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Results 26 - 50 of 3,614
26. New Dr. Seuss Museum to Open in Massachusetts

Seuss Sculpture GardenThe directors behind the Springfield Museums intend to launch a new cultural institution in honor of Theodor Seuss Geisel. An opening date for the permanent exhibition (first floor) of the “The Amazing World of Dr. Seuss Museum” has been set for June 2016.

According to the announcement, a permanent exhibit on the first floor will consist of three sections: Mulberry Street, Dr. Seuss’s Neighborhood, and Readingville. Visitors will encounter “a series of environments that replicate scenes from Dr. Seuss’s imagination and encounter life-sized three-dimensional characters and places from the books.”

The second floor area will showcase “a re-creation of Ted Geisel’s studio, an exhibition about the making of the Dr. Seuss National Memorial Sculpture Garden and other related displays.” It will not be made available to the public until 2017. (via TheArtery)

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27. George Hodgman Thanks Facebook Followers for “Bettyville” Success

In 2012, author and editor Kevin Sessums shared a post that his old colleague from Vanity Fair George Hodgman had written from his hometown of Paris, Missouri, where he was caring for his mother, Betty.

Sessums introduced it, in part, by saying: \"His missives here on Facebook about his time back home with her are so beautiful. I had to share this latest one… (they) resound with such love and respect and a kind of sweet regret.\"

Portions of the story in that missive appear in Hodgman’s new book Bettyville, which will debut at #9 on the New York Times bestseller list next Sunday. Hodgman–a noted book and magazine editor who has worked at Simon and Schuster, Vanity Fair, Talk magazine, Henry Holt and Company, and Houghton Mifflin–announced it on his Facebook blog on March 18: \"This is a total thrill and unexpected. I wanted to post this here because I truly owe it to all of you. YOU MADE THIS BOOK FOR ME.\"

Writing in the New York Times, Cathy Horyn calls Bettyville, \"a most remarkable, laugh-out-loud book\" that \"works on several levels (as a meditation on belonging, as a story of growing up gay and the psychic cost of silence, as metaphor for recovery).\" When Horyn notes that he approaches memoir from a \"fairly new perspective: that of a gay son,\" Hodgman says, \"Here was this neurotic, self-centered, New York, childless gay man.\"

Horyn quotes Sara Bershtel, publisher of Metropolitan Books and a Hodgman colleague from his time at Henry Holt, who said, Bettyville suggests \"the development of a watchful gay kid. You have to watch everybody, you have to watch your parents, and you can’t show anything.\" Horyn feels that watchfulness \"made him a shrewd and witty observer.”

Hodgman told the Times that he generally wrote from 4 to 9 a.m., when his mother rose. Sometimes he would key in their chats while his mother spoke from the sofa.

\"My mother is funny and dry without knowing that she is. Together, we can make people laugh. So I had this idea of a quirky comedy team…I’m also very nostalgic about these towns…I just felt that this rural area was a real story that nobody was telling.\"

People are listening. In January, Publishers Lunch had already flagged it as a book to watch in its BUZZ BOOKS 2015: Spring/Summer edition. Amazon and Books-a-Million recently made Bettyville a Top Pick, and People named it a \"Book of the Week.\"

\"I am a believer in God in my own special way. But I think I was given this book because I came back.\"

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28. Graham Moore Inks Deal For Historical Fiction Book

Graham MooreOscar-winning screenwriter Graham Moore (pictured, via) has landed a deal for his second novel with Random House.

The publisher plans to release The Last Days of Wonder in Fall 2016. Senior editor Noah Eaker negotiated the terms of the agreement with ICM Partners agent Jennifer Joel.

Here’s more from Deadline: “Sticking to the historical thriller bent of Alan Turing’s story in Imitation Game, Wonder is set against the backdrop of 1880s New York and centers on the legal battle over the invention of the light bulb pitting Thomas Edison against George Westinghouse. The story is told through the eyes of Westinghouse’s young attorney, Paul Cravath (later the founding partner of the prestigious law firm Cravath, Swaine & Moore), and focuses on his efforts against enormous odds to win his case for his client.”

