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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: coretta scott king, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 12 of 12
1. Newbery Surprises

Franki and I had a little email conversation late last week. It went something like this:

She: "Are we ignoring the Newbery this year?"
Me: "Kinda. I'll do a 'Newbery Surprises' post on Tuesday because all the winners will be new to me.

And then the biggest surprise of all:


I've read it three times (self, aloud to fourth graders, aloud to fifth graders).

And right there on my picture book shelf were the Caldecott and several honor books!





There's a Coretta Scott King Author Honor book on my chalktray...


...and we just confirmed the Coretta Scott King Illustrator, Bryan Collier for the 2014 Dublin Literacy Conference.

I listened to the Odyssey Award winning audio book.


This Stonewall honor book is being passed through my two fifth grade classes like wildfire...


...and this one needs to be read by every high school and college student.



Pete the Cat, with his attitude ("Did he cry? Goodness NO!") and his Zen-like reminder that "Buttons come and buttons go," made the Geisel Honor list.


So the biggest surprise that came with this year's ALA Youth Media Awards? How many I know, and own, and love!

For all the winners, check out ALA's Official Press Release.

8 Comments on Newbery Surprises, last added: 1/30/2013
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2. Congrats to our award winners!

We tend to think all of our books are winners and if we could sticker them all we would. But in some special cases, our books get shiny gold and silver medals given by people OTHER THAN US. Today, the ALA announced the 2012 Youth Media Awards, and our books showed up for the occasion! Below is a list of the books, authors, illustrators, and their accolades. Enjoy!

 John Newbery Medal:  Dead End in Norvelt by Jack Gantos

John Newbery Honor:  Breaking Stalin’s Nose by Eugene Yelchin

Randolph Caldecott Honor: Grandpa Green by Lane Smith

Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award: Underground by Shane Evans

YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults: Notorious Benedict Arnold by Steve Sheinkin

Pura Belpre Honor: Hurricane Dancers by Margarita Engel

 

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3. ALA Awards: Coretta Scott King, Schneider, Pura Belpré, Carnegie

There is a lot going on in the kidlitosphere to write about, but for now I’m going back to the ALA Youth Media Awards. There are complete lists everywhere, most notably in that there link, so my post is more about my reactions than any official summary.



Coretta Scott King Book Award
Recognizing an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults


Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award:

Bad News for Outlaws: The Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy U.S. Marshal
by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson
Sorry, I don’t know it.

CSK Author Honor Book:

Mare’s WarMare’s War
by Tanita S. Davis
Holy crap! The winner is a longtime KidLitosphere author and Blogging Friend Forever! This win is right on the money as the book is wonderful. When you hear complaints about African American books only focused on slavery or civil rights, look to Mare’s War as a model for another way to portray the experience of people of color in current and historical times. The positive and strong characters also earned the author an nomination for a NAACP image award. Yeah, Tanita!

Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Book Award:

My People
illustrated by Charles R. Smith Jr., written by Langston Hughes
I saw this as a Cybils Fiction Picture Book nominee, and it didn’t impress me nearly as much as the next book.

CSK Illustrator Honor Book:

The Negro Speaks of RiversThe Negro Speaks of Rivers
illustrated by E. B. Lewis, written by Langston Hughes
I didn’t make any CSK predictions here, but at
6 Comments on ALA Awards: Coretta Scott King, Schneider, Pura Belpré, Carnegie, last added: 1/20/2010
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4. Coretta Scott King Book Awards, 2011

By Bianca Schulze, The Children’s Book Review
Published: January 10, 2011

As announced by the American Library Association (ALA) …

Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award

Recognizing an African American author of outstanding books for children and young adults:

One Crazy Summer,” written by Rita Williams-Garcia is the 2011 King Author Book winner. The book is published by Amistad, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

Three King Author Honor Books were selected:

Lockdown,” by Walter Dean Myers and published by Amistad, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers; “Ninth Ward,” by Jewell Parker Rhodes and published by Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.; and “Yummy: The Last Days of a Southside Shorty,” written by G. Neri, illustrated by Randy DuBurke and published by Lee & Low Books Inc.

Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Book Award

Recognizing an African American illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults:

Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet, Slave,” illustrated by Bryan Collier, is the 2011 King Illustrator Book winner. The book was written by Laban Carrick Hill and published by Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.

One King Illustrator Honor Book was selected:


Jimi Sounds Like a Rainbow: A Story of the Young Jimi Hendrix,” illustrated by Javaka Steptoe, written by Gary Golio and published by Clarion Books, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent (Author) Award


Zora and Me

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5. Top Ten Award Winners On My To-Read List

1. Moon Over Manifest by Clare Vanderpool (Newbery) / I love surprises, and so does the Newbery!  So this underrated debut novel, set in 1930s Kansas, is sure to send booksellers and librarians scrambling to put copies on the shelves.  Can’t wait to see if it lives up to the top dog award!

2. Ship Breaker by Paolo Bacigalupi (Printz) / When it comes to YA, no trend sucks me in more than dystopian fiction.  The story of Nailer, a scavenger who finds a wealthy girl trapped among the wreckage of Gulf Coast oil ships, has intrigued me since it was nominated for a National Book Award.  I’m hoping the action is as gripping and bold as the novel’s graphic cover.

3.  One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams Garcia (Coretta Scott King, Newbery Honor) / If I had to place bets on a winner before the awards came out . . . this would’ve been my pick, because everyone’s been raving about it for ages. And something tells me those 3 sisters on their Brooklyn-to-California adventure are gonna steal my heart too.

4. Dark Emperor and Other Poems Of The Night by Joyce Sidman, illustrated by Rick Allen (Newbery Honor) / Three cheers for a picture book getting a Newbery, not just a Caldecott, Honor!  It’s wonderful to see authors of books for younger readers be recognized, because it’s just as hard to say something beautiful in few words as it is to say in many.

1 Comments on Top Ten Award Winners On My To-Read List, last added: 1/13/2011

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6. Coretta Scott King, Pura Belpré, Schneider

I know. It's way past time to cover these ALA Awards, but I'm kind of doing it more for me than you. So... there. I've decided not to cover the Young Adult awards because I haven't read enough in YA this year to make any thoughtful opinions on the awards.

Let's start with - on a most appropriate day - Coretta Scott King Book Awards recognizing an African American author/illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults. The author winner came as no surprise to anyone paying attention in children's literature for the last year. One Crazy Summer written by Rita Williams-Garcia is well-deserving of the award. Three King Author Honor Books were selected: Lockdown by Walter Dean Myers (haven't read it, but will), Ninth Ward by Jewell Parker Rhodes (read it, liked it), and Yummy: The Last Days of a Southside Shorty written by G. Neri (haven't read it, probably won't).

Coretta Scott King Illustrator Book Award went to Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet, Slave, illustrated by Bryan Collier, apparently the best book you've never read. One King Illustrator Honor Book was selected: Jimi Sounds Like a Rainbow: A Story of the Young Jimi Hendrix, illustrated by Javaka Steptoe. I'm sorry, but I haven't seen this either. I wish Ruth and the Green Book had made one of these two lists. A missed opportunity to expose kids to a different topic in the Civil Rights period - that of the African-American motorist. (Read the book.)

Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent (Author) Award went to Zora and Me written by Victoria Bond and T. R. Simon and the Illustrator Award went to Seeds of Change, illustrated by Sonia Lynn Sadler, written by Jen Cullerton Johnson. Haven't read the first, liked the second.

Pura Belpré (Author) Award honoring a Latino writer whose children’s books best portray, affirm and celebrate the Latino cultural experience. The winner was The Dreamer, written by Pam Muñoz Ryan. The three honor books were ¡Olé! Flamenco, written and illustrated by George Ancona, The Firefly Letters: A Suffragette’s Journey to Cuba written by Margarita Engle, and 90 Miles to Havana written by Enrique Flores-Galbis. I've read none of these. Sorry.

I had better luck with the Pura Belpré Illustrator Awards. While I have not seen the winner, Grandma’s Gift illustrated and written by Eric Velasquez, I have read all three of the honor books. They are Fiesta Babies, illustrated by Amy Córdova, written by Carmen Tafolla; Me, Frida, illustrated by David Diaz, written by Amy Novesky; and Dear Primo: A Letter to My Cousin, illustrated and written by Duncan Tonatiuh. I didn't particularly like the illustrations of Fiesta Babies or Dear Primo, but Me, Frida is gorgeous.

The Schneider Family Book Award is given for books that embody an artistic expression of the disability experience. The Pirate of Kindergarten written by George Ella Lyon, illustrated by Lynne Avril wins the award for children ages 0 to 10. After Ever After written by Jordan Sonnenblick is the winner of the middle-school (ages 11-13), and the teen (ages 13-18) award winner is Five Flavors of Dumb, written by Antony John. I like how this category is divided by age group. I've read and like the first two, and plan to read the teen title.

So, that wraps it up for me for another year. I have a lot of catching up to do on the award reading, because I didn't get to many of the books selected this year. Better luck for 2011.

3 Comments on Coretta Scott King, Pura Belpré, Schneider, last added: 1/18/2011
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7. Black Threads in Kid's LIt:

2009 Coretta Scott King Awards - Another Year of Mock Silence?
cover illustration by Cozbi A. Cabrera

1 Comments on Black Threads in Kid's LIt:, last added: 1/4/2009
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8. Review: Coretta Scott

There is so much about this book to like. With poetry by Ntozake Shange and illustrated by Kadir Nelson, this mini biography of Coretta Scott King is direct, simple, and inspirational.

Kadir Nelson's paintings are absolutely luminous. Full of light and emotion, the faces in particular tell a deep and moving story of the life journey of these characters. I was fortunate enough to hear Kadir speak about his work several years ago at a conference and learned that for much of his work, he paints life-size portraits. The figures in his books are always so impactful that there must be some magic in this method because his paintings are always so evocative.

Ntozake Shange's poetry does not disappoint. Deceptively, simple, there are layers of meaning in her carefully crafted words. The book's organization is in short vignettes that capture the various stages of Coretta's life. You can feel the pain and the hope of Coretta and her siblings as they walk the five miles to school each day with the dust of the white children's bus in their faces. Each verse is wonderful in its own way. This is one of my favorites:

over years
learning and freedom
took hold of Coretta's soul
til she knew in her being
that the Good Lord intended freedom
for the Negro.

At the end of the book there is a factual biography of Coretta's life that honors Coretta for the work that she did with her husband, Martin Luther King, and on her own after his death.

This book is a wonderful introduction to one of the great American stories of the 20th century.

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9. Shadra Strickland

The Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe Award Winner for New Talent and the Ezra Jack Keats New Illustrator of 2009. See Ms. Strickland's portfolio here. (And see Everybody Got Their Somethin’)

0 Comments on Shadra Strickland as of 2/20/2009 12:37:00 PM
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10. Celebrating the Coretta Scott King Book Awards in DC

Children's Book Guild Luncheon 2009Recently, I had the pleasure of attending a luncheon held by the Children’s Book Guild of Washington, DC. Established in 1945, the Children’s Book Guild (of which I am a member) is a professional organization of authors, illustrators, and specialists in children’s literature.

The luncheon was held in celebration of the 40th Anniversary of the Coretta Scott King Book Awards. The speakers were author and editor Andrea Davis Pinkney, honorary co-chair of the 40th birthday celebration of the Coretta Scott King (CSK) Book Awards, and Guild member Deborah Taylor, the current chair of the award committee. Pinkney and Taylor talked about the history and winners of these prestigious awards, which recognize outstanding children’s books by African Americans.

As an added bonus, Caldecott Honor and Coretta Scott King Award-winning author and illustrator Kadir Nelson also attended the luncheon, as did Sharon Robinson, author and daughter of baseball legend Jackie Robinson.  Nelson and Robinson brought along copies of their gorgeous new book, Testing the Ice: A True Story About Jackie Robinson.  It was truly an inspiring event for all of us!

0 Comments on Celebrating the Coretta Scott King Book Awards in DC as of 10/8/2009 9:35:00 AM
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11. The Coretta Scott King Book Award Online Curriculum Resource Center

link: multimedia, online database

0 Comments on The Coretta Scott King Book Award Online Curriculum Resource Center as of 1/1/1900
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12. 2010 ALA Winners

Earlier this morning at the ALA Midwinter Conference in Boston, the 2010 ALSC media award winners were announced.

ala_awards

The Lion and the Mouse illustrated (and written) by Jerry Pinkney won the Caldecott medal, which is given to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children. This book was a stand-out favorite, but what is so special is that Pinkney is the first African-American to win this award so this is fantastic!

When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead won the Newbery award, which is given to the to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children. This book was the winner in many mock Newbery awards, so it was the stand-out favorite to win.

Goving Bovine by Libba Bray won the Printz award, which is given a book that exemplifies literary excellence in young adult literature. This was a dark horse that surprised some people, but since its publication this book has always received Printz buzz.

The winners of the Coretta Scott King Awards were also announced this morning.

csk_awards

Bad News for Outlaws: The Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy U.S. Marshal by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson won the author award, which is which is given to African American author for an outstandingly inspirational and educational contribution.

My People by Charles R. Smith Jr. won the illustrator award, which is given to African American illustrator for an outstandingly inspirational and educational contribution.

The Rock and The River by Kekla Magoon won the the John Steptoe Award for New Talent, which is given to to affirm new talent and to offer visibility to excellence in writing and/or illustration.

There were also many other awards given out as well as honor books in each award category. Publisher Weekly has an award round-up as well as the ALSC website.

1 Comments on 2010 ALA Winners, last added: 1/18/2010
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