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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: fiction, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 26 - 50 of 2,553
26. Want to teach your kids how to be kind ? A Kindness Booklist for Kids

I’ve always thought the best way to teach my kids to be kind is to be kind myself. While that’s a really good start, I can’t be with them all day long and life is filled with opportunities to be both kind and unkind. This got me thinking, what books are out there that teach kindness?

Here’s a look at what I found.

The Kindness Booklist for Kids

22

Each Kindness by Jacqueline Woodson

1

Wonder by R. J. Palacio

bully booklist

Because Amelia Smiled by David Ezra Stein

2

Absolutely Almost by Lisa Graff

3

The Lion and the Mouse by Jerry Pinkney

4

The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein

5

Enemy Pie by Derek Munson

6

The Invisible Boy by Trudy Ludwig

7

Hank Finds an Egg by Rebecca Dudley

8

Ben Rides on by Matt Davies

gratitude booklist

Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters: An African Tale by John Steptoe

gratitude booklist

Horton Hears a Who ! by Dr. Seuss

gratitude booklist

A Home for Bird By Philip C. Stead

gratitude booklist

The Monster’s Monster by Patrick McDonnell

gratitude booklist

Little Bird by Germano Zullo

gratitude booklist

The Rainbow Fish by Marcus Pfister

gratitude booklist

Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White

gratitude booklist

A Chair for My Mother by Vera B. Williams

gratitude booklist

Hey Little Ant by Phillip M. Moose

gratitude booklist

Pinduli by Janell Cannon

gratitude booklist

Fill a bucket: A Guide to Daily Happiness for Kids by Carol McCloud

gratitude booklist

**some of these links are affiliate links

FREE GIFT!

Feeling a sense of gratitude in your life? “Conditions of the Heart” is a FREE kids activity book filled with fun activities & crafts that teaches values and conduct. Grab your copy HERE:

Conditions of the Heart

The post Want to teach your kids how to be kind ? A Kindness Booklist for Kids appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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27. Archimede Fusillo talks about Dead Dog In The Still Of The Night

Award-winning Australian author, Archimede Fusillo delves deep into what it is to be a man in his latest coming-of-age novel for young adults, Dead Dog In The Still Of The Night.  The story follows the journey of Primo as he attempts to navigate his way though his final year of school with an emotionally brittle […]

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28. Call for Submissions: Tiferet

Tiferet is currently accepting new submissions. You are invited to submit a short story, an essay or interview, poems, or an original piece of art. 

Click here to read the guidelines and use our online submission process. 

Deadline is December 31st!

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29. Fiction Competition: Boulevard Emerging Writers Contest

$1,500 and publication in Boulevard awarded to the winning story by a writer who has not yet published a book of fiction, poetry, or creative non-fiction with a nationally distributed press  

RULES

All entries must be postmarked by December 31, 2014. Simultaneous submissions are allowed but previously accepted or published work is ineligible. Entries will be judged by the editors of Boulevard magazine.

Entry fee is $15 for each individual story, with no limit per author, and includes a one-year subscription. Make checks payable to Boulevard. 

We accept works up to 8,000 words. Author's name, address, and telephone number, in addition to the story's title and "Boulevard Emerging Writers Contest," should appear on page one. Cover sheets are not necessary. Manuscripts should be typed and double spaced. 

Contest entries can be submitted electronically or by mail. 

Electronic submissions 


Postal Submissions:
 
Send manuscript(s) and SAS post card for acknowledgement of receipt to: 

Boulevard Emerging Writers Contest
PMB 325
6614 Clayton Road
Richmond Heights, MO 63117

No manuscripts will be returned. 

Due to the number of submissions, we cannot respond to each writer individually. Each author will receive an acknowledgement of receipt but will need to check the website for notification of the winner. 

The winning story will be first announced on the website, traditionally during June, though occasionally earlier, and then published in the Spring or Fall 2015 issue of Boulevard

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30. Call for Submissions: pacificReview: Vivarium

pacificREVIEW 2015: Vivarium

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
FICTION * NONFICTION * POETRY *
GRAPHIC NARRATIVE * PHOTOGRAPHY * ARTWORK


Submission Period: October 1st 2014 – February 28th 2015

A vivarium (Latin for "place of life") is an area for keeping and raising animals or plants for observation or research. Often, a portion of the ecosystem for a particular species is simulated on a smaller scale, a microcosm with controls for environmental conditions.