Many have praised Moore for a moving acceptance speech he gave while accepting the Academy Award in the best adapted screenplay category earlier this year. Click here to watch a video with Moore encouraging those who feel like different to “stay weird.”

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29. Neil Gaiman Reminisces About Sir Terry Pratchett

Neil Gaiman and Michael Chabon recently sat for a conversation at the Jewish Community Center of San Francisco. The two writers talked about their craft, stories, and beloved author Sir Terry Pratchett.

The video embedded above features the portion of their discussion where they talked about Pratchett and his influence on the literary community. Click here to watch a recording of the entire event. On the same day that Gaiman learned of Pratchett’s passing, he wrote a short blog post to express his feelings about his dear friend.

Here’s an excerpt: “Thirty years and a month ago, a beginning author met a young journalist in a Chinese Restaurant, and the two men became friends, and they wrote a book, and they managed to stay friends despite everything. Last night, the author died. There was nobody like him. I was fortunate to have written a book with him, when we were younger, which taught me so much.” (via The Huffington Post)

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30. St. Martin’s Press to Publish ‘Humans of New York: Stories’

honyBrandon Stanton, the photographer behind the \"Humans of New York\" (HONY) blog, has landed a deal for Humans of New York: Stories.

Stanton will appear at this year’s BookCon for a conversation event about his new book. According to the BookCon announcement, the book showcases “a whole new group of humans, complete with stories that delve deeper and surprise with greater candor.”

St. Martin’s Press will publish the follow-up to Stanton’s New York Times bestseller on October 13th. In the past, Stanton has snapped photographs featuring editor Yaniv Soha, literary agent Brian DeFioreNYPL President Tony MarxOutliers author Malcolm Gladwell, Breaking Bad actor Bryan Cranston, and President Barack Obama.

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31. Alan Moore’s Jerusalem to be Published in 2016

Alan MooreRenowned comics creator Alan Moore has landed a deal for his second prose novel. Liveright, an imprint at W. W. Norton & Company, will publish Jerusalem in Fall 2016.

According to The New York Times, Moore’s manuscript may contain more than one million words. Moore sets this historical fiction-fantasy story in his hometown of Northampton, England.

Here’s more from The Guardian: “The acclaimed comics writer began work on Jerusalem in 2008 and finished his gargantuan draft last September, as his daughter Leah Moore announced on Facebook. The novel is said to explore the small area of Northampton where Moore grew up, ranging from his own family’s stories to historical events to fantasy, with chapters told in different voices.”

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32. Amanda Palmer & Neil Gaiman Are Having a Baby

Authors Amanda Palmer and Neil Gaiman are expecting a baby.

Gaiman tweeted the news earlier today along with a link to an Instagram photo of the pregnant Palmer.

I just took a photograph of beautiful, three months pregnant @amandapalmer: https://t.co/zqHgiIeS6g

— Neil Gaiman (@neilhimself) March 18, 2015

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33. George R.R. Martin to Skip Comic Con & Finish Book

Author George R.R. Martin won’t be making it to the World Fantasy Convention or Comic Con in San Diego this year.

Instead, he’s going to stay home and get his book done. In a blog post he explained: “I have too much to do. Too many things on my plate. Son of Kong foremost amongst them.”

However, if he completes Winds of Winter before the events, “I reserve the right to change my mind,” he blogged. (Via The Hollywood Reporter).

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34. How to Raise Kids Who Read

Want to raise a child who loves reading? Daniel Willingham, author of the book Raising Kids Who Read recommends making reading “the most appealing thing a child can do.”

In an interview with NPR, the author said that the reason to raise a reader shouldn’t be to increase school performance or to help them make more money later in life. The real reason should be to raise a person that appreciates books and the worlds you can learn from them. Here is an excerpt from the interview:

You should model reading, make reading pleasurable, read aloud to your kid in situations that are warm and create positive associations. But also setting a tone where our family is one where we like to learn new things. We like to learn about the world, and a big part of that is reading. Developing a sense in the child that I am in a family of readers before the child can even read.

