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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: pixar, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 182
1. What?!? When!?!: Your Updated Comics Cinema Calendar, February 2015 Edition

pixels3Here’s the updated dance card for superhero movies, selected animated films, and geek-centric films.

Updates are in bold.

2/13/2015Kingsman: The Secret ServiceFox
5/1/2015The Avengers: Age of UltronMarvel
6/19/2015Inside OutPixar
7/10/2015MininonsUniversal
7/17/2015Ant-ManMarvel
7/24/2015PixelsSony/Columbia
8/7/2015The Fantastic FourFox
8/14/2015Underdogs (Metegol)Weinstein
10/23/2015Jem and the HologramsUniversal
11/6/2015The Peanuts MovieFox
11/25/2015The Good DinosaurPixar
12/18/2015Star Wars: The Force AwakensDisney
Unknown 2015PopeyeSony
   
   
Unknown 2016Untitled Lego MovieWarners
2/12/2016DeadpoolFox
3/4/2016ZootopiaDisney
3/25/2016Batman v SupermanDCE
5/6/2016Captain America: Civil WarMarvel
5/27/2016X-Men: ApocalypseFox
6/3/2016Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2Paramount
6/17/2016Finding DoryPixar
7/8/2016??? (Was Doctor Strange)Marvel
7/8/2016Star Trek 3Paramount
7/22/2016Power RangersLionsgate
8/5/2016Suicide SquadDCE
8/5/2016Untitled Smurfs MovieSony
8/19/2016Kubo and the Two StringsFocus/Laika
9/23/2016NinjagoWarners
10/7/2016GambitFox
10/7/2016Monster HighUniversal
11/4/2016Doctor StrangeMarvel
11/18/2016HP: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find ThemWarners
11/23/2016MoanaDisney
12/16/2016Untitled Star WarsDisney
   
Unknown 2017Wonder WomanDCE
Unknown 2017Justice League, Part OneDCE
Unknown 2017Lego BatmanWarners
2/10/2017Untitled Warner Animation Group ProjectWarners
3/3/2017Untitled WolverineFox
3/10/2017Captain UnderpantsDreamworks
4/14/2017Ghost in the ShellDisney
5/5/2017Guardians of the Galaxy 2Marvel
5/26/2017Untitled LEGO MovieWarners
6/2/2017The Fantastic Four 2Fox
6/16/2017Toy Story 4Pixar
6/23/2017Untitled DCDCE
7/7/2017Pirates Of The Caribbean 5Disney
7/28/2017Unititled Spider-ManSony/Marvel
11/3/2017Thor: RagnarokMarvel
11/17/2017Untitled DCDCE
11/22/2017Untitled Pixar AnimationPixar
   
Unknown 2018FlashDCE
Unknown 2018AquamanDCE
Unknown 2018Lego Movie 2Warners
Unknown 2018HP: Fantastic BeastsWarners
2/9/2018Untitled Warner Animation Group ProjectWarners
3/9/2018Untitled Disney AnimationDisney
3/23/2018Untitled DCDCE
5/4/2018Avengers: Infinity War, Part 1Marvel
5/25/2018Untitled Warner Animated FilmWarners
6/15/2018Untitled Pixar AnimationPixar
7/6/2018Black PantherMarvel
7/13/2018Untitled Fox / MarvelFox / Marvel
7/27/2018Untitled DCDCE
11/2/2018Captain MarvelMarvel
11/16/2018Untitled WB Event FilmWarners
11/21/2018Untitled Disney AnimationDisney
   
Unknown 2019ShazamDCE
Unknown 2019Justice League Part TwoDCE
4/5/2019Untitled DCDCE
5/3/2019Avengers: Infinity War, Part 2Marvel
5/24/2019Untitled Warner Animated FilmWarners
6/14/2019Untitled DCDCE
7/12/2019InhumansMarvel
   
Unknown 2020CyborgDCE
Unknown 2020Green LanternDCE
Unknown 2020HP: Fantastic BeastsWarners
4/3/2020Untitled DCDCE
6/19/2020Untitled DCDCE
11/20/2020Untitled WB Event FilmWarners
   
UNKNOWNSinister SixSony

6 Comments on What?!? When!?!: Your Updated Comics Cinema Calendar, February 2015 Edition, last added: 2/14/2015
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2. Watch 27 Best Animated Film Oscar Presentations

These rare videos document the presentation of the animated short Oscar from 1949 through 2013.

