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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: detroit, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 14 of 14
1. Review – Broken Monsters by Lauren Beukes

This book needs to come with a warning that if you don’t have time to read it the rest of the day don’t start it! Lauren Beukes takes her writing and her dark imagination to another level following the utterly amazing The Shining Girls. Beukes has chosen Detroit for the setting of this novel, the perfect place […]

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2. Sketches from Drawn to the Night on Friday! If you’re in...



Sketches from Drawn to the Night on Friday!

If you’re in #Detroit Metro and you like to draw, you should come out! (Bonus: best snacks ever included!) Events are once monthly in Plymouth!

https://www.facebook.com/events/484547991677737/?fref=ts



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3. Biscuit, Gravy and a Boatload of Books for Detroit: First Book’s Partners Combat the Summer Slide

First Book and our corporate partners take summer slide seriously. And we all should! It accounts for two-thirds of the achievement gap between poor children and affluent children in the communities we call home.

Two of our corporate partners, CBS EcoMedia and Bob Evans, recently took to Detroit to battle summer slide. Together they provided 2,500 new books to schools in Detroit through EcoMedia’s EducationAd program. EducationAd repurposes CBS advertiser dollars to fund projects that benefit education within local communities.

To celebrate the donation, employee volunteers from Bob Evans served up breakfast and books at Gompers Elementary – reading with students and providing each 2nd grader with two new books to take home. CBS EcoMedia President and Founder Paul Polizzotto and Bob Evans’ mascots Biscuits and Gravy attended to share their love of reading with students.

The post Biscuit, Gravy and a Boatload of Books for Detroit: First Book’s Partners Combat the Summer Slide appeared first on First Book Blog.

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4. Teachers Join Forces With First Book: Weingarten Challenges AFT Members to Give Five Million Books to Kids in Need

This is our new challenge. Today I am calling on AFT members to partner with First Book to distribute five million new books this year to students in need.
– Randi Weingarten, AFT president

First Book was in Detroit over the weekend, attending the annual convention of the American Federation of Teachers (AFT), one of the nation’s largest teachers’ unions.

First Book displaying some of our books at the annual AFT conventionTeachers are some of our favorite people; more than anyone, they understand the importance of books and reading, and why an ongoing supply of quality books is so important for turning kids into strong readers and successful students.

We’re especially excited to be working with the 1.5 million teachers, librarians and school staff that make up the AFT. Over the past year, we’ve completed successful pilot projects together in over 20 cities across the country, putting nearly 250,000 new books into the hands of children from low-income families.

Now the AFT is stepping up to do even more. At the convention, AFT president Randi Weingarten challenged the assembled educators to distribute five million new books over the next year.

“By working with our friends in the AFT, we’re able to reach thousands more schools serving kids in need,” said First Book president Kyle Zimmer. “The dedication of these educators is inspiring. Everyone at First Book is proud to be able to help them make a difference in their students’ lives.”

Any teachers, librarians or school staff working with children from low-income families can sign up with First Book to access a steady stream of new, quality books.

Click below to see a video of Kyle talking to the assembled AFT educators about our work together, and about her memories of Mrs. Evans, her own unforgettable first-grade teacher.

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5. 500,000 Motown Book Distribution

This week, First Book and American Federation of Teachers members from Detroit and other Michigan communities helped to distribute 500,000 brand-new books to Michigan-area schools and schools throughout the country. Volunteers from Detroit-area AFT locals helped fill orders and load book cartons for those who came to the warehouse in Romulus to pick up books.

More than 30,000 of the books distributed this week will go to kids in the Detroit area and other Michigan communities. A group of teachers and paraprofessionals from Toledo also picked up books for their students at the book bank event. Check out the photos from the distribution below.

Book Distribution at First Book Warehouse Book Distribution at First Book Warehouse Book Distribution at First Book Warehouse Book Distribution at First Book Warehouse Book Distribution at First Book Warehouse Book Distribution at First Book Warehouse Book Distribution at First Book Warehouse Book Distribution at First Book Warehouse Add a Comment
6. Sam and Papa












This is a small piece from Sam Bennett's New Shoes. Sam and Papa finally free the wagon from the spring-time mud, while Molly the pup watches.

(Personally, I'm looking forward to that spring-time mud!)

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7. Henry Ford

  • Henry Ford established the Ford car company.
  • He was born on June 30, 1863 in Michigan.
  • His mother died in child birth when he was 12.
  • He got a watch for his 13th birthday, and took it apart to put it back together.
  • He liked bird-watching and dancing.
  • He got a job where he could work with boat motors in Detroit.
  • He got married to Clara Wright.
  • Ford built what he called a quadricycle, which was meant to look like two bicycles put together.
  • He started racing cars, then began the Ford company.
  • The first car sold from Ford was a Model A, sold to a dentist.
  • He wanted to make a car that could drive on dirt, and he succeeded with the Model T.  It was a very popular car, and he couldn’t build enough on time for everyone.
  • Men at Ford had to work all night.
  • Ford paid $5 a day so that other people would want to work there.
  • He eventually started making airplanes.
  • He also set up schools, because he loved kids.
  • The Model T became outdated, so Ford made a newer Model A.
  • The new Model A was successful.
  • Ford shut down the company so he could think of new cars, and a riot broke out and 5 men died.
  • People were drawn back to work again when Ford had an inspiration.
  • The working conditions in Ford were miserable.
  • A strike soon formed, and even his wife Clara was involved.
  • When Henry Ford died of a cerebral hemorrhage, at the age of 83 on April 30, 1947
  • His oldest son, Ezel Ford, died of cancer in the stomach, liver, and other diseases, so his other son, Henry Ford II took over the Ford company.

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8. GM Product & Technology Event

We arrived in Detroit on Sunday evening, approaching the young man with the GM binder with a wave and a smile. We kept waving, obnoxiously, trying to get his attention and then he stepped to the side and looked behind him, assuming we were trying to flag down someone else.

Finally, Sugar pointed at him and said, "GM. We're waving at you!" He still didn't quite get it until we both stopped in front of him saying we were there for the Product & Technology event.

"Oh he said. I can usually see them coming." We laughed, wondering what was really going through his head as he watched two thirty-something women heading his way, one with a tattoo (and obnoxious sunburn), the other wish a nose-piercing.

He escorted us to the baggage claim area where he explained that another young man, Jordan, would be driving us back to our hotel. Once we found our luggage, we stepped out into the 90 degree heat and waited on the curb for the Chevy Malibu to pull up.

Jordan was a spunky guy with long hair and right away, he won us over when he handed us water bottles and offered us candy or gum. Of course, we were hoping for a real dinner, like the one we had missed at the Heritage Center, but he assured us that we could take advantage of the room service at our hotel once we finally got there.

Sugar sat in the back as we started telling our driver about how startled the other GM rep was (I think his name was Kurt) when we introduced ourselves. Jordan laughed and proceeded to listen to us as we started to ask where Greektown was and how far away the Joe Louis Arena was from our hotel.

Before he knew what was going on, Sugar pulled out her video camera to show him the footage we taped at the Del Mar Racetrack the previous day and as he drove, he watched the three minute video as I tried to disappear in my seat.

Jordan liked us (he told us as much later into the drive) because he made a detour and took us past Greektown and then back towards Comerica Park, Hockeytown, the Fox Theatre, Ford Field, and made an extra special trip so we could stop and take a picture (which turned out really blurry) of the Joe Louis Arena.

We drove past Joe Louis' arm and saw the skyline of Canada across the lake as somehow our conversation turned to his Mexican girlfriend (very passionate), drinking (he totally would've bought us drinks if he weren't on the clock) and cougars (he made a point of letting us know that he thinks older women are hot).

By the time we got to the hotel (over an hour later), it was late and we were both very hungry. Sugar was anxious to see her daughter so we both headed up to our rooms and enjoyed a quiet meal before bed.

The next day, the true adventure began as we hopped onto the bus after breakfast which too us over to the GM Technical Center. There, we were provided with stickers to cover up the cameras on our phones and were given specific instructions not to touch the vehicles unless we were told otherwise (some were clay models although they looked real).

Bob Lutz, Vice Chair of New Product Development, spoke first and he was very funny as he talked about his reverse retirement, wanting to continue to work for The New GM, thinking that with all of the excitement over the "rebuilding of our image and changing perceptions," the real fun could begin.

Lutz went on to speak about the changes that we can expect from The New GM and how his goal is to "be a privately owned company as quickly as possible." It was clear from his speech that his vision for the company, moving forward, is one that he's excited to be a part of and as a consumer, I'm anxious to watch it all unfold.

After he spoke, we split up into three groups (green, red & blue) dispersing to the many different design galleries within the building, one for each of the four brands that GM is working on reinventing (Buick, Cadillac, GMC, and Chevy). It was in the Buick gallery that we met and spoke with North American VP of Buick-Pontiac-GMC, Susan Docherty, about the Ebay partnership that has just begun in the state of California.

Lunch brought us all together in the Chevy room where we were surrounded by future models, such as the Corvette, Chevy Camaro, Chevy Spark (my personal favorite), Chevy Equinox, Chevy Traverse and where the beautiful Cadillacs were unveiled that are going to be released in the next few years.

The bus ride to the Milford Proving Grounds took about an hour, so we were very eager to finally arrived at the 4,000 acre facility. GM CEO and President Fritz Henderson spoke to us very briefly before letting us all loose to test drive the vehicles that had been introduced to us throughout the day.

I was able to speak to him on a more personal level later that afternoon on the blacktop so I used that as my opportunity to share the story of our roadtrip in the Chevy Equinox just a few weeks back and to thank him for the chance to learn more about The New GM and to be a part of the growth and future of this company.

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9. The Greening of Detroit


We don’t head down to Detroit very often. We couldn’t afford Tigers baseball tickets this year, so the only times we’ve headed down there have been to see our eldest son’s art in the Student Exhibition at the College for Creative Studies and to visit the Detroit Institute of Arts.

We love going to Comerica Park and seeing the Tigers play. The baseball ferris wheel, the tiger carousel, the entire park is wonderfully decorated and designed for fun. This is usually what we do for my birthday. But, we bought a lot of tickets last year for a lot of money and the team just did not play well. Now, of course, that we don’t have tickets, they are in first place in the American League.

College for Creative Studies is one of the best art schools in the country and our eldest son Matt is a ceramics major there. CCS sits behind the Detroit Institute of Arts on Woodward in Detroit.

My father grew up in Detroit and my mother’s mother did also. We went down there all of the time as I was growing up, especially to shop at Hudson’s. I loved the escalator. We went to Hudson’s Thanksgiving Day Parade also. In high school, I went to a lot of theater productions at the Fisher Theater and concerts at the Fox and hockey games at Joe Louis.

It is emotionally taxing to drive down to Detroit nowadays. The abandonned buildings and closed businesses are increasing at an alarming rate and spreading north toward the suburbs.

We should start bulldozing these abandonned buildings and homes, clearing the land. There are huge warehouses sitting empty taking up valuable space and blotting the skyline. We need to rehabilitate the factory on Woodward where Henry Ford built his Model T’s and make it a museum.

After we have cleared all of this land, we need to begin planting. Green spaces where before there were gray, broken spaces of concrete and glass.  Large spaces become parks and smaller spaces become gardens. Flower gardens. Vegetable gardens. Japanese gardens. English cottage gardens. Fruit orchards. Berry patches.

Vegetation cleans polluted air. Vegetation cools the air. Gardens please the senses. Gardens keep idle hands busy. Gardens provide nutrition. Children need contact with nature. Gardens attract birds and butterflies. Birds sing.

All of this beautification would be catching. Someone cares about how this neighborhood looks and so I will care also. I will clean up my own property. Everyone cares about my neighborhood and so I will care also about the people who live in this neighborhood. My life has value. Their lives have value.

What we see around us, the scenery and setting we live in, I believe has a profound impact on our physical, mental, emotional and spiritual well-being. I could not live amongst decay and neglect for long without feeling hopeless and depressed.

I think we have to care first in order for others to care. This is the basic tenant of the Christian faith that God loves us and so we love.

How would this greening of Detroit impact visitors to the city? How would it change the vision of the future the children develop if they grew up in a green Detroit? How would the involved effort of the entire community in planting these green spaces change the way the community interacts with each other?

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10. Odds and Bookends: December 18

“Leave a Mark” online auction – Vintage Veronica by Erica S. Perl
The latest offering in the “Leave a Mark” auctions benefiting First Book is a marked-up copy of First Book staff member and author extraordinaire, Erica Perl’s Vintage Veronica. Bids are accepted online through 11: 59 pm EST on Tuesday, December 22nd – cast your bid today!

Children’s books 2009: It’s all good! says Jon Scieszka
Don’t miss this humorous report on the state of Children’s Books from the National Ambassador of Young People’s Literature, Jon Scieszka.

Kids’ Book Boasts The Best Words, Real Or Not
Listen to this interview with Daniel Pinkwater about a new release of an old book Ounce, Dice, Trice by Aleister Reid, an book for children that is full of words — both real and made-up.

Children’s Books 2009: With a reluctant young reader, the grosser the better
Susan Carpenter shares some book titles and other ideas to get reluctant readers interested in books.

Reading Corps wants YOU
Read this stirring appeal from the Detroit Free Press seeking for tutors to help Detroit’s would-be readers.

The Concord Museum’s tree exhibit celebrates children’s literature
Those in the greater Boston area won’t want to miss the Concord Museum’s “Family Trees: A Celebration of Children’s Literature,’’ an exhibit that spans 14 years and generations of authors and readers.

Reading Practice Can Strengthen Brain ‘Highways’
Your child’s brain on books – NPR shares some interesting research that suggests that intensive reading programs can produce measurable changes in the structure of a child’s brain.

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11. The Moth Expands to Louisville, Pittsburgh & Ann Arbor

The Moth StorySLAM Storytelling Series has expanded to Louisville, Pittsburgh and Ann Arbor.

See all the October events here. Although the series already regularly hosts events in Chicago, the organizers will also double the series’ presence in that city. The storytelling slam already runs in New York City, Detroit, and Los Angeles.

Here’s more from the release: “Kicking off on September 27th, the monthly Louisville StorySLAM will take place at Headliners Music Hall on the last Tuesday of every month. Pittsburgh’s StorySLAMs will commence on October 11th and will be held on the second Tuesday of each month at Club Café. Ann Arbor’s StorySLAM series will be held on the third Tuesday of each month at Circus. Chicago’s existing StorySLAM series will be expanded with a new installment every third Monday of the month at the Haymaker Pub & Brewery.”

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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12. Fast Women

Detroit airport walkway is very neonHere’s the thing: I walk faster than God. I am from New York, and we are a walking people, but even New Yorkers can’t keep up. Midwesterners barely realize what’s happening as I weave through their molassal sidewalk clumps. Mostly people find me freakish. And by that I mean, I get commentary.

I get four types of commentary. Friends, women and men: “I saw you on the street and tried to wave, but you were already on the next block!” (They recognize me in the blur of movement because I usually have a good hat.)

New friends or acquaintances, usually women: “Thank god, you’re the only one I don’t have to slow down with.” We speed and chatter and become better friends. *

Strangers, invariably black men, often older: Laughter and remarks, variants of, “Where’s the fire?!”, or sometimes just an astonished, “Damn.” These ones are my favorite. There are few regular occurrences that improve my day as much as unexpectedly having an occasion to joke around with strangers, which is why I have the best name in the world.

Acquaintances, invariably younger white guys — and this is not the gender-neutral form of guys — : Competition.

They’ll hear me or someone else mention that I walk fast, and they’ll immediately respond, “I bet I can beat you to the end of the block.” Which, I bet you can; your legs are longer and I’m not a runner and it’s just that my natural gait happens to be faster than anyone’s I’ve ever met. But, dude, I find it remarkably self-revealing that this is your reaction, because I notice that it’s not that you’re like me and have a self-identity built partly on walking faster than a hungry hippo, which could justify a certain amount of defensiveness. Or even that you desire a friendly competition, in which we shit-talk each other’s walk and race and then feel fondly toward one another because what bonds you like a mutual shit-talk? Those things I would understand.

But no. That’s not what’s going on. All evidence suggests that, although you have no particular investment in walking fast, nevertheless, the idea that this woman walks faster than you offends you. You must show her up. Well.

I fly a lot through Detroit**, and this occasions a long walk in their crazy neon-lit tunnel between terminals. My airport principle is that you avoid the moving sidewalk because people are not well socialized to place themselves in such a way that you can get around them, so it’s faster to walk alongside where you have more room to maneuver.

So recently I’m strolling through that tunnel and out of the corner of my eye I see this 20-something white guy walking slowly on the moving sidewalk do a double take as I come up alongside and then pass him. And then I see him speed up.

Now, normally I do not engage these races, but something about this dude, or the neon, or the lingering resentment from having earlier had to interact with the TSA brought it out in me. So I sped up, subtly, at first. And he sped up. And then I did some more.

And we got to be moving very fast, him on the sidewalk with his head turning to stare at me, and me next to him and just ahead, much faster than I usually stroll but maintaining my stroll gait (you should feel like you’re loping) and gazing around at all the pretty lights, and this went on for quite some while before the tunnel was over. I pulled through the e

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13. Calling All “Relatives”

The first day of NaBloPoMo (National Blog Post Month) is officially begun. This month’s theme is “Relative,” which means daily posts related to one’s family, however the writer defines “family.”

I will say up front that my definition of “family” is a bit broader than many, but more limited than some. Confused? Don’t be. I figure that if I love, care for, and am concerned about, a person, I consider them family in one sense or another.

Also, I’m a perverse person at times, who regularly reads magazines and catalogs from the back to the front. While I know that today’s suggested prompt is “mother,” I intend to save her for last.

Having said all of that, I’m going to begin with surrogate family, before moving on to real, blood-related people.

Many years ago, I was privileged to teach at a small Native American College here in Montana. The first class I taught there, Intro to Sociology 101, was peopled with mostly matriculated students, both Native American and White.

One who sat close to the front was a marvelous character who had an imp of the Irish within and a laugh that carried everyone along for the ride. Lou was bright, inquisitive, and talented. He played guitar in a band to help support his family while he went back to school for a degree.

A couple of months later I found myself sitting at Lou’s dining table for a Thanksgiving dinner. There was always room at the family table for another diner, with/without an invitation. Drop in and you were invited to partake in whatever meal was being served.

That was a marvelous day, filled with laughter and discovery as to who these new friends were, who were making a place for themselves in my heart.

Over the next year, Lou and I discovered some peculiar links between us. The more we talked, the more “deja-vu” things became. We’d both lived in Jackson, WY, at the same time, went to the same places, knew some of the same people, and yet, had never met. We knew the same woman in Detroit who owned a business just outside the boundary of Greektown. I’d been there several times during a period of residency in Rochester.

Those were just two of the oddities. It was as if our lives had been entangled in this family way for so long, while neither knew of the other’s existence.

There are those who posit that people connect with those whose souls have always been close to them over time and in past lives. I cannot refute that any more than I can prove it.

All I can say is that this man is as close to me in some ways as a brother of blood would be, that I hurt if he’s in distress, and that his family is as dear to me as the one into which I was born.

I don’t get to see him often enough. We live hours apart now, but when schedules and weather permits, I go to see this other family of mine. I get to talk with both Lou and his wife, two of their children, and get to know the grandchildren now. And while their trials are their own, as mine belong to me, they will always hold a piece of my heart and thoughts and reside in my prayers each night.

I love you all, Lou, warts and all.

Claudsy


2 Comments on Calling All “Relatives”, last added: 2/2/2012
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14. Calling All “Relatives”

The first day of NaBloPoMo (National Blog Post Month) is officially begun. This month’s theme is “Relative,” which means daily posts related to one’s family, however the writer defines “family.”

I will say up front that my definition of “family” is a bit broader than many, but more limited than some. Confused? Don’t be. I figure that if I love, care for, and am concerned about, a person, I consider them family in one sense or another.

Also, I’m a perverse person at times, who regularly reads magazines and catalogs from the back to the front. While I know that today’s suggested prompt is “mother,” I intend to save her for last.

Having said all of that, I’m going to begin with surrogate family, before moving on to real, blood-related people.

Many years ago, I was privileged to teach at a small Native American College here in Montana. The first class I taught there, Intro to Sociology 101, was peopled with mostly matriculated students, both Native American and White.

One who sat close to the front was a marvelous character who had an imp of the Irish within and a laugh that carried everyone along for the ride. Lou was bright, inquisitive, and talented. He played guitar in a band to help support his family while he went back to school for a degree.

A couple of months later I found myself sitting at Lou’s dining table for a Thanksgiving dinner. There was always room at the family table for another diner, with/without an invitation. Drop in and you were invited to partake in whatever meal was being served.

That was a marvelous day, filled with laughter and discovery as to who these new friends were, who were making a place for themselves in my heart.

Over the next year, Lou and I discovered some peculiar links between us. The more we talked, the more “deja-vu” things became. We’d both lived in Jackson, WY, at the same time, went to the same places, knew some of the same people, and yet, had never met. We knew the same woman in Detroit who owned a business just outside the boundary of Greektown. I’d been there several times during a period of residency in Rochester.

Those were just two of the oddities. It was as if our lives had been entangled in this family way for so long, while neither knew of the other’s existence.

There are those who posit that people connect with those whose souls have always been close to them over time and in past lives. I cannot refute that any more than I can prove it.

All I can say is that this man is as close to me in some ways as a brother of blood would be, that I hurt if he’s in distress, and that his family is as dear to me as the one into which I was born.

I don’t get to see him often enough. We live hours apart now, but when schedules and weather permits, I go to see this other family of mine. I get to talk with both Lou and his wife, two of their children, and get to know the grandchildren now. And while their trials are their own, as mine belong to me, they will always hold a piece of my heart and thoughts and reside in my prayers each night.

I love you all, Lou, warts and all.

Claudsy


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