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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: fiction, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 26 - 50 of 2,527
26. Interesting blog posts about writing – w/e October 31st 2014



Here’s my selection of interesting (and sometimes amusing) posts about writing from the last week:

There’s Power in the Public Domain (Art Holcomb)
http://storyfix.com/theres-power-public-domain-guest-post-art-holcomb

KAPOW!  Cutting Scenes Like a Superhero (Liz Michalski)
http://writerunboxed.com/2014/10/29/kapow-cutting-scenes-like-a-superhero/

Coming To Terms (Joe Moore)
http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/10/coming-to-terms.html

7 Reasons Twitter Isn’t Building Your Author Platform (And How to Fix It) (Marcy Kennedy)
http://janefriedman.com/2014/10/28/twitter-platform/

What Should Authors Blog About? (Jane Friedman)
http://janefriedman.com/2014/10/27/authors-blog/

Twitter Abuse (Janet Kobobel Grant)
www.booksandsuch.com/blog/twitter-abuse/

Bringing Out the Emotion in First Person POV (Janice Hardy)
http://blog.janicehardy.com/2014/10/real-life-diagnostics-bringing-out.html

Writing Unforgettable Villains (James Scott Bell)
http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/10/sympathy-for-devil-writing.html

Seven Deadly Sins (If You're a First Chapter) (Janice Hardy)
http://blog.janicehardy.com/2010/04/seven-deadly-sins-if-youre-first.html

Basic Formatting of Your Manuscript (Formatting 101) (Jodie Renner)
http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/10/basic-formatting-of-your-manuscript.html


If you found these useful, you may also like my personal selection of the most interesting blog posts from 2013, and last week’s list.

If you have a particular favorite among these, please let the author know (and me too, if you have time).  Also, if you've a link to a great post that isn't here, feel free to share.

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27. Call for Submissions: Tammy

Tammy is reading for its fifth print issue for only four more weeks. Aimed at the esteemed fringes and unguarded egresses of American letters, Tammy seeks writing in all genres and forms of visual art that lend themselves to the printed page.

Submit September 1 - December 1 for the spring 2015 issue and March 1 - May 1 for the fall issue

Online submissions manager 

Submissions in multiple genres and simultaneous submissions are encouraged. If your submission(s) is accepted elsewhere, please let us know via Submittable. 

For queries outside of these guidelines, please email:

thetjournalATgmailDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

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28. Call for Submissions: Duende

Duende welcomes submissions of prose, poetry, hybrid writing, and visual art. We are especially interested in collaborations between two or more writers, or between writers and visual artists. We accept submissions from writers working in English, or translating into English, from anywhere in the world.

Duende tastes good on the tongue and caresses the ear. Duende seeks authenticity & soulfulness, earthiness & expressiveness, a chill up the spine. It encompasses darkness and intensity; elicits sorrow and joy; wrests a response from the body.

If your poetry is rough-cut diamonds, slightly off-kilter; if your fiction will make us feel more human and less alone; if you enjoy exploration of new forms at the edges of the literary universe; if you can bring us elegant translations of literature from far corners of the globe; if your nonfiction is wild and honest; if your visual art is raw and earnest…show us. We want to see it.

Duende aspires to represent the true beauty and diversity of the U.S. literary ecosystem. A majority of the work we publish will be from writers and artists who are queer, of color, differently abled, immigrant, working class, youth, elder, and / or otherwise from communities underrepresented in U.S. literary magazines and journals. Please send us your work!

Submissions are open through November 15th.  


Visit our website for detailed guidelines.

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29. Call for Submissions: Cooper Street

Cooper Street, an online publication sponsored by the Rutgers University Camden MFA program’s student organization, is still looking for more fiction and poetry for our second issue, slated for a January release. Priority deadline for full consideration for the issue is Nov. 15.  

All interested writers are welcome. Please send work as word documents (.doc or .docx) via email to:

ru.cooperstreetATgmailDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

using the following format for the Subject: “Last name – Genre.” We’re interested in stories and poems about cities, particularly those set in the Northeast. But we’ll consider all subjects if the work is interesting and strong. If you have creative non-fiction, we ask that you please save it for an upcoming issue.

Additional guidelines

Fiction: Send either one story of no more than 5,000 words (although stories of 3,000 words or less are especially welcome) or send up to three flash fiction pieces of no more than 600 words each.

Poetry: Send three to five poems as a single attachment, one poem per page.

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30. Comic Fiction Competition: The Robert Reeves Prize in Comic Fiction

The Robert Reeves $1,000 Prize in Comic Fiction, judged by distinguished author and editor, Daniel Menaker

Submit your short comedic fiction (no more than 5,000 words) to The Southampton Review’s first annual Robert Reeves Comic Fiction Contest! We won’t even try to tell you what we’re looking for. The comic impulse is so widely and variously expressed in fiction that it resists definition. But if your comic muse has led you to a story that you consider a match, throw caution to the wind and send it to us.


Entry fee is $15 per submission. Winners will be notified on or before January 15, 2015, and will be honored at the Manhattan launch of TSR: The Southampton Review’s Spring 2015 issue.


Submission Period: September 1st through October 31st. Submit here.


1st Place: $1000 and publication in the Spring 2015 issue of TSR: The Southampton Review. Finalist stories will be considered for publication in TSR Online.


Notably irreverent contest judge Daniel Menaker has been the fiction editor at The New Yorker, and Executive Editor in Chief of Random House. He is the author, most recently, of the memoir My Mistake.

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31. Trolls & the NYT Bestsellers

What do trolls and the New York Times bestseller list have in common?



More than you might think.

It is often stated that bullies act out of a lack of self-esteem. But it is postulated that the opposite is also true: early humans that were good at convincing others of their superiority were perched at the top of the social hierarchy and demeaned others to keep their lofty position. Their followers aped their behavior and adopted their opinions.

Malicious internet trolls tend to be narcissistic, perhaps sociopathic. They need to lash out at other people to make themselves feel better. They usually rely on the cloak of anonymity, but not always. Superstars can be just as guilty.

They know that participants tend to conform to the rules and mindset of the bullies. 
A highly dysfunctional troll can start an attack with stealth with no fear of real reprisal, unless they accidentally target a master hacker who is capable of coming after them with a return cyber-attack. They do this certain that they will gain followers.


If you know such a hacker, I'd like his/her number.

The problem is, people who would never consider themselves bullies, who would never intentionally hurt others, can be drawn into the fray. They may agree with the troll's position, not necessarily the way it was expressed. The troll could be a friend (virtual or real), a relative, or a coworker, but acquaintance is not necessary to gain support. People jump in for myriad reasons.

The opposite of the troll is the cooing elf. Positive posters are motivated by the same phenomena. When the top “elf” loves something, others rush in with praise in their desire to be part of the “in” group. Elves also adopt the opinions and behaviors of their leader.

That is how books that are inherently flawed and barely readable can rise to the top of the NYT bestseller list.

When an elf is attacked by a troll, the battle becomes a free-for-all, dragging in totally innocent bystanders. You end up with a gallows mentality. A faction of the population enjoys a good show, particularly a gruesome one. It is why crowds gather to cheer on combatants when a fight breaks out.


                            But the positive review elves don’t cause any harm, right?

On the contrary, rewarding bad behavior or false praise can be just as toxic as trolling. If friends, family, or total strangers who have never read the book jump in with five-star ratings, it skews public opinion. 

Is there a solution to this problem? 

Not entirely, but there are steps we can take.

It would be nearly impossible to eliminate the cloak of anonymity offered by a virtual world, but attempts are being made to discourage trolls. An administrator can take down any post they consider inappropriate, but how do they decide which posts are “appropriate?” It’s a thin line between abuse and freedom of opinion. You can report abusive messages or direct threats from a troll. The administrators can block the accounts, but that doesn’t keep the troll from assuming a new identity.

If the situation gets stressful, quickest and easiest way to cope is to unplug and refuse to engage. Bullies get bored when they no longer get a rise out of you. You may be tempted to delete your social media accounts. However, authors are encouraged to have a social media presence to market their work, so removing your online presence isn't the best option. Either way, you'll have a hard time getting the troll war erased on review sites. You may need to take a break for a while, until you no longer feel the need to throttle someone.

As for society as a whole, we could aim for higher standards of online behavior:

We can teach our kids (or students) to think for themselves and to consider very carefully before they post anything online.
Stop laughing.

We can teach them to never post a review until they can display a sufficient grasp of the language.
Please, for the love of literacy.

We can encourage civil discourse in all public arenas: the internet, television, radio, the printed press, congress.
I see your smirk.

We can encourage journalistic and reviewer integrity.

I can hear you howling.

We can stop "trading" or writing reviews for books we've never read or refuse to pay for fake reviews and social media "likes." You may mean well, but you are enabling and harming the integrity of the process.

Don't bother sending hate mail.

Short of rewiring human nature, there is no simple solution. We can only change one person's character at a time: our own.

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32. Always Abigail: Review Haiku

Classic middle-grade
about mean girls, nice girls, and
doing the right thing.

Always Abigail by Nancy J. Cavanaugh. Sourcebooks Jabberwocky, 2014, 320 pages.

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33. Review of The Cabinet of Curiosities

bachmann cabinet of curiosities Review of The Cabinet of CuriositiesThe Cabinet of Curiosities:
36 Tales Brief & Sinister

by Stefan Bachmann, Katherine Catmull, Claire Legrand, 
and Emma Trevayne;
illus. by Alexander Jansson
Middle School    Greenwillow    488 pp.
6/14    978-0-06-233105-2    $16.99

Four “curators” — Bachmann, Catmull, Legrand, and Trevayne — travel to lands peregrine and outré to fill their Cabinet of Curiosities museum, sending back grotesqueries and objects of wonder as well as the tales behind them — tales that often bend to the tenebrous and unearthly. The table of contents lists the Cabinet’s “rooms” and “drawers,” each with a theme (cake, luck, tricks, flowers) and four or five tales to explore. In “The Cake Made Out of Teeth” (“collected by” Legrand) a spoiled-rotten boy must finish an entire cake made in his image, despite the sensation of teeth chewing him up with every bite. “Lucky, Lucky Girl” (Catmull) stars a young woman whose good luck seems to depend on the very bad luck of the people around her. In “Plum Boy and the Dead Man” (Bachmann), a rich and opinionated lad has a conversation with a corpse hanging from a tree…and ends up unwillingly changing places with the victim. “The Book of Bones” (Trevayne) features Eleanor Entwhistle, a plucky girl whose courage halts the work of a grave-robbing sorcerer. The stories are remarkable both for their uniformly high quality and for their distinctness from one another; the abundant atmospherics, including occasional stark black-and-white illustrations, provide a unifying sense of dread. The framing device — the curators send letters from the field introducing their latest discoveries — adds depths of mystery, danger, and idiosyncrasy to a book already swimming in each.

From the September/October 2014 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

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34. The Highlights of a Professional Life: An Interview With Ursula Dubosarsky

Ursula Dubosarsky has written over 40 books for children and young adults. Some of which include The Terrible Plop, Too Many Elephants in This House, Tim and Ed (Tim and Ed Review), The Carousel, The Word Spy series, and The Cryptic Casebook of Coco Carlomagno and Alberta series. She is a multi-award winner of many […]

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35. Post-book Publication Awards: 2015 Devil's Kitchen Reading Awards

The Department of English at Southern Illinois University Carbondale and GRASSROOTS,SIUC's undergraduate literary magazine, are pleased to announce the 2015 Devil's Kitchen Reading Awards.  

One book of poetry (book-length work or single-author collection of poems), one book of fiction (novel, novella, or single-author short fiction collection) and one book of prose nonfiction (literary nonfiction, memoir, or single-author essay collection) will be selected from submissions of single-author titles published in 2014, and the winning authors will receive an honorarium of $1000.00 and will present a public reading and participate in panels at the Devil's Kitchen Fall Literary Festival at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois.   

The dates for the 2015 festival will be October 21-23, 2015. Travel and accommodations will be provided for the three winners. 

Entries may be submitted by either author or publisher, and must include a copy of the book, a cover letter, a brief biography of the author including previous publications, and a $20.00 entry fee made out to "SIUC - Dept. of English." Entrants wishing to submit entry fees electronically should e-mail a request to:

grassrootsmagATgmailDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

and they will be sent a link to pay by PayPal or credit card.

Entries must be postmarked December 1, 2014 - February 2, 2015. Materials postmarked after February 1 will be returned unopened. Because we cannot guarantee their return, all entries will become the property of the SIUC Department of English. Entrants wishing acknowledgment of receipt of materials must include a self-addressed stamped postcard.

Judges will come from the faculty of SIUC's MFA Program in Creative Writing and the award winners will be selected by the staff of GRASSROOTS. The winners will be notified in May 2015. All entrants will be notified of the results by e-mail in June 2015.

The three awards are open to single-author titles published in 2014 by independent, university, or commercial publishers. The winners must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents and must agree to attend and participate in the 2015 Devil's Kitchen Fall Literary Festival (October 21-23, 2015) to receive the award. Entries from vanity presses and self-published books are not eligible. Current students and employees at Southern Illinois University Carbondale and authors published by Southern Illinois University Press are not eligible.

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36. Call for Submissions: Beecher's Magazine

Beecher’s Magazine Is Now Open for Submissions

Submission deadline: February 14, 2015

Beecher’s Magazine, an annual print journal produced by graduate students at the University of Kansas, seeks inimitable poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and B&W art for its fifth anniversary issue. For guidelines and to submit your work, visit our Submittable page.

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37. Call for Submissions: Lime Hawk

Lime Hawk Seeks Original Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, and Art for its Winter Issue!

Our Submittable Link.
We look forward to reading your work!

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38. Charting Works in Progress

Chart

I’ve been busy making revisions to my works in progress (nonfiction middle grade and  YA novel). There are lots of ways to use spreadsheets to “see the forest for the trees” when you’re writing, and good thing, because I’m often getting lost in the trees. Or the weeds, maybe.

I used the chart above to help me look at the timeline as it relates to theme in my nonfiction manuscript. (Yes, the picture is blurry on purpose. Call me crazy, but I’m not comfortable sharing THAT much info on a work-in-progress)

Related: a couple of weeks ago I went to a fantastic plotting workshop by Rebecca Petruck. She shared another charting method that I found very helpful. If you ever have the chance to take a workshop from Rebecca, jump at it. More info here about Rebecca and her approach.

Darcy Pattison also has some great ideas on how to use spreadsheets to chart your fiction.

What about you, writers? Do you use spreadsheets to analyze your work, and if so, how?

Currently reading: Michelle Icard‘s Middle School Makeover. No, I don’t have a middle-schooler yet, but I will soon. I am loving Icard’s sensible, practical approach and especially all the science about the adolescent brain.

What about you? Reading anything good?

 

 


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39. Call for Submissions: Mud Season Review

MUD SEASON REVIEW is a community-led literary journal based in Vermont.

We invite strong, deeply human work in fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and art for upcoming issues, and seek to celebrate the writers and artists behind the work. 


For guidelines, visit our website.

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40. Two Girls Staring at the Ceiling: Review Haiku

Innovative and
effective take on
unmentionable disease.

Two Girls Staring at the Ceiling by Lucy Frank. Schwartz + Wade, 2014, 272 pages.

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41. Interesting blog posts about writing – w/e October 24th 2014



Here’s my selection of interesting (and sometimes amusing) posts about writing from the last week:

Body Talk (Debby Harris)
http://bloodredpencil.blogspot.com/2014/10/body-talk.html

This Post is For the Ones You Love (Rachelle Gardner)
www.booksandsuch.com/blog/for-the-ones-you-love/

Everything I Need to Know About Plot, I Learned From Buffy (Dave King)
http://writerunboxed.com/2014/10/21/everything-i-need-to-know-about-plot-i-learned-from-buffy/

Nation or Tribe? (Nyki Blatchley)
http://nyki-blatchley.blogspot.com/2014/10/nation-or-tribe.html

Five Traits to Help You Create Your Character's Personality (Janice Hardy)
http://blog.janicehardy.com/2014/10/five-traits-to-help-you-create-your.html

Deconstructing Micro-Tension (Jan O'Hara)
http://writerunboxed.com/2014/10/20/deconstructing-micro-tension/

How to Write Compelling and Balanced Backstory (Jeni Chappelle)
http://elizabethspanncraig.com/2515/write-compelling-balanced-backstory/

Writing a Smart Query (Janet Kobobel Grant) http://www.booksandsuch.com/blog/writing-smart-query/

Using Critical Reviews as Resources (Elizabeth Spann Craig)
http://elizabethspanncraig.com/2528/using-critical-reviews-resources/

How Did I Find My Clients? (Jennifer Laughran)
http://literaticat.blogspot.com/2014/10/how-did-i-find-my-clients.html

Bad Reviews, or How to Hide the Bodies (Dario Ciriello)
http://blog.janicehardy.com/2014/10/bad-reviews-or-how-to-hide-bodies.html




If you found these useful, you may also like my personal selection of the most interesting blog posts from 2013, and last week’s list.

If you have a particular favorite among these, please let the author know (and me too, if you have time).  Also, if you've a link to a great post that isn't here, feel free to share.

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42. Call for Submissions: The Lindenwood Review

The Lindenwood Review is currently accepting submissions of fiction, poetry, and personal essay for issue 5 through December 15, 2014. We are also accepting submissions for our free flash fiction contest through November 15.  

While current LU MFA students are not eligible, alumni are welcome to submit. 

Please visit our website for full submission guidelines and to read excerpts from previous issues.

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43. Call for Submissions: Prime Number Magazine

Prime Number Magazine is open for submissions! We're especially looking for excellent creative nonfiction (under 5000 words) and short essays (under 1000 words) in addition to short stories (under 5000 words), flash fiction (under 750 words), and poetry. (Book reviews and interviews, too, but query the Books editor first.) In all categories, we're looking for distinctive work. 

Full Submission Guidelines here

And check out our latest issue, #61.

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44. Fat Boy vs. the Cheerleaders: Review Haiku

Never underestimate
the persistence and
power of band nerds.

Fat Boy vs. the Cheerleaders by Geoff Herbach. Sourcebooks Fire, 2014, 320 pages.

0 Comments on Fat Boy vs. the Cheerleaders: Review Haiku as of 10/17/2014 8:46:00 AM
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45. Interjections

Interjections are exclamations or parenthetical words that add color to your dialogue or internal dialogue. They are set off from the rest of the sentence with a comma or set of commas. They can be followed by an exclamation point. However, if the sentence is doing its job, you shouldn't need it.

Interjections express a gamut of emotions: surprise, doubt, fear, anger, hate, happiness, joy, glee, disgust, or sarcasm. They insult, incite, and ignite.

Here are a few examples (minus profanity, which is another topic).

All right
Cool
Far out
As if
Yeh, right
Dig it
Yo
Fair enough
Ouch
Dang it
For real?
Duh
No way
Sure
Yay
Whoot
Hilarious
Screw it
Drat
Yes
Lord have mercy
Meh
Cheers
Ciao
Oops
Oy
Touche
Big whoop
Nope
Nada

My YA series Mythikas Island was set in pre-written-history Greece. Not being able to reach for any of the usual curse words, insults, etc. felt like wearing a straight jacket. I ended up typing *insert insult/curse here* and developing a list of options later.

Here are a few tips when revising:

1.  As you go through your rough draft, it is okay to insert placeholders and fill them in later. You may want to put some thought into the types of insults and interjections you characters will use.

2. It is important that the interjections fit the time and place in a historical novel. Look up the first time your word or phrase was used. Nitpickers love to point out errors.

3. When you write fantasy or science fiction, developing unique interjections helps your story world come alive.

4. Avoid overuse. Strings of expletives or exclamation points are annoying. As you read through your rough draft, highlight the interjections. If you have too many packed together, space them out.

5. You can make them character specific. People living in the same place and time with little exposure to the outside world tend to use the same vocabulary. However, each character can have their favorites or quirks.

6. If you have a diverse cast, each can have their own set of interjections, perhaps in different langauges. Avoid stereotypes. 

7. Avoid clichés . You can twist existing interjections in new ways. 

8. Interjections change as time passes. There is no way to avoid dating your book with them.

9. You can't cut them all. Your story would be lackluster without a few strategically placed verbal punches.

10. They can be used for comic relief. Sometimes after a tense moment, you need a little levity.

If you invent unique injterjections, they may become part of our language or at least the language of your fans. They may even be added to the dictionary. You could be the author of a new catchphrase.

For more information on revision, pick up a copy of:

http://www.amazon.com/Story-Building-Blocks-III-Revision/dp/1475011369

http://www.amazon.com/Story-Building-Blocks-III-Revision-ebook/dp/B007SPPL68


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46. Interesting blog posts about writing – w/e October 17th 2014



Here’s my selection of interesting (and sometimes amusing) posts about writing from the last week:

How to Tell If Your Story Idea Is Mediocre—And How to Improve It (Laurie Scheer)  Jon’s Pick of the week
http://janefriedman.com/2014/10/17/story-idea-mediocre/

Between a Blog and a Hard News Cycle (Porter Anderson)
http://writerunboxed.com/2014/10/17/between-a-blog-and-a-hard-news-cycle/

Query First? The Query as a Plotting Tool (Janice Hardy)
http://blog.janicehardy.com/2009/07/query-first.html

Getting Published: The Genre-Concept Connection (Larry Brooks)
http://storyfix.com/getting-published-genre-concept-connection

Celebrate yourself (Kathleen McCleary)
http://writerunboxed.com/2014/10/15/celebrate-yourself/

Stop Social Media, I Want to Get Off!  (Kerry Gans)
http://authorchronicles.wordpress.com/2014/10/14/stop-social-media-i-want-to-get-off-focusing-your-online-strategy/

Bad Advice (Wendy Lawton)
www.booksandsuch.com/blog/bad-advice/

What You Pay for When You Hire a PR Firm (Sharon Bially)
http://writerunboxed.com/2014/10/13/what-you-pay-for-when-you-hire-a-pr-firm/

How Not to Register Copyright (Victoria Strauss)
http://accrispin.blogspot.com/2014/10/how-not-to-register-copyright.html



If you found these useful, you may also like my personal selection of the most interesting blog posts from 2013, and last week’s list.

If you have a particular favorite among these, please let the author know (and me too, if you have time).  Also, if you've a link to a great post that isn't here, feel free to share.

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47. Emperor Pickletine Rides the Bus: Review Haiku

I don't even want
to think about how bad this
pickle guy must smell.

Emperor Pickletine Rides the Bus by Tom Angleberger. Amulet/Abrams, 2014, 224 pages.

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48. Review of Into the Grey

kiernan into the grey Review of Into the GreyInto the Grey
by Celine Kiernan
Middle School, High School    Candlewick    295 pp.
8/14    978-0-7636-7061-0    $16.99
e-book ed.  978-0-7636-7409-0    $16.99

When their home burns down, twin teens Patrick and Dominick move with their family to the shabby seaside cottage where they usually spend summer holidays. Almost at once, Pat sees that Dom is being haunted by the ghost of a young boy, while Pat himself is visited by nightmares of a soldier drowning in the muddy trenches of World War I. Eventually Dom is utterly possessed by Francis, the ghost of a boy who died of diphtheria decades ago, and Pat is desperate to do what he can to retrieve his brother. Family and local history come together as the twisting plot makes its way toward resolution: another pair of twin brothers, a senile grandmother, Irish lads turned British soldiers, and a series of surreal dreams and psychic landscapes all fall into place. Sometimes Kiernan’s storytelling is fraught and overdrawn; at its best it is confident, pungent, and poetic. Family love, loyalty, and protectiveness are palpable in a well-drawn cast of characters, and the pace is frequently galvanized with energetic drama and dialogue pierced with Irish dialect.

From the September/October 2014 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

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49. Call for Historical Crime and Mystery Fiction Submissions for Anthology: Darkhouse Books

Darkhouse Books seeks stories for an anthology of historical crime and mystery fiction. For the purpose of this anthology we are defining historical fiction as, those works set more than a few decades prior to the present and written by someone without direct experience in the setting and events of the story. But should a truly superb story happen to stray from the above strictures and cross our threshold, we would happily consider it.

The submission period is now open and will remain open through 11:59pm (PST), December 31st, 2014.


We are seeking stories in the 2500 to 7500 word range, though if it’s knockout material, we’ll consider any length.

 
The anthology will contain between twelve and twenty stories, depending on the overall length. Authors will share equally fifty percent of royalties received.

 
We accept MS Word .doc and .docx files. Submissions must be in standard manuscript format. Previously published work will be considered, provided the author has the power to grant us the right to publish in ebook, audio, and print versions, and that it has not been available elsewhere more recently than January 1st, 2014.


Submissions may be sent to:

submissionsATdarkhousebooksDOTcom Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

Please leave “Submission-“ in the subject line and add the name of your story.


Now available "The Anthology of Cozy-Noir"!

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50. Writing Competition: Sequestrum's Editor's Reprint Award

Sequestrum is accepting submissions for our first annual Editor's Reprint Award! For complete guidelines, visit our website.
 

Contest Guidelines:

Open to reprints of fiction and nonfiction in any original format (electronic or print).

One $200 prize plus publication.
One runner-up prize including publication and payment (just above our usual rates). Finalists listed on the site.


$15 entry fee.
Tentative close date of April 30th
. (See site for details)

Include the name and email address of the original publisher in your cover letter.
Length and subject are open.
Submit via our online submission system.
Manuscripts reviewed on a rolling-basis.
Multiple submissions allowed.

No identifying information should be on your manuscript.

Not previously published? No worries! We're always accepting general submissions. Send them here.


About Sequestrum:
We average 1,000+ readers a month, keep our archives free and open to the public, are a paying market, and pair all our publications with stunning visual arts created by outside artists or our staff. Our contributors range from award-winning novelists and poets (with other works featured in publications including The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The American Scholar, The Kenyon Review, many other university periodicals, and Best American Anthologies) to emerging voices and first-time writers.


We're proud of our little plot on the literary landscape and the writers and artists we share it with. Come see why.

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