We, as human beings, create vivariums for both ourselves and other species. In these environments of our own design (zoos, shopping malls, universities, cathedrals, etc.), we breathe simulation, observe phenomena both natural and unnatural, speak in symbols, and cypher our dreams. We are inhabitants of our creations, thriving in the flux between the abstract and the absolute. The newest issue of the pacificREVIEW seeks dynamic work that speaks to this theme and interrogates the ever-blurring line between "real" and "unreal" settings.

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31. Call for Submissions of Historical Crime and Mystery Fiction for Anthology: Darkhouse Books


Submissions remain open for an anthology of historical crime and mystery fiction

Darkhouse Books seeks stories for an anthology of historical crime and mystery fiction. For the purpose of this anthology we are defining historical fiction as, those works set more than a few decades prior to the present and written by someone without direct experience in the setting and events of the story. But should a truly superb story happen to stray from the above strictures and cross our threshold, we would happily consider it.

The submission period is now open and will remain open through 11:59pm (PST), December 31st, 2014.

We are seeking stories in the 2500 to 7500 word range, though if it’s knockout material, we’ll consider any length.

The anthology will contain between twelve and twenty stories, depending on the overall length. Authors will share equally fifty percent of royalties received.

We accept MS Word .doc and .docx files. Submissions must be in standard manuscript format. Links to formatting guides are available here.

Previously published work will be considered, provided the author has the power to grant us the right to publish in ebook, audio, and print versions, and that it has not been available elsewhere more recently than January 1st, 2014.

Submissions may be sent to:

submissionsATdarkhousebooksDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

Please leave “Submission-“ in the subject line and add the name of your story.

Andrew MacRae
Darkhouse Books
www.darkhousebooks.com
Now available "The Anthology of Cozy-Noir"!

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32. Interesting blog posts about writing – w/e November 21st 2014



Here’s my selection of interesting (and sometimes amusing) posts about writing from the last week:

To Free or Not To Free (Terry Odell)
http://bloodredpencil.blogspot.com/2014/11/to-free-or-not-to-free.html

Conquering the Cliché (Ash Krafton)
http://querytracker.blogspot.com/2014/11/conquering-cliche.html

Gerunds Be Gone (Nancy J. Cohen) http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/11/gerunds-be-gone.html

Think YOU Don’t Like Pass Letters? (Rachelle Gardner)
http://www.booksandsuch.com/blog/pass-letters/

Positive and Negative Motivation (Mary Kole)
http://kidlit.com/2014/11/17/positive-and-negative-motivation/

Rising Expectations, Daily Pages, and Having Fun (Kristan Hoffman)
http://writerunboxed.com/2014/11/16/rising-expectations-daily-pages-and-having-fun/

Your Friends Won’t Tell You—But Your Editor Will (Sarah Crysl Akhtar)
www.everydayfiction.com/flashfictionblog/your-friends-wont-tell-you-but-your-editor-will/

Literary Fiction and Self-Publishing (James Scott Bell)
http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/11/literary-fiction-and-self-publishing.html

Story Structure for Dummies (Larry Brooks)
http://storyfix.com/story-structure-dummies

I'm Outraged! (Mark Alpert)
http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/11/im-outraged.html

The Submission Process, from an Agent's POV (Jennifer Laughran)
http://literaticat.blogspot.com/2014/11/an-epic-post-about-submission-process.html


If you found these useful, you may also like my personal selection of the most interesting blog posts from 2013, and last week’s list.

If you have a particular favorite among these, please let the author know (and me too, if you have time).  Also, if you've a link to a great post that isn't here, feel free to share.

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33. Judith Rossell chats about Withering-by-Sea

Judith Rossell’s prodigious talents as an illustrator and writer, her inimitable wit and her obsession with Victoriana come together superbly in her latest book for children – Withering-by-Sea. The story follows the trials of Stella Montgomery, an 11-year-old orphan, who lives with her dreadful aunts in a damp, dull hotel in Victorian England. But everything […]

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34. Three Months of Book Giveaways: Kidlit Books with an Air of Mystery

With the winter months upon us, I feel this is a great time for readers of all ages to snuggle in with a good book. I have been blessed with tons of amazing books titles for kids over these last few months and I want to get these books into the hands of young readers. SO, for the next three months Jump Into a Book will be hosting a book giveaway every Wednesday! Some giveaways will be a single title, some will be a “Book Bundle,” but all will be books that your readers will love and cherish. I think these books will also make great gifts as well! Here’s what we are giving away this week (NOTE: All of these books are physical books, not Kindle versions).

giveaway9

Kidlit Books with an Air of Mystery INCLUDED IN THE GIVEAWAY:

The Calder Game by Blue Balliett

calder

This new mystery from bestselling author Blue Balliett is now available in After Words paperback!

