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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: roberts snow, Most Recent at Top [Help]
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1. The Snow Party

by Beatrice de Regniers1959 Pantheon edition illustratedby Reiner Zimnik1989 Lothrop, Lee & Shepard editionillustrated by Bernice MyersToday, a little compare and contrast between two editions of the same book separated by three decades.Snowed in on and old farmhouse in the Dakotas, a lonely woman begins to fantasize about having a little company. The man, her husband, points out that they don't

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2. The Muse atop my tree

Remember the beautiful snowflake painted by Inga Poslitur that I won at auction last year? Here she is,  crowning my tabletop tree:



Merry Christmas and a peaceful and inspired New Year to you all. 

I'll be on a blog break for awhile.

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3. Robert's Snow: In Memory and Gratitude


Today, on the first anniversary of the death of Grace Lin's husband Robert Mercer, I wanted to write up a post about a very special gift I received in the mail from illustrator Annie Patterson last December. Annie was one of approximately two hundred children’s picture book illustrators who created beautiful snowflakes for the 2007 Robert’s Snow auctions that raised money for the Jimmy Fund and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. I fell in love with Annie’s snowflake of a young girl holding a white rabbit painted on the background of a snowy winter scene.


Annie, who lives in Alaska, is the illustrator of Whale Snow, which was written by Debby Dahl Edwardson. Fortunately for me, I won Annie’s snowflake in the auction. After learning I had won her beautiful work of art, I left the following comment at this post on her blog Imagine and Create:



Annie,

I am one happy lady. I won your snowflake yesterday! I knew I wanted it when I first saw it in the exhibit at the Child at Heart Gallery in October. I'm giving it to myself for Christmas.

Thank you so much for helping with Robert's Snow this year--and for making such a beautiful snowflake!!!


Soon after I left my comment, Annie emailed me and asked for my address. Then she sent me a gift: her original pencil sketch for the snowflake.



I was so touched by Annie Patterson's thoughtful gesture--as I was by the generosity of all the artists who contributed their talents to the Robert’s Snow campaign to raise money for cancer research--and as I was by all the kidlit bloggers who helped to spread word about the auctions, especially the fine ladies of 7-Imp…who went above and beyond the call of duty.

Jules & Eisha of 7-Imp

(Click here for a list of the artists and links to the illustrators’ Robert’s Snow features at different blogs.)

Today, I also want to send my heartfelt thanks to Annie Patterson and all of the artists who created snowflakes for the Robert’s Snow auctions in 2004, 2005, and 2007, to Jules and Eisha and all the of the bloggers who helped in our efforts to raise money for the Jimmy Fund and Dana-Farber, and to all of you out there who bid in the auctions.

And today, in memory of my dear friend Robert Mercer, I am re-posting a poem I wrote especially for him.

Things to Do If You Want to Be a Snowflake
by Elaine Magliaro

Fashion yourself:

a bit of lace,

crystalline,

spun in space

of silken ice,

silvery,

fine—

YOU

C R E A T E

your

own

design.

Thank you, everyone.

Robert Mercer and Grace Lin

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4. Good Work, People.

A big thank you to everyone who bid on a Robert's Snow snowflake (whether you won an auction or not). My unscientific observation of the bids seems to indicate the auction was successful. And now...Go, Science!

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5.

Week three for Robert's Snow


This is your last chance to catch your own snowflake. All the proceeds will go to the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Bidding starts today and ends Friday, 7th December at 5pm. Robert's Snow

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6. Hooray for Hanukkah!

Click the play button on this flash player to listen to the podcast now:


Or click MP3 File to start your computer's media player.

SHOW NOTES:

This episode marks the 2nd year anniversary of The Book of Life! In this show, we celebrate the holiday of Hanukkah.

> Illustrator Ann Koffsky describes her snowflake "Jerusalem of Peace," created for Robert's Snow for Cancer's Cure. We also learn about her illustrations for My Cousin Tamar Lives in Israel by Michelle Shapiro Abraham, and her new Joyfully Jewish 2008 calendar.

> Author Sarah Marwil Lamstein and illustrator Neil Waldman discuss their picture book Letter on the Wind: A Chanukah Tale.