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3. Former Disney Artist Explains How Ed Catmull Tricked Him

Ed Catmull allegedly told Disney artists they were free to find higher-paying work at other studios while he knew they couldn't.

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4. Disney Is Creating a Navajo Version of ‘Finding Nemo’ For A Good Cause

Disney is dubbing Pixar's "Finding Nemo" into the Navajo language.

0 Comments on Disney Is Creating a Navajo Version of ‘Finding Nemo’ For A Good Cause as of 12/24/2014 9:42:00 AM
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5. Techno-magic: Cinema and fairy tale

Movie producers have altered the way fairy tales are told, but in what ways have they been able to present an illusion that once existed only in the pages of a story? Below is an excerpt from Marina Warner’s Once Upon a Time that explores the magic that movies bring to the tales:

From the earliest experiments by George Meliès in Paris in the 1890s to the present day dominion of Disney Productions and Pixar, fairy tales have been told in the cinema. The concept of illusion carries two distinct, profound, and contradictory meanings in the medium of film: first, the film itself is an illusion, and, bar a few initiates screaming at the appearance of a moving train in the medium’s earliest viewings, everyone in the cinema knows they are being stunned by wonders wrought by science. All appearances in the cinema are conjured by shadow play and artifice, and technologies ever more skilled at illusion: CGI produces living breathing simulacra—of velociraptors (Jurassic Park), elvish castles (Lord of the Rings), soaring bionicmonsters (Avatar), grotesque and terrifying monsters (the Alien series), while the modern Rapunzel wields her mane like a lasso and a whip, or deploys it to make a footbridge. Such visualizations are designed to stun us, and they succeed: so much is being done for us by animators and filmmakers, there is no room for personal imaginings. The wicked queen in Snow White (1937) has become imprinted, and she keeps those exact features when we return to the story; Ariel, Disney’s flame-haired Little Mermaid, has eclipsed her wispy and poignant predecessors, conjured chiefly by the words of Andersen’s story

A counterpoised form of illusion, however, now flourishes rampantly at the core of fairytale films, and has become central to the realization on screen of the stories, especially in entertainment which aims at a crossover or child audience. Contemporary commercial cinema has continued the Victorian shift from irresponsible amusement to responsible instruction, and kept faith with fairy tales’ protest against existing injustices. Many current family films posit spirited, hopeful alternatives (in Shrek Princess Fiona is podgy, liverish, ugly, and delightful; in Tangled, Rapunzel is a super heroine, brainy and brawny; in the hugely successful Disney film Frozen (2013), inspired by The Snow Queen, the younger sister Anna overcomes ice storms, avalanches, and eternal winter to save Elsa, her elder). Screenwriters display iconoclastic verve, but they are working from the premise that screen illusions have power to become fact. ‘Wishing on a star’ is the ideology of the dreamfactory, and has given rise to indignant critique, that fairy tales peddle empty consumerism and wishful thinking. The writer Terri Windling, who specializes in the genre of teen fantasy, deplores the once prevailing tendency towards positive thinking and sunny success:

The fairy tale journey may look like an outward trek across plains and mountains, through castles and forests, but the actual movement is inward, into the lands of the soul. The dark path of the fairytale forest lies in the shadows of our imagination, the depths of our unconscious. To travel to the wood, to face its dangers, is to emerge transformed by this experience. Particularly for children whose world does not resemble the simplified world of television sit-coms . . . this ability to travel inward, to face fear and transform it, is a skill they will use all their lives. We do children—and ourselves—a grave disservice by censoring the old tales, glossing over the darker passages and ambiguities

Fairy tale and film enjoy a profound affinity because the cinema animates phenomena, no matter how inert; made of light and motion, its illusions match the enchanted animism of fairy tale: animals speak, carpets fly, objects move and act of their own accord. One of the darker forerunners of Mozart’s flute is an uncanny instrument that plays in several ballads and stories: a bone that bears witness to a murder. In the Grimms’ tale, ‘The Singing Bone’, the shepherd who finds it doesn’t react in terror and run, but thinks to himself, ‘What a strange little horn, singing of its own accord like that. I must take it to the king.’ The bone sings out the truth of what happened, and the whole skeleton of the victim is dug up, and his murderer—his elder brother and rival in love—is unmasked, sewn into a sack, and drowned.

This version is less than two pages long: a tiny, supersaturated solution of the Grimms: grotesque and macabre detail, uncanny dynamics of life-in-death, moral piety, and rough justice. But the story also presents a vivid metaphor for film itself: singing bones. (It’s therefore apt, if a little eerie, that the celluloid from which film stock was first made was itself composed of rendered-down bones.)

Early animators’ choice of themes reveals how they responded to a deeply laid sympathy between their medium of film and the uncanny vitality of inert things. Lotte Reiniger, the writer-director of the first full-length animated feature (The Adventures of Prince Achmed), made dazzling ‘shadow puppet’ cartoons inspired by the fairy tales of Grimm, Andersen, and Wilhelm Hauff; she continued making films for over a thirty-year period, first in her native Berlin and later in London, for children’s television. Her Cinderella (1922) is a comic—and grisly— masterpiece.

Early Disney films, made by the man himself, reflect traditional fables’ personification of animals—mice and ducks and cats and foxes; in this century, by contrast, things come to life, no matter how inert they are: computerization observes no boundaries to generating lifelike, kinetic, cybernetic, and virtual reality.

Featured image credit: “Dca animation building” by Carterhawk – Own work. Licensed under CC-BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

The post Techno-magic: Cinema and fairy tale appeared first on OUPblog.

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6. Disney, DreamWorks and Sony Describe Artists’ Wage-Theft Lawsuit As ‘Futile’

The major studios filed a motion last Friday in federal court asking a judge to dismiss the antitrust wage-fixing lawsuit that had been filed by animation industry employees.

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7. Pixar’s Tony DeRose Explains What Makes CG Characters Look So Smooth

What makes computer animation characters look so smooth? Hint: It's not the artists.

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8. Ed Catmull on Wage-Fixing: “I Don’t Apologize for This”

The wage-theft scheme run by big animation studios is finally receiving some mainstream media attention after a significant piece was published today by Bloomberg News.

0 Comments on Ed Catmull on Wage-Fixing: “I Don’t Apologize for This” as of 11/19/2014 3:28:00 PM
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9. A look at Disney’s BIG HERO 6 Art Book

Walt Disney Animation Studios’ Big Hero 6 is the story of Hiro Hamada, a brilliant robotics prodigy who must foil a criminal plot that threatens to destroy the fast-paced, high-tech city of San Fransokyo. This new title in our popular The Art of series, published to coincide with the movie’s U.S. release, features concept art from the film’s creation—including sketches, storyboards, maquette sculpts, colorscripts, and much more—illuminated by quotes and interviews with the film’s creators. Fans will love the behind-the-scenes insights into Disney’s newest action comedy adventure.


  • Hardcover: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Chronicle Books (October 28, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1452122210
  • ISBN-13: 978-1452122212

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10. Marvel vs. Pixar: Which Acquisition Made Disney Shareholders Richer?

Business publication The Motley Fool offers an interesting assessment of which Disney acquisition—Pixar or Marvel—generates more revenue for the studio.

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11. The Art of Collaboration: Robert Kondo & Dice Tsutsumi on Directing ‘The Dam Keeper’ (VIDEO)

Former Pixar art director Robert Kondo and Dice Tsutsumi talk about the challenges of directing their first independent film "The Dam Keeper."

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12. Limited Edition French ‘Inside Out’ Poster

This Disney France limited edition poster for Pete Docter's "Inside Out" (titled "Vice-Versa" in French) might just be the nicest piece of promo art for the film yet.

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13. New Evidence Emerges of Wage-Fixing by DreamWorks, Pixar and Blue Sky

The wage-theft scheme operated by major American animation studios continues to grow with no end in sight.

0 Comments on New Evidence Emerges of Wage-Fixing by DreamWorks, Pixar and Blue Sky as of 12/3/2014 9:35:00 PM
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14. New ‘Inside Out’ Trailer Released Online [UPDATED]

Disney-Pixar has debuted the first full trailer for its next film, "Inside Out," directed by Pete Docter.

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15. Disney and DreamWorks May Have Been Part of Illegal Pixar/Lucasfilm Wage-Fixing Cartel

Tech site Pando Daily has been providing amazing coverage of the Department of Justice antitrust invesigation and subsequent class action lawsuits over wage-fixing amongst Silicon Valley tech companies and animation studios.

0 Comments on Disney and DreamWorks May Have Been Part of Illegal Pixar/Lucasfilm Wage-Fixing Cartel as of 7/8/2014 6:35:00 PM
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16. Pixar’s Ed Catmull Emerges As Central Figure In The Wage-Fixing Scandal

Pixar and Disney Animation president Ed Catmull has always had a reputation as a decent person, but newly revealed court documents show that he's been working against the interests of Pixar's employees for years, as well as trying to hurt other studios who didn't play by his rules.

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17. First Rendered Image from Pixar’s ‘Lava’

The first rendered image from Pixar's new short Lava" was published today in the "LA Times."

0 Comments on First Rendered Image from Pixar’s ‘Lava’ as of 7/11/2014 7:59:00 PM
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18. Mike Mignola Created A Poster for Pixar’s ‘Toy Story That Time Forgot’ Special

Comic artist Mike Mignola created this poster for the upcoming Pixar TV special "Toy Story That Time Forgot" that will air on ABC this winter.

0 Comments on Mike Mignola Created A Poster for Pixar’s ‘Toy Story That Time Forgot’ Special as of 7/22/2014 8:20:00 AM
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19. ‘New Yorker’ Makes Animator Profiles Available For Free

As part of their website redesign, the "New Yorker" has made every article they've published since 2007 available for free on their website, including some animation-related pieces.

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20. Disney, DreamWorks, Pixar, Lucasfilm, Sony Are Sued in Wage Theft Scandal

Shocking details of wage-theft conspiracy emerge in a class action lawsuit filed against DreamWorks, Disney, Pixar, Lucasfilm, Digital Domain 3.0, Sony Pictures Imageworks and others.

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21. Creativity, Inc.

Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration Ed Catmull with Amy Wallace

Part Pixar-history, part management how-to, Catmull lays out his management philosophy with examples of how he’s implemented it.

One of the things that Catmull really values is candor and building a culture where everyone feels free and safe to give honest feedback, and where speaking truth to power is welcome and encouraged. He shows this well in his book, because he illustrates his ideas with real-life examples, and he is very honest about his missteps and what happened when things didn’t work.

And I think that’s what I appreciated most about this book--Pixar isn’t a perfect company. Many beloved movies failed multiple times before hitting the theaters. I don’t want to say this is a “warts and all” because it’s not a tell-all airing out the dirty laundry, but, at the same time, it is very honest. Catmull shows where things have gone wrong and then parses it to try to examine why and what they changed to make things better.

One the other big underlying themes is letting go of ego. When people point out ways your project isn’t working, it’s not personal. (Of course as he readily admits, not taking it personally is really hard and much easier said than done, but it’s something to strive for). You should hire people smarter than you are, and then trust them to grow and you should listen to them. I think another very good point he makes is that when managers first learn about problems in meetings, or when told about something not-in-private, it’s not a sign of disrespect and that they need to GET OVER IT.

Personally, this is something I strive for in my own management. I told everyone who works at the library in my first few weeks here that if something isn’t working, I need to know. If I’m doing something that’s not helpful, they need to tell me. I have bigger things to worry about and deal with than being personally offended when you rightfully call me out on my bullshit. (Easier said than done, but I’ve been working on separating stuff out. Dealing with the issue, and then going home and acknowledging my sad feelings and wallowing a bit, and then getting on with it.)

He’s also a big proponent of creating a culture where it’s safe to take a risk and it’s safe to fail. (As Robert Reich said in his commencement speech when I graduated from college, if you’re not occasionally failing, you’re not reaching far enough or trying hard enough.)

I like that he gets into the specifics of culture clash issues when Disney bought Pixar and he became the head of Disney Animation. He then talks about what he did to change the Disney culture and that, like most things worth doing, it didn’t happen overnight and it wasn’t always smooth.

But, one of his big things, and I think this is a good take-away for libraries is that everyone’s responsible for quality. And this ties back with his points on candor--everyone should feel empowered to look for quality issues and to go ahead and fix them or bring them to the attention of someone who can help fix them. Problems are not solutions. Often the person who notices the issue won’t have the solution, because often solutions aren’t that easy, but everyone is responsible for quality. One of the ways they foster this is to bring people from different areas and departments together. When movies are in progress, works-in-progress are routinely shown to, and commented on, by people who aren’t involved in the movie. When Pixar had grown so big some of the candor was being lost, they had a notes day where people from all across the company (including kitchen staff) got together to talk about issues and possible solutions.

I spent a number of years in a large library where departments were very separate--the children’s staff had a different work room than the adult services staff, which was different than circ, etc. Since switching systems, I’ve been at branches, which are smaller. At my last branch, only 1 person could physically be on the desk at a time, so they did reference and circ, and helped people of all ages. There’s much more fluidity between departments because that’s how we need to function. I love it. We all have the areas we specialize in, but we all have our fingers in other things, which makes us understand each other a lot better, and we have a bigger pool of people to bounce ideas off, because even if it’s not their department, they know the basics of your resources and constrictions. It doesn’t always work and it’s not always good, BUT one of things I really want to do as a manager is foster this type of cross team collaboration and minimize some of the us vs. them dynamic that I often see in libraries that can get really poisonous really quickly. And this is where Creativity, Inc. really spoke to me, both with ideas on how to nurture this, but in just reaffirming its great importance. (And, here I’m going to plug my friend Rachel’s new blog, Constructive Summer: Building the Unified Library Scene which is about this very thing)

So, overall, obviously, I loved this book. I found a lot of inspiration, but it was also just a fun read (let’s face it, when your examples are about making Toy Story, I will find it more engaging than an example about making a car.) Also, the Afterword: The Steve We Knew made me cry, which was embarrassing, because I was on the bus. Steve Jobs (owner of Pixar) came up frequently in the bulk of the book, but the afterword really looked at his role, but more importantly was Catmull talking about a friend who died. Catmull really looks at the biographical books and articles about Steve and talks about how they jived and did not jive with the person he knew. As someone who’s read Steve Jobs: The Man Who Thought Different a countless number of times, it was really interesting to see some of the big points directly rebutted.


Book Provided by... my local library

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22. ‘Cars’ Co-Creator Jorgen Klubien Debuts His First English Album

Jorgen Klubien lives a double life: he's an animation artist in the United States and a pop singer in Denmark.

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23. Watch The Teaser Trailer for Pixar’s ‘Inside Out’

The first teaser trailer is out for Pixar's next film "Inside Out" directed by Pete Docter.

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24. Peter Sohn Named New Director of Pixar’s ‘The Good Dinosaur’

Yesterday evening, Pixar quietly revealed on Twitter that the new director of "The Good Dinosaur," scheduled to be released in November 2015, is Peter Sohn.

0 Comments on Peter Sohn Named New Director of Pixar’s ‘The Good Dinosaur’ as of 10/22/2014 4:53:00 AM
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25. ‘Toy Story 4.’ It’s Happening!

'Toy Story 4'. It's Happening.

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