When Calder Pillay travels with his father to a remote village in England, he finds a mix of mazes and mystery . . . including an unexpected Alexander Calder sculpture in the town square. Calder is strangely drawn to the sculpture, while other people have less-than-friendly feelings towards it. Both the boy and the sculpture seem to be out-of-place . . . and then, on the same night, they disappear! Calder’s friends Petra and Tommy must fly out to help his father find him. But this mystery has more twists and turns than a Calder mobile . . . with more at stake than first meets the eye.
Horten’s Miraculous Mechanism by Lisa Evans

horton

As if being small and having S. Horten as his name isn’t bad enough, now 10-year-old Stuart is forced to move far away from all his friends.But on his very first day in his new home, Stuart’s swept up in an extraordinary adventure: the quest to find his great-uncle Tony–a famous magician who literally disappeared off the face of the earth–and Tony’s marvelous, long-lost workshop. Along the way, Stuart reluctantly accepts help from the annoying triplets next door… and encounters trouble from another magician who’s also desperate to get hold of Tony’s treasures.

The Cabinet of Wonders by Marie Rutkoski

cabinet

Petra Kronos has a simple, happy life. But it’s never been ordinary. She has a pet tin spider named Astrophil who likes to hide in her snarled hair and give her advice. Her best friend can trap lightning inside a glass sphere. Petra also has a father in faraway Prague who is able to move metal with his mind. He has been commissioned by the prince of Bohemia to build the world’s finest astronomical clock. Petra’s life is forever changed when, one day, her father returns home – blind. The prince has stolen his eyes, enchanted them, and now wears them. But why?
Guys Read: Thriller

guysreadthrill

A body on the tracks

A teenage terrorist

A mysterious wish-granting machine

The world’s worst private detective

The second volume in the Guys Read Library of Great Reading is chock-full of mystery, intrigue, and nefarious activity.

DETAILS ON GIVEAWAY:

  • ONE winner each receive a one copy of all three books. Giveaway begins November 26th and ends December 3rd, 2014
  • Prizing & samples courtesy of Audrey Press
  • Giveaway open to US addresses only
  • ONE lucky winner will win one copy of each book listed above.
  • Residents of USA only please.
  • Must be 18 years or older to enter.
  • One entry per household.
  • Staff and family members of Audrey Press are not eligible.
  • Grand Prize winner has 48 hours to claim prize.
  • Winner will be chosen via Rafflecopter on November 27th

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The post Three Months of Book Giveaways: Kidlit Books with an Air of Mystery appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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35. Steampunk queen: an interview with Gail Carriger

gail brookline parasol Steampunk queen: an interview with Gail Carriger

Tea time! Photo: Elissa Gershowitz

Gail Carriger introduced readers to her alternate Victorian London — chock-full of steampunk technology and supernatural characters — in 2009 with Soulless, the first volume of her five-book adult series The Parasol Protectorate. The Finishing School series, a YA prequel series set in the same world, soon followed, beginning with Curtsies & Conspiracies. Espionage lessons, a dirigible boarding school, a girl inventor, vampires and werewolves, witty banter: what more could a steampunk fantasy fan ask for? Gail is currently working on another companion YA series, The Custard Protocol, which will kick off with Prudence in spring 2015.

brooklineinvite Steampunk queen: an interview with Gail Carriger

You’re invited… Photo: Elissa Gershowitz

My beloved local Brookline Public Library (hi Robin!) hosted Gail on November 10th for a lovely evening tea party — cucumber sandwiches and all! — and Q&A event to celebrate the release of Waistcoats & Weaponry, the third book in the Finishing School series. I spoke with her over tea just before the event. In addition to being a prolific and (ahem) fantastic author, Gail is also an archaeologist by training, Elissa’s college roomie (Oberlin represent!), and a very stylish lady — she told me she had a different Waistcoats & Weaponry–cover coordinated ensemble for each stop on the book tour.

The Parasol Protectorate books are adult books and The Finishing School series is YA — although there’s been a lot of crossover, with the YA books being read by adults and the adult books being read by teens. Have you found that there are things you can do in adult books that you can’t do in YA, or vice versa?

For me, YA has to be — and this is what I like about it — it has to be very clean and sharp. As a writer, it requires me to do a lot more editing because it needs to be very sparse. You don’t sacrifice details, but you sacrifice a certain amount of waffling. In adult books you’re allowed to put in extra little bits and distract the readers with pretty description for a while. In young adult, you just can’t do that. You have to be very structured and paced. Pacing is always really important to me, but I think in YA it’s even more important. That’s one of the biggest differences. And I allow myself to be a little more racy when I’m writing the adult stuff.

carriger waistcoats and weaponry Steampunk queen: an interview with Gail CarrigerYour Finishing School protagonist Sophoronia Temminnick has quite the name. Do you have other favorite Victorian-era names that you’ve come across in your research (or that you’ve come up with yourself)?

I tend to use them if I come across them. I love the name “Euphrenia”; I don’t know if I’ve leaked it into the books yet, but it’s one of my favorite ultra-Victorian names. I really like first names that are traditionally Victorian but are not used anymore. That’s one of the reasons I chose “Sophronia.” It’s still a pretty name, and sort of like “Sophia,” but just old-fashioned enough for you to know immediately, the minute that you read her name, that she’s not of our time. “Dimity” was another actual name from the time period. Alexia [from the Parasol Protectorate books] only got named “Alexia” because she was one of those characters that announced herself as being named that. Sometimes characters just enter your head and they’re like, “This is my name!” “Soap” is one of those as well. “Pillover” is another one — it’s not a real name; I just made that one up completely. But “Sophronia” and “Dimity” I picked.

Is there a mythological creature that you’ve been wanting to introduce into this world that you haven’t gotten to yet?

I’m pretty strict with myself with world-building. I’m sticking to motifs of vampires, shape-shifters, and ghosts, probably because almost every ancient culture has some version of them, like the kitsune in Japan. But I excavated in Peru for a while and there is a legend in the Peruvian highlands of a creature called a pishtaco (which is fantastically ridiculous-sounding, first of all). It’s essentially a fat-sucking vampire rather than a blood-sucking vampire — which is comedy gold. I’m dying to get [Custard Protocol protagonist] Prudence to the New World at some point so that she can meet one of these creatures and I can write all about them.

gail standing brookline Steampunk queen: an interview with Gail Carriger

Ensemble #1 at the Brookline Public Library. Photo: Elissa Gershowitz

Are we going to see more mechanimals like Bumbersnoot in the Finishing School books? (Or do you say “mech-animals”?)

I say “mechanimals,” like “mechanicals” but with an “animal” at the end. You will see more of them, but you’re not going to see a named little friend like Bumbersnoot. There’s quite a few in the last book but that’s all I’m going to say.

If you were going to have a mechanimal pet yourself, what kind of animal would you pick?

Probably something like a hedgehog. I would like a round, roly-poly, friendly sort of critter. I have a very demanding cat who’s svelte and overdramatic, so I think I’d like a calm, rodentia-style, chubby little creature. Something in the porcupine, hedgehog arena. The cat would probably be very upset with it.

What would your dream teatime guest list and menu look like?

Oh, goodness. Do I get to pick fantastic characters? Or historical people?

Sure. Living, dead, fictional — anyone you want.

There’s part of me that has to be true to my archaeological roots and pick Nefertiti, Hatshepsut, Boadicea… I’m attracted to super-powerful female historical figures, the queens and mistresses, so I’d probably concoct a party that was all these fantastic women from history. The problem, of course, would be interpretation, but it’s my fantasy so everyone would speak English. I’m an adventurous eater, and I’d like to cater to the guests, so I’d have foods from all of the different places and times they came from. One of my favorite things is cooking ancient food, sourcing the ingredients and re-creating it myself. I think if you can taste the flavor of the past, you can get a better impression of it. I’d try to do that so everybody got to try everybody else’s dishes.

What’s your specialty, your pet era as an archaeologist?

I’m not an area specialist; I’m a materials specialist. My focus was on ceramics. To this day I have a propensity to pick up a piece of pottery and flip it over to look at the back side — which can be terribly embarrassing if I’ve forgotten that there’s food on the front side — to look for the maker’s mark.

gail cambridge Steampunk queen: an interview with Gail Carriger

Ensemble #2 at Cambridge’s Pandemonium Books and Games store. Photo: Elissa Gershowitz

Are there other historical eras that you’d like to write about?

The series I’m writing now [The Custard Protocol] is set in the 1890s, which is basically the dawn of female emancipation. Mostly because of trousers — women gained a great deal of autonomy due to education and to the bicycle. The two combined started the New Woman movement, these educated young ladies with self-motivation and autonomy. I’m excited to move closer to the turn of the twentieth century and to have a bit more realism behind my super-strong female characters, because they’re not quite realistic to their time. There’s certainly other time periods I’d love to write in. I’d love to set an ancient story in some of the places I’ve visited.