> Kenny Ellis, cantor and performer, riffs on his CD Hanukkah Swings! You can also check out Kenny's MySpace page, and download "Swingin' Dreidel" as a ringtone.

> Author Barbara Bietz talks about her chapter book Like a Maccabee, as well as her kidlit blog and her new position on the Sydney Taylor Book Award Committee, where she'll help choose the best Judaic children's books of the year.

NEWS:

Here is a special Hanukkah treat for you: a complete online version of the holiday classic, Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins by Eric A. Kimmel, provided by Lookybook. To hear from Eric himself about the inspiration for Hershel, you can read this post from my Library Blogathon or you can listen to the very first episode of The Book of Life from December 2005, when Eric was a featured guest. Enjoy!




Background music is provided by The Freilachmakers Klezmer String Band.

Books and CD's mentioned on the show may be borrowed from the Feldman Children's Library at Congregation B'nai Israel. Browse our online catalog to reserve books, post a review, or just to look around!


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7. Robert's Snow Auction 3!! Bid! Win! Fight!


The third and final auction for Robert's Snow 2007 starts this MONDAY, DECEMBER 3 and ends FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7 at 5PM!!! Check out the original works of art that can be all yours... just for fighting cancer...HERE!

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8.

Robert's Snow auction week two

Here is another chance to own unique pieces of artwork created by children's illustrators. All the proceeds got to the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Happy bidding: Robert's Snow

Things have been pretty quiet around here - lot's and lot's of work to do. Lately, I have been listening to Librivox while I paint. Volunteers have recorded books for your listening pleasure. I get completely transported while I paint. So far, I have got through Jane Eyre, Little Women and The Secret Garden. Some books are read by just one person and others can have each chapter read by a different person, so it can make for entertaining listening.

In between work, I have been trying to do a little Christmas shopping on Etsy. I haven't got time to make any of my own gifts this year or to go shopping. There is such a wide of variety of unique and lovely things to choose from, and I can browse while I am sitting in my cosy house. I just have to remember that I am shopping for other people and not for myself!

And it was exciting to see our book in the Scholastic flyer today!

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9. Robert's Snow - Let's Get Bidding!

It's time for auction one! Can you stand it? Check out the links to the previews of the snowflakes, and start the bidding, folks!

Auction 1 will begin accepting bids on Monday, Nov. 19 at 9:00 a.m. with a starting bid of $50 for each snowflake. All bids must be placed before the close of Auction 1 on Friday, Nov. 23 at 5:00 pm. Don't forget that 100 percent of the proceeds from this online auction will benefit sarcoma research at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and that all but $25 of the winning bid is tax deductible.

Read about all the illustrators who contributed to this auction at the sites linked below. (The order presented is the same as on the auction page.)



  • Julie Fromme Fortenberry at Your Neighborhood Librarian
  • Sharon Vargo
  • Abigail Marble
  • Marion Eldridge at Chicken Spaghetti
  • Chris Gall at Through the Studio Door
  • Annette Simon at Check It Out and Deo Writer
  • Rolandas Kiaulevicius at a wrung sponge
  • Paige Keiser at Your Neighborhood Librarian
  • Tracy McGuinness-Kelly at Sam Riddleburger's blog
  • Jeannie Brett at cynthialord’s Journal
  • Peter Emmerich at Loree Griffin Burns: A Life in Books
  • Anna Dewdney at Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast
  • Erik Brooks at Bildungsroman
  • Joan Waites
  • Patrick Girouard at Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast
  • Yuyi Morales at Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast
  • Jennifer Thermes at Through the Studio Door
  • Liza Woodruff at Check It Out
  • Ilene Richard at Something Different Every Day
  • Molly Idle at The Shady Glade
  • Leanne Franson at Just Like the Nut
  • Anni Matsik at A Sound From My Heart
  • Inga Poslitur
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    10. It's Bidding Time! Robert's Snow

    It's time to start bidding on the Robert's Snow Snowflakes!

    Here are the links that showcase the snowflakes for Auction One!

    Auction 1 will begin accepting bids on Monday, Nov. 19 at 9:00 a.m. with a starting bid of $50 for each snowflake. All bids must be placed before the close of Auction 1 on Friday, Nov. 23 at 5:00 pm. Don't forget that 100 percent of the proceeds from this online auction will benefit sarcoma research at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and that all but $25 of the winning bid is tax deductible.

    Read about all the illustrators who contributed to this auction at the sites linked below. (The order presented is the same as on the auction page.)



  • Julie Fromme Fortenberry at Your Neighborhood Librarian
  • Sharon Vargo
  • Abigail Marble
  • Marion Eldridge at Chicken Spaghetti
  • Chris Gall at Through the Studio Door
  • Annette Simon at Check It Out and Deo Writer
  • Rolandas Kiaulevicius at a wrung sponge
  • Paige Keiser at Your Neighborhood Librarian
  • Tracy McGuinness-Kelly at Sam Riddleburger's blog
  • Jeannie Brett at cynthialord’s Journal
  • Peter Emmerich at Loree Griffin Burns: A Life in Books
  • Anna Dewdney at Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast
  • Erik Brooks at Bildungsroman
  • Joan Waites
  • Patrick Girouard at Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast
  • Yuyi Morales at Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast
  • Jennifer Thermes at Through the Studio Door
  • Liza Woodruff at Check It Out
  • Ilene Richard at Something Different Every Day
  • Molly Idle at The Shady Glade
  • Leanne Franson at Just Like the Nut
  • Anni Matsik at A Sound From My Heart
  • Inga Poslitur
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    11. Robert’s Snow profile: Tim Coffey


    Tim Coffey is the latest Albert Whitman illustrator to be featured online for the annual Robert’s Snow art fundraiser. Tim illustrated the award-winning books Red Berry Wool, by Robyn Eversole, and Mabela the Clever, by Margaret Read MacDonald. He also wrote and illustrated Christmas at the Top of the World, and if something about his style looks familiar, it’s because he also has a line of scrapbooking products. Today he’s being profiled by Pam Calvert at her blog The Silver Lining.

    Once again, the Robert’s Snow auctions begin November 19th, and we’ll let you know when you can bid on snowflakes by your favorite Albert Whitman illustrators to raise money for cancer research.

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    12. Robert’s Snow profile: Diane Greenseid


    Last week the children’s book podcast Just One More Book talked to Diane Greenseid about her contribution to the Robert’s Snow art fundraiser. Diane is the illustrator of Teeny Weeny Bop by Margaret Read MacDonald and Waynetta and the Cornstalk by Helen Ketteman, and she has a great blog, too.  She painted her snowflake back in July—children’s book illustrators are always having to conjure up different seasons—and she discussed the process and showed her sketches in this fun entry.  Listen to the podcast to hear her talk about Robert’s Snow, working under pressure, “singing colors,” and more.

    We’ll be posting more about other Albert Whitman illustrators participating in Robert’s Snow as they’re profiled around the web. The auctions to buy these terrific snowflakes and raise money for cancer research begins November 19th.

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    13. Robert's Snow - Adam Rex!

    Behold J.Lo, in all his snowflakey glory!

    Adam Rex is on of the illustrators who has donated a snowflake to the wonderful Robert's Snow auction to benefit the Dana-Faber Cancer Institute. He happens to be one of my favourite illustrators, and I was very happy that I snagged him when the ladies over at Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast (also big fans...see here and here) were organizing this whole affair!




    I think I first came to Adam Rex's work through Frankenstein Makes a Sandwich. The second I spied the cover, I knew I had to have it. As a collector of Halloween picture books, I was so pleased not only with the art, but with the smart and funny poetry within. It's a killer for my Halloween read alouds with all kids loving the illustrations, and the kids with that sense of humour (you know the ones) splitting their sides over the content.

    My next encounter (after searching for more) was with the Lucy Rose series. An early chapter book, featuring a feisty protagonist (what's not to love?). After that, I just wanted to read, and own everything. Fandom? Maybe...but I have yet to be disappointed.

    Adam graciously agreed to answer some of my questions, as well as some questions from The True Meaning of Smekday loving kids at my school. So here we go.

    Stacy: How did you get involved with Robert's Snow?

    Adam: They tracked my email address down and got in touch in 2005–I think Grace Lin had seen my first book, The Dirty Cowboy (written by Amy Timberlake), and thought my work would compliment the collection.

    Stacy: Did you always know that you wanted to be an illustrator? How did you figure out that writing and illustrating for children was for you?

    Adam: I always knew I wanted to be an artist of some kind. I didn't think about writing and illustrating kids' books until I was in my teens, and working in a bookstore. When I became familiar with some of the titles coming out in the late eighties like The True Story of the Three Little Pigs! and A Day With Wilbur Robinson, I realized there was a place for my sense of humor, and for the sort of art I wanted to make.

    Stacy: How long were you cooking up The True Meaning of Smekday?

    Adam: Oh, off and on for four or five years. At first it was just the fun project I worked on when I wanted to avoid my real work. So I started slowly. Then my agent sold it based on maybe the first third, and I worked more in earnest then. But I think some of the ideas go back further than that–I've long thought an alien invasion would be a good way to address our own history.

    Stacy: How did you come up with the Boov Speak? I found that when I was reading Smekday, Boov speak stayed in my brain quite easily. Did you find yourself rearranging your words while you were writing?

    Adam: Boovspeak comes kind of naturally to me–it's kind of an exaggeration of how I talk when I'm being lazy and there isn't anyone but my wife and me around. As I was working on Smekday I reached a point at which J.Lo's (my Boov's) speech came as quickly for me as did any other character's. I have not had for writing this way recentlies, so I am possibly notso much a Boovspeak Superstar as to before now. Hm.

    Stacy: My students were asking about the "secret cover" on Smekday. The dust jacket image is different than the image that is physically on the book. What's the story?

    Adam: No big story, really - I just came up with a number of images that I thought would make different covers for the book, and wanted to use as many of them as possible. People can peruse my July postings on my blog to see a little of how the cover evolved. I don't like to waste ideas, so I stuck runner-up covers beneath the dust jacket and on the title page. My books Tree Ring Circus and Frankenstein Makes a Sandwich have "secret covers" as well, for various reasons.

    Stacy: I have read that there is a sequel to Frankenstein Makes a Sandwich in the works. How is that going? Is the writing process for a collection of poetry vastly different than for a picture book?

    Adam: It's written! Now I'm just figuring out the art. It will be called Frankenstein Takes the Cake. I've reported in other places that I thought it was going to be called Frankenstein Makes a Sequel

    , but I was eventually talked out of that.
    Writing in rhyme is different from writing prose, of course, for obvious reasons. Otherwise, writing something like one of my Frankenstein books is, in a way, like writing a number of rhyming picture books at once. Many of the poems in FMaS could have been expanded into full-length books if I'd thought that was the best way to present them.

    Stacy: And here are some questions from my students who have been reading and loving The True Meaning of Smekday...

    From an 8th grade reader: When you wrote the book, and didn't tell the readers some of the horrors of the aliens, did you know yourself? Or was it a mystery to you as well as the reader?

    Adam: I don't know what details you're thinking about specifically, but I can definitely say that some things in Smekday were as much a mystery to me as I wrote as they will be to my readers. I wrote a lot without knowing exactly where the story was going, or how it would end, and trusted that I would figure it out eventually. That meant I had to go back from time to time and change some passages I'd written earlier so they'd fall in line with some plot detail I'd only just discovered. I didn't know at first, for example, that Gorg is not the name of the alien race, but rather that every member of the race is named Gorg. But it struck me at some point that having your planet invaded by, say, the Todd (a huge group of people who are all named Todd) or whatever would be funny.

    From a 7th grade reader: How did you think of the characters and planets in The True Meaning of Smekday?

    Adam: I thought a lot and drew a lot. When I felt like I had a good idea what the aliens were going to look like, their appearance helped me figure out what kind of people they were.

    From another 7th grade reader: This book has so many characters and contraptions...it had a crazy plot. What or where did all of those ideas come from?

    Adam: I was inspired by a lot of other books and movies and so forth, particularly the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy trilogy by Douglas Adams. But my ideas come from the same kind of places everyone's ideas come from -- you all the stories you've read, the movies and TV shows you've seen, things other people have old you, then maybe you mix it up with some other stories and ideas that don't seem to have anything to do with the first stories and ideas, then you run it all through the dirty coffee filter of your brain and, if you're lucky, it comes out looking and smelling like something brand new.

