What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Posts

(tagged with 'fiction')

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: fiction, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 26 - 50 of 2,338
26. Call for Science Fiction Submissions: Building Red--The Colonization of Mars


A new science fiction anthology—Building Red-The Colonization of Mars—is currently accepting submissions. Payment is $25 per story accepted, five free contributor copies, and 50% off copies contributors purchase
 
Deadline for entries is November 1, 2014
 
Complete submission guidelines. Included on the blog are web resources regarding the technicalities of getting to and living on Mars. Please note: we're looking for science fiction, not fantasy stories. Submissions can be funny, dark, quirky, serious, etc., but must include hard/believable science in the fiction. Send questions to:
 
janetcannoneditorATgmailDOTcom (Change At to @ and DOT to . )

Janet L. Cannon, Acquisitions Editor
Walrus Publishing, Inc.



Add a Comment
27. Call for Submissions: The Cartier Street Review

The Cartier Street Review is a literary and art magazine seeking poetry, short story submissions and jpgs of original art.

We accept previously published works and simultaneous submissions.
Below are our publishing rules.

Submission Rules

1. Write your last name in the subject line and the type submission, for example, poetry or art in an email to tip us off what you are sending. Address the submission to:
 
VioletwritesATgmailDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )


2. Provide a greeting. "Hello" or "Dear Editor" works great.

3. Include a very short bio. For example, "I am John or Jane Poet". Wow, that's easy!

4. Thank the people you are sending your submission to for taking the time to read it.

5. Add a closing salutation with a name at the end. "Sincerely, John and/or Jane Artist".

6. Send as a microsoft word attachment, open office attachment or copy into the body of the email.

7. Don’t send more than 4 pieces maximum.

8. We accept previously published works as long as you, (the author) maintain publishing rights.

9. You can try this out and we'll consider your pieces for publishing. Or you can say, "Forget that!" in which case we wish you luck!

Previous issue.

Add a Comment
28. The Taming of the Tights

The Taming of the Tights Louise Rennison

Tallulah is back at school, ready to put Cain and the kissing behind her. Even if Charlie has a girlfriend. She also has bigger issues--Dother Hall is still very financially unstable and while it’s not in danger of closing, it is very much in danger of falling down. And while Sidonie recognizes Tallulah’s talent, not everyone else does and the more she tries to prove herself, the more hilariously she fails in the eyes of her teachers (but never to us, dear reader.) And there is still the Cain thing. Tallulah may be willing to ignore the kissing, but Cain has no problem telling others about it.

I love Tallulah and her craziness. I like that only some of her drama is self-invented. I love the insanity that is Dother Hall and the Dobbinses and the Tree Sisters and her fun size pal and the crazy dog Ruby. Overall, very hilariously funny. I don’t think it gets near as much love as Georgia, which is too bad.

Book Provided by... my local library

Links to Amazon are an affiliate link. You can help support Biblio File by purchasing any item (not just the one linked to!) through these links. Read my full disclosure statement.

0 Comments on The Taming of the Tights as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
29. Nominations Open for 2014 Best of the Net Anthology: Sundress Publications

Sundress Publications is now open for the 2014 Best of the Net Anthology nominations. This project continues to promote the diverse and growing collection of voices who are publishing their work online.

The internet continues to be a rapidly evolving medium for the distribution of new and innovative literature, and the Best of the Net Anthology aims to nurture the relationship between writers and the web. In our first seven years of existence, the anthology has published distinguished writers such as Claudia Emerson, B.H. Fairchild, Ron Carlson, Dorianne Laux, and Jill McCorkle alongside numerous new and emerging writers from around the world. This year’s judges are Kathy Fagan, Lily Hoang, and Michael Martone.

Kathy Fagan's fifth collection of poems, Sycamore, will be published by Milkweed Editions in 2016. Winner of the National Poetry Series and Vassar Miller prizes, she has received grants from the NEA, the Ingram Merrill Foundation, and the Ohio Arts Council, and her work has appeared in venues such as FIELD, Narrative, Ninth Letter, The Paris Review, and Poetry. Fagan teaches in the MFA Program at Ohio State, where she also serves as Series Editor of the OSU Press/The Journal Wheeler Poetry Prize.

