like the (one nomer or great work) rule was in effect thius year. Great to see works hat flew under the rader like Graha,m Chafee’s Good Dog get a nom; and some old friends whose names I see here that personally I’m really hapy for. Also, a special congrats to Beat alum Zainab Akhtar for her nom for Comics and Cola!

    The DeFraction household is the overall winner with Hawkeye, Sex Criminals and Pretty Deadly getting a bunch, including for artist Emma Rios.

    Really a great fresh list of comics well worth exploring.

    Three titles lead the list with more than 3 nominations each: Marvel’s Hawkeye, Image’s Saga, and DC/Vertigo’s The Wake. Hawkeye is nominated for Best Continuing Series, Best Writer (Matt Fraction), and Best Penciller/Inker and Best Cover Artist (David Aja). Saga has received nods for Best Continuing Series (which won the category in 2013), Best Writer (Brian K. Vaughan), and Best Painter and Cover Artist (Fiona Staples). And The Wake is nominated for Best Limited Series, Best Writer (Scott Snyder), Best Penciller/Inker (Sean Murphy), and Best Cover Artist (Sean Murphy/Jordie Bellaire). Bellaire is also nominated in the Best Coloring category, for her work on The Wake and on numerous titles for other companies.

    Titles garnering 3 nominations include Fantagraphics’s Love and Rockets: New Stories #6 (Best Short Story, Single Issue, Writer/Artist for Jaime Hernandez), Top Shelf’s March: Book One, by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell (Best Publication for Teens, Reality-Based Work, and Penciller/Inker), and Candlewick’s Bluffton: My Summers with Buster, by Matt Phelan (Best Publication for Teens, Graphic Album–New, and Writer/Artist).

    Other titles with multiple nominations are East of West (Jonathan Hickman and Nick Dragotta, Image), Nowhere Men (Eric Stephenson and Nate Bellegarde, Image), Pretty Deadly (Kelly Sue DeConnick and Emma Ríos, Image), Sex Criminals (Matt Fraction and Chip Zdarsky, Image),Hip Hop Family Tree (Ed Piskor, Fantagraphics), Today Is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life (Ullie Lust, Fantagraphics), The Adventures of Superhero Girl (Faith Erin Hicks, Dark Horse), The Fifth Beatle (Vivek J. Tiwary, Andrew C. Robinson, and Kyle Baker, Dark Horse), Richard Stark’s Parker: Slayground (Darwyn Cooke, IDW), Genius, Illustrated: The Life and Art of Alex Toth (Dean Mullaney and Bruce Canwell, LOAC/IDW), Rachel Rising (Terry Moore, Abstract Studio), The Art of Rube Goldberg (Abrams ComicArts), The Encyclopedia of Early Earth (Isabel Greenberg, Little, Brown), Watson and Holmes (New Paradigm), The Complete Don Quixote (Rob Davis, SelfMadeHero), When David Lost His Voice (Judith Vanistendael, SelfMadeHero), Hilda and the Bird Parade (Luke Pearson, Nobrow), and High Crimes (Monkeybrain).

    Among publishers, Image and Fantagraphics top the list with the most nominations. Image has 17 plus 3 shared. In addition to the nods for Saga, East of West, Nowhere Men, Pretty Deadly, and Sex Criminals, nominated Image titles include Lazarus (Rucka and Lark) and Rat Queens (Wiebe and Upchurch). Fantagraphics’s 18 nominations—besides Love and Rockets, Hip Hop Family Tree, and Today Is the Last Day)—are spread among such titles as Good Dog (Graham Chaffee), Julio’s Day (Gilbert Hernandez), Goddam This War (Tardi and Verney), The Heart of Thomas (Moto Hagio), and several archival collections.

    Dark Horse ranks third with 12 nominations (plus 1 shared), including 2 for publisher Mike Richardson (Best Anthology for Dark Horse Presents and Best Limited Series for 47 Ronin with Stan Sakai). IDW’s 9 nominations include 5 in the archival categories, with 3 of Scott Dunbier’s Artist’s Editions up for Best Archival Collection–Comic Books and 2 of Dean Mullaney’s Library of American Comics collections up for Best Archival Collection–Comic Strips. Mullaney has 4 nominations in all.

    DC and its Vertigo imprint are next with 8 nominations plus 2 shared, the majority going to The Wake. Ranking next is SelfMadeHero with 7 nods (including 3 for When David Lost His Voice and 2 for The Complete Don Quixote), followed by Marvel’s 6 (plus 4 shared), led by Hawkeye. Drawn & Quarterly’s 6 nominations include books by Peter Bagge, Tom Gauld, Rutu Modan, and Art Spiegelman.

    Other publishers with multiple nominations include First Second, Nobrow, and Top Shelf (4 each) and Abstract Studio, BOOM!, Candlewick, and TOON Books (3 each). Eleven publishers have 2 nominations each, and another 31 companies or individuals have 1 nomination each.

    Individual creators with the most nominations are David Aja, Matt Fraction, Gilbert Hernandez, Sean Murphy, Matt Phelan, Nate Powell, and Fiona Staples, all with 3. Nineteen creators can boast of 2 nominations.

    Named for acclaimed comics creator the Will Eisner, the awards are celebrating their 26th year of highlighting the best publications and creators in comics and graphic novels. The 2014 Eisner Awards judging panel consists of comics retailer Kathy Bottarini (Comic Book Box, Rhonert Park, CA), author/educator William H. Foster (Untold Stories of Black Comics), reviewer Christian Lipski (Portland, OR Examiner), Comic-Con International board member Lee Oeth, library curator Jenny Robb (Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum), and Eisner Award-nominated cartoonist/critic James Romberger (Post York, 7 Miles a Second).

    Voting for the awards is held online, and the ballot will be available soon at www.eisnervote.com. All professionals in the comic book industry are eligible to vote. The deadline for voting is June 13. The results of the voting will be announced in a gala awards ceremony on the evening of Friday, July 25 at Comic-Con International.

    The voting in one Eisner Awards category, the Hall of Fame, is already completed. The judges chose the nominees earlier this year, and voting was conducted online.

    Best Short Story
    “Go Owls,” by Adrian Tomine, in Optic Nerve #13 (Drawn & Quarterly)
    “Mars to Stay,” by Brett Lewis and Cliff Chiang, in Witching Hour (DC)
    “Seaside Home,” by Josh Simmons, in Habit #1 (Oily)
    “Untitled,” by Gilbert Hernandez, in Love and Rockets: New Stories #6 (Fantagraphics)
    “When Your House Is Burning Down, You Should Brush Your Teeth,” by Matthew Inman, http://theoatmeal.com/comics/house

    Best Single Issue (or One-Shot)
    Demeter, by Becky Cloonan (self-published)
    Hawkeye #11: “Pizza Is My Business,” by Matt Fraction and David Aja (Marvel)
    Love and Rockets: New Stories #6, by Gilbert Hernandez and Jaime Hernandez (Fantagraphics)
    Viewotron #2, by Sam Sharpe (self-published)
    Watson and Holmes #6, by Brandon Easton and N. Steven Harris (New Paradigm Studios)

    Best Continuing Series
    East of West, by Jonathan Hickman and Nick Dragotta (Image)
    Hawkeye, by Matt Fraction and David Aja (Marvel)
    Nowhere Men, by Eric Stephenson and Nate Bellegarde (Image)
    Saga, by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples (Image)
    Sex Criminals, by Matt Fraction and Chip Zdarsky (Image)

    Best Limited Series
    The Black Beetle: No Way Out, by Francesco Francavilla (Dark Horse)
    Colder, by Paul Tobin and Juan Ferreyra (Dark Horse)
    47 Ronin, by Mike Richardson and Stan Sakai (Dark Horse)
    Trillium, by Jeff Lemire (Vertigo/DC)
    The Wake, by Scott Snyder and Sean Murphy (Vertigo/DC)

