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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: fiction, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 26 - 50 of 2,482
26. Eerie places

A creepy space can go a long way in creating the tone for a scary story. These novels all transport readers to places that are likely to give them the willies.

lindelauf nine open arms Eerie placesA building is the main character in Benny Lindelauf’s Dutch import Nine Open Arms. A family of nine moves into the titular rundown brick house in 1930s Holland and tries to figure out its mysteries, including the tombstone in the cellar, a forbidden room, and the homeless man who moves into the hedge. Halfway through, the tale travels back to a doomed 1860s love story and starts to reveal the origins of the steeped-in-sadness Nine Open Arms. In a return to the main narrative, kindness, courage, and truth-telling partly redeem the house’s tragic past. This is a strange, somber, and oddly compelling narrative. (Enchanted Lion, 9–12 years)

milford greenglass house Eerie placesIn Kate Milford’s Greenglass House, protagonist Milo expects a quiet winter holiday week with his adoptive parents at the “smugglers’ hotel” they run. But then strange visitors begin to arrive, and a mysterious document Milo finds is stolen before he and Meddy, the cook’s daughter, can figure out what it means. Smugglers, folktales, stolen objects, adopted children, and ghosts each play a part in this eerie (but not scary) tale. Milford cunningly sets up clues and gradually reveals their importance, bringing readers to higher and higher levels of mystery. (Clarion, 9–12 years)

zafon marina Eerie placesIn Spanish import Marina, Carlos Ruiz Zafón takes readers to the outskirts of late-1970s Barcelona, where fifteen-year-old Oscar investigates what he thinks is an abandoned home and finds himself entangled — with its inhabitant Marina — in a series of events set in motion at the turn of the twentieth century. The quickly paced adventure involves an eccentric scientist and his quest to unravel the mystery of mortality through the reanimation of dead tissue, his doomed romance with a famous but damaged actress, and ultimately his descent into madness. Zafón weaves a twisted tapestry of gothic horror with frequent allusions to Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. (Little, 10–14 years)

bachmann cabinet of curiosities Eerie placesFour “curators” — authors Stefan Bachmann, Katherine Catmull, Claire Legrand, and Emma Trevayne — travel to bizarre lands and send back objects of wonder and the often unearthly tales behind them in The Cabinet of Curiosities: 36 Tales Brief & Sinister. The table of contents lists the “rooms” and “drawers” of the Cabinet of Curiosities museum, each with a theme (cake, luck, tricks, flowers) and four or five tales to explore. The stories are remarkable both for their uniformly high quality and for their distinctness from one another; the abundant atmospherics, including occasional stark black-and-white illustrations by Alexander Jansson, provide a unifying sense of dread. (Greenwillow, 10–14 years)

From the October 2014 issue of Notes from the Horn Book.

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27. Innocent Darkness

Innocent Darkness Suzanne Lazear

Steampunk Faeries. Oh yes. And that’s all you really need to know.

Ok, you want to know more.

Noli comes from a good family that’s fallen on hard times. She’s an ace engineer and too reckless and spirited to ever be the perfect Lady her mother expects. After one-too-many brushes with the law, she’s sent to a reform finishing school.

Kevighn Silver is drawn to the school--it’s a school devoted to ridding young ladies of the Spark. The Spark may make them less-than-society-perfect, but every 7 years, the faeries in the Otherworld need to sacrifice a mortal girl with Spark in order to keep the magic going. The time is coming fast, and it’s Kevighn’s job to find the girl. A well-timed wish in the wrong place, and poof, Noli’s in the Otherworld, slated to die.

On top of all this is Noli’s best friend and next-door-neighbor, V. Noli knows V’s father would never let them marry, so it’s all very platonic, despite her wishes that it could be something else. V knows something is very wrong and tracks her all the way to the Otherworld, where he just happens to be an exiled prince. YEP.

First off, despite the awesomeness of STEAMPUNK FAERIES*, Noli is what makes this book. Noli knows who she is. She likes who she is. She struggles that who she is isn’t who her mother wants or needs her to be and how she can best take care of what’s left of her family. I like that despite the tensions between who her mother (and society) expect her to be and who she is, she still really loves her mother. There's tension, but it's not much greater than most teen daughter/mother tension. I appreciate that it's not a breaking point between them. Unlike many "modern before her time" historical heroines, she chafes at the restrictions, but kind of understands them? Also, more than many historicals, Noli and the text understand that many of these restrictions are actually the restrictions of her class rather than the time period. (She wants to work. The fact her mother won't let her isn't because she's a girl, it's because girls of their station don't work. Even though her mother (most shamefully) does.) She’s brave and bold, but will still cry when things go to hell.

As with all good faeries stories, court politics and tradition are intriguing and dark (even if this one is dressed up in crazy fashion choices and steampunk toys.)

The first in a series, this one pretty much just sets everything up, but it builds a pretty awesome world you’ll want to stay in for longer. (Just don’t eat anything.)


*This is kinda like whenever I talk about His Fair Assassins, I just end up randomly shouting ASSASSIN NUNS! ASSASSIN NUNS!

Book Provided by... my local library

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28. Belzhar: Review Haiku

Rich, weird, and thoughtful;
takes "unreliable narrator"
to new heights.

Belzhar by Meg Wolitzer. Dutton, 2014, 272 pages.

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29. Call for Submissions: Helen: A Literary Magazine

Helen: A Literary Magazine is now accepting submissions for our next issue.

 
We are seeking:
*short literary fiction between 1,500-5,000 words
*flash fiction between 50-1,500 words
*poems (12 pages MAX)
*creative nonfiction between 1,500-5,000 words.
 
 
Please send us work that honors our theme: "MUSIC."  
 
For more information on guidelines, please visit here.

To submit your work, please use our Submittable page.
 
 
We pay $2 for poems, $5 for flash fiction, and $10 for all short fiction and creative nonfiction.

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30. Call for Submissions: The Jet Fuel Review

The Jet Fuel Review is now accepting submissions for our 8th issue. We are an online journal welcoming submissions of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and art. No previously published works are accepted. Simultaneous submissions are permitted. 

The Deadline for submissions is October 15, 2014. 

Fiction: 3,000 words or less
Nonfiction: 3,000 worlds or less
Poetry: 3-5 poems
Art: up to 5 pieces
 


More information concerning the submission process can be found at our website.


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31. Call for Submissions: Red Earth Review

Red Earth Review Call for Submissions 

Submissions Link  

Red Earth Review, a literary magazine published by the Red Earth MFA program at Oklahoma City University, is now accepting submissions for our third edition. Much like the MFA program at Oklahoma City University that shares its name and home, Red Earth Review is genuine, grounded, and fearless. Send us poetry or prose firm in foundation, steadfast in soul and in craft. Submission guidelines below. We look forward to reading your work.

We accept fiction, both literary and genre, creative nonfiction, poetry, and encourage new and emerging writers to submit. The deadline for submissions is November 1, 2014 or 300 submissions, whichever comes first. The target release date is July 2015. Submit one to five previously unpublished poems or one short story (fewer than 7,500 words) or one essay (fewer than 7500 words).

If our Submittable page says "No Active Categories," before November 1, then we have reached 300 submissions. Red Earth Review has chosen to limit the number of submissions in order to assure that we can give submissions the readings they deserve. Submissions that do not follow guidelines on the Submittable page will not be read.

Simultaneous submissions are allowed, but if your submitted work is accepted elsewhere, please withdraw your submission using your Submittable account.

Payment is in copies. After first publication, all rights revert to the author/artist.​

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32. Spicing Up Your Prose Part 6 of 6

Over the past few weeks, we have explored an exotic array of language spices starting with A. This week, we complete the collection with Z.



Simile compares two different things that are similar to each other using like and as. They often border on cliché. A hidden simile does not use like or as.

Jane curled up on the couch like a satisfied cat licking her lips.

Jane curled up on the couch, a satisfied cat licking her lips. (hidden)

Symploce uses anaphora and epistrophe in the same sentence or paragraph. It should appear once or twice in a manuscript for maximum impact and emotion.

Dick should have walked away. He should have put the diary down. He should never have read the shocking words. Jane had charmed him, confused him, and consumed him.

Synecdoche uses part of something to refer to the whole, a whole thing to refer to a part, a specific thing to refer to a generality, or a generality to refer to a specific thing. It is referring to a car as wheels, workers as hands, eyewear as glasses, and bandages as Band-Aids.