    Stacy: Since it's Halloween and all, could you let us in on your favourite candy? Is it the same as when you were young or has your palate evolved?

    Adam: I like gummi a lot these days, and it didn't really exist in America, as far as I knew, when I was a little kid. My earliest memories of Gummi Bears are from 6th or 7th grade. And yet Wikipedia tells me they've been around since the twenties. I don't know. I also love good dark chocolate, which as a kid I lumped in the same category as wine or coffee or kissing in movies -- things that only the mental illness of adulthood could cause you to like. When I was a kid I liked Butterfingers.


    If you just can't stand it and you need some more, Adam Rex can be found all over the web. Here's a list of a few of the places that I found!

    Adam Rex

    Smekday

    Ironic Sans

    Nerds with Kids

    The ARTDEPARTMENT

    Chicken Nugget Lemon Tooty

    And for the CONTEST! Just use the comments to tell me what YOUR favourite Adam Rex title is, and you will be in the running for a brand new shiny hardcover copy of The True Meaning of Smekday! Woot!

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    14. 465 Robert's Snow Posts so Far!

    Wow! We're nearing the end of week 2 of the fantastic multi-blog effort promoting the Robert's Snow Auction. I just did a search for Robert's Snow in the JacketFlap Blog Reader, and there have been an incredible 465 blog posts mentioning Robert's Snow. As many of you know, there are 4 to 5 regularly scheduled "official" blog posts across the kidlitosphere featuring the work of the wonderful illustrators contributing snowflakes to this year's auction. But 465 blog posts means that this effort has inspired numerous other people to blog about Robert's Snow, and that's really fantastic!

    Click here to search for Robert's Snow in our Blog Reader and read the 465 blog posts for yourself. I'm sure you've read many of these posts, but as you can see, there are plenty to read. Have a great weekend!

    Tracy

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    15. Robert's Snow 2007 Redux

    My Robert's Snow creation is featured today in the Blogging for a Cure "tour" over at Bildungsroman by Little Willow. A great reminder for a terrific fundraiser and a fine way to create some awareness.

    My particular snowflake will be auctioned off November 19-23. Find your checkbooks!

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    16. Check out Robert's Snow!


    Two years ago I was honored to be invited to submit a snowflake (that's mine above) for Robert's Snow, a fundraiser for cancer research that was started by writer-illustrator Grace Lin in honor of her husband Robert who was battling a rare cancer. Sadly, Robert lost his fight this summer, but Grace Lin's unique fundraiser continues, providing hope for others with cancer. Each year, Robert's Snow invites 200 children's book illustrators to create original art on wooden snowflakes, which are then sold in a series of three auctions. This year's auctions begin Nov. 19th and run through Dec. 3rd; all proceeds benefit the Jimmy Fund at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston.

    You can view all the snowflakes here, auction by auction, as well as peek at the ones from previous years. The quality, variety, and all around creativity are astounding, and they're worth checking out even if you have no intention of buying one. But it's also worth bidding at the auctions, because it's a chance to obtain a piece of original art by an established artist who might not normally sell his or her work, or by up-and-coming illustrator, often at a bargain price and you get the satisfaction of helping to cure cancer at the same time! What could be better than that?

    This week, starting today, bloggers are helping to showcase some of the snowflakes before the auctions begin. You can view the featured snowflakes and artists by clicking on the following links:

    Monday, October 15
    Randy Cecil at ChatRabbit
    Michelle Chang at The Longstockings
    Kevin Hawkes at Cynthia Lord's Journal
    Barbara Lehman at The Excelsior File
    Grace Lin at In the Pages

    Tuesday, October 16
    Selina Alko at Brooklyn Arden
    Scott Bakal at Wild Rose Reader
    Alexandra Boiger at Paradise Found
    Paige Keiser at Your Neighborhood Librarian
    Janet Stevens at The Miss Rumphius Effect

    Wednesday, October 17
    Rick Chrustowski at laurasalas
    Diane DeGroat at Jama Rattigan's Alphabet Soup
    Ilene Richard at Something Different Every Day
    Brie Spangler at Lectitans
    Don Tate at The Silver Lining

    Thursday, October 18
    Brooke Dyer at Bookshelves of Doom
    D.B. Johnson at Lessons from the Tortoise
    Erin Eitter Kono at Sam Riddleburger
    Sherry Rogers at A Life in Books
    Jennifer Thermes at Through the Studio Door

    Friday, October 19
    Graeme Base at Just One More Book
    Denise Fleming at MotherReader
    Jeff Mack at AmoXcalli
    Jeff Newman at A Year of Reading
    Ruth Sanderson at Book Moot

    Saturday, October 20
    Linas Alsenas at A Wrung Sponge
    Theresa Brandon at The Shady Glade
    Karen Katz at Whimsy Books
    Judy Schachner at Kate's Book Blog
    Sally Vitsky at Shelf Elf: read, write, rave

    Sunday, October 21
    Matthew Cordell at Just Like the Nut
    Maxwell Eaton III at Books and Other Thoughts
    Roz Fulcher at Goading the Pen
    Susie Jin at sruble's world
    Susan Mitchell at Check It Out

    Want to see some pictures of a really, really cute snowflake in progress? Visit illustrator Roz Fulcher's blog (posting for July 9th, 2007).

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    17. Remembering Robert

    I had the opportunity to meet the talented and effervescent author and illustrator Grace Lin this spring when we were on a panel together at the Texas Library Association conference. Her husband, Robert Mercer, was desperately ill and sadly passed away a month ago at the too-young age of 35. My good friend Nancy also lost her husband to cancer this summer. Grief has been weighing on many I care about recently, so I sought a poem for solace, of course.


    Poem
    by Langston Hughes

    I loved my friend.
    He went away from me.
    There’s nothing more to say.
    The poem ends,
    Soft as it began—
    I loved my friend.

    Hughes, Langston. 1994. The Dreamkeeper and Other Poems. New York: Knopf, p. 12.

    I would also like to join in the promotion of Robert’s Snow: For Cancer’s Cure, the fundraising effort that Grace initiated several years ago. From the Web site: “Own a piece of art from your favorite children's book illustrator while helping to fight cancer” by buying an original snowflake ornament created by children’s book illustrators. “Since 2004, this online auction has raised over $200,000 for Dana-Farber, and with your help, we can continue this holiday tradition in 2007.” The auction begins in November. And for more information about Robert himself, check out the Blue Rose Girls blog.

    For the whole Poetry Friday roundup, go to Sara Lewis Holmes' blog Read Write Believe.

    Picture credit: http://bluerosegirls.blogspot.com/

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    18. Blogging for a Cure

    I was sitting in church yesterday as our pastor was reading names of prayer concerns. Recently there seems to be quite a few names of those who are battling cancer, battling its vicious spread despite even amputations, miraculously recovering and, for some, miraculously passing. I suddenly had a memory of the first person I ever knew to die of cancer. Her name was Sherry Nicholson and she was our church's youth music director. She died when I was maybe 7 or 8. I remember watching her husband and her two kids, my friends, at the "Celebration of Life" party we had at church in her memory. We, the kids, sang a song, and I have never felt so helpless and guilty for wanting to "celebrate" a life while her kids just stared at the floor. As is the way with this disease, Mrs. Nicholson would be the first of many victims and survivors with which I had/have a personal connection.

    The fantastic and fervent duo at Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast sent out an All Points Bulletin to bloggers to rally in spreading the word for fundraising efforts for Robert's Snow: for Cancer's Cure. This is headed by author Grace Lin whose husband recently died due to cancer. The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute published a book in 2005 with beautiful illustrator-designed snowflakes. The proceeds from auctioning these snowflakes went directly to the Institute and they are ready to do it again. As a thanks and getting the word out on the contributing snowflake-illustrators, 7-Imp will be compiling a massive list (there's over 200 illustrators!) of illustrator interviews hosted in the kidlitblogsophere. Stay tuned for the run-down over at 7-Imp. I'm still deciding if I can commit to an interview. Anyone want to tag team with me?

    In the meantime, please visit 7-Imp, read, learn, share, buy snowflakes, change the world.

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