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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: hipster, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 48
1. Bad Houses: Review Haiku

Love among the ruins:
estate sales and hoarding,
graphically told.

Bad Houses by Sara Ryan, illustrated by Carla Speed McNeill. Dark Horse Comics, 2013, 160 pages.

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2. Nine Inches: Review Haiku

Lonely hearts, fallen
heroes, and sad sacks get prime
Perrotta treatment.

Nine Inches: Stories by Tom Perrotta. St. Martin's Press, 2013, 256 pages.

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3. This Is What Happy Looks Like: Review Haiku

A classic daydream --
"A movie star loves me!" -- gets
the smart-girl treatment.

This Is What Happy Looks Like by Jennifer E. Smith. Poppy, 2013, 446 pages.

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4. Calling Dr. Laura: Review Haiku

Unfinished family
business becomes fodder for
a thoughtful memoir.

Calling Dr. Laura: A Graphic Memoir by Nicole Georges. Mariner Books, 2013, 288 pages.

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5. What the Family Needed: Review Haiku

Superpower wish-
fulfillment at home: if Anne
Tyler wrote The Flash.

What the Family Needed by Steven Amsterdam. Riverhead, 2013, 272 pages.

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6. Heads in Beds: Review Haiku

I confess: I've never
tipped. I didn't know how
critical it was.

Heads in Beds: A Reckless Memoir of Hotels, Hustles, and So-called Hospitality by Jacob Tomsky. Doubleday, 2012, 256 pages.

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7. Illustrator Dyna Moe (previously with the Mad Men Illustrated)...



Illustrator Dyna Moe (previously with the Mad Men Illustrated) has a very hilarious (and still as yet on-going) set of The 12 Days of Christmas featuring her Hipster Animals. 

(By the way, she’s got a Tumblr. Follow her now.)



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8. Marbles: Review Haiku

Took me a hundred
pages to realize, "Ohhhh --
Part-Time Indian chick."

Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, and Me: A Graphic Memoir by Ellen Forney. Gotham, 2012, 256 pages.

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9. That Book About Harvard: Review Haiku

Just like my freshman
year -- except, uh, not.
(Widener D-basement, dude. Sheesh.)

That Book About Harvard: Surviving the World's Most Famous University, One Embarrassment at a Time by Eric Kester. Sourcebooks, 2012, 352 pages.

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10. The Year of Learning Dangerously: Review Haiku

Down-to-earth take on
homeschooling that almost sounds
doable. (But not.)

The Year of Learning Dangerously: Adventures in Homeschooling by Quinn Cummings. Perigree, 2012, 240 pages.

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11. Just One Day: Review Haiku

So cringingly true
to late-teenage wander/lust,
I almost lost it.

Just One Day by Gayle Foreman. Dutton, 2012, 320 pages.

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12. The Tragedy Paper: Review Haiku

Boarding-school hijinks
gone wrong: it's an old story,
but worth a fresh look.

The Tragedy Paper by Elizabeth Laban. Knopf, 2013, 320 pages.

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13. Fake Mustache: Review Haiku

A day late on this, I know,
but what a ridiculously
good time.

Fake Mustache by Tom Angleberger. Amulet, 2012, 208 pages.

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14. The Popularity Papers #5: The Awesomely Awful Melodies . . . : Review Haiku

Lydia and Julie
try their hands as rock stars.
It doesn't go well.


The Popularity Papers #5: The Awesomely Awful Melodies of Lydia Goldblatt & Julie Graham-Chang by Amy Ignatow. Amulet, 2013, 160 pages.

0 Comments on The Popularity Papers #5: The Awesomely Awful Melodies . . . : Review Haiku as of 5/15/2013 7:01:00 AM
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15. Bringing Up Bebe: Review Haiku


Well, whaddya know.
I'm not slagass or disconnected --
I'm just French!


1 Comments on Bringing Up Bebe: Review Haiku, last added: 5/7/2012
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16. Some Assembly Required: Review Haiku


I wanted to love this,
but the self-indulgence
kinda drove me nuts.


Some Assembly Required: A Journal of My Son's First Son by Anne Lamott and Sam Lamott. Riverhead, 2012, 288 pages.

1 Comments on Some Assembly Required: Review Haiku, last added: 5/24/2012
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17. Food Rules: Review Haiku

Slightly twee, but made
palatable by Kalman.
(SEE WHAT I DID THERE?)

Food Rules: An Eater's Manual by Michael Pollan, illustrated by Maira Kalman. Penguin, 2011, 240 pages.

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18. Are You My Mother: Review Haiku

Inward-looking to
the point of suffocation:
smart but hard to love.

Are You My Mother? A Comic Drama by Alison Bechdel. HMH, 2012, 304 pages.

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19. Girl Walks Into a Bar: Review Haiku

I heart you, Rachel Dratch,
for being normal and awesome.
*sad trombone*


Girl Walks Into a Bar: Comedy Calamities, Dating Disasters, and a Midlife Miracle by Rachel Dratch. Gotham, 2012, 272 pages.

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20. Man Made: Review Haiku

Self-professed wimp tries
fire fighting, cage matches
to impress infant son.

Man Made: A Stupid Quest for Masculinity by Joel Stein. Grand Central, 2012, 304 pages.

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21. Wild: Review Haiku

Just realistic
enough to keep from giving
me any ideas.

Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Coast Trail by Cheryl Strayed. Knopf, 2012, 336 pages.

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22. Tessa Masterson WILL Go to Prom: Review Haiku

Well-drawn characters
make topical drama resonate
more strongly.

Tessa Masterson WILL Go to Prom by Emily Franklin and Brendan Halpin. Walker, 2012, 272 pages.

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23. Making Babies: Review Haiku

Rehash of "smart woman
has baby; freaks" tropes, but
still wicked funny.

Making Babies by Anne Enright. Norton, 2012, 208 pages.

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24. Seating Arrangements: Review Haiku

I swear none of this
happened at my wedding* (or
I didn't notice).

Seating Arrangements by Maggie Shipstead. Knopf, 2012, 320 pages.

* Thirteen years yesterday -- happy anniversary, dorkbutt!


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25. Friday procrastination: milking edition

By Alice Northover


It’s been an eventful week in Oxford spires (although I write this from the New York office which contains no spires). We had a kerfuffle over the OED and we’re gearing up for the Place of the Year extravaganza next week. So what have we learned in between?

Neither plank nor batman nor owl of night keep these students from the swift completion of their appointed reads. But milk might.

Appropriate after Black Friday and Cyber Monday, our OED Appeal of the week: Doorbuster.

The DSM definitions are always a source of controversy, the newest being personality disorders.

The end is in sight for the published works of Leonhard Euler.

How do you come up with the perfect brand name? Wordnik [good name] has the scoop.

Can you own page turning?

Our Australian cousins, the ANDC, have Ned Kelly in words and phrases (that I would very much like to adopt).

Wikipedia is partnering with JSTOR, so those citations may be getting better.

NYU Local examines replyallcalyse, or how Nicholas Cage will make your inbox explode.

Are you a hipster? What your reading habits reveal (about your cigarette jeans-wearing, Williamsburg neighbors, not you of course).

New on the dictionary insult list: “Give him credit this week, he’s got his very own word in the English dictionary, omnishambles.” (As opposed to the more traditional: “If you look up stupid in the dictionary, your face is there.”)

Can e-books help get books to remote communities in Latin America?

The Irish Times has appointed a poetry editor. (h/t Leslie Kaufman)

I’m sad not more people read Rob St. Amant’s amazing article on robots replicating animal tool use (promoting OUPblog content I know but it’s awesome).

Alexandra Lange on place setting anxiety.

And finally, stay curious my friends.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Alice Northover joined Oxford University Press as Social Media Manager in January 2012. She is editor of the OUPblog, constant tweeter @OUPAcademic, daily Facebooker at Oxford Academic, and Google Plus updater of Oxford Academic, amongst other things. You can learn more about her bizarre habits on the blog.

Subscribe to the OUPblog via email or RSS.

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