    Best New Series
    High Crimes, by Christopher Sebela and Ibrahim Moustafa (Monkeybrain)
    Lazarus, by Greg Rucka and Michael Lark (Image)
    Rat Queens, by Kurtis J. Wiebe and Roc Upchurch (Image/Shadowline)
    Sex Criminals, by Matt Fraction and Chip Zdarsky (Image)
    Watson and Holmes, by Karl Bollers, Rick Leonardi, Paul Mendoza et al. (New Paradigm Studios)

    Best Publication for Early Readers (up to age 7)
    Benjamin Bear in Bright Ideas, by Philippe Coudray (TOON Books)
    The Big Wet Balloon, by Liniers (TOON Books)
    Itsy Bitsy Hellboy, by Art Baltazar and Franco (Dark Horse)
    Odd Duck, by Cecil Castellucci and Sara Varon (First Second)
    Otto’s Backwards Day, by Frank Cammuso (with Jay Lynch) (TOON Books)

    Best Publication for Kids (ages 8-12)
    The Adventures of Superhero Girl, by Faith Erin Hicks (Dark Horse)
    Hilda and the Bird Parade, by Luke Pearson (Nobrow)
    Jane, the Fox, and Me, by Fanny Britt and Isabelle Arsenault (Groundwood)
    The Lost Boy, by Greg Ruth (Graphix/Scholastic)
    Mouse Guard: Legends of the Guard, vol. 2, edited by David Petersen, Paul Morrissey, and Rebecca Taylor (Archaia/BOOM!)
    Star Wars: Jedi Academy, by Jeffrey Brown (Scholastic)

    Best Publication for Teens (ages 13-17)
    Battling Boy, by Paul Pope (First Second)
    Bluffton: My Summers with Buster, by Matt Phelan (Candlewick)
    Boxers and Saints, by Gene Luen Yang (First Second)
    Dogs of War, by Sheila Keenan and Nathan Fox (Graphix/Scholastic)
    March (Book One), by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell (Top Shelf)
    Templar, by Jordan Mechner, LeUyen Pham, and Alex Puviland (First Second)

    Best Humor Publication
    The Adventures of Superhero Girl, by Faith Erin Hicks (Dark Horse)
    The Complete Don Quixote, by Miguel de Cervantes and Rob Davis (SelfMadeHero)
    The (True!) History of Art, by Sylvain Coissard and Alexis Lemoine (SelfMadeHero)
    Vader’s Little Princess, by Jeffrey Brown (Chronicle)
    You’re All Just Jealous of My Jetpack, by Tom Gauld (Drawn & Quarterly)

    Best Anthology
    Dark Horse Presents, edited by Mike Richardson (Dark Horse)
    Nobrow #8: Hysteria, edited by Sam Arthur and Alex Spiro (Nobrow)
    Outlaw Territory, edited by Michael Woods (Image)
    Smoke Signal, edited by Gabe Fowler (Desert Island)
    Thrilling Adventure Hour, by Ben Acker, Ben Blacker et al. (Archaia/BOOM!)

    Best Digital/Webcomic
    As the Crow Flies, by Melanie Gillman, www.melaniegillman.com
    Failing Sky, by Dax Tran-Caffee, http://failingsky.com
    High Crimes, by Christopher Sebela and Ibrahim Moustafa, http://www.monkeybraincomics.com/titles/high-crimes
    The Last Mechanical Monster, by Brian Fies, http://lastmechanicalmonster.blogspot.com
    The Oatmeal by Matthew Inman, http://theoatmeal.com

    Best Reality-Based Work
    A Bag of Marbles, by Joseph Joffo, Kris, and Vincent Bailly (Graphic Universe/Lerner)
    The Fifth Beatle: The Brian Epstein Story, by Vivek J. Tiwary, Andrew C. Robinson, and Kyle Baker (M Press/Dark Horse)
    Hip Hop Family Tree, vol. 1, by Ed Piskor (Fantagraphics)
    March (Book One), by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell (Top Shelf)
    Today Is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life, by Ulli Lust (Fantagraphics)
    Woman Rebel: The Margaret Sanger Story, by Peter Bagge (Drawn & Quarterly)

    Best Graphic Album—New
    Bluffton: My Summers with Buster, by Matt Phelan (Candlewick)
    The Encyclopedia of Early Earth, by Isabel Greenberg (Little, Brown)
    Good Dog, by Graham Chaffee (Fantagraphics)
    Homesick by Jason Walz (Tinto Press)
    The Property, by Rutu Modan (Drawn & Quarterly)
    War Brothers, by Sharon McKay and Daniel LaFrance (Annick Press)

    Best Adaptation from Another Medium
    The Castle, by Franz Kafka, adapted by David Zane Mairowitz and Jaromír 99 (SelfMadeHero)
    The Complete Don Quixote, by Miguel de Cervantes, adapted by by Rob Davis (SelfMadeHero)
    Django Unchained, adapted by Quentin Tarantino, Reginald Hudlin, R. M. Guéra et al. (DC/Vertigo)
    Richard Stark’s Parker: Slayground, by Donald Westlake, adapted by Darwyn Cooke (IDW)
    The Strange Tale of Panorama Island, by Edogawa Rampo, adapted by Suehiro Maruo (Last Gasp)

    Best Graphic Album—Reprint
    The Creep, by John Arcudi and Jonathan Case (Dark Horse)
    Hand-Drying in America and Other Stories, by Ben Katchor (Pantheon)
    Heck, by Zander Cannon (Top Shelf)
    Julio’s Day, by Gilbert Hernandez (Fantagraphics)
    RASL, by Jeff Smith (Cartoon Books)
    Solo: The Deluxe Edition, edited by Mark Chiarello (DC)

    Best Archival Collection/Project—Strips
    Barnaby, vol. 1, by Crockett Johnson, edited by Philip Nel and Eric Reynolds (Fantagraphics)
    Percy Crosby’s Skippy Daily Comics, vol. 2: 1928–1930, edited by Jared Gardner and Dean Mullaney (LOAC/IDW)
    Prince Valiant vols. 6-7, by Hal Foster, edited by Kim Thompson (Fantagraphics)
    Society Is Nix: Gleeful Anarchy at the Dawn of the American Comic Strip, edited by Peter Maresca (Sunday Press)
    Tarzan: The Complete Russ Manning Newspaper Strips, vol. 1, edited by Dean Mullaney (LOAC/IDW)
    VIP: The Mad World of Virgil Partch, edited by Jonathan Barli (Fantagraphics)

    Best Archival Collection/Project—Comic Books
    Best of EC Artist’s Edition, edited by Scott Dunbier (IDW)
    Canteen Kate, by Matt Baker (Canton Street Press)
    In the Days of the Mob, by Jack Kirby (DC)
    MAD Artist’s Edition, edited by Scott Dunbier (IDW)
    Will Eisner’s The Spirit Artist’s Edition, edited by Scott Dunbier (IDW)

    Best U.S. Edition of International Material
    Adventures of a Japanese Businessman, by Jose Domingo (Nobrow)
    Goddam This War! by Jacques Tardi and Jean-Pierre Verney (Fantagraphics)
    Incidents in the Night, Book One, by David B. (Uncivilized Books)
    Today Is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life, by Ulli Lust (Fantagraphics)
    When David Lost His Voice, by Judith Vanistendael (SelfMadeHero)

    Best U.S. Edition of International Material—Asia
    The Heart of Thomas, by Moto Hagio (Fantagraphics)
    The Mysterious Underground Men, by Osamu Tezuka (PictureBox)
    Showa: A History of Japan, 1926–1939, by Shigeru Mizuki (Drawn & Quarterly)
    Summit of the Gods, vol. 4, by Yemmakura Baku and Jiro Taniguchi (Fanfare/Ponent Mon)
    Utsubora: The Story of a Novelist, by Asumiko Nakamura (Vertical)