When it came to books, Jane preferred paper over plastic.

Tricolon repeats phrases, clauses, or sentences three times. If the phrases, clauses, or sentences increase in length with each repetition, it is called a tricolon crescendo.

It was a dark, dark, darkmoment for them both.

The book was old, oldand faded, old enough to be dangerous.

Zeugma ends a sentence with a last word or clause that doesn't fit in with the proposition. It offers a twist. It should end a paragraph for maximum effect.

Jane left with her book, her suitcase, and her pride.

Jane needed him and wantedhim and wished him dead.

Next week, we will talk about how to use them and revise for them.

For the complete list of spices and other revision layers, pick up a copy of: 

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33. Interesting blog posts about writing – w/e October 3rd 2014



Here’s my selection of interesting (and sometimes amusing) posts about writing from the last week:

How to Create Your Own Galley Proof With Word (Jordan McCollum)
http://blog.janicehardy.com/2014/10/how-to-create-your-own-galley-proof.html

When Doubt Niggles (Mary Keeley)
www.booksandsuch.com/blog/doubt-niggles/

How to Request Rights Reversion From Your Publisher (Victoria Strauss)
http://accrispin.blogspot.com/2014/10/how-to-request-rights-reversion-from.html

10 Terrors for a Writer (Elspeth Antonelli)
http://bloodredpencil.blogspot.com/2014/10/10-terrors-for-writer.html

The Legend of the Movie Deal (Rachelle Gardner)
www.booksandsuch.com/blog/legend-of-the-movie-deal/

Why Genre Matters (Cathy Yardley)
http://writerunboxed.com/2014/09/30/why-genre-matters/

Eight Fundamental Steps to being a Professional Writer (Art Holcomb)
http://storyfix.com/eight-fundamental-steps-professional-writer

Crew No-Nos (Lynn Viehl)
http://pbackwriter.blogspot.com/2014/09/crew-no-nos.html

Write Mysteries for Kids…for the Right Reasons (Dori Hillestad Butler)
http://elizabethspanncraig.com/2457/write-mysteries-kidsfor-right-reasons/

Creating Characters We Care About (James Scott Bell)
http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/09/creating-characters-we-care-about.html


If you found these useful, you may also like my personal selection of the most interesting blog posts from 2013, and last week’s list.

If you have a particular favorite among these, please let the author know (and me too, if you have time).  Also, if you've a link to a great post that isn't here, feel free to share.

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34. Book-length Fiction Competition: 2014 Horatio Nelson Fiction Prize

2014 Horatio Nelson Fiction Prize, Black Balloon's annual award of $5000 and a book deal for an outstanding fiction manuscript.  

We are accepting submissions October 1st - 31st, 2014, and we are hoping you and your department colleagues will share news of this prize with your faculty, students, alumni, and social media communities. There's no reading fee to submit, and any previously unpublished, original, and completed fiction manuscript over 50,000 words in length is eligible. There isn't another prize like this awarded by an independent publisher, and we are proud to help talented writers find their readership!

Next month, Black Balloon will publish Fat Man and Little Boy, the novel by Mike Meginnis that won the 2013 Horatio Nelson Fiction Prize. The book has already received great early buzz, with The Sisters Brothers author Patrick deWitt calling the novel “beguiling, strange, and strangely lovely,” Publishers Weekly proclaiming it "imaginative...both surprising and incisive," and the Brooklyn Book Festival naming Meginnis one of "the year's most impressive debut novelists." 

Details at our website.

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35. Fiction Competition: Story Quarterly

StoryQuarterly is accepting submissions for our Fourth Annual Fiction Contest through October 31. The winner will receive $1000, the first runner-up $500, and the third $250. All three winners will be published in StoryQuarterly 48 (January 2015).

 Entry fee: $15.00

The contest will be judged by Elizabeth McCracken, author of Thunderstruck and Other Stories, An Exact Replica of a Figment of My Imagination, Niagara Falls All Over Again, The Giant's House, and Here's Your Hat What's Your Hurry. 

Please visit our website for full guidelines and to submit your work.