Lily Hoang is the author of four books, including Changing, recipient of a PEN Open Books Award. With Blake Butler, she edited 30 Under 30, and with Joshua Marie Wilkinson, she is editing the forthcoming anthology The Force of What's Possible: Writers on the Avant-Garde and Accessibility. She teaches in the MFA program at New Mexico State University, where she is Associate Department Head, and she serves as Prose Editor for Puerto del Sol.

Michael Martone's most recent book of essays is Racing in Place. The Flatness and Other Landscapes was the winner of the AWP Creative Nonfiction Prize. He has authored a dozen books of short fiction and edited several collections short prose including The Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction. He currently teaches at the University of Alabama and has taught at Iowa State University, Harvard University, Syracuse University, and Warren Wilson College.

Nominations for the 2014 edition must be sent to:

bestofnetATsundresspublicationsDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

between July 1st and September 30th, 2014. Further submission guidelines can be found here.

Add a Comment
30. Call for Submissions: Lunch Ticket

Lunch Ticket is currently accepting submissions for Amuse-Bouche, its bimonthly production, until July 31, 2014. 

Submissions in the following genres are all encouraged: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, writing for young people, visual art, and translation. Send us your best work! 

For guidelines and submission manager, visit our website.

Add a Comment
31. Call for Submissions: The Boiler

Online submission deadline: August 15, 2014

The Boiler is accepting submissions in poetry, short stories, and short memoir/essays (prose under 3,500 words) for its Fall 2014 issue. Submissions close Aug. 15, 2014. We look forward to reading your work. For submission guidelines visit our website.

About The Boiler: The Boiler was started online in 2011 by a group of MFA students from Sarah Lawrence College. Now publishing quarterly. Recently published authors include: Rigoberto González, Tara Betts, Lisa Marie Basile, Kristen Keckler, Leah Griesmann, Tomaž Šalamun, and others.

--
The Boiler Journal

Follow us on: Twitter
Like our page on: Facebook

Add a Comment
32. Interesting blog posts about writing – w/e July 4th, 2014



Here’s my selection of interesting (and sometimes amusing) posts about writing from the last week:

Resources for Writers—Microsoft Word (Elizabeth Spann Craig)
http://elizabethspanncraig.com/2265/resources-writers-microsoft-word/

Your Hook: the On/Off Button in Your Proposal (Mary Keeley)
www.booksandsuch.com/blog/hook-onoff-button-proposal/

Infused (Donald Maass)
http://writerunboxed.com/2014/07/02/infused/

Avoiding Info Dumps (Nancy J. Cohen)
http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/07/avoiding-info-dumps.html

7 (Bad) Habits of Highly Successful Authors (Rachelle Gardner)
www.booksandsuch.com/blog/highly-successful-authors/

American Writing Association: A Service Writers Don't Need (Victoria Strauss)
http://accrispin.blogspot.com/2014/07/american-writing-association-service.html

Narrator Intrusion - Part 2 (Diana Hurwitz)
http://bloodredpencil.blogspot.com/2014/06/narrator-intrustion-part-2.html

You Really Want To Avoid This… (Stina Lindenblatt)
http://querytracker.blogspot.com/2014/06/you-really-want-to-avoid-this.html

Is It Plagiarism to Steal a Plot? (James Scott Bell)
http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/06/is-it-plagiarism-to-steal-plot

Writers: What Are You Afraid Of? (Dan Blank)
http://writerunboxed.com/2014/06/27/writers-what-are-your-afraid-of/


If you found these useful, you may also like my personal selection of the most interesting blog posts from 2013, and last week’s list.

If you have a particular favorite among these, please let the author know (and me too, if you have time).  Also, if you've a link to a great post that isn't here, feel free to share.