    Best Writer
    Kelly Sue DeConnick, Pretty Deadly (Image); Captain Marvel (Marvel)
    Matt Fraction, Sex Criminals (Image); Hawkeye, Fantastic Four, FF (Marvel)
    Jonathan Hickman, East of West, The Manhattan Projects (Image); Avengers, Infinity (Marvel)
    Scott Snyder, Batman (DC); American Vampire, The Wake (DC/Vertigo)
    Eric Stephenson, Nowhere Men (Image)
    Brian K. Vaughan, Saga (Image)

    Best Writer/Artist
    Isabel Greenberg, The Encyclopedia of Early Earth (Little, Brown)
    Jaime Hernandez, Love and Rockets New Stories #6 (Fantagraphics)
    Terry Moore, Rachel Rising (Abstract Studio)
    Luke Pearson, Hilda and the Bird Parade (Nobrow)
    Matt Phelan, Bluffton: My Summers with Buster (Candlewick)
    Judith Vanistendael, When David Lost His Voice (SelfMadeHero)

    Best Penciller/Inker or Penciller/Inker Team
    Nate Bellegarde, Nowhere Men (Image)
    Nick Dragotta, East of West (Image)
    Sean Murphy, The Wake (DC/Vertigo)
    Nate Powell, March (Book One) (Top Shelf)
    Emma Ríos, Pretty Deadly (Image)
    Thomas Yeates, Law of the Desert Born: A Graphic Novel (Bantam)

    Best Painter/Multimedia Artist (interior art)
    Andrew C. Robinson, The Fifth Beatle (Dark Horse)
    Sonia Sanchéz, Here I Am (Capstone)
    Fiona Staples, Saga (Image)
    Ive Svorcina, Thor (Marvel)
    Marguerite Van Cook, 7 Miles a Second (Fantagraphics)
    Judith Vanistendael, When David Lost His Voice (SelfMadeHero)

    Best Cover Artist
    David Aja, Hawkeye (Marvel)
    Mike Del Mundo, X-Men Legacy (Marvel)
    Sean Murphy/Jordie Belaire, The Wake (DC/Vertigo)
    Emma Ríos, Pretty Deadly (Image)
    Chris Samnee, Daredevil (Marvel)
    Fiona Staples, Saga (Image)

    Best Coloring
    Jordie Bellaire, The Manhattan Projects, Nowhere Men, Pretty Deadly, Zero (Image); The Massive (Dark Horse); Tom Strong (DC); X-Files Season 10 (IDW); Captain Marvel, Journey into Mystery (Marvel); Numbercruncher (Titan); Quantum and Woody (Valiant)
    Steve Hamaker, Mylo Xyloto (Bongo), Strangers in Paradise 20th Anniversary Issue 1 (Abstract Studio), RASL (Cartoon Books)
    Matt Hollingsworth, Hawkeye, Daredevil: End of Days (Marvel); The Wake (DC/Vertigo)
    Frank Martin, East of West (Image)
    Dave Stewart, Abe Sapien, Baltimore: The Infernal Train, BPRD: Hell on Earth, Conan the Barbarian, Hellboy: Hell on Earth, The Massive, The Shaolin Cowboy, Sledgehammer 44 (Dark Horse)

    Best Lettering
    Darwyn Cooke, Richard Stark’s Parker: Slayground (IDW)
    Carla Speed McNeil, Bad Houses; “Finder” in Dark Horse Presents (Dark Horse)
    Terry Moore, Rachel Rising (Abstract Studio)
    Ed Piskor, Hip Hop Family Tree (Fantagraphics)
    Britt Wilson, Adventure Time with Fiona and Cake (kaBOOM!)

    Best Comics-Related Periodical/Journalism
    Comic Book Resources, produced by Jonah Weiland, www.comicbookresources.com
    The Comics Journal #302, edited by Gary Groth and Kristy Valenti (Fantagraphics)
    Comics and Cola, by Zainab Akhtar, www.comicsandcola.com
    Multiversity Comics, edited by Matthew Meylikhov, www.multiversitycomics.com
    tcj.com, edited by Dan Nadel and Timothy Hodler (Fantagrapahics)

    Best Comics-Related Book
    Al Capp: A Life to the Contrary, by Michael Schumacher and Denis Kitchen (Bloomsbury)
    The Art of Rube Goldberg, selected by Jennifer George (Abrams ComicArts)
    Co-Mix: A Retrospective of Comics, Graphics, and Scraps, by Art Spiegelman (Drawn & Quarterly)
    Genius, Illustrated: The Life and Art of Alex Toth, by Dean Mullaney and Bruce Canwell (LOAC/IDW)
    The Love and Rockets Companion, edited by Marc Sobel and Kristy Valenti (Fantagraphics)

    Best Scholarly/Academic Work
    Anti-Foreign Imagery in American Pulps and Comic Books, 1920–1960, by Nathan Vernon Madison (McFarland)
    Black Comics: Politics of Race and Representation, edited by Sheena C. Howard and Ronald L. Jackson II (Bloomsbury)
    Drawing from Life: Memory and Subjectivity in Comic Art, edited by Jane Tolmie (University Press of Mississippi)
    International Journal of Comic Art, edited by John A. Lent
    The Superhero Reader, edited by Charles Hatfield, Jeet Heer, and Ken Worcester (University Press of Mississippi)

    Best Publication Design
    The Art of Rube Goldberg, designed by Chad W. Beckerman (Abrams ComicArts)
    Beta Testing the Apocalypse, designed by Tom Kaczynski (Fantagraphics)
    Genius, Illustrated: The Life and Art of Alex Toth, designed by Dean Mullaney (LOAC/IDW)
    The Great War: July 1, 1916: The First Day of the Battle of the Somme: A Panorama, by Joe Sacco, designed by Chin-Yee Lai (Norton)
    Little Tommy Lost, Book 1, designed by Cole Closser (Koyama)

    10 Comments on 2014 Eisner Nominations: It was the DeFractions year…and a lot of other great things too, last added: 4/18/2014
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    6. Donna Tartt Wins The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction

    pulitzerAuthor Donna Tartt has won The Pulitzer Prize for fiction for her book The Goldfinch. The novel about an orphan, also won Amazon’s Best Books of the Month “Spotlight Pick” in October 2013 and was shortlisted for 2013 National Book Critics Circle Award.

    The Flick by Annie Baker won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. Alan Taylor‘s The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832 won the prize for History. Megan Marshall‘s Margaret Fuller: A New American Life took the Pulitzer for the Biography category. Vijay Seshadri won the Poetry prize for 3 Sections.

    Dan Fagin‘s Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation won the prize for General Nonfiction. John Luther Adams‘ Become Ocean took the prize for Music.

     

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    7. ‘The Fault in Our Stars’ Clip Unveiled by MTV

    A new clip from The Fault in Our Stars was unveiled during the 2014 MTV Movie Awards.

    Young adult novelist John Green attended the event along with his wife and the stars from the film adaptation. The video embedded above features an intense conversation scene between Hazel Grace Lancaster and Augustus Waters.

    continued…

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    8. The Winners of the LA Times’ 34th Annual Book Prize

    latimesThe Los Angeles Times  hosted its 34th Annual Book Prizes ceremony over the weekend, honoring 50 writers in 10 categories for their 2013 books. The Times’ book critic David L. Ulin hosted the event at at the University of Southern California’s Bovard Auditorium.

    Susan Straight received the Robert Kirsch Award for lifetime achievement and John Green took The Innovator’s Award. We’ve got the entire list of winners after the jump. continued…

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    9. Lust and Yang win LA TImes Book Prizes

    today_is_the_last_ulli_lust.jpg

    The Los Angeles Times Book Prizes were handed out last night and the winner in the graphic novel division was Ulli Lust’s Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life, published in the US by Fantagraphics.

    Gene Yang’s Boxers and Saints won in the YA Literature category—a strong win for a GN in a traditionally prose only category. Yang’s work—he’s also a two time National Book Award nominee—continues to help define the new role for graphic novels as literature.

    JK Rowling won in the Mystery category for The Cuckoo’s Calling which she wrote under a pen-name to avoid being ghettoized in Potter’s field.

    The other nominees in the graphic novel category were • David B., “Incidents in the Night: Volume 1,” Uncivilized Books
    • Ben Katchor, “Hand-Drying in America: And Other Stories,” Pantheon
    • Ulli Lust, “Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life,” Fantagraphics
    • Anders Nilsen, “The End,” Fantagraphics
    • Joe Sacco, “The Great War: July 1, 1916: The First Day of the Battle of the Somme,” W. W. Norton & Co.

    I would have been pleased with any of the winners, but Lust’s book was one of my favorites of the year and is truly a novel with a dense examination of youthful ignorance, gender roles, the limits of friendship and early punk culture viewed through an impromptu trip to Italy by two Austrian girls without money. If you haven’t read it, do so!

    The complete list of winners.

    Biography: “Bolivar: American Liberator” by Marie Arana
    Current Interest: “Five Days at Memorial” by Sheri Fink
    Fiction: “A Tale for the Time Being” by Ruth Ozeki
    Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction: “We Need New Names” by NoViolet Bulawayo
    Graphic Novel/Comics: “Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life” by Ulli Lust
    History: “The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914” by Christopher Clark
    Mystery/Thriller: “The Cuckoo’s Calling” by J.K. Rowling writing as Robert Galbraith
    Poetry: “Collected Poems” by Ron Padgett
    Science and Technology: “Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth?” by Alan Weisman
    Young Adult Literature: “Boxers & Saints” by Gene Luen Yang

    2 Comments on Lust and Yang win LA TImes Book Prizes, last added: 4/12/2014
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    10. And more award news…

    2012-04-05aIn a week that continues to be unreal, Life in Outer Space has been shortlisted for the Children’s Book Council of Australia (CBCA) Book of the Year 2014, Older Readers. In the children’s publishing departments where I have worked, there’s a bit of a tradition on shortlist day, of poring over the CBCA website while undertaking multiple refreshes as the announcements roll out. As an editor, it is always exciting to see a book you’ve been involved with being recognized; I can’t describe how cool, and wonderfully overwhelming it is to see my book up there too.

    Giant thanks to the CBCA judges, and to my amazing Ampersand publishers at Hardie Grant Egmont. And, a heartfelt congratulations to all the other notable and shortlisted authors! Looking forward to catching up on some reading between now and the August Book Week announcement…

    2014 CBCA Older Readers

     


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    11. 2014 Glyph Award Nominees Announced

    GCA2014Flyer-Final-1024x682.jpg
    The 2014 nominees for the Glyph Awards, honoring the best in African America comics and characters have been announced. The awards will be presented on May 16th at the ECBACC show in Philadelphia. The deadline for voting in the Fan Award is Friday, May 2, 2014.

    STORY OF THE YEAR
    • MARCH; John Lewis
    • WATSON AND HOLMES #6; Brandon Easton
    • WATSON AND HOLMES: A STUDY IN BLACK; Brandon Perlow

    BEST COVER
    • HASS #1; B. Alex Thompson
    • INDIGO; Richard Tyler
    • LIFE AND DEATH IN PARADISE; Nigel Lynch
    • NOWHERE MAN; Jerome Walford
    • THE OLYMPIANS; Paulo Barrios and Luis Guerrero
    • ROUTE 3; Robert Jeffrey

    BEST WRITER
    • Brandon Easton; WATSON AND HOLMES #6
    • Jamal Igle; MOLLY DANGER
    • Anthony Montgomery and Brandon Easton; MILES AWAY
    • Whit Taylor; BOXES
    • B. Alex Thompson; HASS #1

    BEST ARTIST
    • B. Robert Bell; RADIO FREE AMERIKA
    • Abel Garcia; P.B. SOLDIER
    • N. Steven Harris; WATSON AND HOLMES #6
    • Jamal Igle; MOLLY DANGER
    • Mshindo Kuumba; ANIKULAPO
    • Mase; URBAN SHOGUN#3: THINGS FALL APART
    • Jerome Walford; NOWHERE MAN

    BEST MALE CHARACTER
    • Anikulapo ‘He who has Death in his Pouch’; ANIKULAPO; Mshindo Kuumba
    • Deakon Taylor; ONE NATION; Jason Reeves
    • Dustan Knight / Stactic Shagz; SPIRIT BEAR; Tristan Roach
    • Force; FORCE; Yancey A. Reed
    • Jack Maguire; NOWHERE MAN; Jerome Walford
    • Maxwell Miles; MAXWELL MILES; Brandon Easton
    • Moses B. Verelea; RADIO FREE AMERIKA; Robert Jeffery

    BEST FEMALE CHARACTER
    • Ajala; AJALA: A SERIES OF ADVENTURES; N. Steven Harris and Robert Garrett
    • Mary Freemen; URBAN SHOGUN; James Mason
    • Indigo; INDIGO: HIT LIST 3.0; Richard Tyler
    
RISING STAR AWARD
    • Raymond Ayala; URBAN MYTH (NEW OLYMPIANS)
    • Naseed Gifted; P.B. SOLDIER EPISODE
    • Turner Lange; THE ADVENTURES OF WALLY FRESH
    • Chris Miller; CHRONICLES OF PIYE
    • Jason Reeves; ONE NATION
    • Tristian Roach; SPIRIT BEAR
    • Tony Robinson; THE DESCENDENT

    BEST COMIC STRIP OR WEBCOMIC
    • THE ADIGUN OGUNSANWO; Charles C. J. Juzang
    • BLACKWAX BOULEVARD; Dmitri Jackson
    • LOVE AND CAPES: WHAT TO EXPECT; Thom Zahler
    • YES YOU CAN; Ian Herring and Dallas Penn

    BEST REPRINT PUBLICATION
    • EARLY DAYS; Mshindo Kuumba
    • LOVE AND CAPES: WHAT TO EXPECT; Thom Zahler
    • MLK THE MONTGOMERY STORY; Fellowship of Reconciliation

    FAN AWARD FOR BEST WORK
    • BOXES; Whit Taylor
    • MOLLY DANGER BOOK; Jamal Igle
    • URBAN SHOGUN; James Mason
    • WATSON AND HOLMES #6; Brandon Easton

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    12. MoCCA Award of Excellence Winners announced — and here’s where you can get them

    Saturday night at a rockin party at the Socirty of Illustrators, the winners of the 2014 MoCCA Arts Festival Awards of Excellence were announced. Winners were all on sale at the festival and were selected by a jury consisting of Gregory Benton (a winner last year), D&Q’s Tracy Hurren, AdHouse publisher Chris Pitzer, designer Chip Kidd and James Sturm of the CCS.

    Five winners were announced — all got handsome coin-like awards and a Wacom tablet.

    plunkert-heroical-coverphoto2-stor.jpg
    David Plunkert for Heroical

    Greg_Kletsel_Demon.jpg
    Greg Kletsel for Exercise the Demon

    tumblr_n3eym6qWyy1qkyyqpo3_400.png
    Luke Healy for Of The Monstrous Pictures of Whales (which you can read online for free in this link)

    InvisibleWounds_Cover.jpg
    Jess Ruliffson for Invisible Wounds

    narwhal-cover-2_900.jpg
    The Art of Alexandra Beguez for Narwhal

    So as you can see, comics are just fine, as far as artistry goes. Poke around all the artists links above…you’ll spend a pleasant moning/afternoon.

    2 Comments on MoCCA Award of Excellence Winners announced — and here’s where you can get them, last added: 4/7/2014
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    13. INK Author News for April

     NEW BOOKS


    Beneath the Sun by Melissa Stewart, ill. by Constance Bergum (Peachtree)


    A Place for Butterflies by Melissa Stewart (revised edition, Peachtree)


    LATEST AWARDS

    The Mad PotterGeorge E. Ohr, Eccentric Genius by Jan Greenberg and Sandra Jordan (Roaring Brook)
                • Orbis Pictus Recommended
                • Booklist Best Book
                • School Library Journal Best Book
                • CBC/NCSS Notable for Social Studies
                • Dorothy Canfield Fisher Children’s Book Award Master List

    The Animal Book by Steve Jenkins (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
                • John Burroughs Riverby Award
                • featured title, New England Book Show eBook category.

    The Mystery of Darwin's Frog by Marty Crump, ill. by Steve Jenkins and Edel Rodriguez (Boyds Mills)
                • John Burroughs Riverby Award

    Animals Upside Down by Steve Jenkins & Robin Page (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
                • featured selection, New England Book Show

    Eruption!: Volcanoes and the Science of Saving Lives by Elizabeth Rusch (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
                • 2014 CCBC Choices

    Volcano Rising by Elizabeth Rusch (Charlesbridge)
                • 2014 CCBC Choices

    Rotten Pumpkin, by David Schwartz (Creston Books)
                • 2013 Distinguished Book, Association of Children's Librarians of Northern California

    Courage Has No Color, by Tanya Lee Stone (Candlewick)
                • NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literature for Youth/Teens


    APPEARANCES

    April 3-5 Melissa Stewart will speak at the National Science Teachers Association conference in Boston, MA.

    April 7: Deborah Heiligman will speak at the Simons Foundation in New York City: Lyrical And Logical: A Reading of Children's Books About Math.  

    April 9: Steve Jenkins and his co-author Robin Page will speak at the TLA (Texas Library Association) Conference in San Antonio, TX.

    April 10-11 Melissa Stewart will speak at the Massachusetts Reading Association annual meeting in Quincy, MA.

    April 10-11: David Schwartz will speak at the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics National Meeting, New Orleans, LA.

    April 10-12: Deborah Heiligman will speak at the Festival of Faith and Writing, Calvin College, Grand Rapids MI.

    April 26: Steve Jenkins will speak at the 32nd annual Spring Festival of Children’s Literature at Frostburg State, MD.

    April 26: Susan Kuklin will be guest speaker at the 2014 Stamford Literary Competition Award Ceremony, Stamford, CT. 








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    14. INK Author News for April


     NEW BOOKS


    Beneath the Sun by Melissa Stewart, ill. by Constance Bergum (Peachtree)


    A Place for Butterflies by Melissa Stewart (revised edition, Peachtree)


    LATEST AWARDS

    The Mad Potter: George E. Ohr, Eccentric Genius by Jan Greenberg and Sandra Jordan (Roaring Brook)
                • Orbis Pictus Recommended
                • Booklist Best Book
                • School Library Journal Best Book
                • CBC/NCSS Notable for Social Studies
                • Dorothy Canfield Fisher Children’s Book Award Master List

    The Animal Book by Steve Jenkins (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
                John Burroughs Riverby Award
                • featured title, New England Book Show eBook category.

    The Mystery of Darwin's Frog by Marty Crump, ill. by Steve Jenkins and Edel Rodriguez (Boyds Mills)
                John Burroughs Riverby Award

    Animals Upside Down by Steve Jenkins & Robin Page (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
                • featured selection, New England Book Show

    Eruption!: Volcanoes and the Science of Saving Livesby Elizabeth Rusch (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
                • 2014 CCBC Choices

    Volcano Rising by Elizabeth Rusch (Charlesbridge)
                • 2014 CCBC Choices

    Rotten Pumpkin, by David Schwartz (Creston Books)
                • 2013 Distinguished Book, Association of Children's Librarians of Northern California

    Courage Has No Color, by Tanya Lee Stone (Candlewick)
                • NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literature for Youth/Teens


    APPEARANCES

    April 3-5 Melissa Stewartwill speak at the National Science Teachers Association conference in Boston, MA.

    April 7: Deborah Heiligman will speak at the Simons Foundation in New York City: Lyrical And Logical: A Reading of Children's Books About Math.  

    April 9: Steve Jenkins and his co-author Robin Page will speak at the TLA (Texas Library Association) Conference in San Antonio, TX.

    April 10-11 Melissa Stewart will speak at the Massachusetts Reading Association annual meeting in Quincy, MA.

    April 10-11: David Schwartz will speak at the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics National Meeting, New Orleans, LA.

    April 10-12: Deborah Heiligman will speak at the Festival of Faith and Writing, Calvin College, Grand Rapids MI.

    April 26: Steve Jenkins will speak at the 32nd annual Spring Festival of Children’s Literature at Frostburg State, MD.

    April 26: Susan Kuklin will be guest speaker at the 2014 Stamford Literary Competition Award Ceremony, Stamford, CT. 







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    15. 2014 Reuben Award nominees are out

    201404021105.jpg

    The “Reuben Awards”, aka the divisional awards presented by the National Cartoonist Society to deserving creators in comic strips, illustrations, animation and even comics, have been announced. The MAIN Rueben nominees (given to a deserving cartoonist for a lifetime of work) were announced a few weeks ago, are:

    Wiley Miller (NonSequitur)
    Stephan Pastis (Pearls Before Swine)
    Hilary Price (Rhymes with Orange)
    Mark Tatulli (Lio)

    The rest of the nominees have come out and here they are. Of some note — the webcomics category, which has been a source of some confusion and controversy but now has a board of advisors and is now divided into short form and long form categories. The awards will be presented Saturday, May 24th at the annual NCS meeting, this year held in San Diego.

    (Above an image from Jay Fosgitt’s Bodie Troll, probably the least known of the comic book nominees.)

    Editorial Cartoons
    • Clay Bennett
    • Adam Zyglis
    • Mike Ramirez

    Newspaper Illustration
    • Bob Eckstein
    • Miel Prudencio Ma
    • Dave Whamond

    Feature Animation
    • Mike Giamo: Production Design Frozen (Disney)
    • Hayao Miyazaki: Director, The Wind Rises (Disney)
    • Jonathan del Val: Animator of Lucy character, Despicable Me 2 (Illumination)

    TV Animation
    • Craig McCracken, Wander Over Yonder (Disney)
    • Paul Rudish, Disney Channel’s Mickey Mouse shorts (Disney)
    • Douglas Sloan And Art Edler Brown, Dragons: Riders of Berk (Dreamworks)

    Newspaper Panels
    • Dave Coverly
    • Scott Hilburn
    • Mark Parisi

    Magazine Gag Cartoons
    • Matt Diffee
    • Bob Eckstein
    • Mike Twohy

    Advertising/Product Illustration
    • Cedric Hohnstadt
    • Sean Parkes
    • Rich Powell

    Greeting Cards
    • Glenn McCoy
    • Mark Parisi
    • George Schill

    Comic Books
    • Sergio Aragones, Sergio Aragones Funnies
    • Jay Fosgitt, Bodie Troll
    • Chris Samnee, Daredevil

    Graphic Novel
    • Dan E Burr, On The Ropes
    • Rick Geary, Madison Square Tragedy
    • Andrew C Robinson, The 5th Beatle

    Magazine Illustration
    • Daryll Collins
    • Anton Emdin
    • Dave Whamond

    Online — Long Form
    • Jenn Manley Lee, Dicebox
    • Dylan Meconis, Family Man
    • Eddie Pittman, Red’s Planet
    • Jeff Smith, Tuki

    Online — Short Form
    • Jim Horwitz, Watson
    • Ryan Pagelow, Buni
    • Mike Twohy, New Yorker Online

    Book Illustration
    • Matt Davies
    • William Joyce
    • CF Payne

    Newspaper Comic Strips
    • Isabella Bannerman, Six Chicks
    • Terri Libenson, Pajama Diaries
    • Mark Tatulli, Lio

    Via

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    16. Award news!

    LiOS COVEREXCITING ANNOUNCEMENT! Life in Outer Space has been chosen as the winner of the 2014 Ena Noel Award, a biennial IBBY Australia Encouragement Award for Literature for Young People. Past winner include Markus Zusak, Sonya Hartnett, Catherine Jinks, and a host of other wonderful writers who I’m totally honoured to be in the company of.

    You can find out more about the award here

    The good people at IBBY (International Board on Books for Young People) have this to say:

    Melissa Keil’s debut novel arrived on the YA scene with a refreshing, individual style which has impressed not only its target audience but also readers across generations…Keil has a superb knack of capturing the teenage ‘cringe’ factor: the beach picnic episode is a laugh-out-loud account of awkwardness and developing confidence. The ingenuous style of this novel makes it highly readable and amusing.

    Colour me chuffed.

     


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    17. Yakama Nation Library: Great Books Giveaway

    Yakama Native students could hardly wait to check out new books at the Yakama Nation Library, the latest recipient of YALSA’s Great Books Giveaway. YALSA donates thousands of dollars worth of books every year to qualifying libraries across the United States.

    Yakama Native students reviewing new books.

    Yakama Native students reviewing new books.

     

    The Yakama Nation Library serves 12 schools within a 5-mile radius, and students from all of those schools need access to books and information for reports, language studies, and recreational reading. Before YALSA’s donation, the books on YNL’s shelves were outdated. Now the collection has become richer with a more current range of fiction and nonfiction books and media to choose from. 

    The teens are delighted with the new books and with having so many choices, as you can tell from these pictures.

    Judging a book by its cover

    Judging a book by its cover

    So many books . . .

    Where to start?.

    Where to start?

    Too much good stuff!

    Each year the YALSA office receives approximately 3,000 newly published books, videos, CD’s and audiocassettes, materials that have been targeted primarily towards young adults. Publishers and producers submit copies for selection committees to review and nominate. After the ALA Midwinter Meeting (when committees select their annual lists), these materials need to be removed from the YALSA office to make room for the next year’s publications. If you are interested in getting 2014′s books and media for your collection, apply online for the Great Books Giveaway by December 1, 2014.

    Photo credits: Errol Olney & Mike Sekaquaptewa

     

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    18. 2014 Doug Wright award nominees

    201403311142.jpg
    The nominees for the 2014 Doug Wright Awards have been announced, honoring the best in Canadian cartoonists past and present. The awards will be presented in what is sure to be a gala evening at the Toronto Comic Arts Festival on May 10/ To celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Awards, a commemorative book is being published with “past art and memorabilia, along with original interpretations of Doug Wright’s “Nipper” comic by artists such as Seth, Chester Brown, Joe Ollmann, Pascal Girard, Michael DeForge, and more. The project will be funded via Kickstarter.  

    And the nominees are
    Best Book

    •    Palookaville #21 by Seth (Drawn and Quarterly)
    •    Paul Joins the Scouts by Michel Rabagliati (Conundrum Press)
    •    Science Fiction by Joe Ollmann (Conundrum Press)
    •    Susceptible by Geneviève Castrée (Drawn and Quarterly)
    •    Very Casual by Michael DeForge (Koyama Press)

    Doug Wright Spotlight Award (a.k.a. “The Nipper”) which recognizes Canadian cartoonists deserving of wider recognition:

    •    Connor Willumsen for “Calgary: Death Milks a Cow,” “Treasure Island,” “Mooncalf,” and “Passionfruit”
    •    Dakota McFadzean for Other Stories and the Horse You Rode in On (Conundrum Press)
    •    Patrick Kyle for Distance Mover #7 – 12, New Comics #1 – 2
    •    Steven Gilbert for The Journal of the Main Street Secret Lodge
    •    Georgia Webber for Dumb # 1 – 3

    2014 Pigskin Peters Award, which recognizes the best in experimental or avant-garde comics:
    •    “Calgary: Death Milks a Cow” by Connor Willumsen
    •    Flexible Tube with Stink Lines by Seth Scriver
    •    Journal by Julie Delporte (Koyama Press)
    •    “Out of Skin” by Emily Carroll 
    •    Very Casual by Michael DeForge (Koyama Press)

    The Giant of the North Hall of Fame award will be presented to the pioneering artists of the Second World War “Canadian Whites” comics.

    The Canadian Whites were black-and-white comics produced between 1941 and 1946 that contained a host of original (and iconic) Canadian characters such as Johnny Canuck, Canada Jack and Nelvana of the Northern Lights. These characters were created by the likes of Murray Karn, Adrian Dingle, Gerry Lazare, Leo Bachle and Jack Tremblay. The event will also serve as the official launch of a new collection of the complete Nelvana of the Northern Lights (by Adrian Dingle) being published by CGA Comics.


    The winners will be se;ected by a jury consisting of poet and novelist Lynn Crosbie, cartoonist and 2013 Doug Wright Award-winner Nina Bunjevac, media critic Jesse Brown (Canadaland, Search Engine) and and multiple Doug Wright Award-nominated cartoonist Nick Maandag.            This year’s nominating committee included Jerry Ciccoritti, Betty Liang, Rachel Richey, Chris Randle and Chester Brown.

    1 Comments on 2014 Doug Wright award nominees, last added: 4/1/2014
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    19. WARNING! Incredibly Long Post Ahead...


    I got two awards.  In one day!

    I wonder why that is?
    Oh, this is why.  Makes sense now. :)

    So first off, the Sunflower award.

    Amanda and Bella both nominated me for this award.
    Source

    These are the rules.  Since I am a rebel, I will do everything except nominate eleven other bloggers, 'cause all the eleven I'd nominate probably already received this anyway.

    Rule the First:  Share eleven facts about yourself.

    Rule the Second:  Answer the questions set by your nomination blogger.

    Rule the Third:  Nominate eleven bloggers.
    Yeah. That's not happening. I'll nominate SOME.

    Rule the Fourth:  Set questions for the nominated bloggers.

    SOOOOOO.... First off, here are Eleven Facts About Me.

    1.)  With my medical transcription training, I tend to double-space between periods now, in everything except novels I'm writing, 'cause for the most part Editors/Agents/Publishers don't like double-spacing.

    2.)  I love watching music videos.

    3.)  I have a hard time doing new things.
    Source

    4.) I usually run out of things to share around Number Four.
    Source

    5.)  I get depressed with popular young adult fiction and go back to my staple diet of Diana Wynne Jones, Patricia McKillip, and Tolkien's Farmer Giles of Ham and Smith of Wootton Major.
    Source

    6.)  I have taken to saying "Jeepers" a lot.  Not sure where that came from.

    7.)  I don't even know how many books I own.  I think there were a hundred on one bookshelf in my bedroom, and there's got to be five?  six?  maybe even ten times that amount in the closet... and on other bookshelves... and under the bed... and in other sisters' rooms.
    Mark Sheppard as Crowley

    8.)  I find it amazing how many TV shows Mark Sheppard has played in.
    Source

    9.)  I was tempted to skip number 9 and see how many of you were devoted enough to read through all these "facts" in order to catch the missing number.  I resisted.  Aren't you proud?

    10.)  Right now, one of my most favourite songs to listen to is POMPEII by BASTILLE.

    11.)  I want Josh Groban to do another Kid Snippets video NOW!
    Josh watches Kid Snippets, you guys!

    Whew!
    Source


    Now for the questions from Amanda and Bella.


    AMANDA'S QUESTIONS ~

    1.) What's your favorite type of dog?
    I freakin' LOVE German Shepherds!  But, if we're talking smaller dogs, I'm into Border Collie/Cocker Spaniel mixes, and Shiba Inus.
    Shiba Inus TOTALLY look like foxes... minus the tail. :)

    2.) Do you sing along to Doctor Who's theme song?
    TOTALLY!!

    Source
     
    3.) What does Tahiti make you think of?
    This:
    Source
     
    4.) How did Moriarty fake his death?
    Source
    'Nough said.

    5.) Who's your favorite Superhero.
    Iron Man.
    Source
    6.) If you could choose a superhero name, what would you call yourself?
    Hmmm.... I'd probably end up sticking with Cat.  Ooh, I know.  Panther. Cat Panther.  That's my superhero name.

    7.) You can travel back in your timeline, and only your timeline. What would you re-visit?
    March 27th, 2007, August 24, 2011, and October 6, 2013... because those were the times we saw Josh Groban in CONCERT. And end of April to beginning of May 2013, 'cause that's when we went to Scotland. And every single Christmas Eve and Christmas in the history of my life.


    There's Amanda's questions answered. Exciting, wasn't it?
    Source


    BELLA'S QUESTIONS ~

    1) Do you like Daylight Savings Time?
    I like when Daylight Savings Time ENDS, and we gain an hour.  Otherwise I'm like:
    Source
     
    2) What is one really good series which you have just discovered?
    Book series?  Um, how recently?  I'd say The 100 Cupboards was good, though technically that's a trilogy and not really a series.

    3) Are you a subtle fan-girl or more of a loud excited fangirl like me?
    I believe I am subtle.
    Source


    4) Hamburgers or Hot dogs?
    Definitely hamburgers.

    5) Do you like wearing sweaters or do you prefer hoodies?
    I'm more of a sweater person.  I'm not crazy about hoodies on myself, because I feel totally gangsta in them.  However, I like hoodies on other people.
    Source

    6) Do you like going out in the evening?
    I hope you like the caption  :-P

    7) Did you ever play Truth or Dare and did you like it?
    You mean Interrogation or Humiliation? *See question six's gif for your answer.* 
      
    And that's the Sunflower Award!  Thanks again to Amanda and Bella for the nomination!

    I nominate:
    Allyn
    Nessie
    John the Hedgehog

    My questions for youse all:
    1.)  Do you prefer Arabic or Roman numerals?
    2.)  Do you watch My Little Ponies?
    3.)  What's the absolute stupidest thing you've ever done?
    4.)  What's your idea of the best car?
    5.)  What's the worst thing you can imagine?
    6.)  Do you know what gif stands for?
    7.)  Be honest... did you have to Google "gif" in order to answer question 6 intelligently?

    Have fun! :)


    And Now...
     Drumroll, please...
    Source

    I also received the Liebster Award from Rose M.

    Le Rules for Le Reward:

    Uno: Acknowledge the blog that nominated you. Thank you, Rose from The Golden Road!

    Dos: Answer the 11 questions the nominating blogger created.

    Tres: List 11 bloggers with less than 200 followers that deserve some recognition.

    Quatro: Post 11 questions for them to answer.

    Cinco: Notify them that they've been nominated.


    Alrighty! ROSE'S QUESTIONS ~

    1.)  An anonymous someone drops a note on your front porch saying that they will fund a trip to either England, an African Safari, Prince Edward Island, or Italy. Which do you choose? Why?
    Italy.  Why?  Because it's freakin' ITALY!
    Source
     
    2.)  You're being forced to re-do your room. What color do you paint it?
    THIS:
    Source
     
    3.)  Do you have a particular song that you listen to often, but it never seems to get old? If so, what is it?
    Yes.  Yes I do.
     
    4.)  Would you rather be lounging in the sun on the beach reading a good book or adventuring in the waves?
    Ooh, choices, choices... I'd do both.  Read a little in the sun, and go for a swim, and read a little in the sun, and go for a swim, and read a little in the sun, and... you get the picture, right?

    5.)  You suddenly end up with two twin kittens. One is a girl; one is a boy. What do you name them? 
    Sam and Jess.

    6.)  You're organizing a get together with friends. Would you choose a picnic or a movie night?
    Definitely a movie night.  Less small talk.  LOL

    7.)  What is your pet peeve? 
    BADLY WRITTEN YA AND MG NOVELS!!!
    Source
     
    8.)  Is there a new hobby you've been wanting to try out? 
    Source
     I fancy archery.
     
    9.)  If you could pick one instrument that you would (without any effort on your part) instantly master, which would you choose? 
    Pan pipes.

    10.)  Would you like to be snowed inside for a week? 
    *See John Watson gif used in Bella's question number 6.*

    11.)  Pick the closest book to you that you've read. Who is your favorite character in the book?
    Right now, the book closest to me that I've read is The Unexpected Mrs. Pollifax, and my favourite character in that book is John Sebastian Farrell.
     
    I DID IT, Y'ALL!! 
     
    And now I nominate:

    My questions for YOUSE all:
    1.)  What fandom do you "belong" to?
    2.)  Would you fight to the death someone who bashes one of your favourite characters?
    3.)  Would you use daggers for subtlety, or swords for an all-out "COME AT ME, BRO!" battle?
    4.)  What do you do when someone tells you that you have pepper in your teeth?
    5.)  To you, what's more awesome... climbing trees, or writing stories?
    6.)  Have you ever secretly wished you were a unicorn?
    7.)  When you drink tea, do you prefer a mug or a bone china cup?
    8.)  What's your opinion on Alka-Seltzer?
    9.)  If you are an Agents of SHIELD fan, or a Marvel fan, or just a superhero fan, which agent/superhero do you think you'd be?
    10.)  Do you have a lucky number?
    11.)  WHY do you have a lucky number?!  (Those of you who replied No to question 10, Why DON'T you have a lucky number?!!
     
    And that's that.
    http://kotwg.blogspot.com/2013_11_01_archive.htmlI'm AWESOME!
     
     Hope you all had fun with that, and we'll see you next time!
     
    God bless!
     
    Cat
     
     
     
     
     
     




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    20. March comes in like a lion wins Tezuka Prize top award

    m03499579-01.jpg

    The 18th Annual Tezuka Osamu Cultural Prizes, given out to notable manga, were announced yesterday. he grand prize went to March comes in like a lion by Chica Umino. The story is described thusly:

    The story of the manga follows a solitary shōgi player named Rei and his relationships with a neighboring family. He becomes acquainted with Akari, and two young girls, Hinata and Momo, who also have have a large number of cats.


    OH MY GOD CAN SOMEONE PLEASE PUBLISH THIS HERE.

    Other winners:
    New Birth Prize
    Mitsuami no Kami-sama and other works by Machiko Kyō

    Short Work Prize
    Onnoji and other works by Yūki Shikawa

    Special Prize
    Manga Michi, Ai…Shirisomeshi Kei ni by Fujiko Fujio A

    Reader Prize
    Space Brothers by Chūya Koyama

    1 Comments on March comes in like a lion wins Tezuka Prize top award, last added: 3/25/2014
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    21. Kanigher, Mantlo and Mendelsohn win the Finger Award for 2014

    In a break with tradition, two living authors have been given the 2014 Bill Finger Award for Excellence in Comic Book Writing for 2014, but since the committee just couldn’t decide who are we to judge?