Former GalleyCat Editor Jason Boog also has excellent tips for parents looking to raise bookworms. In his book Born Reading, Boog outlines step-by-step instructions and advice for cultivating reading in kids from birth.

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35. Gallery Nucleus to Host Adam Rex’s Solo Exhibit

Adam RexGallery Nucleus will host the Adam Rex solo exhibition.

According to the organization’s website, this program focuses on the art of two books: The True Meaning of Smekday and Chu’s Day. It will also showcase a behind-the-scenes look at the animated film adaptation (based on the Smekday title), Home.

Rex himself (pictured, via) will make an appearance for a panel to discuss the Home movie and conduct a book signing during the opening reception. This exhibit will open on March 28th and close on April 19th.

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36. Classroom Connections: THE ACTUAL AND TRUTHFUL ADVENTURES OF BECKY THATCHER by Jessica Lawson

age range: 8-12

setting: 1860 Missouri; retelling of Tom Sawyer

curriculum guide

Jessica Lawson’s website

“The deliciously impetuous, devilishly clever, and uncommonly brave Becky Thatcher is now one of my all-time favorite heroines, and I’m desperate to follow her on more adventures. Captivating, exciting, and great barrels-full of fun, this is a book to adore.”
Anne Ursu, author of The Real Boy and Breadcrumbs

A delightfully clever debut.”
– Publishers Weekly, starred review

“Young readers will race through this adventure, while teachers and adults will delight in its gold mine of creative parallels.”
– BookPage

Please tell us about your book.

The Actual & Truthful Adventures of Becky Thatcher is part origin story, part retelling of Mark Twain’s classic The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Written from the perspective of Becky Thatcher, it takes the setting and many characters from Twain’s beloved work and forms a new plot that puts Becky in the spotlight as she grapples with the after-effects of her brother’s death and has adventures in his honor. Samuel Clemens (aka Mark Twain), who was actually a riverboat pilot on the Mississippi during the time of the novel (1860), makes several appearances and serves as a reminder that every writer’s stories and characters have an origin.

What inspired you to write this story?

I’ve always admired the wit and wisdom of Mark Twain. His books are among the most treasured of my personal collection. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer caught my eye while I was dusting my bookshelf one day, and I found myself thinking about how, as a much younger reader, I had wanted nothing more than to run around with Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn, making mischief and having adventures. As I thought about the other characters, I considered the fact that I’d never really connected with Becky Thatcher. Why was that? Upon reflection, I think it was because Becky, an iconic female character in her own right, didn’t get to embrace the same things/traits that the boys did. And although her actions and manner fit Twain’s image of the character perfectly, they didn’t really fit the girl I had been. So as an adult, I decided it could be fun to give Becky Thatcher an opportunity to embrace adventure and see what she did with it.

Could you share with readers a lesson learned while conducting research?

During my normal research process for historical fiction, one of favorite things to do is read old newspapers. Not only do I discover a sense of what sort of things were newsworthy, but I get a sense of language and culture. I also like to hunt down academic articles; for a recent Work-In-Progress, an internet search helped me find some article titles that sounded informative, intriguing, and pertinent to my setting/plot. I sent an email to the author, a professor at New York University’s Irish House, explaining who I was and that I was hoping to get access to a few of his articles that were only published in a (very large, very expensive) anthology. I was so thrilled when he responded, attaching the requested articles and wishing me luck with my project. The lesson I learned is that people, even ones that may seem intimidating in skill level/profession, are nearly always willing to help. So ask. 

With my Becky Thatcher book, my research was fairly limited, concentrating mostly on finding biographical information about Samuel Clemens’s life. I avoided close re-readings of Tom Sawyer until after I’d written several drafts to avoid any subconscious tendency to try to copy Twain’s voice. I wanted any similarities in tone to come out naturally and not be forced.

What are some special challenges associated with retellings?