Add a Comment
33. The Start of the Parade

In the distance I hear the band warming up – not a single note piercing the air sounds right. Each is singular, isolated, and the sound of them issuing from so many instruments almost hurts the ear. It is not melodious or rich. It sounds a mess.

People young and old run and walk around me, depending on their ability. The youngest citizens are aided by the hands of parents who steady their wobbly steps. The elderly are aided by their children, their children’s children, or a kind neighbor. No one is alone.

Excitement is high. I can see the shopkeepers giving out red, white, and blue buttons, pinwheels, and balloons on sticks to anyone who wants them. Somehow, today isn’t about profit or loss. Those cares will wait until tomorrow. Competition forgotten, today they smile together and serve.

The entire of Main Street is lined with flags – 48 white stars, seven red stripes, and six white. My own native flag boasts the same colors but in a much different configuration. I never saw it displayed so much when my home was there. Of course, as countries go, mine is old and gray while this one is but a newborn. In the latter years, one doesn’t celebrate birthdays with quite as much vigor as a youngster. One hundred and fifty years old today, I’m reminded.

This little town of Portsong is like any other in the country. It boasts nothing outside its borders that make it unique. It is known for nothing, remembered by few, and can’t seem to grow despite the mayor’s efforts. Yet there is something special here. While I cannot put my finger on it or label it properly, there is something that made this old Brit stay and set up shop.

I believe the allure is in the small details.  For instance, I have been asked to join the festivities no less than seventeen times since I came and sat on this bench. Five of those offers came from people I do not know and four more came from people who saw me at a distance and went far out of their way to make their inquiry. I have been here since just after sunrise and it is now nearly eleven o’clock. In that time, I have counted forty-three people of various ages who have passed me. Forty-two of them shared a smile and kind word with me. The only one who did not was little Esther Parsons and being two, she was in the middle of a fit about her bonnet, I believe.

In most places I have been, an old man on a bench can blend in… be anonymous… simply fade away into background. Not here. In this place this old man has been knitted into the fabric of the community so tightly that I believe I would be missed if I left. Yes, I believe there would be a hole in the quilt if I or anyone else took flight. And that is the loveliness of Portsong. Does it exist in other small towns? I am certain to some degree. It is certainly here to stay. As am I.

parade

The parade is about to start. As I leave my seat aided by the hand of a beautiful child with golden ringlets, I hear the marching band leading the way. No longer are they clanging individuals striking off on their own notes. Now they play as one group. Their sound gets closer. It is beautiful, melodious, and wonderful. Like this place, it is a collection of people working together in harmony.

I truly love it here.

 

-Colonel Clarence Birdwhistle

July 4, 1926


Filed under: Character Voices

6 Comments on The Start of the Parade, last added: 7/4/2014
Display Comments Add a Comment
34. Call for Submissions: Prairie Wolf Press Review

The editors of Prairie Wolf Press Review, an online literary journal, announce our open reading period from July 1 to Sept. 1, for our 8th issue to be published late October 2014.

We are looking for short stories, flash fiction, essays, and poetry. All prose submissions to Prairie Wolf Press Review must be fewer than one thousand words. You may send up to three poems. Please send submissions in .doc or .docx format. In the subject area of your email, identify your submission as prose or poetry and include your name.

Please mail submissions to:

editorsATprairiewolfpressDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

You may view our current issue and archives at our website.

We look forward to reading your work.
Marjorie Carlson Davis and j.d. Daniels, editors

Add a Comment
35. Call for Submissions: Saw Palm: florida literature & art

Saw Palm: florida literature & art is seeking submissions of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry for Issue 9. We are as interested in lyric and experimental work as we are to more traditional forms.

Saw Palm is an annual print magazine out of the University of South Florida. Our mission is to be the premier cultural barometer of Florida – to collect, publish, and review the best cultural works of one of the most populous and diverse states in the U.S.

We welcome writers and artists from across the globe, as long as the work is somehow connected to Florida (via images, people, themes, etc.). We also welcome creative works from Floridians and former Floridians that are not obviously about someplace else.