What would be the most useful gadget for a Finishing School student to have on her person in the case of an espionage emergency? (This is a very difficultly worded question!)

It sounds like something I’ve written! The voice-acting talent [for my audiobooks] is always calling and complaining because I love tongue-twisters. I don’t even realize I’ve written them until somebody’s like, “Why did you write that?!” “I didn’t think about you guys reading it out loud.”

“Handiest gadget?” is the short version!

I love Sophronia’s fan, but I think it’s really handy for her. She becomes comfortable with it and adapts to it, but it’s not necessarily something that would be useful for everybody. In the final book, the chatelaine really comes to the fore. The girls keep going to balls, and they keep having to have chatelaines on them. A chatelaine is like the base for a Swiss Army Knife; it hangs off your belt and there’s a bunch of little chains and clips so you can hang multiple little things off it. Customarily you’d have a bit of perfume and a dance card, maybe keys or a little sewing kit. But of course Geraldine’s girls have a whole different set of things dangling! I love the idea that you could just attach something that has everything useful hanging off of it. Why can’t we still do that?

More fabulous photos at the Brookline Public Library Teen Room Tumblr.

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The post Steampunk queen: an interview with Gail Carriger appeared first on The Horn Book.

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36. 100 Sideways Miles: Review Haiku

Similarities to
Grasshopper Jungle
do not go unnoticed.

100 Sideways Miles by Andrew Smith. S&S, 2014, 288 pages.

0 Comments on 100 Sideways Miles: Review Haiku as of 11/17/2014 8:35:00 AM
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37. Call for Submissions: Thin Air Magazine

Thin Air Magazine is reading submissions from now until Dec 15 for our Spring 2015 issue and our Web Features.

Founded in 1994, Thin Air is a nonprofit operating at an altitude of 6,910 ft, on the mountain of Flagstaff, Arizona, a popular stop along Route 66. The magazine is managed and edited entirely by Northern Arizona University graduate students on a volunteer basis, with faculty support from Nicole Walker. 

Thin Air is published in print once a year and on the web on an ongoing basis. We seek work that represent the forefront of contemporary American prose and poetry, work that tear up our hearts, and work that matter. We care about sharp aesthetics, cultural relevance, artistic cohesion, and are especially excited about writings that bend rules and surprise readers while sneakily winking at tradition. 
 
We are supportive of emerging writers and diverse voices, and aim to represent a wide range of talent in every issue we publish. We encourage submissions from writers of non-dominant, traditionally underrepresented backgrounds.
 

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38. Call for Submissions: The Great American Lit Mag

Deadline: December 31, 2014

The Great American Lit Mag is seeking bold work for its second issue! We publish quarterly. Our current reading period runs through the end of December.  


For more information about our magazine, please visit our website.

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39. Call for Submissions: The Cumberland River Review

Deadline: April 30, 2015

The Cumberland River Review reads during the traditional academic year, September through April, and aims to maintain a regular response time of three months. We read and encourage simultaneous submissions and acquire First North American Serial Rights and the right to maintain an archive copy of accepted work online. (All other rights revert to our authors upon publication.) 


We nominate work for the Pushcart Prize, Best New Poets, Best of the Net, and other anthologies and prizes. As always, our hope is to feature work of moral consequence.

 To submit and for more information, please visit our website.

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40. Call for Submissions: Tiferet

Tiferet is currently accepting new writing submissions! 

We look for high-quality creative work that expresses spiritual experiences and/or promotes tolerance. Our mission is to help raise individual and global consciousness, and we publish writing from a variety of religious and spiritual traditions. 

We seek and publish the following types of work:  

Fiction: We interpret the word "spiritual" broadly. First, we seek well-written stories, pure and simple, that engage us in some small pocket of humanity.  

Nonfiction: We like to publish essays and interviews that shed light on personal experiences of grappling with the invisible...or different aspects of spiritual traditions.  

Poetry: We look for the highest quality poems that display mastery of content and craft. Technical proficiency is extremely important, along with clear expression of various aspects of the human spirit.  

Art and Photography: We seek original art and photography which in some way captures the spiritual or contemplative in a visual representation. 

For complete submission guidelines or to submit your work, please visit our website.

The deadline for all submissions is December 31st, 2014.  

Thank you for being a part of the global Tiferet community. We look forward to reading all submissions!

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41. Interesting blog posts about writing – w/e November 14th 2014



Here’s my selection of interesting (and sometimes amusing) posts about writing from the last week:

Kill What? What to Do When You Need to Cut a Major Part of Your Novel (Janice Hardy)
http://blog.janicehardy.com/2012/07/kill-what-what-to-do-when-you-need-to.html

Amazon and Hachette resolve bitter dispute over price
www.bbc.com/news/business-30044531

When Critiques Conflict (Rachel Kent)
www.booksandsuch.com/blog/critiques-conflict/

The Publishing Roller Coaster (Mary Keeley)
www.booksandsuch.com/blog/publishing-roller-coaster/

Plot Motivators (Joe Moore)
http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/11/plot-motivators.html

The Five Stages of New Writers’ Grief (Keith Cronin) Jon’s Pick of the Week
http://writerunboxed.com/2014/11/11/the-five-stages-of-new-writers-grief/

The One Writer I Will Not Represent (Wendy Lawton)
www.booksandsuch.com/blog/one-writer-will-represent/

Managing Eagerness (Mary Kole)
http://kidlit.com/2014/11/10/managing-eagerness/

10 Things to Know About Pitching Agents and Editors (Colby Marshall)
http://elizabethspanncraig.com/2561/10-things-know-pitching-agents-editors/

Solicitation Alert: LitFire Publishing (Victoria Strauss)
http://accrispin.blogspot.com/2014/11/solicitation-alert-litfire-publishing.html


If you found these useful, you may also like my personal selection of the most interesting blog posts from 2013, and last week’s list.

If you have a particular favorite among these, please let the author know (and me too, if you have time).  Also
, if you've a link to a great post that isn't here, feel free to share.

Add a Comment
42. Narative Summary


There is an art to narrative summary. Ideally the information should be related through the point of view character's lens, not an info dump, like this:

The city was founded in 1779 by tea and sugar plantation owners who commissioned elaborate mansions on top of the hill with a view of the inlet that was large enough to dock their ships. Small villages soon cropped up along the periphery to house the tradesmen needed to service their needs. Over the centuries, the spaces between were filled until it became a crowded, mish-mash of squalor and grandeur.

This passage provides the information, but dully and through the prism of the writer, not the character. 

Info dumps are often found in prologues, epilogues, summaries of what happened in previous books, long dialogue passages, as you know dialogue, long explanations of how things work, and extensive backstory.

Here are a few examples of how to use narrative summary effectively.

1. Narrative summary helps you skip ahead.

Sometimes you have to provide important background, condense time, and relate events that don't deserve a lot of page time through narrative summary. 

The call came at five o'clock on a Saturday. Dick never forgot the pitch of the sun through the pines or the way his boots sank in the mud as he arrived at a scene to view his first corpse. After fifteen years, he'd seen so many bodies, in myriad locations,and every season.He no longer got the shakes, or the sicks, or the rapid pulse, but the scent of pine, dirt, and dying heat still filled his nostrils when he received a summons. Funny how some things stuck. He snapped on gloves and booties before ducking under the yellow tape blocking a snow-drenched alleyway in the heart of downtown Chicago. "What've we got?" 

Narrative skips over the boring bits. Shift it into real-time when possible, particularly if you find paragraphs of it. Use specific details and strong word choices.

1) Narrative summary can offer new information or recap necessary information. 

It should support, extend, or refute the information given through dialogue and action. It can add context in a timely fashion and set up expectation. It uses a few words that work hard and lead into or trail action and dialogue. If narrative runs on for paragraphs or pages, you have some editing to do.

The carpet fibers were a dead end: could have come from any low-rent apartment anywhere in town. The call-ins were a bunch of attention-seeking loonies. No legitimate suspects. No obvious motive. No one seemed to know anything about Jane. That was the problem these days: everyone had bloody telephones and computers and social media but never talked to their neighbors. Jane worked from home and played games with virtual friends. She ordered everything online or shopped at big box stores where everyone was strange and a stranger. There were no angles to grab hold of. Who would kill a girl who never seemed to leave her flat? But girls didn't just drag themselves into the woods, cover themselves with debris, and choke themselves with their own pantyhose.

2. Narrative transitions between scenes.

Dick skipped the shower and shave and was at the crime scene by nine thirty. He stood next to the corpse lying on the ground who obviously hadn’t shaved in days either and the bath in the river hadn’t done him any favors.

3. Narrative wrinkles time.

Four days sped by in a series of dead leads and dull conversations. Dick tackled the stacks of paperwork he had successfully ignored for a month, drank gallons of coffee, and smoked endless packs of cigarettes. His anxiety grew like a bonfire as he waited for the DNA results.


Revision Tips
? Read through your manuscript. Highlight areas that contain narrative. Decide whether you should turn narrative into action and dialogue. If not, is it serving a distinct purpose? Does it support, extend, add to, or refute a proposition? Does it condense time or provide important background?
? Does it involve tertiary characters or actions that are of lesser importance?
? Does it involve clichés?
? Have you told the reader what someone thinks or feels instead of showing it?

For more revision tips on revision and narrative summary check out.

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43. Around the world

Reading can take children on journeys outside of their everyday realms. The following stories — some humorous, some tender — allow independent readers to spend time with characters from all over the globe.

nye turtle of oman Around the worldWhen Naomi Shihab Nye’s The Turtle of Oman opens, Aref and his mother are preparing to leave their home in Muscat, Oman, to join his father in Michigan, where they’ll live temporarily while Aref’s parents attend graduate school. Though unhappy about the move, Aref is thrilled to spend his last few days in Oman going on adventures with Sidi, his grandfather. The setting is so affectionately portrayed, with descriptions of colorful sights, mouth-watering tastes, and friendly interactions with fellow countrymen, that even when Aref is ready to say goodbye, readers may not be. Nye’s story, with spot art by Betsy Peterschmidt, is both quiet and exhilarating. (Greenwillow, 7–10 years)

tak mikis and the donkey Around the worldPhilip Hopman’s illustrations set the stage on the island of Corfu in Bibi Dumon Tak’s Mikis and the Donkey (translated from the Dutch). Mikis befriends Tsaki, his grandfather’s new donkey, and advocates successfully for Tsaki’s welfare. There’s a lovely simplicity to this affecting portrait of a close-knit Greek community, where a teacher’s boyfriend can give her class motorbike rides to general contentment. The generous number of loosely drawn illustrations capture windswept landscapes and village life with equal aplomb. (Eerdmans, 6–8 years)

lagercrantz my heart is laughing Around the worldFirst grader Dani, of My Happy Life, returns in Rose Lagercrantz’s My Heart is Laughing (translated from the Swedish). Classmates Mickey and Vicky both like the same boy, Cushion, and they ostracize Dani because Cushion likes her. When they start sneakily pinching Dani’s arm at the lunch table, she fights back, inadvertently causing a food fight and getting herself into trouble. Eva Eriksson’s line drawings brilliantly portray facial expressions and body language — Cushion’s tentative approach to Dani; her teacher’s big, solid, comforting hand enclosing her shoulder. Salty and sweet, this is umami for the emerging reader. (Gecko, 6–8 years)

lloyd murilla gorilla and the hammock problem Around the worldThe titular primate in Jennifer Lloyd’s Murilla Gorilla and the Hammock Problem lives in the rainforest of an unnamed African country. Okapi (an indigenous central African mammal) hires Murilla to figure out who put a hole in the hammock she’s selling. This accessible book is easy to read without looking babyish, and the mystery is easy to solve without being too obvious. Jacqui Lee draws with muted tones, highlighting Murilla’s pink cheeks and prehensile feet and Okapi’s gray-striped legs and arms. (Simply Read, 6–8 years)

From the November 2014 issue of Notes from the Horn Book.

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44. Mr. Pants: It's Go Time! Review Haiku

Great option for
My First Graphic Novel: snappy,
funny, includes pants.

Mr. Pants: It's Go Time! by Scott McCormick. Dial, 2014, 128 pages.

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45. Half a World Away: Review Haiku

I wanted to love this,
but last-minute twist felt
unsupported, weak.

Half a World Away by Cynthia Kadohata. Atheneum, 2014, 240 pages.

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46. Interesting blog posts about writing – w/e November 7th 2014



Here’s my selection of interesting (and sometimes amusing) posts about writing from the last week:

When What You Don’t Know Trumps What You Do Know (Larry Brooks) Jon’s Pick of the Week
http://storyfix.com/writing-successful-fiction-dont-know-trumps-know

Reading for kids (Matt Q. McGovern)
http://authorchronicles.wordpress.com/2014/11/04/reading-for-kids/

How to Write Horror in a Flash (R. L. Black)
www.everydayfiction.com/flashfictionblog/how-to-write-horror-in-a-flash/

Bad Agent Behavior (Wendy Lawton)
www.booksandsuch.com/blog/bad-agent-behavior/

Sometimes You Gotta Suck It Up And Write the Darn Outline (P. J. Parrish)
http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/11/sometimes-you-gotta-suck-it-up-and.html

Complexity vs. Flip-Flopping (Mary Kole)
http://kidlit.com/2014/11/03/complexity-vs-flip-flopping/

Creating the Dreaded Synopsis (H. L. Dyer)
http://querytracker.blogspot.com/2014/11/creating-dreaded-synopsis.html

NaNoisms Ten (Lynn Viehl)
http://pbackwriter.blogspot.com/2014/11/nanoisms-ten.html

Fiction Writing Keys for Non-Outliners (Steven James)
http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/11/fiction-writing-keys-for-non-outliners.html

The Publishing Landscape: What Do You See? (Rachelle Gardner)
www.booksandsuch.com/blog/publishing-landscape/


If you found these useful, you may also like my personal selection of the most interesting blog posts from 2013, and last week’s list.

If you have a particular favorite among these, please let the author know (and me too, if you have time).  Also, if you've a link to a great post that isn't here, feel free to share.

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47. New Writer Award: Glimmer Train

New Writer Award: 1st place $1,500 & publication in Issue 96.  

Deadline: 11/30.  

This category is open only to emerging writers whose fiction has not appeared in any print publication with a circulation over 5000. (Seven of the last eight 1st place 

New Writer winners have been those authors' first print publications.) 
 
Second- and 3rd-place winners receive $500/$300, respectively, or, if accepted for 
publication, $700. Winners and finalists will be announced in the February 1 bulletin, and 
contacted directly the previous week.
 
Most submissions run 1,500 - 6,000 words, but can be as long as 12,000. 
 
Reading fee is $15 per story.  
 
Please, no more than three submissions per category. Writing Guidelines 


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48. Award for Black College Writers: Hurston-Wright Foundation


Hurston-Wright Foundation College Awards

ELIGIBILITY 

Open to Black college writers. At the time of submission applicants must be enrolled full or part time as undergraduate or graduate students in an accredited U.S. college or university. Open to both poets and fiction writers, submitted work must be previously unpublished.  

A winner and two honorable mentions are chosen in the categories of poetry and fiction.

Winners receive a cash prize of $1,000 and honorable mentions receive $250. Winners and honorable mentions will be announced at the end of April 2015 and will be honored at the Legacy Award Ceremony in October 2015.

Entry Fee: $20.00

Submit here.

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49. Call for Submissions: Printer's Devil Review

Call for Submissions: Printer's Devil Review

“Gorgeous…Beautifully put together…the kind of journal where good writers who go on to be great get their start.” These are just a few of the compliments paid Printer’s Devil Review in a review recently published on the journal review site The Review Review.

PDR is currently seeking submissions of fiction (2,000 to 9,000 words), poetry, and nonfiction. Our reading period for Spring 2015 opened October 1, 2014 and closes January 1, 2015.

Printer's Devil Review (ISSN 2160-2948) is an independent, open access journal of literary and visual art. We publish new writers alongside Pushcart- and Pulitzer Prize-winning ones.

We pay a lot of attention to graphic design and have a killer website that ensures your work will not only look good, but reach readers wherever they are and on any device, from desktops to phones. (Yeah, we're kind of from the future.) We nominate for Best of the Net, Pushcart Prize, and Best Indie Lit New England.

You can find full guidelines for each section and access our online submission system.

You can keep up with us by subscribing to our newsletter.

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50. Writing Competition for Fiction, Poetry, and Cross-Genre Manuscripts: Tarpaulin Sky Book Prizes

Contest for Fiction, Poetry, and Cross-Genre Manuscripts

The deadline for the 2015 Tarpaulin Sky Book Prizes is 30 November 2014. 


This year two manuscripts will be chosen, rather than one. In addition to publication, each author will receive $1000 ($500 cash, $500 book-tour expenses) plus 25 copies.

Books will be published in Spring 2016, in time for AWP Los Angeles. Submission fees are sliding scale, $20-30, and each entrant is eligible to receive a free TS book from our catalogue in return for an SASE. 

Individual works in manuscript submissions are also automatically considered for publication in Tarpaulin Sky Literary Journal.

Founded in 2002 as an online magazine, Tarpaulin Sky Press began publishing books in 2006, focusing on cross-genre / trans-genre / hybrid forms as well as innovative poetry and prose. Although known for their staunch refusal to fit neatly into genre conventions, Tarpaulin Sky Press titles are nonetheless reviewed positively in a wide variety of popular venues, including After Ellen, Huffington Post, The Nation, NPR Books, Publishers Weekly, Time Out New York, and VICE, as well as in small-press venues such as American Book Review, Bloomsbury Review, Bookslut, HTML Giant, Hyperallergic, Iowa Review, Review of Contemporary Fiction, The Rumpus, and TriQuarterly. 

Please see the 2015 Book Prizes guidelines page for full details.

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