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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Bestsellers, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 85
1. Current Bestsellers.

Amazon (Teen): City of bones

1. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

3. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

4. City of Bones, by Cassandra Clare

5. Mockingjay, by Suzanne Collins

American Booksellers Association, National (Children's Interest):

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

3. Wonder, by R.J. Palacio

4. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, by Ransom Riggs

5. The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak

New York Times (YA):

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

3. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

4. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

5. The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak

Publishers Weekly (Children's Frontlist): Catching fire

1. Middle School: How I Survived Bullies, Broccoli, and Snake Hill, by James Patterson and Chris Tebbets

2. Dork Diaries 6: Tales from a Not-So-Happy Heartbreaker, by Rachel Rene Russell

3. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, by Ransom Riggs

4. Catching Fire, by Suzanne Collins

5. The Third Wheel, by Jeff Kinney

USAToday (Youth):

1. Divergent, by Veronica Roth (#4 overall)

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green (#5 overall)

3. City of Bones, by Cassandra Clare (#16 overall)

4. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth (#18 overall)

5. Catching Fire, by Suzanne Collins (#33 overall)

Add a Comment
2. Current Bestsellers.

Amazon (Teen): Catching fire

1. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

3. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

4. Catching Fire, by Suzanne Collins

5. Mockingjay, by Suzanne Collins

American Booksellers Association, National (Children's Interest):

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. Wonder, by R.J. Palacio

3. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

4. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, by Ransom Riggs

5. The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak

New York Times (YA):

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

3. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

4. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

5. The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak

Publishers Weekly (Children's Frontlist): Dork_Diaries_Book_6

1. Middle School: How I Survived Bullies, Broccoli, and Snake Hill, by James Patterson and Chris Tebbets

2. Dork Diaries 6: Tales from a Not-So-Happy Heartbreaker, by Rachel Rene Russell

3. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, by Ransom Riggs

4. Catching Fire, by Suzanne Collins

5. The Third Wheel, by Jeff Kinney

USAToday (Youth):

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green (#9 overall)

2. Divergent, by Veronica Roth (#10 overall)

3. City of Bones, by Cassandra Clare (#20 overall)

4. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth (#21 overall)

5. Dork Diaries 6: Tales from a Not-So-Happy Heartbreaker, by Rachel Rene Russell (#48 overall)

Add a Comment
3. Current Bestsellers.

Amazon (Teen): Out of breath

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

3. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

4. Out of Breath, by Rebecca Donovan

5. Mockingjay, by Suzanne Collins

American Booksellers Association, National (Children's Interest):

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. Wonder, by R.J. Palacio

3. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

4. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, by Ransom Riggs

5. The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak

New York Times (YA):

1. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

3. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

4. The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak

5. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

Publishers Weekly (Children's Frontlist): Miss peregrine's home for peculiar children

1. Middle School: How I Survived Bullies, Broccoli, and Snake Hill, by James Patterson and Chris Tebbets

2. Dork Diaries 6: Tales from a Not-So-Happy Heartbreaker, by Rachel Rene Russell

3. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, by Ransom Riggs

4. Catching Fire, by Suzanne Collins

5. The Third Wheel, by Jeff Kinney

USAToday (Youth):

1. Divergent, by Veronica Roth (#7 overall)

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green (#10 overall)

3. City of Bones, by Cassandra Clare (#21 overall)

4. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth (#22 overall)

5. Middle School: How I Survived Bullies, Broccoli, and Snake Hill, by James Patterson and Chris Tebbets (#31 overall)

Add a Comment
4. Current Bestsellers.