I wrote something several months ago about the nature of retellings and how such a large variety of approaches exist, making it difficult to establish “rules.” But my personal guidelines for retellings always involve the following three things:

First, you should love the original work as written and have respect for the author. In my opinion, a retelling shouldn’t be undertaken in order to “fix” something that the original author did wrong, but rather to bring fresh attention and a new perspective to a well-loved tale.

There must be at least one large twist. But the twist should be a playful/thoughtful/deliberate one that has meaning within the original elements, not just a random item. Know why you’re changing a key element of the story and be confident in your reasoning.

Keep the heart of the original in mind and try your best to honor it. While my own retelling of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer alters personalities and changes plot elements, the themes of learning what it means to grow up and struggling with losing pieces of childhood are still there and are recognizable.

What topics does your book touch upon that would make it a perfect fit for the classroom?

I think the inclusion of historical figure Samuel Clemens could promote interesting classroom discussions on who the “real” Mark Twain was as a younger man and how writers form their stories.

Themes touched upon in my book are things that students deal with each day in both home life and school situations (morality, friendship, telling truth and lies, labeling people, decision-making, consequences of choices) as well as a couple of more personal, sensitive themes (loss and grieving).

Simon & Schuster was kind enough to put together a curriculum guide for the book as a standalone and also as a companion to both The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. 

The post Classroom Connections: THE ACTUAL AND TRUTHFUL ADVENTURES OF BECKY THATCHER by Jessica Lawson appeared first on Caroline Starr Rose.

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37. A.J. Jacobs Launches Indiegogo Campaign

Journalist and author A.J. Jacobs has been researching geneology for his forthcoming book, It’s All Relative. Not too long ago, he launched a crowdfunding venture for the Global Family Reunion Festival on Indiegogo.

Jacobs and his team hope to raise $30,000.00 for this event which is scheduled to take place on June 6th in New York City. It will feature more than dozens of speakers, musical performances, and a number of activities.

The video embedded above features appearances from former President George H. W. Bush, filmmaker Morgan Spurlock, and Harry Potter movie series actor Daniel Radcliffe; Spurlock confirmed that he will appear at the festival. The proceeds from ticket sales will benefit two organizations, the Alzheimer’s Association of New York City and the Cure Alzheimer’s Fund.

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38. Gretchen Rubin On Failure

Gretchen RubinBetter Than Before author Gretchen Rubin has written an article about failure. Rubin recommends enjoying “the fun of failure” and not allowing perfectionist tendencies to become “the enemy of the good.”

Here’s an excerpt: “Telling myself that I can enjoy the ‘fun of failure’ has made me (somewhat) more light-hearted about taking risks. As G. K. Chesterton wrote, ‘If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.’ I also tell myself, ‘If I’m not failing, I’m not trying hard enough.'”

In the past, many other authors have also talked about failure including Harry Potter series author J.K. Rowling, Fight Club novelist Chuck Palahniuk, and Trigger Warning writer Neil Gaiman. Recently, graphic novelist Gene Luen Yang and Nobel laureate Toni Morrison contributed pieces about this topic to NEA Arts Magazine. How do you deal with failure?

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39. The Leader’s Guide on Kickstarter

Eric Ries, the author of The Lean Startup, is hoping to raise $135,000 for his next book The Leader’s Guide.

Ries, launched the campaign at SXSW this week, and has already raised almost $130,000. The book will only be available as a limited edition to Kickstarter donors. He has no plans to publish it further. Here is more from his Kickstarter page:

The campaign offers two elements: the book and a master class for Lean Startup practitioners. Check it out:

The Leader’s Guide is a a 250-page, four-color hardcover book (also
offered digitally) that contains the curriculum Eric uses with his
startup and corporate clients, as well as scores of never-before-published case studies and stories gathered over the course of five years. Think of it as a field guide for implementing Lean Startup principles in any work environment.

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40. Terry Pratchett’s Final Discworld Novel Will be Published

The world lost sci-fi novelist Terry Pratchett last week, but he left us one final novel.