Our contributors include national and international award-winners, as well as emerging artists and writers, many of whom are published for the first time here.

Submission period: July 1st – October 1st

Our submissions page and guidelines.

Add a Comment
36. Call for Submissions: Barking Sycamores

Barking Sycamores is a literary journal publishing poetry, short fiction (1,000 words or less), and art by neurodivergent (autistic, ADHD, bipolar, dyslexic, etc.) writers. We seek poetry, short fiction, and art for our unthemed Issue 3, Fall/Winter 2014.

Works on nearly any subject will be considered, as well as essays on neurodivergence and the creation of literary works. Artwork submitted may be considered for use as cover art. The philosophy of our journal is unique, so we ask that interested writers consult our submission guidelines before sending any work to us.

Submission period: July 1 – September 15, 2014.

Add a Comment
37. Call for Submissions: Blue Skirt Productions and Blue Skirt Press

We have three calls for submissions right now. One is for our website: fiction, non-fiction, poetry, visual art, video and audio. The second is for our Microfiction magazine. Those are ongoing at this point.

And the final one is for an anthology on the theme of the loss of a parent. Deadline for the anthology: Sep. 30, 2014

For more information, please visit our official submissions page. Thank you!

Add a Comment
38. Review of This One Summer

tamaki this one summer Review of This One Summerstar2 Review of This One SummerThis One Summer
by Mariko Tamaki; illus. by Jillian Tamaki
Middle School    First Second/Roaring Brook    320 pp.
5/14    978-1-59643-774-6    $17.99

Rose Wallace and her parents go to Awago Beach every summer. Rose collects rocks on the beach, swims in the lake, and goes on bike rides with her younger “summer cottage friend,” Windy. But this year she is feeling too old for some of the activities she used to love — and even, at times, for the more-childish (yet self-assured) Windy. Rose would rather do adult things: watch horror movies and talk with Windy about boobs, boys, and sex. In their second graphic novel — another impressive collaboration — the Tamaki cousins (Skim, rev. 7/08) examine the mix of uncertainty and hope a girl experiences on the verge of adolescence. The episodic plot and varied page layout set a leisurely pace evocative of summer. Rose’s contemplative observations and flashbacks, along with the book’s realistic dialogue, offer insight into her evolving personality, while the dramatic changes in perspective and purply-blue ink illustrations capture the narrative’s raw emotional core. Secondary storylines also accentuate Rose’s transition from childhood to young adulthood: she’s caught in the middle of the tension between her parents (due to her mom’s recent abrasive moodiness and the painful secret behind it) and fascinated by the local teens’ behavior (swearing, drinking, smoking, fighting, and even a pregnancy; the adult situations — and frank language — she encounters may be eye-opening reading for pre-adolescents like Rose). This is a poignant drama worth sharing with middle-schoolers, and one that teen readers will also appreciate for its look back at the beginnings of the end of childhood.

From the July/August 2014 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

share save 171 16 Review of This One Summer

The post Review of This One Summer appeared first on The Horn Book.

0 Comments on Review of This One Summer as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
39. Running to the Guru

“Four miles down, two to go.”

It seemed like the third time I’d told myself that very count. Mileage wasn’t passing. People were, not mileage. A short six miles was turning into a torturous climb under the sweltering Georgia sun.

And then, I saw him!

He came toward me walking confidently with both hands shoved in his pockets. His dark hair with streaks of gray hung well below his shoulders – unkempt, but not messy. Although there was no breeze, it seemed to wave behind him majestically like a flag in a hurricane.

In the brief moment he stood before me, I saw in his eyes a certain combination of peace, sagacity, and happiness uncommon to this world. He smiled slightly, but not at me. No, he radiated carefree joy – I was just a party to it. His turned up mouth revealed lines chiseled by years and somehow, if possible, even his eyes smiled.

He wore nothing special – wrinkled khaki pants, dirty sandals, and a grey t-shirt far too big for him that simply said, “Whistler”. I sensed he was above making clothing choices and didn’t consider what his appearance told others.