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36. Writing Competition: The Great Plains Emerging Writer Prize

The Great Plains Emerging Writer Prize, sponsored the Great Plains Writers’ Conference at South Dakota State University, is given annually to a writer of the Great Plains region who has not yet published a book, but whose work and career shows exceptional promise. The winner will receive a $1000 honorarium and a featured reading at the conference in Brookings, SD in March, 2015, as well as land travel and lodging.

Submissions open October 1, 2014. Postmark deadline December 1, 2014. All genres open; include a maximum of 15 pages of poetry or hybrid-genre work, or a maximum of 20 pages of fiction, nonfiction, drama, or screenplay. Work submitted may be previously published, but must be stripped of all information identifying the author or the venue. Judging will be blind. Entry fee $15. 

The Great Plains region is broadly defined as reaching from western Minnesota to eastern Montana and from the Canadian border to central Oklahoma. We consider writers to be “of” this region if they have resided here more than three years or have a demonstrable historical link to the region (e.g., you grew up here and moved away). Please state your relationship to the region in your cover letter.

For full guidelines visit our website.

Submit electronically here.

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37. Top Secret Twenty-One: Review Haiku

Same old same old, but
I appreciate Steph's
tolerance of weirdos.

Top Secret Twenty-One by Janet Evanovich. Bantam, 2014, 352 pages.

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38. Call for Submissions: Barking Sycamores

A journal for neurodivergent literature and its craft-- 
 
Barking Sycamores is a literary journal publishing poetry, short fiction (1000 words or less), and art by neurodivergent (autistic, ADHD, bipolar, dyslexic, etc.) writers and artists. 
 
We seek poetry, short fiction, and art for Issue 4, Winter/Spring 2015. Theme: “The Doors of Perception”. Pieces about doors, perception, and vision are welcome as well as ekphrastic work based on the works of William Blake, Aldous Huxley, or the American rock band The Doors. However, in the end, artists may submit poetry, short fiction, and visual art that interpret the theme as broadly or as narrowly as desired. We also seek essays on neurodivergence and how it impacts the creation of literary works. Artwork submitted may be considered for use as cover art. 
 
The philosophy of our journal is unique, so we ask that interested writers consult our submission guidelines before sending any work to us.  
 
Submission period: October 1 – November 30, 2014.

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39. Call for Submissions: Lunch Ticket

Lunch Ticket is accepting submissions for its Summer/Fall 2014 issue from the following genres: Fiction, Flash Fiction, and Poetry, Writing for Young People, Visual Art, Translation / Multi-lingual texts & Creative Nonfiction. 

Translated submissions: include original work with your translation, and a document showing that you have permission to publish the original work. Original, bilingual work may be submitted under the translation category; please indicate this in your cover letter. The responsibility for clearing rights, permissions for translated works, & the payment of any related fees, lies with the translator. 

For any of the genre guidelines and submission manager (Please follow submission guidelines CAREFULLY), visit our website.

Deadline: October 31, 2014

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40. Interesting blog posts about writing – w/e September 26th, 2014



Here’s my selection of interesting (and sometimes amusing) posts about writing from the last week:

Your Scene Needs a Problem (Ken Hughes)
http://blog.janicehardy.com/2014/09/your-scene-needs-problem.html

Winging it (Jennifer R. Hubbard aka writerjenn) http://writerjenn.livejournal.com/396025.html

Setting the Stage: How I Hook Readers From Page One (Stafanie Gaither)
http://blog.janicehardy.com/2014/09/setting-stage-how-i-hook-readers-from.html

How to be a more productive writer (April Henry aka aprilhenry)
http://aprilhenry.livejournal.com/1127610.html

Book to Screen: Seeing Your Book as a Visual Story (Shonell Bacon)
http://bloodredpencil.blogspot.com/2014/09/book-to-screen-seeing-your-book-as.html

Screenwriting: The Emotional Spine (Karina Wilson)
http://litreactor.com/columns/screenwriting-the-emotional-spine

Social Media for Authors 101 (Gary Parkes)
http://blog.janicehardy.com/2014/09/social-media-for-authors-101.html

Why You Need To Write a Series (Bill Ferris)
http://writerunboxed.com/2014/09/20/why-you-need-to-write-a-series/

Blessing or Curse? The Modern Writer’s Dilemma (Dario Ciriello)
http://blog.janicehardy.com/2014/09/blessing-or-curse-modern-writers-dilemma.html

5 Things Literary Writers Can Learn from Sci-Fi Writers (Susan DeFreitas)
http://litreactor.com/columns/what-literary-writers-can-learn-from-speculative-fiction-writers


If you found these useful, you may also like my personal selection of the most interesting blog posts from 2013, and last week’s list.

If you have a particular favorite among these, please let the author know (and me too, if you have time).  Also, if you've a link to a great post that isn't here, feel free to share.

Add a Comment
41. Spicing Up Your Prose Part 5 of 6

This week, we continue to add to our collection of rhetorical devices.



Polysyndeton uses conjunctions to string phrases in a series.

The library was dim and overly warm and full of sneaky shadows.

Neither rain nor snow nor sleet nor hail would keep Dick from finding Jane.

Polyptoton repeats words from the same root but with different inflections appearing in close proximity.

Dick believed the only thing they had to fearwas fearlessness.

Prefabs can be used to create two and three beat rhythms to speed the sentence up. They include, but are not limited to:


  • boom and bust
  • bump and grind
  • daily double
  • doom and gloom
  • ebb and flow
  • eager beaver
  • fixer-upper
  • flimflam
  • flip-flop
  • harum-scarum
  • helter-skelter
  • herky-jerky
  • hip-hop
  • hotsy-totsy
  • hour of power
  • hurly-burly
  • itsy-bitsy
  • lean and mean
  • meet and greet
  • moldy oldie
  • namby-pamby
  • near and dear
  • oopsy daisy
  • razzle-dazzle
  • rinky dink
  • rise and fall
  • rough and ready
  • rough and tough
  • rough and tumble
  • shilly-shally
  • splish-splash
  • super-duper
  • super-saver
  • surf and turf
  • teenie-weenie
  • thrills and chills
  • tit for tat
  • topsy-turvy
  • town and gown
  • wear and tear
  • wheeler-dealer
  • whipper-snapper
  • wild and wooly
  • wishy-washy
  • zigzag

Next week, we will contine adding spices to your prose shelf.

For the complete list of spices and other revision layers, pick up a copy of: 

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42. Annika Riz, Math Whiz: Review Haiku

Sudoku is the
hook, but the cookie failures
were my favorite part.

Annika Riz, Math Whiz by Claudia Mills. FSG, 2014, 128 pages.

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43. 2014 BGHB Fiction Day

Yesterday we gave you web extras on our BGHB Nonfiction Award winners — today we’re honoring the Fiction Award winner and Honorees. Read reviews of smith grasshopper jungle 2014 BGHB Fiction Dayall of the 2014 fiction winners here; see below for more web extras to celebrate them.

The 2014 Boston Globe–Horn Book Fiction Award winner is Andrew Smith’s Grasshopper Jungle (Dutton/Penguin).

boxers saints 2014 BGHB Fiction DayAuthor/illustrator Gene Luen Yang received a BGHB Fiction Honor for Boxers & Saints (First Second/Roaring Brook).

wein rose under fire 2014 BGHB Fiction DayElizabeth Wein received a BGHB Fiction Honor for Rose Under Fire (Hyperion/Disney).

Stay tuned for picture book web extras tomorrow!

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44. Call for Submissions: Glassworks

Glassworks, the literary magazine of Rowan University’s Master of Arts in Writing graduate program, invites writers to submit work to be considered for publication.

Glassworks publishes nonfiction, fiction, poetry, hybrid pieces, craft essays, new media, and art both digitally and in print. We are currently reading until December 15, 2014.


More information about the magazine, sample issues, and our submission manager can be found at our website.


Submissions link.

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45. Call for Submissions: Sun and Sandstone

Sun & Sandstone, a national literary journal of undergraduate writing published annually by Rocky Mountain College, is now accepting submissions for its 2015 issue. Publishable genres include poetry, creative nonfiction, short fiction, and one act plays.

For complete submission guidelines, please visit our website.

Deadline: February 28, 2015

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46. Call for Submissions: Cooper Street Journal

Cooper Street, an online publication sponsored by the Rutgers University Camden MFA program’s student organization, is looking for fiction and poetry for our second issue, slated for a January release. All interested writers are welcome. Please send work as word documents (.doc or .docx) via email to:

ru.cooperstreetATgmailDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

using the following format for the Subject: “Last name – Genre.” We’re interested in stories and poems about cities, particularly those set in the Northeast. But we’ll consider all subjects if the work is interesting and strong. If you have creative non-fiction, we ask that you please save it for an upcoming issue.

Additional guidelines

Fiction: Send either one story of no more than 5,000 words (although stories of 3,000 words or less are especially welcome) or send up to three flash fiction pieces of no more than 600 words each.

Poetry: Send three to five poems as a single attachment, one poem per page.

Submitters may view our May 2014 issue at our website.

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47. Call for Submissions: Psychopomp Magazine


Psychopomp Magazine, a journal devoted to genre-bending and experimental prose, is now open for free submissions.
 
Please read an issue or two to get a sense of what we're looking for. Surprise us. Ferry us away from the familiar. We like fiction and art. Please visit our website for more information.



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48. The Truth About Twinkie Pie: Review Haiku

Southern-fried cooking
comes to Long Island, packed with
family secrets.

The Truth About Twinkie Pie by Kat Yeh. Little Brown, 2015, 352 pages.

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49. Bonjour Tristesse

Bonjour Tristesse Francoise Sagan, translated from the French by Irene Ash

Cecile loves the carefree and glittering lifestyle she and her father live in Paris. The summer is shaping up to be perfect--her father, his current mistress, and Cecile are spending the summer in a rented beach house. There’s even Cyril-- a nearby university student that Cecile tastes first love with. But then her father invites Anne, a friend of his late wife, to join them and it turns sour. Anne’s understand elegance forces out the mistress Elsa and the lifestyle that Cecile loves. When her father and Anne get engaged, Cecile, Cyril and Elsa hatch a plot to break them up, with tragic consequences.

While Sagan has some interesting and insightful comments about the type of people in Cecile’s life, especially her father, her age when writing this really shows. It’s written as Cecile looking back, mostly regretful for her actions, but then you realize that only a year has passed, and Sagan herself was only 18 when the book came out (younger when she wrote it) so while it well captures the emotions and logic behind Cecile, the older-and-wiser gets a bit tiresome as readers that actually are older and wiser will realize she still doesn’t get it, and it’s pretty obvious that it’s the author who still doesn’t get it, not the character.

THAT SAID, I did like a lot about it and I think it would lend itself really well to a modern YA-reworking, and it would work really well when aimed at an age-contemporary audience instead of adults. It’s a short book (without back matter, it’s only 130 pages in a small trim size) and she captures the languid summer beach atmosphere really well.

Not sure if I recommend it, but I am glad I read it.

Book Provided by... my local library

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50. Review of Nest

ehrlich nest Review of NestNest
by Esther Ehrlich
Intermediate, Middle School    Lamb/Random    330 pp.
9/14    978-0-385-38607-4    $16.99
Library ed.  978-0-385-38608-1    $19.99    g
e-book ed.  978-0-385-38609-8    $9.99

In this debut novel set in the late 1960s, Naomi “Chirp” Orenstein’s sixth-grade teacher tells her, “Your mom is a very lucky lady to have such a responsible girl.” Chirp is very responsible, but her mother is feeling anything but lucky. She’s been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and sinks into a severe depression, ultimately committing suicide. It’s an overwhelmingly sad story, but the sadness never feels gratuitous, only immutable, just like the Cape Cod seasons and the ebb and flow of life in Chirp’s beloved salt marsh. Ehrlich’s characters are all fully developed: the dancer mother in anguish over not being the parent she wanted to be; the psychiatrist father’s well-meaning but hapless response to the situation; and — most of all — Chirp’s best friend Joey, who has his own issues at home. Chirp’s first-person voice is believable; her poignant earnestness is truly heartrending. Ehrlich writes beautifully, constructing scenes with grace and layers of telling detail and insight. She offers Chirp (and readers) no trite and tidy resolutions, just a dawning understanding that her “nest” of family, friends, and salt marsh will give her the support and sustenance she needs to move forward.

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