The Shepherd’s Crown, will be published, according to the book’s designer Paul Kidby. Kidby told io9.com that he is working on illustrations for the book. He also confirmed that Pratchett had finished the book last summer, before “he succumbed to the final stages of his illness.”

The book is the fifth in the Discworld series and will be based on the witch Tiffany Aching. A release date has not been revealed.

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41. Lexa Hillyer Inks Book Deal

Proof of ForeverLexa Hillyer has landed a deal for her debut young adult novel.

HarperCollins will release Proof of Forever on June 2nd. Hillyer has become well-known in the publishing industry as the co-founder of a literary incubator company called Paper Lantern Lit.

In the past, Hillyer served as a young adult editor at both HarperCollins and Penguin Young Readers Group. She published a collection of poetry entitled Acquainted with the Cold back in November 2012.

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42. Cervantes’ Missing Tomb Discovered in Spain

Scientists believe that they have located the tomb of author Miguel de Cervantes in Spain.

The Don Quixote author died in 1616, but his coffin was moved after his initial burial.

BBC has more:

They believe they have found the bones of Cervantes, his wife and others recorded as buried with him in Madrid’s Convent of the Barefoot Trinitarians. Separating and identifying his badly damaged bones from the other fragments will be difficult, researchers say.

To celebrate this discovery, here is a link to a free eBook version of Don Quixote.

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43. BookCon to feature “Comics Are Awesome” panel with Smith, Telgemeier, Hatke and Holm

BookCon—the consumer-focused book show that is tacked on to the trade BEA show—is expanding to two days this year, May 30-31, with way more authors, more exhibitors and more more. And there will be a very cool panel on comics, on  Saturday, May 30th at 11:30am. Here’s the logline:

 COMICS ARE AWESOME!

Join comics superstars Ben Hatke (Little Robot), Jenni Holm (Sunny Side Up), Jeff Smith (Bone), and Raina Telgemeier (Sisters) as they talk about how comics work, how they make their own comics, and what makes comics so completely awesome.  If you’re a fan of comics, don’t miss this great discussion – it’ll have amazing authors sharing their latest work and exciting art drawn right before your eyes!  Moderated by Heidi MacDonald (Publishers Weekly).

That’s right, this super awesome panel will be moderated by me; I’ll try to live up to the awesomeness. But getting to listen to four such talented creators in a whole new arena is a very exciting challenge. Be there!

Ticket information for BookCon are in the above link.

comicsareawesome

3 Comments on BookCon to feature “Comics Are Awesome” panel with Smith, Telgemeier, Hatke and Holm, last added: 3/17/2015
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44. The Literary Community Remembers Sir Terry Pratchett

Terry took Death’s arm and followed him through the doors and on to the black desert under the endless night.

— Terry Pratchett (@terryandrob) March 12, 2015

The literary community is mourning the loss of famed science-fiction writer, Sir Terry Pratchett.

The beloved fantasy author had been suffering from Alzheimer’s disease for nearly a decade. The news was announced yesterday on Pratchett’s Twitter (embedded above) and Facebook pages.

A number of people have expressed their sadness on social media including Good Omens co-author Neil Gaiman, Stone Mattress author Margaret Atwood, and the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom David Cameron. Below, we’ve collected several messages from Twitter in a Storify post.

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45. Harper Lee’s Literary Agent Rejects Claims of Elder Abuse

HarperLeeAlabama state officials opened an investigation following complaints about Harper Lee possibly suffering from elder abuse. The New York Times reports that Lee’s literary agent, Andrew Nurnberg, has issued a statement about this issue to denounce these claims.

Here’s an excerpt: “The fact that she is hard of hearing and suffers from some macular degeneration (entirely common for someone in their late 80s) has no bearing whatsoever on her quick wit or of speaking her mind on all manner of things. That she chose many years ago to lead a quiet life away from the world at large (the last time she spoke to the press was, I believe, in 1964) is her prerogative and should be respected. She was surprised when the manuscript, which she had presumed long lost, was found last August and she is both delighted and enthused that it will now be published.”

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Nurnberg has been overseeing the negotiations for international rights to the To Kill a Mockingbird sequel. The Alabama Securities Commission recently announced that they have interviewed Lee; they found her to be both mentally sound and aware about the publication of Go Set a Watchman. This organization has cut off its involvement with this inquiry. (via The Associated Press)

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46. Harper Lee’s Literary Agent Disputes Claims of Elder Abuse

HarperLeeAlabama state officials opened an investigation following complaints about Harper Lee possibly suffering from elder abuse. The New York Times reports that Lee’s literary agent, Andrew Nurnberg, has issued a statement about this issue to denounce these claims.

Here’s an excerpt: “The fact that she is hard of hearing and suffers from some macular degeneration (entirely common for someone in their late 80s) has no bearing whatsoever on her quick wit or of speaking her mind on all manner of things. That she chose many years ago to lead a quiet life away from the world at large (the last time she spoke to the press was, I believe, in 1964) is her prerogative and should be respected. She was surprised when the manuscript, which she had presumed long lost, was found last August and she is both delighted and enthused that it will now be published.”

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Nurnberg has been overseeing the negotiations for international rights to the To Kill a Mockingbird sequel. The Alabama Securities Commission recently announced that they have interviewed Lee; they found her to be both mentally sound and aware about the publication of Go Set a Watchman. This organization has cut off its involvement with this inquiry. (via The Associated Press)

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47. Anna Atkins Gets a Google Doodle For Her 216th Birthday

Anna Atkins' Google Doodle

Google has created a Doodle to celebrate Anna Atkins’ 216th birthday. The botanist became well-known as the first to incorporate photographic illustrations in a book.

According to TIME.com, Atkins self-published Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions in 1843. It features “sunprinted” pictures developed through the Cynanotype process which is “an iron-based chemical method that creates a white image appearing on a blue background.”

In the past, Google has crafted Doodles in honor of Pride & Prejudice author Jane AustenLittle House series author Agatha Christie, poet Langston Hughes, and more. Here’s a video from Google headquarters spotlighting the artists behind the doodles. Which authors would you suggest as future Doodle subjects? (via The Independent)

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48. Author Feuds: INFOGRAPHIC

insult infographicDid you know that Truman Capote had a sharp tongue? The team at AussieWriter.com has created an infographic that shine the spotlight on “Famous Writers’ Insults.”

The image features quotes from The Invisible Man author H. G. Wells, Madame Bovary author Gustave Flaubert, and The Sun Also Rises author Ernest Hemingway. We’ve embedded the full infographic below for you to explore further—what do you think? (via The Digital Reader)

famous writers' insults

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49. Kate DiCamillo On Resilience

Kate DiCamillo (2)Many would say that it’s hard to imagine Kate DiCamillo as a struggling writer. The two-time Newbery Medal winner recently appeared at the Love of Literacy luncheon.

PalmBeachPost.com reports that during the Q&A session, DiCamillo was prompted to talk about resilience. She revealed that while her debut book, Because of Winn Dixie, did ultimately earn a Newbery Honor, she had to deal with 473 rejections letters to even get it published.

DiCamillo feels that she owes her successful career to “figuring out who you are and not giving up on that idea of yourself.” Do you agree with her advice? Follow this link to watch a TED talk about grit. (via CBCBooks.org)

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50. Amber Tamblyn & Yo La Tengo to Headline Poetry Concert

Dark SparklerThe Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants actress Amber Tamblyn landed a deal for her third book of poetry. Harper Perennial will release Dark Sparkler on April 7th.

Poet Diane di Prima wrote a foreword for this project. According to The Hollywood Reporter, the poems were inspired by “the lives and untimely deaths of well-known actresses, including Marilyn Monroe, Jayne Mansfield, Frances Farmer, Sharon Tate, Thelma Todd, and Brittany Murphy.”

Housing Works Bookstore Café will host a special performance event for this book on April 6th. Tamblyn will deliver poetry readings while Yo La Tengo plays instrumental music. Dorothea Lasky will serve as the host. (via TIME.com)

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