I must remark that I typically don’t notice much about others on my runs. I wave and say hello to fellow runners. I try to smile, but I don’t really look at them. That said, I was mesmerized by this gentleman.

When we passed each other, I realized that I had finally broken into my last mile. How? What propelled me? I had been running in quicksand all this time, never making progress and suddenly a mile ticked off! How did that happen?

The heat became stifling at 5.5 miles, but with the finish in sight, I soldiered on. Plodding, pushing, slogging until I nearly fell out with two tenths of a mile to go. And there he was again. Seated at the bench that marked my final turn. How he got in front of me I have no idea, but there he sat – smiling at me. This time I was certain he was smiling at me… For ME!

I collapsed ten feet from him and crawled on my hands and knees toward his bench, ready to thank him for helping me through the tough part of the run and hoping to learn something… anything at his feet. Just when I began to speak, he held up a finger. At his command, nature seemed to come to a stop. Birds didn’t chirp, frogs hushed, and rabbits ceased their noisy hopping.

When the time was right, he began to laugh – a slow, deliberate, infectious chuckle that I felt contained a slight mocking tone.800px-Guru_rimpoche_at_samdruptse

“Why do you laugh, Guru?” I asked, my voice taking the tone of Grasshopper.

He cocked his head back and roared. “You have not completed your run,” he mocked.

“Yes, yes,” I pleaded. “I have gone six miles.”

“Observe your watch,” He instructed between peals of mirth. “You are precisely 1/10th of a mile short.”

I frantically searched the screen of my GPS watch. “NOOOOOOOOOOO!”

He was right. How did he know? I looked up, only to find he was no longer there. His laughter still hung in the air and haunted me – but he was gone. Where he went, I know not. I both hated him and wanted to be his best friend at the same time – I’ve never been so conflicted.

I wonder if I’ll ever see the guru again. I want to, and then again, I don’t.

Next week, I’ll run a tenth over my goal and show him!

 

***************

This was a  little writing exercise I concocted, built around an interesting man I saw on my Sunday run. Can you picture him?


Filed under: From the Writer

0 Comments on Running to the Guru as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
40. Running to the Guru

“Four miles down, two to go.”

It seemed like the third time I’d told myself that very count. Mileage wasn’t passing. People were, not mileage. A short six miles was turning into a torturous climb under the sweltering Georgia sun.

And then, I saw him!

He came toward me walking confidently with both hands shoved in his pockets. His dark hair with streaks of gray hung well below his shoulders – unkempt, but not messy. Although there was no breeze, it seemed to wave behind him majestically like a flag in a hurricane.

In the brief moment he stood before me, I saw in his eyes a certain combination of peace, sagacity, and happiness uncommon to this world. He smiled slightly, but not at me. No, he radiated carefree joy – I was just a party to it. His turned up mouth revealed lines chiseled by years and somehow, if possible, even his eyes smiled.

He wore nothing special – wrinkled khaki pants, dirty sandals, and a grey t-shirt far too big for him that simply said, “Whistler”. I sensed he was above making clothing choices and didn’t consider what his appearance told others.

I must remark that I typically don’t notice much about others on my runs. I wave and say hello to fellow runners. I try to smile, but I don’t really look at them. That said, I was mesmerized by this gentleman.

When we passed each other, I realized that I had finally broken into my last mile. How? What propelled me? I had been running in quicksand all this time, never making progress and suddenly a mile ticked off! How did that happen?

The heat became stifling at 5.5 miles, but with the finish in sight, I soldiered on. Plodding, pushing, slogging until I nearly fell out with two tenths of a mile to go. And there he was again. Seated at the bench that marked my final turn. How he got in front of me I have no idea, but there he sat – smiling at me. This time I was certain he was smiling at me… For ME!

I collapsed ten feet from him and crawled on my hands and knees toward his bench, ready to thank him for helping me through the tough part of the run and hoping to learn something… anything at his feet. Just when I began to speak, he held up a finger. At his command, nature seemed to come to a stop. Birds didn’t chirp, frogs hushed, and rabbits ceased their noisy hopping.

