What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: new words, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 5 of 5
1. New words are great for back to school

By Dennis Baron It's back to school, and that means it's time for dictionaries to trot out their annual lists of new words. Dictionary-maker Merriam-Webster released a list of 150 words just added to its New Collegiate Dictionary for 2011, including "cougar," a middle-aged woman seeking a romantic relationship with a younger man, "boomerang child," a young adult who returns to live at home for financial reasons, and "social media" -- if you don't know what that means, then you're still living in the last century.

0 Comments on New words are great for back to school as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
2. Woot woot–get ready to retweet this breaking news.

Due to the incredible response to Angus Stevenson's morning post, we've decided to share a little bit more about the brand new Concise Oxford English Dictionary, which is celebrating its 100th birthday. This fully updated 12th edition contains more than 240,000

0 Comments on Woot woot–get ready to retweet this breaking news. as of 8/18/2011 10:53:00 AM
Add a Comment
3. Dead End Dating by Kimberly Raye


Cover Image In this lighthearted, fluffy vampire novel, Raye introduces us to Lil Marchette, a born vampire who prefers pink to black.  She has decided not to go into the family business (copying, not mob related at all) and start a matchmaking business for humans, vampires, and others.  There is only one problem….she can’t seem to get any clients and there is a murderous man on the loose hunting down women who go to dating agencies.  Plus her parents keep setting her up with eligible born vampires (yes, apparently in this world vampires can have children) while she is getting the hots for a made vampire that she has no right to be looking at.  It is completely irreverent and more chick lit than vampire.  It reminds me a bit of Marta Acosta’s work.  There is obviously more to the story of Lil and it should be fun to see where Raye takes it.  

0 Comments on Dead End Dating by Kimberly Raye as of 1/1/1990
Add a Comment
4. Overheard: “-ish.”

It’s how Maggie, my 10-year-old daughter, answers certain types of questions these days.

For example, “Maggie, are you feeling better now that you’ve rested?”

“-ish,” she answers. As in, better-ish. Kind of, sort of, a little, not really.

Or perhaps it’s spelled “Ish.” Hard to tell, though I prefer the hyphenated, lower case version. The questions that elicit this response tend to be qualitative in nature. But the range seems to be widening, with “-ish” covering more ground. Not dissimilar to, say, meh.

“How do you like that coffee ice cream?”

“-ish,” she’ll reply from the back seat, licking away without any great enthusiasm, waffling on the waffle cone.

No character in my books has used “-ish” in dialogue. But I suspect that’s going to change.

Add a Comment
5. Defining our language for 100 years

By Angus Stevenson Since the publication of its first edition in 1911, the revolutionary Concise Oxford Dictionary has remained in print and gained fame around the world over the course of eleven editions. This month heralds the publication of the centenary edition: the new 12th edition of the Concise Oxford English Dictionary contains some 400 new entries, including cyberbullying, domestic goddess, gastric band, sexting, slow food, and textspeak.

0 Comments on Defining our language for 100 years as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment