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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Jillian Tamaki, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 15 of 15
1. Your Dreams, My Nightmares interview


While in NY for the SCBWI conference, I snuck away to spend a bit of time with two of my art homies, Jillian Tamaki and Sam Weber. They ambushed me and forced me into recording an episode of Your Dreams My Nightmares. You may listen to the hilarity here.

Please, let me apologize for a huge faux pas. Lift Every Voice and Sing was written by James Weldon Johnson. I mistakenly said that it was Langston Hughes during the interview.

From the site:
Your Dreams My Nightmares is an audio side project hosted by Sam Weber
Your Dreams My Nightmares is available as a free podcast via itunes.
Your Dreams My Nightmares is on Sound Cloud.
You can follow us on facebook and Twitter

For the time being any inquiries can be directed to (917) 719-0086

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2. Jillian Tamaki takes my breath away. In her words: A 6-page...



Jillian Tamaki takes my breath away. In her words:

A 6-page visual essay for Print Magazine’s “Trash” issue. Over about four weeks in April, I surveyed lost, abandoned, and discarded items on three blocks surrounding my apartment in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. The “trash” ranged from the mundane to the bizarre to the seemingly-poetic.

Click through to see the full post, which is beautifully drawn, beautifully painted, and beautifully paced. *sigh*



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3. Jillian Tamaki’s Super Mutant Magic Academy is my...



Jillian Tamaki’s Super Mutant Magic Academy is my favourite thing on the Internet.

mutantmagic:

Art Project



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4. Weekend reading: SuperMutant Magic Academy

201203231814 Weekend reading: SuperMutant Magic Academy

How on earth have we somehow never noticed Jillian Tamaki’s webcomic SuperMutant Magic Academy? It’s a bit of a dark look at the mutant/magic academy genre. You know, Ronald Searle for the Hunger Games generation.

She’s made a mini comic with added strips but it’s already sold out. She assures us more is coming. More had better be.

1 Comments on Weekend reading: SuperMutant Magic Academy, last added: 3/25/2012
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5. mattforsythe: Supermutant Magic Academy Fan Comic. I made this...



mattforsythe:

Supermutant Magic Academy Fan Comic.

I made this fan-fic comic for one of my favourite webcomics ever made - Jillian Tamaki’s Supermutant Magic Academy.

It’s kind of a reverse nod to the character Everlasting Boy, who might be the only webcomic character who’s actually made me think pretty hard about how I am living my life.

YES YES YES. Panel #4: I love you. 



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6. Oh man. Jillian Tamaki’s Supermutant Magic Academy just...



Oh man. Jillian Tamaki’s Supermutant Magic Academy just keeps getting better. Nothing else like it!



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7. On Drawing Animals by Jillian Tamaki

It takes restraint not to re-post everything Jillian writes on her blog over here. But take a moment to check out her advice on drawing animals in this post – “There is no formula to trick to drawing animals, or anything else for that matter. Only observation (ideally from life) and practice will give you a fundamental understanding of structure and form.”

Check Jillian’s illustration gallery here to see how uses animals in her illustrations regularly to evoke motion and emotion to great effect.


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8. Now let us praise famous jacket artists – 2010

Due to the sheer proliferation of book jackets featuring photographs rather than illustrations, I think the time is right to offer a little ode of praise to our brave illustrators who work so hard to give us great illustrated chapter book covers.  In an age when it feels like all the teen covers are dedicated to giving us variations on the same theme, it’s refreshing to consider that some artists do more than just Photoshop a girl’s dress from pink to blue.

That said, sometimes it’s hard to tell who the cover artist is on an individual book.  A lot of galleys and advanced readers copies may refuse to mention the jacket artist’s name, perhaps because they are reserving the right to choose a different cover at any time. As for the artists themselves, they’re not usually all that prompt with their online portfolios.  With that in mind, these are the only artists I could think of off the top of my head that are doing more than one chapter book cover in the year 2010.  If you can think of someone I’ve missed (or can identify another 2010 cover that is by an artist listed here) please let me know and I’ll add them as time permits.

Scott Altmann

Here’s a guy that sneaks up on you.  You don’t notice him for a while and then BLAMMO!  The dude seems to be everywhere.  This year Altmann’s been impressing youngsters with …

The Smoky Corridor by Chris Grabenstein:

The Death Defying Pepper Roux by Geraldine McCaughrean:

The Shadow Hunt by Katherine Langrish:

The Ring of Five by Eoin McNamee:

On the other side of the pond Altmann gets his own fair share of work.  I was pleased as punch, for example, to see that they had reissued Astrid Lindgren’s Ronia the Robber’s Daughter over there this year.

Not that I don’t still love the original Trina Schart Hyman illustrations from over here.

While fellow artist Brandon Dorman does the Fablehaven books in the States, Altmann is doing them in the UK.  He’s also doing the Charlie Bone series over there as well.  All the more interesting that he didn’t do the UK versi

13 Comments on Now let us praise famous jacket artists – 2010, last added: 8/30/2010
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9. YA Lit Symposium Pre-Conference: On Beyond Stonewall

The morning began with Michael Cart giving an overview of some of the important social and political events related to LGBTQ issues. Next, Cart and Christine Jenkins presenting a list of all of the books with LGBTQ content from 1969 to 2010. They booktalked many of these, highlighting some trends (resolution by automobile crash, melodrama, impossibly good looking gay men and the women who love them), the breakthrough books, and the real dingers. It was like being back in library school, taking a class on LGBTQ YA Lit, but it was compressed. If you want to spend more time with these books and these issues, check out Cart and Jenkins’ book from Scarecrow Press, The Heart Has It’s Reasons.

If you get your hands on their bibliography and were not in attendance, please note that this is not a list of recommended books. Some are good and some are not so good. During introductions, we each chose books from the list to highlight. Boy Meets Boy by David Levithan and Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green and Levithan got the most nods, along with the graphic novel Skim by Mariko Tamaki and Jillian Tamaki. Please add your own recommendations in the comments.

After lunch of sandwiches and delicious chocolate cupcakes, there was an author panel consisting of: Lauren Bjorkman, Kirstin Cronn-Mills, Malinda Lo, and Megan Frazer (hey, that’s me!). We talked about what brought us to write our books, the challenges we faced, and what we hope to see in the future. We compiled a list of links that are on Malinda’s site.

After the author panel, I had to dash to the Body Positivity and Fat Acceptance in Contemporary YA Fiction pre-conference (which I hope someone else blogs about, because when I came in they were sharing some awesome ideas and resources), so I cannot give a first-person account of the breakouts that occurred — if anyone else would like to chime in, please do.

If you are in Albuquerque but missed the pre-conference, you can still hear about LGBTQ issues today at 1:30 at the breakout session: The New Gay Teen: Moving Beyond the Issue Novel.

bookmark bookmark

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10. Jillian Tamaki reminds us there was a time when Maclean’s...



Jillian Tamaki reminds us there was a time when Maclean’s actually used illustrations on their covers (this cover was by Oscar Cahen). I don’t think I’ve ever seen them use an illustrated cover in my 41 years. (By the way, this is me dropping a gigantic hint to whomever is the Art Director there right now.)



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11. “Count Me in Kids” Interview and stuff…

A few things, first, check out the interview I did with Casey Ahn over at Count Me in Kids, a new blog whose goal is to empower the next generation of Asian-American children by exposing them to books, artwork, television programming and movies that reflect their faces and their lives. Casey featured my work last month and I chimed in to say thanks. She then asked for an interview; we chatted on the phone for about half an hour and the rest is history. The interview is very concise as she was typing as I talked, and I am impressed to see that all of the bases were covered! Thanks Casey for taking the time to share my work with your readers~ Stop on over and share your thoughts with her.

Secondly, a big THANKS to Jules over at Seven-Imp for sharing my “Spring Splash” print on her blog. Check that out along with the work of Amy Shimler. You’re in for a real treat.

Lastly, Stone Mountain Patch is stopping by the studio today. Look for that interview soon~

In non-Shadra related news, a big congratulations goes out to Jillian Tamaki for her AMAZING Penguin Threads Deluxe Classics. Here is one of the covers taken from her blog. Head on over to her sketchblog to see the rest and how she did them. They’re awesome.

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12. Nice Art: Best American Comics 2011 cover by Jillian Tamaki

201104151154.jpg
This year’s edition of the compendium is guest-edited by Alison Bechdel, with series editors Jessica Abel and Matt Madden. Pre-order here.
Via

3 Comments on Nice Art: Best American Comics 2011 cover by Jillian Tamaki, last added: 4/15/2011
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13. A Century Later: The Secret Garden

Illustrated by Robert Ingpen, Sterling, $19.95 (hbk)
Frances Hodgson Burnett's beloved tale of a neglected girl and the secret garden that transforms her life and the lives of her uncle and ill cousin turns 100 this year.

Published in 1911, The Secret Garden is the story of 10-year-old Mary Lennox, who goes to live with her reclusive uncle after her parents' death and restores a garden that inspires them all.

As she tends the garden, Mary transforms from a standoffish, sour girl who never knew love to a caring niece who helps her uncle overcome grief and her unhappy cousin find the hope to get better.

In celebration of its centennial year, I've posted two beautiful new editions of the book, one illustrated by the inimitable Robert Ingpen and the other with cover art by needlepoint artist Jillian Tamaki, along with favorite quotes and a fun fact.

Both of the following quotes are from Chapter 23, "Magic," after the garden comes alive and Mary, her friend Dickon and her wheelchair-bound cousin Colin are brimming with joy at seeing the plants burst to life:

Cover embroidery by Jillian Tamaki, Penguin, $16 (pbk)
The first describes the return of roses to the secret garden and echoes the positive feelings growing inside Mary and Colin as each realizes that thinking good thoughts can makes their lives happier.

"Rising out of the grass, tangled round the sun-dial, wreathing the tree trunks

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14. "Think about the marks you want to make on the paper in front of you… the ones that bring you..."

“Think about the marks you want to make on the paper in front of you… the ones that bring you pleasure and satisfaction. You can’t control what other people think or if they’ll give you a job. You can only control your own actions and the work you produce. You have to be a little delusional to pursue a life in the arts, so throw caution to the wind and make pictures that excite you and hopefully the world will agree.”

- Some great illustration advice and questions answered for students (and non-students) in Jillian Tamaki’s new FAQ

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15. Jillian Tamaki: Thoughts on a sketchbook

sketch483-727996

Jillian Tamaki offers up some fine advice on keeping a sketchbook:

Your personal work (sketchbook) and jobs (projects) are not separate. Your sketchbook work should be experimental and free and represent what truly interests YOU. Discoveries made in your sketchbook can and should find their way into your paid work.

More on her site: Thoughts on a sketchbook.

Previously:

Where do you get your ideas?

2 Comments on Jillian Tamaki: Thoughts on a sketchbook, last added: 7/22/2009
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