When the time was right, he began to laugh – a slow, deliberate, infectious chuckle that I felt contained a slight mocking tone.800px-Guru_rimpoche_at_samdruptse

“Why do you laugh, Guru?” I asked, my voice taking the tone of Grasshopper.

He cocked his head back and roared. “You have not completed your run,” he mocked.

“Yes, yes,” I pleaded. “I have gone six miles.”

“Observe your watch,” He instructed between peals of mirth. “You are precisely 1/10th of a mile short.”

I frantically searched the screen of my GPS watch. “NOOOOOOOOOOO!”

He was right. How did he know? I looked up, only to find he was no longer there. His laughter still hung in the air and haunted me – but he was gone. Where he went, I know not. I both hated him and wanted to be his best friend at the same time – I’ve never been so conflicted.

I wonder if I’ll ever see the guru again. I want to, and then again, I don’t.

Next week, I’ll run a tenth over my goal and show him!

 

***************

This was a  little writing exercise I concocted, built around an interesting man I saw on my Sunday run. Can you picture him?


Filed under: From the Writer

5 Comments on Running to the Guru, last added: 7/2/2014
Display Comments Add a Comment
41. Review – Silence Once Begun by Jesse Bell

9780307908483This is one of those great novels that blends up truth and imagination so well that the lines between fact and fiction are so blurred you don’t even know where to begin trying to unravel it. It also doubles the intrigue especially the way Jesse Ball structures the story to unfurl piece by piece, layer by layer in such a way you are taken by surprise after surprise.

The story concerns the “Narito Disappearances”. A crime that baffled local authorities in Osaka where eight people had gone missing seemingly without a trace until one day a signed confession is handed in to police. The man who has made the confession is quickly arrested and doesn’t say another word. But this is not a whodunit because as the story goes on we see there is a much bigger and more important question that who.

“I am looking for this mystery. Not the mystery of what happened but the mystery of how”

One one level this is an ingenious crime novel. By telling the story in a different order the facts and “truth” aren’t revealed to us until we get to the beginning of the story. Rather than telling the story in chronological order we follow the path Jesse Ball’s investigation follows like a trail of breadcrumbs. Ball recounts his investigation through interview transcripts and internal notes as well as letters and other documents he is given along the way.  Each interview shines a little more light onto the story and leads Jesse to another piece of the puzzle.

I was so engrossed in this book it wasn’t until finishing it that I truly digested what I had read. In many ways this is a modern parable about the moral fallacies we place on our systems of justice but the skill and subtlety in which Jesse Ball tells the story gives it not just power but also emotional resonance. And by doing so Jesse Ball gets to the absolute core of what a crime story is and what it should mean when we read one.

Buy the book here…

Add a Comment
42. Call for Submissions on "Skin": The Chattahoochee Review

Submission deadline: September 1, 2014

The Chattahoochee Review seeks submissions for its Fall/Winter 2014 double issue with a special focus on “Skin.” Literal and figurative explorations of the theme welcome. We’re particularly interested in sophisticated treatments, whether of sexuality, race, health, species, food, anatomy, or surfaces. 


Please note the call for submissions in a cover letter and follow the general guidelines on our website. Our special-focus issues fill quickly; we encourage submissions by August 1 but will read until September 1 or until the issue fills

Please visit our website for more details.

Add a Comment
43. Call for Submissions: Grist: The Journal for Writers



Grist: The Journal for Writers is now reading for Issue 8! We seek quality fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction, as well as essays devoted to discussions of craft. We welcome all styles and aesthetic approaches.  
We welcome submissions from writers in every stage of their career and are especially interested in considering work from emerging writers. More than 90% of the content of our most recent issues has come from our general (unsolicited) submissions. We love discovering new voices. 
Grist is currently published once a year, in the spring. Each issue also includes an Online Companion in which we feature some of the best work we’ve received during our reading period. 
Deadline for submissions is September 15. 
 