Amazon (Teen): Reason to breathe

1. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

2. Out of Breath, by Rebecca Donovan

3. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

4. Reason to Breathe, by Rebecca Donovan

5. Mockingjay, by Suzanne Collins

American Booksellers Association, National (Children's Interest):

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. Wonder, by R.J. Palacio

3. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

4. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, by Ransom Riggs

5. The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak

New York Times (YA):

1. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

3. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

4. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

5. The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak

Publishers Weekly (Children's Frontlist): Book thief

1. Middle School: How I Survived Bullies, Broccoli, and Snake Hill, by James Patterson and Chris Tebbets

2. Dork Diaries 6: Tales from a Not-So-Happy Heartbreaker, by Rachel Rene Russell

3. Catching Fire, by Suzanne Collins

4. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, by Ransom Riggs

5. The Third Wheel, by Jeff Kinney

USAToday (Youth):

1. Divergent, by Veronica Roth (#9 overall)

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green (#14 overall)

3. Dork Diaries 6: Tales from a Not-So-Happy Heartbreaker, by Rachel Rene Russell (#25 overall)

4. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth (#32 overall)

5. Middle School: How I Survived Bullies, Broccoli, and Snake Hill, by James Patterson and Chris Tebbets (#35 overall)

Add a Comment
5. Current Bestsellers.

Amazon (Teen): Curse touch of eternity

1. The Curse: Touch of Eternity, by Emily Bold

2. Out of Breath, by Rebecca Donovan

3. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

4. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

5. Reason to Breathe, by Rebecca Donovan

American Booksellers Association, National (Children's Interest):

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. Wonder, by R.J. Palacio

3. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

4. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, by Ransom Riggs

5. The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak

New York Times (YA):

1. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

3. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

4. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

5. The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak

Publishers Weekly (Children's Frontlist): Theodore boone the activist

1. Dork Diaries 6: Tales from a Not-So-Happy Heartbreaker, by Rachel Rene Russell

2. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, by Ransom Riggs

3. The Third Wheel, by Jeff Kinney

4. The Moon and More, by Sarah Dessen

5. Theodore Boone: The Activist, by John Grisham

USAToday (Youth):

1. Divergent, by Veronica Roth (#13 overall)

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green (#17 overall)

3. Dork Diaries 6: Tales from a Not-So-Happy Heartbreaker, by Rachel Rene Russell (#27 overall)

4. Middle School: How I Survived Bullies, Broccoli, and Snake Hill, by James Patterson and Chris Tebbets (#30 overall)

5. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth (#38 overall)

Add a Comment
6. Current Bestsellers.

AllegiantI figured that since I check them every week, I may as well post 'em, eh?

Amazon (Teen):

1. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

2. Reason to Breathe, by Rebecca Donovan

3. Catching Fire, by Suzanne Collins

4. Allegiant, by Veronica Roth

5. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

American Booksellers Association, National (Children's Interest):

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. Wonder, by R.J. Palacio

3. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, by Ransom Riggs

4. The One and Only Ivan, by Katherine Applegate

5. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

New York Times (YA):

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

3. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

4. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky

5. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

Publishers Weekly (Children's Frontlist): Moon and more

1. Dork Diaries 6: Tales from a Not-So-Happy Heartbreaker, by Rachel Rene Russell

2. Catching Fire, by Suzanne Collins

3. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, by Ransom Riggs

4. The Moon and More, by Sarah Dessen

5. The Third Wheel, by Jeff Kinney

USAToday (Youth):

1. Dork Diaries 6: Tales from a Not-So-Happy Heartbreaker, by Rachel Rene Russell (#8 overall)

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green (#17 overall)

3. Divergent, by Veronica Roth (#34 overall)

4. Catching Fire, by Suzanne Collins (#41 overall)

5. City of Bones, by Cassandra Clare (#62 overall)

Add a Comment
7. Current Bestsellers.

While it lastsI figured that since I check them every week, I may as well post 'em, eh?