    The winners for this year’s award—which recognizes underappreciated comics writers, one living and one deceased—have been awarded to the late Robert Kanigher, author of a ton of great war comics; and Bill Mantlo and Jack Mendelsohn, both still living.

    “This year, the judges couldn’t decide between two living recipients so one said, ‘Why don’t we just give it to both of them?’ And we decided to give it to both of them,” Awards administrator Mark Evanier said in a statement. “They’re two men who deserve the honor and we figured, why make one of them wait until next year, especially in light of the fact that Bill Finger would have turned 100 this year? And as for our posthumous recipient, Robert Kanigher, that one’s long overdue.”

    This year’s committee consisted of Evanier, Charles Kochman (executive editor at Harry N. Abrams, book publisher), comic book writer Kurt Busiek, artist/historian Jim Amash, cartoonist Scott Shaw!, and writer/editor Marv Wolfman. The major sponsor for the 2014 awards is DC Comics; supporting sponsors are Heritage Auctions and Maggie Thompson.

    awards_finger2014_kanigher.jpg

    Robert Kanigher wrote his first comic books in 1942 and quickly became one of the most prolific talents in the field. His early work included Blue Beetle, Steel Sterling, and the original Captain Marvel. Then in 1945, he went to work for All-American Comics as an editor and writer and segued to DC Comics when it absorbed All-American. In 1946, he began a 35-year association with Wonder Woman, serving as the character’s editor for 22 of those years and writing hundreds of her adventures. As the main editor of DC’s war comics line, he created and/or wrote Sgt. Rock,The Haunted Tank, Captain Storm, Enemy Ace, Johnny Cloud, and dozens of other series. He wrote the first story of the 1956 Flash revival that is often cited as the beginning of the Silver Age of Comics, and his list of co-creations also includes The Metal Men, The Sea Devils, The Rose and the Thorn, and Black Canary. He worked on most of the major DC features up until his death in 1986.

    awards_finger2014_mantlo.jpg

    Bill Mantlo went to work for Marvel Comics as a production assistant and colorist in 1974 but quickly found his niche as a writer, initially of fill-ins. Within a few years, he had written at least an issue or two of almost every major Marvel title and also took on many regular assignments. The regular books included long and popular runs on Micronauts and Rom: Spaceknight, and readers hailed his work on such titles as Ka-Zar the Savage, The Incredible Hulk, Moon Knight and his co-creation (with artist Ed Hannigan), Cloak and Dagger. Another co-creation was the Guardians of the Galaxy character Rocket Raccoon, soon to be part of the major motion picture. Mantlo used his income from comics to go to law school, and in 1987 he passed the bar and began working as a public defender. In 1992 while rollerblading, he was struck by a car and suffered what was described as “irreversible brain damage.” He currently resides in a nursing facility. His Finger Award will be shipped to his brother and caregiver Michael, who will present the plaque to Bill.

    awards_finger2014_mendelsohn.jpg

    Jack Mendelsohn got his start in comics interning for Jerry Iger in 1942. His earliest identified credits as a writer are for DC’s More Fun Comics in 1946 and Animal Antics in 1947. Other early writing appeared in comics published by Ziff-Davis, Pine, and the Archie company, and then for EC Comics when he scripted their in-house imitation of Mad called Panic. Later credits include comics for Dell and Western Publishing of Nancy and Sluggo, Rocky & Bullwinkle, Miss Peach and Beetle Bailey. He wrote the Felix the Cat newspaper strip for a time and also wrote (and sometimes drew) Felix comic books. His own newspaper strip, Jacky’s Diary, was the subject of a Dell comic book he wrote and drew, and the strip has recently been collected between hardcovers by IDW Publishing. Mendelsohn also had an extensive career in animation (including work on the screenplay for the animated feature Yellow Submarine). His live-action writing credits include Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In, The Carol Burnett Show and Three’s Company.

    The Bill Finger Award is named after William Finger (1914-1974), whose essential and promethean work on Batman went mostly uncredited.

    4 Comments on Kanigher, Mantlo and Mendelsohn win the Finger Award for 2014, last added: 3/25/2014
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    22. S. Korean Animated Films Top Holland Animation Film Festival

    The 17th edition of the Holland Animation Film Festival concluded last Sunday in Utrecht, Netherlands. The winners of the top prizes for both feature film and narrative short hailed from South Korea.

    0 Comments on S. Korean Animated Films Top Holland Animation Film Festival as of 3/26/2014 3:43:00 AM
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    23. APRIL UPDATE!

    BIRDth-DAY! April 1st marks the 11th anniversary of the publication of my first book, Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! Because of the support of Librarians, Teachers, Parents, Grand-Parents, and Fans the last 11 years have been a wonderful ride filled with opportunities for me to write, draw, and meet fantastic kids and grown-ups all over the world. Thank you for this gift.

    0 Comments on APRIL UPDATE! as of 3/28/2014 10:07:00 AM
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    24. Thoughts on Newbery: Patrick Ness’s CBAITS

    Some of you may bristle (or already have) about this topic, but I think it is one to take very, very seriously. It is Patrick Ness‘s provocative point in his SLJ Battle of the Kids’ Book decision this week about what  he has termed CBAITs:

    Crappy Books About Important Things; you know exactly what I’m talking about: books with either important subject matter or important formats that are so terrible-but-worthy they turn reading into medicine for young people.  People tend to be far too afraid to give these books bad reviews and they often go on to win prizes.

    I think Patrick has a point, an important and enormously complicated one. First of all, what Patrick may consider a CBAIT may not be what someone else does. That is, our criteria may be different, our idea of what is good, our taste, and so forth. Which is why, presumably, some end up winning prizes. That is, enough people on a particular award jury may have the same sense of what is good even if it isn’t what others think. And so they are going to give an award to a book they sincerely think is good not crappy.

    And that gets to the heart of Patrick’s issue: what do people consider to be a good book? Many indeed think a book is good if it takes on an Important Thing and will dismiss questions about the quality of sentence level writing that would be something I’d be paying attention to . While Patrick and I probably would agree that something with painfully poor sentence level writing is crappy there are some who might feel differently. Not to mention what I might consider overwrought writing might be something someone else would think is wonderful, and vice versa.

    That said, I do think there is a tendency for those of us who review and/or participate in selecting best books, award books, and such to pay a lot of attention to books that deal with topics that we feel need to be more known. And sometimes we excuse weaknesses in such books because we think they are so important. Because they are so few and because we so badly want young people to take in the topics, to know about these Important Things.

    I think this has special resonance when considering the Newbery award. While the criteria are clear that it is for literary merit not popularity or didactic intent, I suspect most  of us can look back at the books that have received the medal and find one we’d call a CBAIT.

    Thank you, Patrick, for pointing out that metaphorically children’s book award emperors sometimes have no clothes.

     


    9 Comments on Thoughts on Newbery: Patrick Ness’s CBAITS, last added: 3/31/2014
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    25. Best Book Award - A Lark in the Ark


    On Thursday, I got the fantastic news that A Lark in the Ark has been shortlisted for the Booktrust's Best Book Award - how brilliant is that?


    Peter Bently and myself are in some pretty awe-inspiring company too: Axel Sheffler (Flap-Flap Farm), Tony Ross & David Wallliams (The Slightly Annoying Elephant) and Ed Bryan (Red Riding Hood) are the others in our category. As, you imagine, I am tickled pink.



    We are in a section for the best digital adaptation of books, because Signed Stories has done a superb job of creating a signed and animated version of A Lark in the Ark. Just look at that signer in his waterproof! There's a trailer here which gives you a flavour.

    You can vote for your favourite's in all the categories here (vote for us, vote for us, vote for us..!) and you can download the signed versions of the book from Signed Stories here. It's £3.99.

    0 Comments on Best Book Award - A Lark in the Ark as of 3/30/2014 4:45:00 AM
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