Please visit our website for submissions guidelines and to learn more about us! Back issues are also available for $6. 

We look forward to reading your work!! --
Grist: The Journal for Writers
English Department
University of Tennessee

Add a Comment
44. Return of Zita the Spacegirl: Review Haiku

My favorite space
pioneer girl gets a fitting
conclusion. Well done.


Return of Zita the Spacegirl by Ben Hatke. First Second, 2014, 240 pages.

0 Comments on Return of Zita the Spacegirl: Review Haiku as of 6/27/2014 8:31:00 AM
Add a Comment
45. Sex Criminals: One Weird Trick

Sex Criminals Volume 1: One Weird Trick Matt Fraction and Chip Zdarsky

Suzie works at a library that’s about to be foreclosed on. While at a fundraising party to try to save it, she meets a guy she likes and they sleep together. It’s only in the afterglow that Suzie discovers that Jon shares her secret--after orgasms, time stops until she’s ready to go again. When she sleeps with Jon, they’re in trapped time together (she calls it The Quiet. He calls it Cumworld.) Jon works at the bank that’s foreclosing on Suzie’s library and hates it. So… why not make the best of their talents in order to rob the bank so they can give the money back in the form of the library’s mortgage payment?

My brother-in-law has a comic book store and last time I was visiting them, my sister was SO EXCITED about this series, so I was excited when the omnibus showed up.

I love the premise and it’s executed so well. Suzie narrates and it goes between the present and the past, and how she figured out about The Quiet. It’s really funny and a great introduction to a world that I want to know more about (Jon and Suzie aren’t the only ones with this talent, and they will get caught breaking the rules, even if time is standing still.) I also love the artwork when time’s standing still, so you know what’s going on. But most of all, I love Suzie. I love that she robs banks to save her library. I love her voice. I love the idea of her as a librarian. She isn't mousey and quiet, isn't too in-your-face cool. She is very cool, and very committed to books and research and helping people who came in to find their information--reminds me of a lot of the librarians I know and love. It was nice to see in pop culture.

I also like the back matter for this one. In addition to the regular offerings of page/cover sketches and rejects that we usually get in omnibus back matter, this had some great stuff on process, and the complete brain-storm list of made up positions.

Obviously, with this premise, it’s an adult title. But while the gimmick is lewd, the execution is beautiful and the actual story is worth digging into--there’s definitely some there there.

Cannot wait to read more.


Book Provided by... my local library

Links to Amazon are an affiliate link. You can help support Biblio File by purchasing any item (not just the one linked to!) through these links. Read my full disclosure statement.

0 Comments on Sex Criminals: One Weird Trick as of 6/27/2014 11:15:00 AM
Add a Comment
46. Clichés

Clichés are overused metaphors and often employ the words like and as

Agents and editors hate clichés. However, clichés are so deeply imbedded in our language, we don't know we are using them. Personally, I applaud all those creative people who came up with the phrases that give our language its biting wit, sappy compliments, colorful swear words, and delightful put downs. Our world would be boring without such gems as:

Dead as a doornail

Like a cat on a hot tin roof

Hot as snot

Sure as shootin'

Detractors call clichés predictable, annoying, a symptom of lazy writing, and bordering on purple prose. The main concern is cliché abuse.

The key to using clichés well is to use them sparingly and twist them to make them original. They can be placed strategically to add a comic punch or to define a single character, not the entire cast.

                Cliché: Dick won’t rock the boat.
                Twist: Dick won’t rock the rescue dinghy.

                Cliché: Not for all the tea in China.
                Twist: Not for all the fortune cookies in China.

There are too many clichés to list them all. Some are so ingrained in our language, it would sound stilted to avoid them. Make artistic choices.


REVISION TIPS


?Turn on the Clichés, Colloquialisms, and Jargon option in the toolbox. They will be marked for you. As you read through your draft, decide which to keep and which to kill. Have you used the cliché intentionally?
?Can you twist it or make it fresh?
?Have you committed cliché abuse? Should you trim them?
?Does the cliché fit the time and place?
?Does the cliché fit the background and personality of the character uttering it?

