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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Character Design, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 198
1. Just 2 more days....

Oh boy oh boy, I am so excited!

It's hard to believe that it's almost 'D-Day'! This Friday, Sketchbook Skool is opening its doors and there is an overwhelming amount of students about to burst in! In fact, I think there's actually some of them already in front of the doors in sleeping bags, waiting to get started.



We have worked really hard to get everything up and running and the past months have been kind of crazy, but this week, for the first time in a long time I haven't had the feeling of being a few steps behind of my schedule. While checking and double-checking all of the klass content, I am so amazed and excited about the videos the teachers made! It'll be awesome and Danny and I can be proud of what we have accomplished so far. Fact is, we just dove into this without knowing what exactly we were getting ourselves into. We've learned a lot, and now we can focus on getting in place for the second semester (the teachers we got together are again, awesome!), improve our website workflow and planning strategies.

So here's what we got in store for you this first semester, starting Friday April 4:

Danny Gregory on why we need to be creative and what happens if we suppress the urge. How to draw expressively and yet accurately. How to choose art supplies. And much more from L.A.!

Me on taming your inner critic. On drawing better with colored pencils and on braving the frigid outdoors. And a whole lot more from Amsterdam!

Prashant Miranda on 20 years of journaling, on travel, on watercoloring and on discovering your family history through your sketchbook. And much more from all around India!

Jane La Fazio on mixed media, on how to uncover beauty and on turning sketchbook pages into developed works of art. And much more from sunny Southern California!

Roz Stendahl on how to draw animals of any kind, alive or dead(!), and what are the best media to use and why. And loads more from snowy Minnesota!

Tommy Kane on how to turn mistakes into masterpieces, and how to combine ink, watercolors and colored pencil to make rich, beautiful journal pages. And heaps more from deep in Brooklyn.



I'm not sure if I will be able to sleep, because of the excitement! Will you?


0 Comments on Just 2 more days.... as of 4/2/2014 12:25:00 PM
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2. Yawn


Sometimes, when it's the end of the day and I realize I didn't have time to make a daily drawing or sketch in my drawing journal, I take it to bed with me. To do a little bedtime sketch. Yesterday, when I did so, I was yawning a lot because of the long day behind me. So I snapped a pic of myself and used it as a reference to make this self portrait sketch.
The funny thing is... each time I look at it, I start yawning again!

(ps. in my upcoming class on How To Design A Character, we'll be working on a lot of different facial expressions and how to draw them - this one has a lot of character already!)


0 Comments on Yawn as of 3/22/2014 9:01:00 AM
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3. Learn character design from concept to completion with Character Mentor

You’ve researched your character extensively, tailored her to your audience, sketched hundreds of versions, and now you lean back content as you gaze at your final character model sheet. But now what? Whether you want to use her in an animated film, television show, video game, web comic, or children’s book, you’re going to have to make her perform. How a character looks and is costumed starts to tell her story, but her body language reveals even more. Character Mentor shows you how to pose your character, create emotion through facial expressions, and stage your character to create drama. Author Tom Bancroft addresses each topic with clear, concise prose, and then shows you what he really means through commenting on and redrawing artwork from a variety of student “apprentices.” His assignments allow you to join in and bring your drawing to the next level with concrete techniques, as well as more theoretical analysis. Character Mentor is an apprenticeship in a book.

Professional artists from a variety of media offer their experience through additional commentary. These include Marcus Hamilton (Dennis the Menace), Terry Dodson (X-Men), Bobby Rubio (Pixar), Sean “Cheeks” Galloway (Spiderman animated), and more. With a foreword by comicbook artist Adam Hughes, who has produced work for DC, Marvel Comics, Lucasfilm, Warner Bros. Pictures, and other companies.

Grab this book Character Mentor: Learn by Example to Use Expressions, Poses, and Staging to Bring Your Characters to Life on Amazon.

  • Paperback: 180 pages
  • Publisher: Focal Press; 1 edition (April 24, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0240820711

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4. I’ve been working on some comic con illustrations and took...



I’ve been working on some comic con illustrations and took a break to sketch out Zelda from link the past. 



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5. A Lesson on Character Design by ‘SpongeBob’ Artist Robertryan Cory

Robert Ryan Cory, a veteran character designer on "SpongeBob SquarePants" and "Secret Mountain Fort Awesome," has posted a helpful set of notes from a character design lecture he presented recently to CalArts animation students.

0 Comments on A Lesson on Character Design by ‘SpongeBob’ Artist Robertryan Cory as of 3/11/2014 2:30:00 AM
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6. Crime Noir for Comics and Graphic Novels

Crime Noir is the most sophisticated, exciting, and dangerous comic book genre around. It is the highly stylized, modern version of such classic 1950s films as “The Maltese Falcon” and “The Asphalt Jungle”. Modern crime noir is exploding in popularity with movies such as “Batman Begins” and graphic novels such as Frank Miller’s “Sin City”. This genre focuses on the mean streets of the city and its amoral characters. Picture windswept streets, deep shadowy figures, reckless woman, men without conscience, reluctant heroes, and boulevards of fear. It’s the desperation of ordinary men, and the loneliness of the action hero. “Drawing Crime Noir” teaches the aspiring artist how to use all of the latest techniques and principles to create the moody world of crime noir. Extensive instruction is offered in the use of shadows to create intense comic book moods and suspense. And there’s more: the costumes of noir – the trench coats and sunglasses of the nihilistic characters: the mobbed-up politicians on the take; and the hit men who keep order; the sexy women who would just as soon kill you as kiss you; techniques for creating dark, brooding, costumed action heroes; and how to turn an ordinary comic book scene into a crime noir scene and how to draw the weapons that the criminals use to make crime pay. Strong, cutting-edge imagery shows artists how to make crime pay. Superstar Christopher Hart explores a new genre. It is perfect for anyone interested in drawing for comic books or graphic

Support Rabbleboy and get this awesome book on Amazon Drawing Crime Noir: For Comics and Graphic Novels

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7. Virtual Animators with James Lopez

Last fall I took a class with Virtual Animators (http://www.virtualanimators.com/)  taught by James Lopez. I’ve had quite a few questions from the internets about what I thought, so I thought I’d write a note about my experience.

About the class: Character Design with Disney Artist & Animator James Lopez is a 12 week course taught online. See his IMDB here or amazing work here. The class is viewed through Adobe connect once per week for 12 (12!) weeks. You log in and the VA team, James and your classmates are online. You can ask questions via a chat box, and the VA team does a great job keeping track of the chat and bringing questions to James. The class is not structured, giving James the freedom to teach the class to the group’s skill level. You are also invited to send it work weekly to have it reviewed by James online.

What I thought: 

1. The cost: usually where I’d start when considering a class. I didn’t have to consider the class cost here, since I won this class in a contest, but even if I hadn’t it would be a great deal. (As a note: this is not an endorsed post, haha). All of these courses are so affordable- This one was $250, which is really a couple of trips to the grocery store. For 12 weeks, that breaks down to $20/ class- for an experienced teacher at James, who teaches at Cal Arts… it’s beyond a bargain.

2. The class size: SMALL. There were under ten people in our class, which allows for everyone to ask questions and see James visually explain the answer. You can send emails with questions and receive individual attention.

3. The talent & experience of the instructors: I’ve only taken one class with VA (I am planning on another class this spring/ summer) and the instructors are so experienced and knowledgeable it’s unreal to have this sort of individualized attention. James is a friendly and giving individual who really cares about paying it forward and working with artists of all skill levels. He’s got so much knowledge and information it’s a thrill to see him visually work out problems and review your work. 

4. The Virtual Animators team: Usually I wouldn’t touch on the “customer service” aspect in this sort of thing, but it was so amazing it needs to be mentioned. The small group who runs this online class system are probably the most genuine and friendly team ever. They’re focused around making a good experience for everyone involved, and keep up with their students. If I had a question or concern I would have an email back super quick. Also, as I mentioned above, they are in the classes with you running the sessions and keep on top of questions for the instructor. 

5. Work Review: You send in your work, it gets a review online that week or the next. James was thorough and incredibly professional when reviewing work- it sort of felt like I was working with him at a studio! I learned a lot in such a small amount of time. 

6. Recorded Classes: Classes are recored and posted on vimeo so you can watch later, or if you miss a class you can catch up. This was really helpful to me, watching in the midwest where the class time was late. Also, if you miss something, you can re-watch the class too!

7. A Personal Connection to the industry: As I mentioned above, I’m located in the midwest. It’s sort of like being on my own island, far away from the sunshine and talent network of California. Being involved in this class allowed me to connect at CTNX to the VA team, including founder Bill Recinos (who has an impressive IMDB himself), meet James Lopez and be involved in the community.

Ok, so, that’s a lot of writing. I guess you can see that I really loved the class. Negatives include the regular things of online classes- difficult to connect to classmates, really late live class times because of the time difference- but the benefits far outweigh these small points. I’m going to be completely honest, if you’ve ever thought of taking an online class, don’t think twice about this one, or any with these guys. This class is definitely the best online class I’ve taken based on the personal attention, small class size and the amount of information I learned in a short period of time.

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8. Sketch of the day: Jem!



Sketch of the day: Jem!



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9. Ten Monsters in a Bed


Do you like burps, slurps, snores or sneezes? How about monsters? What about monsters that burp, slurp, snore or sneeze (and fart)? Well, then, here's the book for you- Ten Monsters in a Bed!



A fun, colorful, noisy picture book- perfect to read before bedtime! It's published by Templar Publishing, the same wonderful UK publisher that I illustrate the shark series- Harry Hammer for!

 Templar's description-


In this play on '10 in a bed', 10 monsters are very squished on a bunk bed. On each spread, a monster gets pushed out on to the floor, where readers can press them to hear the fun sounds they make, for example: snoring, scratching, burping, slurping, sniffing and farting.

In each spread, a different noisy monster is kicked out of the top bunk bed by his fellow monsters, where the reader can press a button to activate that monster's noise.



Some near-final sketches of the ten monsters-

Pick up your copy here-

Templar Publishing
Book Depository
Waterstones
Amazon UK
Amazon US

Some early nice reviews-

Read it Daddy!
Red Reading Hub

PS- Sorry for the long time of (8 months!) lack of blogging- I've been posting all news on my Facebook and Twitter but I'll try to add more big news here when I can!

My Facebook Page
My Twitter Page

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10. Drover with horse


 Another experiment with the loose pen style. More practice at hatching will do me good. I had to fix a few spots in Photoshop and the horse didn't fade away into the background quite like I'd pictured it.

0 Comments on Drover with horse as of 4/9/2013 11:16:00 PM
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11. Why Is It So Difficult to Make Cute Characters?

Over on question-and-answer website Quora, someone posted a very simple question: Which is the cutest cartoon character ever created? The answers from Quora members cover a broad spectrum, some more obvious (Tweety, Pokemon, Pooh) and others less so (Gertie the Dinosaur, Night Fury from How to Train Your Dragon).

So what makes a cartoon character cute? You could reduce the answer down to a few basic characteristics: big eyes and head, fluffiness, warmth and chubbiness. “Cuteness is based on the basic proportions of a baby plus the expressions of shyness or coyness,” wrote Preston Blair in Advanced Animation. According to Blair, other cute traits include:

  • Head large in relation to the body.
  • Eyes spaced low on the head and usually wide and far apart.
  • Fat legs, short and tapering down into small feet for type.
  • Tummy bulges—looks well fed.

But cuteness is far more complex than even Blair’s set of rules; some consider E.T., Yoda and WALL·E to be the epitome of cute, despite their furless, odd appearances. Cuteness and a character’s perceived hugability aren’t always determined by aesthetic appeal. “Cuteness is distinct from beauty,” wrote Natalie Angier for The New York Times. “Beauty attracts admiration and demands a pedestal; cuteness attracts affection and demands a lap.”

In essence, any creature deemed cute is one that speaks to our nurturing instincts. The cuteness of an infant can motivate an adult to take care of it, even if the baby is not a blood relation. Even more, studies have found that humans transfer these same emotions to animals (or even inanimate objects) that bear our similar features. Finding Nemo combined all of these psychological elements perfectly—you can’t hug or cuddle a fish, yet adorable Nemo, with his fin damaged from birth and his human-like facial features, appeals to our caregiving instincts. In fact, every character in Pixar films, whether it’s a clownfish or a car, features forward-facing eyes, the most crucial feature for achieving an emotional connection with the audience.

But with any extreme comes another. If a character is too cute and sugary sweet, the audience can develop skepticism. “Cute cuts through all layers of meaning and says, ‘Let’s not worry about complexities, just love me,’” philosopher Denis Dutton told The New York Times. It is for that very reason cuteness stirs uneasiness and sometimes feels cheap.

After all, the adorable, smiling face of a child can hide the havoc he just wreaked by breaking all of his toys. “Cuteness thus coexists in a dynamic relationship with the perverse,” writes Daniel Harris in his book Cute, Quaint, Hungry And Romantic: The Aesthetics Of Consumerism. You could call this the Gremlin Effect—a character with an underlying creepiness. Troll dolls (which were recently acquired by DreamWorks Animation) and Cabbage Patch Kids are the inexplicable result of this paradox.

There’s no denying a cultural need to pigeonhole and perfect the attributes that could be popularly deemed cute. In his fantastic short essay on Mickey Mouse, biologist and historian Stephen Jay Gould asserts that Mickey’s changing appearance over time is a physical evolution that mirrors cultural attitudes toward cuteness. As the Benjamin Button of animated rodentia, Mickey’s eyes and head have grown larger, his arms and legs chubbier. Mickey has become more childlike and, most would say, more cute and less rat-like. Mickey isn’t the only character to undergo this transformation. The teddy bear, first sold in 1903, started out anatomically similar to a real bear, with a long snout and gangly arms. Today’s teddy bears more closely resemble the Care Bears, with pudgier features and colorful fur.

Audience don’t always need Mickey’s goofy grins and huge eyes to connect with a character’s cuteness. Pictoplasma, the artists’ network and conference that celebrates characters extracted from context, reveals how sometimes it’s our own invented narrative that blasts a character into hall-of-fame cuteness. As Pictoplasma co-founder Peter Thaler said explains, “It’s a horrible example, but Hello Kitty has no facial expression. You don’t know if she’s happy or sad; you just see these two dots. You’re projecting all the narration, the biography.”

Our ideals of cuteness continue to evolve, a trajectory in visual culture that has birthed Hello Kitty and Japan’s kawaii movement, Giga Pets, Furby, Elmo and Slimer. Often the most exciting, memorable cute characters are the ones who bear negative traits that reveal the vulnerability. Scrat, the saber-toothed squirrel from Ice Age, is adorable and loved by audiences even more for his greed. Cuteness, perhaps then, is not just about an objective set of physical features—it’s also about a behavior that compels audiences and connects us emotionally to the character.

0 Comments on Why Is It So Difficult to Make Cute Characters? as of 4/24/2013 12:14:00 PM
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12. Why Is It So Difficult to Make Cute Characters?

Over on question-and-answer website Quora, someone posted a very simple question: Which is the cutest cartoon character ever created? The answers from Quora members cover a broad spectrum, some more obvious (Tweety, Pokemon, Pooh) and others less so (Gertie the Dinosaur, Night Fury from How to Train Your Dragon).

So what makes a cartoon character cute? You could reduce the answer down to a few basic characteristics: big eyes and head, fluffiness, warmth and chubbiness. “Cuteness is based on the basic proportions of a baby plus the expressions of shyness or coyness,” wrote Preston Blair in Advanced Animation. According to Blair, other cute traits include:

  • Head large in relation to the body.
  • Eyes spaced low on the head and usually wide and far apart.
  • Fat legs, short and tapering down into small feet for type.
  • Tummy bulges—looks well fed.

But cuteness is far more complex than even Blair’s set of rules; some consider E.T., Yoda and WALL·E to be the epitome of cute, despite their furless, odd appearances. Cuteness and a character’s perceived hugability aren’t always determined by aesthetic appeal. “Cuteness is distinct from beauty,” wrote Natalie Angier for The New York Times. “Beauty attracts admiration and demands a pedestal; cuteness attracts affection and demands a lap.”

In essence, any creature deemed cute is one that speaks to our nurturing instincts. The cuteness of an infant can motivate an adult to take care of it, even if the baby is not a blood relation. Even more, studies have found that humans transfer these same emotions to animals (or even inanimate objects) that bear our similar features. Finding Nemo combined all of these psychological elements perfectly—you can’t hug or cuddle a fish, yet adorable Nemo, with his fin damaged from birth and his human-like facial features, appeals to our caregiving instincts. In fact, every character in Pixar films, whether it’s a clownfish or a car, features forward-facing eyes, the most crucial feature for achieving an emotional connection with the audience.

But with any extreme comes another. If a character is too cute and sugary sweet, the audience can develop skepticism. “Cute cuts through all layers of meaning and says, ‘Let’s not worry about complexities, just love me,’” philosopher Denis Dutton told The New York Times. It is for that very reason cuteness stirs uneasiness and sometimes feels cheap.

After all, the adorable, smiling face of a child can hide the havoc he just wreaked by breaking all of his toys. “Cuteness thus coexists in a dynamic relationship with the perverse,” writes Daniel Harris in his book Cute, Quaint, Hungry And Romantic: The Aesthetics Of Consumerism. You could call this the Gremlin Effect—a character with an underlying creepiness. Troll dolls (which were recently acquired by DreamWorks Animation) and Cabbage Patch Kids are the inexplicable result of this paradox.

There’s no denying a cultural need to pigeonhole and perfect the attributes that could be popularly deemed cute. In his fantastic short essay on Mickey Mouse, biologist and historian Stephen Jay Gould asserts that Mickey’s changing appearance over time is a physical evolution that mirrors cultural attitudes toward cuteness. As the Benjamin Button of animated rodentia, Mickey’s eyes and head have grown larger, his arms and legs chubbier. Mickey has become more childlike and, most would say, more cute and less rat-like. Mickey isn’t the only character to undergo this transformation. The teddy bear, first sold in 1903, started out anatomically similar to a real bear, with a long snout and gangly arms. Today’s teddy bears more closely resemble the Care Bears, with pudgier features and colorful fur.

Audience don’t always need Mickey’s goofy grins and huge eyes to connect with a character’s cuteness. Pictoplasma, the artists’ network and conference that celebrates characters extracted from context, reveals how sometimes it’s our own invented narrative that blasts a character into hall-of-fame cuteness. As Pictoplasma co-founder Peter Thaler said explains, “It’s a horrible example, but Hello Kitty has no facial expression. You don’t know if she’s happy or sad; you just see these two dots. You’re projecting all the narration, the biography.”

Our ideals of cuteness continue to evolve, a trajectory in visual culture that has birthed Hello Kitty and Japan’s kawaii movement, Giga Pets, Furby, Elmo and Slimer. Often the most exciting, memorable cute characters are the ones who bear negative traits that reveal the vulnerability. Scrat, the saber-toothed squirrel from Ice Age, is adorable and loved by audiences even more for his greed. Cuteness, perhaps then, is not just about an objective set of physical features—it’s also about a behavior that compels audiences and connects us emotionally to the character.

0 Comments on Why Is It So Difficult to Make Cute Characters? as of 4/24/2013 1:34:00 PM
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13. Rainy Days

It's May already and I forgot about the blog, I gave up on a new portfolio site for now and on Tumblr. I have been working a lot though, so hopefully this is a good excuse!
This is an old drawing, maybe some of you will remember it. It started as a watercolour and traditional collage and was then forgotten on my old external hard drive. I found it and heavily reworked it in Photoshop. The original never really met my expectations, but now she's quite a character. Maybe, she has a story to tell. For now we're both enjoying the rain, hoping spring will last a little longer... Read the rest of this post

1 Comments on Rainy Days, last added: 5/7/2013
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14. Pandistelle


At the beginning of this year I was called for a very fun project!
Pandistelle, one of Italy's most famous cookies turned 30 years old. To celebrate, Barilla alonside the nice people of creative agency "I Mille", called 12 artists to illustrate every month of the new year for their online magazine and Facebook page. Mine was for the month of April.



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15. A spark, a robot, a whirlpool and a card.



When the new stationery layouts landed in my mailbox a few weeks ago, I knew the "Thank You" card was trouble. I can't say why, but while the rest of them had little sparks of inspiration all over the edges, this card was a big, blank space. I left it for last and moved on with the rest of my work…

If you follow me on Twitter, you know I have a son, Elia or E. as most of my online friends know him. He will be 8 in July. He's curious, imaginative and won't take an easy answer. His questions demand spectacular revelations or something vague and mysterious enough to leave him thinking for a while.
You don't have to be a parent to work as a picture book illustrator. I've always lived the two things separately. For a long time, the illustrating process was just my own big ego trip. It was me, my 6 year old-self and sometimes, a more feminine version of Gaia appearing in my drawings. Then as E. grew older, I started to listen more. Not only he has a lot of questions, but has opinions, plans and most of all, stories!

Two weeks ago, I was finishing a big illustration and part of it was the image of a cycle. I won't go into details, but I had this flat circle and I was trying to avoid using arrows, while giving the idea of movement. Another blank space, no spark at all…
E. asked what it was and I told him the blue circle was water with different life stages of a sea creature. He looked at the screen for a while then pointing his finger and moving it around, said: "Like water in the bath tub". Boom! It was under my nose. A whirlpool!

As I solved this puzzle, I also had an idea for the Thank You card. The old robot needed new batteries and a new spark. A small explorer arrived to help. I had more fun designing this, than any other card in the group. I wasn't reaching out to the princess I've never been as a child, but to a little boy with golden wings.

There are so many things I don't do anymore, now that I am a parent. In the past I used to travel a lot and everything was a little bit easier and more adventurous. I could take risks. These thoughts only lasts a little minute though. Most of the time I'm too busy finding a good answer to the many questions I receive:

- Is a "brown dwarf" a sad star? The guy on tv says it's a star without light, a failed star...
- Is Mercury cold or entirely covered with olives? Not trees, just olives.
- If Mothra lands on our house, will my Flytrap plant be enough to fight it off?
- I think Dante the Elephant has a small phone book, do you know why?
- Do you keep cosmic piranhas in your socks drawer?
- Do you know the cartoonist who draws this comic? Really? Let's send him a note saying "Dude, you're awesome!"
- Would you rather have a daimon or a backpack with tentacles? Answer carefully, both are very cool, but you can have only one!

I don't think you must be a parent to illustrate or write picture books, but if you have one of these creativity bombs walking around your house, listen. Give answers, ask question, but mostly listen. They have opinions, unexpected solutions, silly plans and most of all, they love a good story as much as you do.

2 Comments on A spark, a robot, a whirlpool and a card., last added: 5/28/2013
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16. Be a Vis Dev Children's Illustrator!



I am having lots of fun on my personal project!! I want to make sure I am doing all the prep work to make sure it's the best book I can make! I've learned a lot this year from Visual Development/Concept Artists about the importance of planning. My goodness, before this year, I had no idea what "Vis Dev" even meant!

As Seth Godin would put it in his book Linchpin- this is "thrashing." It's important to thrash (or do all the exploring, bad work, and planning) at the beginning of the project or you will be doing bad thrashing at the end of your project (with bad results). Thrashing at the beginning will make everything much better in the long run. How will you know if you have the best solutions unless you explore many of them?

Above is what I finally came up with for my characters. I decided to make Sculpey maquettes of the characters to use for reference- lighting and angles etc. The proportions are not exact, but it gives me a good reference anyway. I will probably paint them soon. I am also going to post a video soon of how I made them. I also started doing some color studies of the main character- Brunhilda. This is so much fun, I am loving this!

2 Comments on Be a Vis Dev Children's Illustrator!, last added: 8/15/2013
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17. At the Market

0500


Tagged: Art, Beach, California, character design, Humor, Illustration, quick sketch, sketchbook

11 Comments on At the Market, last added: 9/8/2013
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18. Sailor Moon will always hold a special place in my animation...



Sailor Moon will always hold a special place in my animation loving heart. 

Background was referenced from: http://yuninaoki.deviantart.com/



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19. Bubbies

bubbies


Tagged: Allen Capoferri, Aquatic Life, Art, character design, Fish, Humor, Illustration, Pre-Vis

10 Comments on Bubbies, last added: 10/21/2013
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20. Bubbies

bubbies Rough characters from “A Fish Story”.


Tagged: Allen Capoferri, Aquatic Life, Art, character design, Fish, Humor, Illustration, Pre-Vis

0 Comments on Bubbies as of 10/21/2013 11:22:00 AM
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21. 3D Henry

Look what I got in my inbox!

Mohamed from Egypt is learning 3d programs. He used my model sheet of Henry  (from Henry and the Buccaneer Bunnies) to create this beautiful digital image. I love the textures of the different articles of clothing—the leather vest, the woolen shirt.

mohamed.henry

digital art created by Mohamed Eldemerdash

Thanks, Mohamed!


5 Comments on 3D Henry, last added: 12/13/2013
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22. Cold

cold copy

It was.


Tagged: About Me, Allen Capoferri, Art, character design, Christmas, Illustration, people sketches, quick sketch, sketchbook, sketchbook drawing, USA

10 Comments on Cold, last added: 12/22/2013
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23. Cold

cold copy

It was.


Tagged: About Me, Allen Capoferri, Art, character design, Christmas, Commentary, Illustration, people sketches, quick sketch, sketchbook, sketchbook drawing, USA

0 Comments on Cold as of 12/23/2013 1:56:00 PM
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24. Primordal

primordal

Sketchbook fun.


Tagged: Allen Capoferri, Art, character design, Illustration, sketchbook, sketchbook drawing

10 Comments on Primordal, last added: 1/20/2014
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25. Here’s Charlie

Twenty-fourteen is a big year here in Oil City, Pennsylvania. It was 100 years ago, just a couple of doors up from my studio address, that Charlie Chaplin signed his first movie deal with Mack Sennett. Charlie was performing at the Lyric Theater with Fred Karno’s comedy troupe and met Sennett in between acts to sign the contract. Here’s a detailed account of Charlie’s early career.

I was approached by the Friends of the Library to create a stand-alone cut-out of Charlie. They wanted him big—8 feet tall. I went over to the library to see where Charlie would be installed and discovered that there is not very much floor space but there is ample height—the main floor’s ceiling is about 16 feet high. I scrapped the drawing I’d done of Charlie standing and drew Charlie suspended, using his cane as a hook. I think this pose fits his acrobatic style.

I enlarged my drawing onto pieces of foam board. The project is 3 ply, so that I could paint front & back without it warping. His arm has a center of plywood and his cane itself is 3 pieces of plywood laminated together, since it supports the whole piece.

He is painted with acrylic in black & white, of course!

hangingcharlie.front charliechaplin.sk hangingcharlie.front hangingcharlie.back IMGP1914 IMGP1915 IMGP1916 IMGP1917 IMGP1918 IMGP1919 IMGP1920 IMGP1921 IMGP1922 IMGP1923 IMGP1924 IMGP1925 IMGP1940 IMGP1941 IMGP1942 IMGP1943 IMGP1944 IMGP1945 IMGP1946 IMGP1947 IMGP1948 IMGP1949 IMGP1951 IMGP1952 IMGP1953 IMGP1954 IMGP1955 IMGP1956 IMGP1957 IMGP1958 IMGP1959 IMGP1960 IMGP1961 IMGP1964 IMGP1965 IMGP1966 IMGP1967 IMGP1968 IMGP1969 IMGP1970 IMGP1971 IMGP1972 IMGP1973 IMGP1974 IMGP1975 IMGP1976 IMGP1977 IMGP1978 IMGP1979 IMGP2001 IMGP2002 IMGP2003 IMGP2004 IMGP2005


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