Amazon (Teen):

1. Mockingjay, by Suzanne Collins

2. Catching Fire, by Suzanne Collins

3. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

4. The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins 

5. While it Lasts, by Abbi Glines

American Booksellers Association, National (Children's):

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. Poems to Learn by Heart, by Caroline Kennedy

3. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

4. Wonder, by R.J. Palacio

5. The One and Only Ivan, by Katherine Applegate

New York Times (YA):

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky

3. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

4. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

5. While it Lasts, by Abbi Glines

Publishers Weekly (Children's Frontlist): Theodore boone the accused

1. The Third Wheel, by Jeff Kinney

2. Big Nate: Game On!, by Lincoln Peirce

3. The Clockwork Princess, by Cassandra Clare

4. Theodore Boone: The Accused, by John Grisham

5. Middle School: My Brother is a Big, Fat Liar, by James Patterson

USAToday (Youth):

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

3. Catching Fire, by Suzanne Collins

4. Mockingjay, by Suzanne Collins

5. The Clockwork Princess, by Cassandra Clare

Add a Comment
8. Current Bestsellers.

Just for nowI figured that since I check them every week, I may as well post 'em, eh?

Amazon (Teen):

1. Mockingjay, by Suzanne Collins

2. Catching Fire, by Suzanne Collins

3. The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins 

4. Just for Now, by Abby Glines

5. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

American Booksellers Association, National (Children's):

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. Poems to Learn by Heart, by Caroline Kennedy

3. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

4. Wonder, by R.J. Palacio

5. Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made, by Stephan Pastis

American Booksellers Association, Regional (NE, Children's):

1. Poems to Learn by Heart, by Caroline Kennedy

2. Wonder, by R.J. Palacio

3. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

4. The One and Only Ivan, by Katherine Applegate

5. Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made, by Stephan Pastis

New York Times (YA): City of bones

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky

3. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

4. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

5. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

Publishers Weekly (Children's Frontlist):

1. The Clockwork Princess, by Cassandra Clare

2. The Third Wheel, by Jeff Kinney

3. Middle School: My Brother is a Big, Fat Liar, by James Patterson

4. Big Nate Flips Out, by Lincoln Peirce

5. Art2-D2's Guide to Folding and Doodling: An Origami Yoda Activity Book, by Tom Angleberger

USAToday (Youth):

1. The Clockwork Princess, by Cassandra Clare (#21 overall)

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green (#28 overall)

3. The Third Wheel, by Jeff Kinney (#58 overall)

4. Light, by Michael Grant (#62 overall)

5. City of Bones, by Cassandra Clare (#63 overall)

Add a Comment
9. Current Bestsellers.

Art2-d2I figured that since I check them every week, I may as well post 'em, eh?

Amazon (Teen):

1. Just for Now, by Abby Glines

2. Mockingjay, by Suzanne Collins

3. Michael Vey: The Prisoner of Cell 25, by Richard Paul Evans

4. Catching Fire, by Suzanne Collins

5. The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins 

American Booksellers Association, National (Children's):

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. Poems to Learn by Heart, by Caroline Kennedy

3. Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made, by Stephan Pastis

4. The One and Only Ivan, by Katherine Applegate

5. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

American Booksellers Association, Regional (NE, Children's):

1. Poems to Learn by Heart, by Caroline Kennedy

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

3. Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made, by Stephan Pastis

4. Wonder, by R.J. Palacio

5. The One and Only Ivan, by Katherine Applegate

New York Times (YA): Fault in our stars

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky

3. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

4. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

5. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

Publishers Weekly (Children's Frontlist):

1. The Clockwork Princess, by Cassandra Clare

2. The Third Wheel, by Jeff Kinney

3. Middle School: My Brother is a Big, Fat Liar, by James Patterson

4. Big Nate Flips Out, by Lincoln Peirce

5. Art2-D2's Guide to Folding and Doodling: An Origami Yoda Activity Book, by Tom Angleberger

USAToday (Youth):

1. The Clockwork Princess, by Cassandra Clare (#10 overall)

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green (#21 overall)

3. The Third Wheel, by Jeff Kinney (#25 overall)

4. Middle School: My Brother is a Big, Fat Liar, by James Patterson (#27 overall)

5. Divergent, by Veronica Roth (#48 overall)

Add a Comment
10. Current Bestsellers.

ApothecaryI figured that since I check them every week, I may as well post 'em, eh?

Amazon (Teen):

1. Mockingjay, by Suzanne Collins

2. Catching Fire, by Suzanne Collins

3. The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins 

4. The Clockwork Princess, by Cassandra Clare

5. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

American Booksellers Association, National (Children's):

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made, by Stephan Pastis

3. The One and Only Ivan, by Katherine Applegate

4. Wonder, by R.J. Palacio

5. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

American Booksellers Association, Regional (NE, Children's):

1. Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made, by Stephan Pastis

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

3. Wonder, by R.J. Palacio

4. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

5. The Apothecary, by Maile Meloy

New York Times (YA): Clockwork princess

1. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

3. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

4. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

5. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

Publishers Weekly (Children's Frontlist):

1. The Clockwork Princess, by Cassandra Clare

2. The Third Wheel, by Jeff Kinney

3. Middle School: My Brother is a Big, Fat Liar, by James Patterson

4. Big Nate Flips Out, by Lincoln Peirce

5. Beautiful Chaos, by Margaret Stohl and Kami Garcia

USAToday (Youth):

1. The Clockwork Princess, by Cassandra Clare (#2 overall)

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green (#30 overall)

3. The Third Wheel, by Jeff Kinney (#34 overall)

4. Beautiful Creatures, by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl (#43 overall)

5. Divergent, by Veronica Roth (#48 overall)

Add a Comment
11. Current Bestsellers.

Perks of being a wallflowerI figured that since I check them every week, I may as well post 'em, eh?

Amazon (Teen):

1. The Clockwork Princess, by Cassandra Clare

2. The Jesus Storybook Bible, by Sally Lloyd-Jones & Jago

3. Mockingjay, by Suzanne Collins

4. Catching Fire, by Suzanne Collins

5. The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins 

American Booksellers Association, National (Children's):

1. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

2. The One and Only Ivan, by Katherine Applegate

3. Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made, by Stephan Pastis

4. Wonder, by R.J. Palacio

5. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

American Booksellers Association, Regional (NE, Children's):

1. Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made, by Stephan Pastis

2. The One and Only Ivan, by Katherine Applegate

3. Wonder, by R.J. Palacio

4. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

5. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

New York Times (YA): Fault in our stars

1. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green 

3. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

4. Looking for Alaska, by John Green

5. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

Publishers Weekly (Children's Frontlist):

1. The Third Wheel, by Jeff Kinney

2. Big Nate Flips Out, by Lincoln Peirce

3. Chasing the Prophecy, by Brandon Mull

4. The 39 Clues: Cahills vs. Vespers Book 6: Day of Doom, by David Baldacci

5. Tales from a Not-So-Smart Miss Know-It-All, by Rachel Renee Russell

USAToday (Youth):

1. The Hunger Games Trilogy (#13 overall)

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green (#24 overall)

3. Beautiful Creatures, by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl (#27 overall)

4. The Third Wheel, by Jeff Kinney (#32 overall)

5. Chasing the Prophecy, by Brandon Mull (#36 overall)

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12. Opening Lines of Bestsellers: Which would you buy?

Opening Lines:
I’ve written before about the importance of opening lines and 12 options for opening a story or novel. Which of these would make you read the next line? If you had to choose JUST BY READING THE OPENING LINES, which book would you buy?

Opening Lines

A. Barry Fairbrother did not want to go out to dinner.
B. I am a lawyer and I am in prison.
C. They took Mother away today
D. When I think of my wife, I always think of her head.
E. Some years in Portland, Oregon, winter is a bully, spitting sleet and spewing snow in fits and starts as it violently wrestles days from spring, claiming some archaic right to remain king of the seasons—ultimately the vain attempt of another pretender.
F. “I don’t know why we gotta sit here baking in your car in the middle of he day, in the middle of the summer, in the middle of this crummy neighborhood,” Lulu said.
G. The light of a half-moon shimmered off the restless sea like a streak of flaming mercury.
H. The rear door to St. Anthony’s church had been left open.
I. The four dead men were lined up on the living room floor of the safe house
J. He had the look of a man who was afraid that tonight would be his last on earth.

Did you guess that these are the opening lines for titles on the Best Selling Books for December 03, 2012? Does that change your evaluation of them? Match these opening lines with these top 10 bestselling adult novels.

Bestselling Titles, December 2012

  1. Notorious Nineteen by Janet Evanovich
  2. Agenda 21 by Glenn Beck
  3. The Forgotten by David Baldacci
  4. Merry Christmas, Alex Cross by James Patterson
  5. The Racketeer by John Grisham
  6. The Last Man by Vince Flynn
  7. The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling
  8. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
  9. Cross Roads by Wm Paul Young
  10. Poseidon’s Arrow by Clive Cussler

What do you notice about these opening lines? Leave a comment: which book would you buy, if you only read the opening lines?

Answers: 1-F, 2-C, 3-J, 4-H, 5-B, 6-I, 7-A, 8-D, 9-E , 10-G

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13. NYT Creates Separate Middle Grade & YA Bestsellers Lists

The New York Times will divide its Children’s Bestsellers list for chapter books, creating separate middle grade and YA lists. NYT editor Pamela Paul announced the news last night on Twitter. We’ve embedded her three tweets below.

The newly formed middle grade and young adult lists will account for both eBook and print book sales. However, the picture books list will continue to exclusively spotlight on hardcover titles. What do you think?

The Fault in Our Stars author John Green offered this comment on his tumblr page: “In news that only matters to publishing nerds, the New York Times has changed its bestseller lists to become format neutral (so it counts e-book sales and doesn’t distinguish between hardcover and paperback)…Those of you who follow my tumblr closely may know that for many weeks, I have been chasing Bill O’Reilly and promising to destroy him. But now we have been placed on DIFFERENT LISTS.” (via Publishers Weekly)

continued…

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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14. What makes a book a hit?

Both the Wall Street Journal and NPR took a look at Hit Lit: Cracking the Code of the Twentieth Century's Biggest Bestsellers.

The Wall Street Journal piece begins: “If you want to make the big money in fiction, don't skimp on the friction—especially the sexual, spiritual and political varieties—and go light on the navel-gazing. So counsels James W. Hall in "Hit Lit," a study of what makes best sellers tick.”

Read the rest of the WSJ piece about Hit Lit here.

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Both the Wall Street Journal and NPR took a look at <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0812970950/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=aprilhenrymys-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0812970950">Hit Lit: Cracking the Code of the Twentieth Century's Biggest Bestsellers</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=aprilhenrymys-20&l=as2&o=1&a=0812970950" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important; margin:0px !important;" />.

The Wall Street Journal piece begins: <i> “If you want to make the big money in fiction, don't skimp on the friction—especially the sexual, spiritual and political varieties—and go light on the navel-gazing. So counsels James W. Hall in "Hit Lit," a study of what makes best sellers tick.”</i>

<a href= "http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303816504577313743632665590.html?mod=WSJ_LifeStyle_Lifestyle_5">Read the rest of the WSJ piece about Hit Lit here</a>.

<a href= "http://www.npr.org/2012/04/13/150582219/on-writing-a-bestseller-theres-a-formula-shhh>And read NPR’s take on Hit Lit here</a>.


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15. Thanks to my hometown indie bookstores for making my books bestsellers!

I owe a BIG shout of thanks to the Independent Bookstores of St. Louis for making The Dead Gentleman an Riverfront Times bestseller!

Powerless popped up on the list a few weeks ago, and if that wasn’t cool enough now both of my books have had that honor.

Makes me a bit homesick, I cannot lie . . .


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16. Eight tips for plotting a bestseller

Writers Digest had a great article on Eight tips for plotting a bestseller
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17. I Can Haz Bookscan?

I'm obsessed with numbers. Obsessed. I used to call this automated toll-free number Ingram had that reported how many of your books had shipped. When they discontinued the number, I was left with Amazon, which still represents such a tiny fraction of the books sold.

Right now, I'm lucky. One of my publishers does quarterly royalty statements (practically unheard of) and one of my editors has sent me several notes to let me know how many copies of one book have shipped to date.

But that's shipped, not sold.

And then there's Bookscan, which supposedly tracks 75% of sales (no Wal-Mart, though, and I don't think any library sales). But these are real sales, not books shipped to bookstores (which can and returned to the publisher for credit). I even emailed Bookscan to ask about purchasing the right to see one ISBN, which supposedly cost $85. They never replied.

Amazon's Author Central now allows authors to see their own Nielsen Bookscan weekly data for the last 4 weeks. For free!

You can read the LA Times article here.. I'm just glad it's only updating weekly. Because that Ingram number was like crack cocaine.



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18. Romance is not a dirty word

by Lauren

 
Oh, Danielle Steel! First Nicholas Sparks, now you. How can we help you make peace with romance novels? It may be true that your novels are not romance, narrowly defined by some conventions of the genre. I'm not sure I agree, but I'll grant the premise isn’t completely without merit, not least because I’m not immune to the packaging efforts of publishers. Which is not to say your books are without their conventions—I hate to judge*, but formulaic is a word that comes to mind—but perhaps in some way those conventions are quite specific to you and your prolific output, possibly distinct enough to consider them in a separate category from other titles. However, I get the impression here, Ms. Steel, that you don't want people to think of you as an author of romance because it devalues your work, which it turns out is some kind of lofty thing about the human condition, and that is a problem. (To be fair, you handle the issue with quite a bit more grace than Mr. Sparks.)

Romance novels can be totally fabulous. Not all of them are, sure, but that's true in any category including whatever category you’d each like to be in. More than that, though, if you think a different label will change how seriously people take you, you’re being a bit naive. You're both giant targets, especially you, Ms. Steel, with your shelves and shelves of bright and shiny spines branded more thoroughly than any other set of books in any store. When I worked at Barnes & Noble, you took up half a bookcase all by yourself, even without duplicate copies of anything. Trust me when I tell you that that’s a noticeable amount of gold foil and fuchsia. When people notice success, they deride it. That, my friend, is the human condition.

But you're also massively successful with more readers than you can count and dedicated fan bases who come back for more every time it's on offer. Let the haters hate, as they say, and take a look at your bank statement when you're feeling insecure about what people think of you. Not because money matters more than respect or makes up for all the world's ills, but because it proves that people keep buying your books in droves, so you're doing something right.

Oh, and, don't make us link this blog to the Ducktales theme again, because you know we will.




*I love to judge.

5 Comments on Romance is not a dirty word, last added: 9/25/2010
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19. Don't quit your day job

by Chasya

The Millions has a good article that delves into the myth of the rags-to-riches career novelist. It’s a well-known, albeit depressing, reality in the publishing industry that most authors don’t have the luxury of writing full-time and supporting themselves through their work. But authors--don’t worry, you’re not alone! As the article points out, and as we can’t stress enough, as much as we’re obsessed with the J.K. Rowling-esque stories of writers who came from nothing and succeeded to become the most famous (and wealthy) authors of our day, this is the exception--not the rule. And, as it turns out, keeping your day job can benefit most of us. Among the perks? Well, being in the everyday world and gleaning from your everyday experiences. And, er, eating. Yes, that’s important! Because as much as we all have that curmudgeonly chain-smoking, black coffee drinking stereotype of an author in our minds, it’s important for even the most obsessive writer to keep up their strength.

9 Comments on Don't quit your day job, last added: 2/18/2010
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20. The secrets behind the bestseller lists

No one actually knows all the secrets behind each list. I don’t even know all the secrets, and I’ve had a book (Face of Betrayal with Lis Wiehl) on the New York Times bestseller list.

Now Pimp My Novel takes a closer look at bestseller lists, including one tidbit that is a bit shocking, “For example: let's say Barrel O' Books maintains a store-wide "Top Ten" bestseller list, and they're overstocked on a particular title that isn't quite making that list. They may swap out the #10 title for the overstocked title, or may grant individual stores limited discretion when displaying the list, meaning it may differ slightly from location to location. (Book sales are surprisingly regionally varied in nature.) It's not exactly underhanded, since the action of adding the title to the list (and applying the appropriate discount, if applicable) will probably bump that title onto the list numbers-wise in short order. It is, however, something of a self-fulfilling prophecy.”

Read more here.



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21. It’s not a bestseller if no one bought it

by Michael

It seems that Amazon finally caught on to the fact that the top 10 books on the Kindle Bestseller list were all free books—they’re now creating two lists, one for paid books, and one for free books. As the LA Times Jacket Copy blog notes, at the very least, the “bestseller” label won’t be a misnomer any longer.

This is also as it should be. Comparing the downloads of free books to the download of paid books never made much sense—the whole point of making the book free is to entice people who aren’t willing to pay for the work in the first place. Without payment, it’s not a sale, it’s a gift. Including both paid and free books on the list is comparing apples to oranges, and I’m glad they’re making the distinction—as Apple does in their App and iBook stores. With more than half the books on the Kindle Bestseller list being free, it’s going to be interesting to see which books now appear in the paid list.

With more information about the paid books, I’m curious to see how pricing affects sales. We know that free books are frequently downloaded, but is there a big different between $12.99 and $9.99? Or $9.99 and $4.99? A quick look at the iBookstore bestsellers shows only 7 books under $9.99 in the top 50, and those books are not new and priced to move, but rather backlist titles available in mass market formats. But the titles in the iBookstore are much more limited, so it’s hard to really draw conclusions.

So what do you think? Was it a good idea to divide the lists? Or did lumping free and paid ebooks onto the same list tell us something important?

7 Comments on It’s not a bestseller if no one bought it, last added: 5/14/2010
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22. Galley tales

by Miriam

It’s BEA week (check this out for an overview of the conference if you’re not familiar with it) which means that some of us are at the Javitz Center checking out publishers’ exhibits, schmoozing with authors who are in from out of town, and loading up free tote bags with galleys of books that are already generating buzz.

For me, the point of BEA has always been collecting those galleys. Invariably, I find myself walking the huge expanse of the Javitz arena ridiculously bogged down by the weight of too many of these advanced readers copies only to realize when I leave the building that getting from 11th Avenue to civilization requires a very long walk to the nearest subway or an endless wait for a cab. No matter. It’s still a thrill to read something in this vulnerable, unfinished format (complete with typos and mostly exaggerated promotional information on the back cover) and then watch the published book race up the bestseller lists, win a huge prize, or both.

I just came across this old piece from New York magazine and was delighted to see how many of those galleys I’d picked up at the 2007 BEA went on to gaudy sales and great acclaim.

Are any of you attending BEA this year? What galleys are you walking away with?

4 Comments on Galley tales, last added: 5/29/2010
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23. From Vlad to RPatts

by Miriam

Around these parts, everyone knows that my love of vampires long precedes the Twilight phenomenon. Robert Pattinson was probably still in diapers when I was falling in love with Anne Rice’s Lestat and I remember then-starting-out agents at DGLM rolling their eyes at me when I suggested that they fill their lists with vampire books. One who took me seriously was Jim McCarthy and he’s got the delightful and talented Richelle Mead and her Vampire Academy series, among others, to show for it.

Thing is, it made sense for people to be skeptical. Before Stephenie Meyer re-energized the vampire tale with her sparkly bloodsuckers, this was a tired literary standby. As Meg Cabot reminds us vampires have been around longer even than Bram Stoker’s Count Dracula, and, throughout the ages, they have preyed on our imaginations precisely because they traffic in the two most powerful human preoccupations: sex and death.