0 Comments on Clichés as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
47. Interesting blog posts about writing – w/e June 27th, 2014



Here’s my selection of interesting (and sometimes amusing) posts about writing from the last week:

Editing Crimes: A Case Study (Kathryn Craft) http://bloodredpencil.blogspot.com/2014/06/editing-crimes-case-study.html

Hard part #2 (Joe Moore)
http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/06/hard-part-2.html

Narrator Intrusion - Part 1 (Diana Hurwitz)
http://bloodredpencil.blogspot.com/2014/06/narrator-intrusion-part-1.html

Trouble Hitting Send? (Rachelle Gardner)
www.booksandsuch.com/blog/trouble-hitting-send/

Not Quite Ready for Prime Time (Kathryn Lilley)
http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/06/no-writing-debuts-before-its-time.html

Think Outside the Bookstore (Heidi M. Thomas)
http://bloodredpencil.blogspot.com/2014/06/think-outside-bookstore.html

Creating a Business Philosophy (Elizabeth Spann Craig)
http://elizabethspanncraig.com/2236/creating-business-philosophy/

Should I Stay or Should I Go? (Jennifer Laughran)
http://literaticat.blogspot.com/2014/06/should-i-stay-or-should-i-go.html

Most of the Stuff You Need to Know to Edit Your Manuscript (Bill Ferris)
http://writerunboxed.com/2014/06/21/most-of-the-stuff-you-need-to-know-to-edit-your-manuscript/

Writing Advice: “The Lie,” and What it Really Means (Larry Brooks)
http://storyfix.com/writing-advice-lie-really-means

Be Cool: How Not To Be a Diva Debut Author (Erin Reel)
http://litreactor.com/columns/be-cool-how-not-to-be-a-diva-debut-author

I Was a Digital Best Seller! (Tony Horwitz) www.nytimes.com/2014/06/20/opinion/i-was-a-digital-best-seller.html?hp&rref=opinion&_r=1
by way of Lois Winston


If you found these useful, you may also like my personal selection of the most interesting blog posts from 2013, and last week’s list.

If you have a particular favorite among these, please let the author know (and me too, if you have time).  Also, if you've a link to a great post that isn't here, feel free to share.
 

Add a Comment
48. Saving Baby Doe: Review Haiku

The dangers of
stereotypes; the power of
love. Bring a hankie.

Saving Baby Doe by Danette Vigilante. Putnam, 2014, 230 pages.

0 Comments on Saving Baby Doe: Review Haiku as of 6/30/2014 6:31:00 AM
Add a Comment
49. Call for Submissions: Masque & Spectacle

Masque & Spectacle is a new online literary journal taking submissions for its first issue slated for September 1. We publish all forms of creative writing, including drama, literary journalism, and essays, as well as visual art, photography (especially performance photography), video, and sound art. 

Please send all submissions and inquiries to:

masqueandspectacleATgmailDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )



Our website.

Add a Comment
50. Call for Submissions: Sequestrum Summer '14

We are currently reading for Sequestrum: Summer '14. To browse our archives, subscribe (for free), and find our complete guidelines, visit our website.

Guidelines:
For our summer issue, we're interested in poetry (under 35 lines) and fiction and nonfiction (under 5,000 words). Topic and theme are open, our only requirement is to send your best work - and to read a past publication or two to get an idea of what we like.

We're also actively seeking visual artists to feature. See our "submissions" page for details.

About Sequestrum:
We average 1,000+ readers a month, keep our archives free and open to the public, are a paying market, and pair all our publications with stunning visual arts created by outside artists or our staff. Our contributors range from award-winning novelists and poets (with other works featured in publications including The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The American Scholar, The Kenyon Review, many other university periodicals, and Best American Anthologies) to emerging voices and first-time writers.

We're proud of our little plot on the literary landscape and the writers and artists we share it with. Come see why.

Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts