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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Environmental Theme, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 11 of 11
1. Farewell to Shady Glade by Bill Peet

The picture books of Bill Peet were a big part of my childhood. To learn more about Peet and his long career (including working at Disney Studios as a story editor during the heyday of their animated films) read my review of Bill Peet: An Autobiography, his Caldecott winning, wonderfully illustrated memoir. Today, on the birthday of Rachel Carson, the marine biologist, founder of the

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2. Toby Alone by Timothee de Fombelle, illustrated by Francois Place, translated by Sarah Ardizzone, 400pp RL5

First reviewed in 2009, Toby Alone presents the reader with a world within a world, in miniature and facing enormous problems. Enchanting, exciting and magical, Toby is a wonderfully brave, thoughtful character you won't forget. Reading Toby Alone by French playwright Timothée de Fombelle, translated by Sarah Ardizzone, winner of the Marsh Award for Children's Literature in Translation,

6 Comments on Toby Alone by Timothee de Fombelle, illustrated by Francois Place, translated by Sarah Ardizzone, 400pp RL5, last added: 8/3/2013
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3. More, written by IC Springman and illustrated by Brian Lies AND Little Bird, written by Germano Zullo and illustrated by Albertine

Before I write anything about these two wonderful books, I have to mention Sophie Blackall (The Crows of Pearlblossom by Aldous Huxley, Mr and Mrs Bunny - Detectives Extraordinaire! by Polly Horvath) a favorite illustrator of mine an now book reviewer! While I had More in my pile of books to review, it was Blackall's review of Springman's book in the NY Times on May 11, 2012 that introduced me

1 Comments on More, written by IC Springman and illustrated by Brian Lies AND Little Bird, written by Germano Zullo and illustrated by Albertine, last added: 5/31/2012
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4. Dead Boys written by Royce Buckingham, 201 pp, RL 5

Dead Boys by Royce Buckingham begins with a prologue that tells the story of an old sycamore tree growing in Richland, WA in the arid, eastern part of the state.  Just down the road from the Hanford Nuclear Plant, site of some serious toxic waste dumps into the Columbia River in the 1940s.  This dump fills the tree with toxic energy, turning it hungry and violent.  When a twelve-year old boy

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5. Yucky Worms by Vivian French, illustrated by Jessica Ahlberg and Insect Detective by Steve Voake, illustrated by Charlotte Voake

Almost every child I have ever had the pleasure of knowing has been fascinated by bugs, which usually also involved some form of "playing " with them... Yucky Worms by Vivian French, with pictures by Jessica Ahlberg, illustrator of the Toon Tellegen's marvelous forest books, the first of which is The Squirrel's Brithday and other Parties and Insect Detective, written by Steve Voake, author of

2 Comments on Yucky Worms by Vivian French, illustrated by Jessica Ahlberg and Insect Detective by Steve Voake, illustrated by Charlotte Voake, last added: 6/9/2010
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6. Bag in the Wind by Ted Kooser, illustrated by Barry Root

With his first book for children, former National Poet Laureate and Pulitzer Prize winner Ted Kooser tells the story of a plastic grocery bag, the "color of the skin of a yellow onion," as it blows out of a landfill and into the lives of several townsfolk. Bag in the Wind is beautifully and somberly illustrated by Barry Root, subject of a great interview over at Just One More Book. About Bag in

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7. EARTH DAY 2010!

There are plenty on non-fiction books for children on the market these days covering everything earth related from recycling to global warming, getting the point across with facts, crafts and mazes. Any bookstore or library you walk into this month should have a display of some or all of these books.Having a literary focus on my blog, I will leave the reading of these books up to you. I want

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8. Standing for Socks by Elissa Brent Weissman, 220 pp, RL 4

Standing for Socks, the debut novel from Elissa Brent Weissman employs one of my favorite plot devices in adult literature, children's literature and even movies, namely, how one, seemingly miniscule, unconscious act can shape and change a person's life forever.  In Standing for Socks, fifth grader Fara Ross unwittingly wears one white and one dark grey sock to school and starts a kid-sized

0 Comments on Standing for Socks by Elissa Brent Weissman, 220 pp, RL 4 as of 9/14/2009 6:30:00 AM
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9. Toby Alone by Timothee de Fombelle, illustrated by Francois Place, translated by Sarah Ardizzone, 400pp RL5

Reading Toby Alone by French playwright Timothée de Fombelle, translated by Sarah Ardizzone, winner of the Marsh Award for Children's Literature in Translation, and illustrated by François Place, is a bit like looking at an optical illusion where two different images vie for prominence - in a good way. The story of Toby Lolness, thirteen at the start of the story, and the events that cause him

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10. The Secret History of Mermaids by Professor Ari Berk, illustrated by Wayne Anderson, Gary Chalk, Matt Dangler and Virginia Lee

Once again, the remarkable academics of Professor Ari Berk and multifaceted artistry that made The Secret History of Giants a treasure of a book come together to bring us The Secret History of Mermaids and Creatures of the Deep, another look into the archives of the Order of the Golden Quills. Like the Ology series of books published by Candlewick Press, Berk's Secret Histories (a series, I

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11. Roar by Emma Clayton, 496 pp, Reading Level 5

The Roar by British author Emma Clayton is so many amazing things at once and has stirred up such visceral feelings in me that I hope I can do it justice here. For a very concise review by that hits all the right spots, check out Pink Me, which is a book review site written by a children's librarian with great taste and insight when it comes to YA books. For my longer, slightly more rambling

4 Comments on Roar by Emma Clayton, 496 pp, Reading Level 5, last added: 1/23/2010
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