I’ve been hearing a lot about The Passage, Justin Cronin’s contribution to vampire lit (the description of which makes me think of a cross between 28 Days Later and The Road), including Stephen King’s over-the-top praise of the novel. It’s expected to be one of the summer’s blockbusters. We publishing people are forever trying to predict trends (a fool’s game in the best of times), and we at DGLM often ask ourselves whether the vampire mania is subsiding or getting ready for yet another resurgence. Is it too late to be signing up yet another vampire novel? Or am I right in thinking that this genre will, ahem, never die?
What do you all think?

10 Comments on From Vlad to RPatts, last added: 6/10/2010
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24. Big boxes and buzz

by Jim

I was out for dinner with a friend and her sister recently, and I mentioned that I had finally read The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.

“Oh, I’ve been meaning to read that,” said friend’s sister. “I keep seeing it at WalMart.”

“I know! It’s everywhere!” I replied, at this point still enjoying the conversation.

“Well, I just don’t buy books until they’re in the WalMart,” she commented. “Once they’re there, I just know they’re good.”

After briefly choking on my tongue, I asked her to explain. Her theory, which in fairness does make some sense, was that WalMart only carries the most popular books, so once they’re there, they’ve essentially been pre-screened by the public. And okay, that makes a good degree of sense. But in a market where so much great new fiction doesn’t really have a chance to break out, it made me worried about how people choose what to read.

Have we created a system in which only books pre-ordained to bestsellerdom even have a chance? Is there such a thing as a word of mouth bestseller anymore?

It reminds me of when Jonathan Franzen turned down the Oprah book club back in 2001 and made comments alluding to his own discomfort that we trust so few people to tell us what to read and are so willing to jump on board with whatever they point us to. For me, so much of the thrill is in finding something unexpected or something no one else has talked to me about so I can go in with no expectations.

That brings me back to The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo which I loved more than most folks I know who have read or tried to read it and which does seem like an honest to goodness word of mouth bestseller. It did get a huge push from its publisher, but as folks have dived in and the rest of the trilogy came out, it has expanded hugely. So the chance for books to break out is there, but…I’m still concerned about the nature of big box retail and its effect on book buying habits.

What about you guys? Do you prefer books you know other people love, or would you rather uncover an unexpected gem? And how do you decide what to read?

I won’t pretend I’m uninfluenced by buzz. I just bought Justin Cronin’s doorstop The Passage this weekend because I’ve heard so many great things. But then I started something else…

29 Comments on Big boxes and buzz, last added: 6/18/2010
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25. Rise of the Lightning Thief

by Stacey

Rick Riordan is likely a household name to anyone with young readers at home. His Percy Jackson series of middle grade fantasy novels have sold millions of copies around the world. This article goes into some detail about his publishing history. What's interesting to me about this piece is that they talk about how just a few years ago he was clearly a mid-list author, with a series of adult detective novels that had sales that were modest at best. He moved into children's publishing after some inventive storytelling shared with his son, who recommended Riordan turn the tale into a book. Then The Lightning Thief hit in 2005 and became an incredibly successful franchise. It's a wonderfully inspiring and uplifting story to me because not only is this guy super talented, but he had a sales track to overcome before taking his career to this next level. Granted, it's easier to move from adult to children's to make this happen, but it's still an incredibly positive success story (you know how much I love to share those). I think this article is stretching the boundaries of comparison by suggesting that the books are a publishing phenomenon, but not a cultural one. By any measure, these books are a whopping success, and even though the movie didn't do as well as one might hope, there are more books to come and many more opportunities for new fans to come to the table. Speaking as a publishing professional, that seems like a pretty good place to be for the author, his publisher, and his agent too.

3 Comments on Rise of the Lightning Thief, last added: 7/7/2010
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