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1. Are you heading to ALA’s Annual Conference?

AC16_General_0#alaac16 is less than a month away!

The ALSC Blog is looking for people interested in live blogging during the upcoming Annual Conference in Orlando, Florida.

Have you looked at the ALSC daily schedule?  SO MANY opportunities to share information with those #leftbehind.

If you are interested in lending your thoughts to this blog about what you are experiencing & learning, contact ALSC Blog manager, Mary Voors, at alscblog@gmail.com. We’d love to have your contributions! (And your pieces can be very concise… like this post!)

The post Are you heading to ALA’s Annual Conference? appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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2. ALSC Member of the Month – Alyssa Morgan

Each month, an ALSC member is profiled and we learn a little about their professional life and a bit about their not-so-serious side. Using just a few questions, we try to keep the profiles fun while highlighting the variety of members in our organization. So, without further ado, welcome to our ALSC profile, ten questions with ALSC member, Alyssa Morgan.

1. What do you do, and how long have you been doing it?

Courtesy photo from Alyssa Morgan

Courtesy photo from Alyssa Morgan

I’m the Children’s Librarian/Head of Youth Services at the Morgan County Public Library in Martinsville, IN.  I’ve been in this position almost 5 years, and actually began my career here as an intern.

And yes, the library and I do have the same name.

2. Why did you join ALSC? Do you belong to any other ALA divisions or roundtables?

I see ALSC as a way to keep in touch with other librarians across the nation.  Through ALSC, I’ve gained not only great programming ideas, useful management tips, and the knowledge that I’m not the only librarian who faces triumph and struggle on a daily basis.

3. If a movie was presented of your life, who would you want to play you?

Kate Winslet or Emma Thompson.  Even though I bear no resemblance whatsoever to either of them.

4. Do you have a favorite word?  What is it?

Serendipitous!

5. What forms of social media do you use regularly?

I’m a Facebook fiend!  I try to tweet (@LibraryLyssa) and blog (www.librarylyssa.com) on a regular basis but it usually falls on the back burner.

6. Do you have any cats or dogs or other pets?

One cat, Olivia.  When I was at the shelter looking for a cat, I was holding her in my lap and another cat hopped in my lap and hissed at her.  She very calmly turned around, smacked the snot out of the other cat, and went back to cleaning her paws.  I knew this was the cat for me!

7. What do you like to drink? Coffee, tea, juice, water, or something else?

COFFEE!  COFFEE!  COFFEE!

8. What’s the best book you’ve read recently?

The War That Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley.  The teen librarian and I recommend it to EVERYONE!

9. Do you normally celebrate holidays? What’s your favorite?

December 4 has become a holiday at my library because there are four of us who share that date as our birthday!  Cards and all sorts of sweet treats are brought in to help celebrate.

10. What would you be doing if you weren’t a librarian?

I honestly have no idea and hope I never have to find out!

*********************************************************************************

Thanks, Alyssa! What a fun continuation to our monthly profile feature!

Do you know someone who would be a good candidate for our ALSC Monthly Profile? Are YOU brave enough to answer our ten questions? Send your name and email address to alscblog@gmail.com; we’ll see what we can do.

 

The post ALSC Member of the Month – Alyssa Morgan appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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3. ALSC Member of the Month – Rachel Fryd

Each month, an ALSC member is profiled and we learn a little about their professional life and a bit about their not-so-serious side. Using just a few questions, we try to keep the profiles fun while highlighting the variety of members in our organization. So, without further ado, welcome to our ALSC profile, ten questions with ALSC member, Rachel Fryd.

1. What do you do, and how long have you been doing it?

Photo courtesy of Rachel Fryd

Photo courtesy of
Rachel Fryd

Currently I am the Young Adult materials selector for the Free Library of Philadelphia.  In the past 12 years I have been a children’s librarian, branch manager, and the youth services coordinator.

2. Why did you join ALSC? Do you belong to any other ALA divisions or roundtables?

I joined ALSC so I could go to conferences!  But the best part of being an ALSC member is participating on committees where I can meet and learn from other librarians who are just as passionate (if not more passionate) about library service for children as I am.  I like to think of my far flung colleagues as my camp friends that I see once or twice a year at conference with tons of emails and social media contact in between.  I’m always surprised and intrigued by the new ideas and programs that librarians around the country come up with!

3. What form(s) of transportation do you prefer? 

I’m really into trains right now – I took AMTRAK from Philadelphia to Boston for the Midwinter Meeting this past January and it reminded me how pleasant travel by train is compared to flying.  It actually inspired me to take a cross country train journey this May – Philadelphia to Oakland over the course of two weeks!

4. What is your dream job?

I’ve actually been really lucky to have had quite a few of my dream jobs already – I loved working on Summer Reading for the entire city of Philadelphia as a Youth Services Coordinator and I’m currently having  more fun than should be allowed at work as the Young Adult Material Selector for our library system.  But if I had to choose the all-time dream job I think it would be to own a children’s book store.  In fact, sometimes on the weekend I wind up doing accidental readers advisory in my local independent bookstore.  I figure I’m just a few million dollars short of achieving this dream.

5. Vegetarian, Vegan, or Carnivore?

Just a picky eater – have been all my life, but my particular brand of picky eater happens to overlap mostly with a vegetarian diet.  I still don’t like broccoli though.

6. What’s the favorite part of your job?

My favorite part of the job is finding the right thing for the right person at the right time – be it a book they are looking for or helping a colleague fill out a tricky purchase order or introducing – I love learning and then sharing that information and ideas.

7. Do you have any tattoos or piercings?

I have my ears pierced but I almost never wear earrings – which is silly because I BEGGED my Mom to let me get my ears pierced as a kid. I don’t have any tattoos – just when I think I might be interested in getting one a new “20 Worst Tattoo Fails” article comes out… and I scare myself out of doing it.

8. What is your favorite age of kids to work with at the Library?

I really like kids of all ages – there are so many great things about all ages – but I think my favorite age is that middle grade age – your 8 to 12 year olds.  There is a fearlessness and an unselfconsciousness to them.  They are happy to tell me that they loved or hated the book I recommended and why.  This is also the age where they are most likely to come in afterschool and reenact a Lady Gaga or Beyoncé video for no reason other than they love it.  (True story – the kid in question is 17 now and still does Beyoncé  just on his Instagram instead of in person.)

9. Coffee, tea, water… or something else?

Coffee.  Also coffee with maybe a side of coffee.

10. What do you wish every children’s librarian knew?

That being flexible is more important that being right.  That library service is about relationships.   That you might be the only nice or supportive adult a kid interacts with all day.  And the kid causing you the most trouble is the one who will remember you the most in 10 years – and the one you’ll remember the most too.

*********************************************************************************

Thanks, Rachel! What a fun continuation to our monthly profile feature!

Do you know someone who would be a good candidate for our ALSC Monthly Profile? Are YOU brave enough to answer our ten questions? Send your name and email address to alscblog@gmail.com; we’ll see what we can do.

The post ALSC Member of the Month – Rachel Fryd appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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4. ALSC Member of the Month – Chelsea Couillard-Smith

Each month, an ALSC member is profiled and we learn a little about their professional life and a bit about their not-so-serious side. Using just a few questions, we try to keep the profiles fun while highlighting the variety of members in our organization. So, without further ado, welcome to our ALSC profile, ten questions with ALSC member, Chelsea Couillard-Smith.

  1. What do you do, and how long have you been doing it?
Photo by Sara Pinnell, courtesy of Chelsea Couillard-Smith

Photo by Sara Pinnell, courtesy of Chelsea Couillard-Smith

My official title is Senior Librarian in Collection Management Services, but what I actually DO is select all children’s and teen print materials as well as audiobooks, e-books, and e-audiobooks. My library is a 41-branch city/county system that includes the city of Minneapolis, and in addition to materials selection, I get to work on lots of other collection-related projects, too. I’m so fortunate to have a job that allows me to focus on the collection, and I absolutely love my work! I’ve been with HCL since June 2015, and prior to that, I spent 4 years as the Youth Materials Selector for the Sacramento (CA) Public Library.

  1. Why did you join ALSC? Do you belong to any other ALA divisions or roundtables?

I joined ALSC right out of graduate school because I was just starting out as a youth services manager, and I knew I would need the support and resources that ALSC provides. What I didn’t expect was to find such a wonderful community of amazing peers and mentors who have really helped me find my place in ALA and in the library profession. I’m currently co-chairing the ALSC Intellectual Freedom Committee, and I’ve previously served on the Public Awareness and Newbery Award committees (shout out to FLORA & ULYSSES). I’m also a member of YALSA and the Intellectual Freedom Round Table.

  1. If given the opportunity, would you prefer to be on American Ninja Warrior, Hell’s Kitchen, or The Amazing Race?

I’d love to be on The Amazing Race! I really enjoy traveling, and it would be fun to see all those amazing places in such a unique way. A college classmate (and rugby teammate) of mine actually won a couple of years ago, so I’ve been thinking lately that it might be time to put together a librarian team!

  1. What’s the last book you recommended to a friend?

For a co-worker’s baby shower, my Dad wanted to gift a book that the baby could grow into, so I suggested WHERE THE MOUNTAIN MEETS THE MOON by Grace Lin. It’s such a gorgeous book, so it makes a great gift. But I also like that it’s both a great read aloud (for a younger child) and a great independent read for a broad age range.

  1. What forms of social media do you use regularly?

I use Facebook mostly because it keeps me connected to my personal and professional worlds, but I dabble in Twitter, too, and I try to use Goodreads regularly. I can’t find the time to add anything else!

  1. What’s your favorite thing to do when you are not working?

I love the outdoors, so when I’m not working (or reading), I’m probably hiking, camping, or biking. And this will be my first summer with a garden, so I’m looking forward to that new challenge.

  1. What’s the scariest book you’ve ever read?

I have a very low tolerance for scary stuff. I’m still haunted by a particular GOOSEBUMPS title I picked up as a kid that involved murder by decapitation (using a guitar string), and a “children’s” adaptation of DRACULA affected my sleeping habits until about middle school. Don’t even get me started on SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK!

  1. What’s the best book you’ve read recently?

Kate DiCamillo’s RAYMIE NIGHTINGALE has really stayed with me. She manages to keep the story so firmly centered on the girls and their emotions in spite of the chaos in their families. The most fun I’ve had recently was reading the second volume in Varian Johnson’s heist series, TO CATCH A CHEAT. I love the humor and the intricate plotting.

  1. Do you normally celebrate holidays? What’s your favorite?

I am a Christmas FIEND. I usually start listening to Christmas music in November because we have a house rule that I can’t start before Halloween. I love all the traditions: baking, selecting and wrapping presents, decorating the house, spending time with family. There’s a peacefulness to the season, one that comes from the cold and the stillness of Midwestern winters, I think, that really appeals to me.

  1. Do you remember the first book you ever read?

When I was 5 years old, my family spent about a year living in Lesotho in southern Africa. My parents were planning to homeschool me, so they made some books to teach me to read. I’m told that I read through all the books they’d made and demanded more, so they decided to send me to “real” school instead. I’d love to read one of those homemade books again!

*********************************************************************************

Thanks, Chelsea! What a fun continuation to our monthly profile feature!

Do you know someone who would be a good candidate for our ALSC Monthly Profile? Are YOU brave enough to answer our ten questions? Send your name and email address to alscblog@gmail.com; we’ll see what we can do.

The post ALSC Member of the Month – Chelsea Couillard-Smith appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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5. ALSC Member of the Month – Melissa Morwood

Each month, an ALSC member is profiled and we learn a little about their professional life and a bit about their not-so-serious side. Using just a few questions, we try to keep the profiles fun while highlighting the variety of members in our organization. So, without further ado, welcome to our ALSC profile, ten (plus one) questions with ALSC member, Melissa Morwood.

1. What do you do, and how long have you been doing it?

Courtesy photo from Melissa Morwood”

“Courtesy photo from Melissa Morwood”

I am a Senior Children’s Librarian for the Palo Alto City Library, and I have been here for 11 years. I present weekly storytimes for babies, toddlers, and preschoolers, host class visits, plan and present school-age and family programming for our customers, and help folks on both the kids and adult reference desks.

2. Why did you join ALSC? Do you belong to any other ALA divisions or roundtables?

I initially joined ALSC to feel a sense of community with other children’s librarians across the country, since for many years I was the only youth services staff person at my branch. I have gained so much through my membership- the ALSC blog posts are always fantastic, and they help me to grow as a librarian, and to provide better service to our customers.

3.  Are you ready for Summer Reading?

I’m in charge of our library’s Summer Reading Program for the third year in a row, so I’ve been thinking about Summer Reading since January! We’ll be doing early Summer Reading registrations as part of a kindergarten library card campaign this year, so it’s only a few more weeks until we have to be ready for the program to go live. And I always look forward to our Kick-Off party, which features music, ice cream, and lots of happy families.

4.   Are you starting to make plans for retirement?

Yes! I’ve still got 19 more years until I can retire, but my husband and I are already making plans to move to California’s north coast where we went to college at Humboldt State University. We love the smaller towns, the laid back atmosphere, and the combination of redwoods, farmland, and desolate beaches. It’s a gorgeous area with friendly people.

5.    What’s the last book you recommended to a friend?

Phoebe and Her Unicorn, by Dana Simpson. I just read it last week, quickly followed by the sequel Unicorn on Wheels. The books are humorous yet sweet, and it cracks me up how endearing Marigold is to the reader, despite being such an egomaniac. Some of my other favorite graphic novels include Roller Girl, Baba Yaga’s Assistant, and This One Summer.

6.    What’s your favorite piece of technology?

My iphone. When I’m not at work, I enjoy not being tied to a desktop computer if I need to send a quick email or get directions. I also love having my phone’s camera capabilities ready at all times for when my 11 month old twin niece and nephew inevitably do something super cute.

7.   Do you have any family traditions?

Every year on Christmas Eve my husband, dog, and I curl up in our pjs and watch Love Actually. It’s been our annual tradition for close to 10 years now, and I always look forward to it.

8.   What is the last song you sang?

The More We Get Together. It’s my closing song each week at Baby Storytime, and we do the sign language along with it. I do two Baby Storytime sessions every Tuesday morning, and I had over 140 attendees between the two programs this morning!

9.   If you could bring back any extinct animal, which would it be?

Definitely dinosaurs (preferably herbivorous dinosaurs…) Regardless of how badly all of the Jurassic Park movies end, I still always turn to my husband and say “I’d TOTALLY visit Jurassic Park!”

10.  How do you incorporate STEM/STEAM activities in your work with children? 

I’m actually doing my very first STEM-based program tomorrow afternoon! We’re having an Engineers at Work program, where kids in grades 2-5 will be challenged to create marble runs out of household materials, and then we’ll have races to see how well each run works. I was inspired to try STEAM programming after watching ALSC webinars presented by Amy Koester, who makes STEAM programming look so fun and easy.

11.  What’s your favorite thing to do when you are not working?

Hanging out with my husband and talking about children’s literature. He’s a kindergarten teacher, and it’s so much fun to recommend books for him to read to his class- they love the Mercy Watson and Princess in Black series. It’s great to be able to geek out regarding the ALSC Book & Media Awards, and have him not only listen but actively participate in the conversation. He’s super supportive of my dream to serve on an ALSC award committee someday.

*********************************************************************************

Thanks, Melissa! What a fun continuation to our monthly profile feature!

Do you know someone who would be a good candidate for our ALSC Monthly Profile? Are YOU brave enough to answer our ten questions? Send your name and email address to alscblog@gmail.com; we’ll see what we can do.

The post ALSC Member of the Month – Melissa Morwood appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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6. ALSC Award Confidentiality: Let us know what you think!

For decades many ALSC book and media award committees have observed time-honored confidentiality policies. The question has been brought to the ALSC Board: For research purposes, should there be a designated statute of limitations on these confidentiality policies?

That’s a big question to think about, and we want your input!  Please complete the following survey by Wednesday, May 18:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HVVWNRZ

Let us know what you think!

The post ALSC Award Confidentiality: Let us know what you think! appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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7. Are you ready for the Youth Media Awards?

2016 ALA Youth Media AwardsIn less than 24 hours, the Youth Media Awards will be announced at #alamw16. Hundreds and hundreds of librarians will be at the press conference. They will be eagerly anticipating the announcement of the 2016 Newbery, Caldecott, Coretta Scott King, Printz, Pura Belpré, Sibert, Geisel, Schneider Family, and more.  The excitement is building in Boston as children’s librarians engage in animated discussions about titles they read and loved over the course of the year.

Are you excited? Will you be participating in the YMA Pajama Party from your home? Do you have a title you are hoping, hoping, hoping will take home a medal? Let us know in the comments below.

Meanwhile, check out some of the results of Mock Elections from around the country.

The post Are you ready for the Youth Media Awards? appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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8. Family Feud at #ALAmw16

Among all the required meetings and opportunities for learning, networking, and growth, it’s always good to make room for some good old-fashioned fun. AAP’s Library Family Feud was such an opportunity.

Family One: The Fearless Authors

Family One: The Fearless Authors

Played in the style of the classic TV game show, the session pitted authors (Ruta Sepetys,  Margaret Peterson Haddix, Josh Funk, Stephanie Evanovich, and Cecilia Tan) against a team of Boston librarians with team captain, Michael Colford.

It was a entertaining interlude in a very busy day.

The post Family Feud at #ALAmw16 appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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9. ALA Youth Media Awards 2016

#alaYMA @ #ALAmw16

It is always a highlight of my midwinter ALA journey to attend the Youth Media Awards Press Conference, and this year was no exception.

The excitement was palpable in the Boston Convention Center ballroom as hundreds of librarians and other children’s literature aficionados excitedly heard the announcements of the Youth Media Awards. As the winners were announced, they were greeted with (sometimes raucous) applause, hoots of delight, and gasps of surprise.

Tremendous thanks go to all the committee members who worked and read so diligently throughout 2015 to bring us this stellar collection of winners!

Here is a complete list of the winners announced this morning:

John Newbery Medal for the most outstanding contribution to children’s literature:

“Last Stop on Market Street,” written by Matt de la Peña, is the 2016 Newbery Medal winner. The book is illustrated by Christian Robinson and published by G. P. Putnam’s Sons, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC.

Three Newbery Honor Books also were named: “The War that Saved My Life,” written by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley and published by Dial Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC; “Roller Girl,” written and illustrated by Victoria Jamieson and published by Dial Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC; and “Echo,” written by Pam Muñoz Ryan and published by Scholastic Press, an imprint of Scholastic Inc.

Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children:

“Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear,” illustrated by Sophie Blackall, is the 2016 Caldecott Medal winner. The book was written by Lindsay Mattick and published by Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.

Four Caldecott Honor Books also were named: “Trombone Shorty,” illustrated by Bryan Collier, written by Troy Andrews and published by Abrams Books for Young Readers, an imprint of ABRAMS; “Waiting,” illustrated and written by Kevin Henkes, published by Greenwillow Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers; “Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer, Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement,” illustrated by Ekua Holmes, written by Carole Boston Weatherford and published by Candlewick Press; and “Last Stop on Market Street,” illustrated by Christian Robinson, written by Matt de le Peña and published by G. P. Putnam’s Sons, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC.

Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award, recognizing an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults:

“Gone Crazy in Alabama,” written by Rita Williams-Garcia, is the King Author Book winner. The book is published by Amistad, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

Three King Author Honor Books were selected: “All American Boys,” by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely and published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division; “The Boy in the Black Suit,” by Jason Reynolds and published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division, and “X: A Novel,” by Ilyasah Shabazz with Kekla Magoon and published by Candlewick Press.

Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Book Award:

“Trombone Shorty,” illustrated by Bryan Collier, is the King Illustrator Book winner. The book was written by Troy Andrews and Bill Taylor and published by Abrams Books for Young Readers, an imprint of ABRAMS.

Two King Illustrator Honor Books were selected: “The Book Itch: Freedom, Truth & Harlem’s Greatest Bookstore,” illustrated by R. Gregory Christie, written by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson and published by Carolrhoda Books, a division of Lerner Publishing Group, Inc. and “Last Stop on Market Street,” illustrated by Christian Robinson, written by Matt de la Peña and published by G. P. Putnam’s Sons, an imprint of Penguin Group USA.

Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Author Award:

“Hoodoo,” written by Ronald L. Smith, is the Steptoe author award winner. The book is published by Clarion Books, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Illustrator Award:

“Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer, Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement,” illustrated by Ekua Holmes, is the Steptoe illustrator award winner. The book is written by Carole Boston Weatherford and published by Candlewick Press.

Coretta Scott King – Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement:

Jerry Pinkney is the winner of the Coretta Scott King – Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement. The award pays tribute to the quality and magnitude of beloved children’s author Virginia Hamilton.

Jerry Pinkney’s illustrations detail a world that resonates with readers long after the pages of a book have been turned. His five decades of work offer compelling artistic insights into the legacy of African American storytelling and experience. Beyond Pinkney’s technical brilliance, his support of differentiated learning through art and of young illustrators sets him apart as both artist and educator. His powerful illustrations have redefined the scope of the sophisticated picture book and its use with multiple levels of learners.

Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in literature written for young adults:

“Bone Gap,” written by Laura Ruby, is the 2016 Printz Award winner. The book is published by Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

Two Printz Honor Books also were named: “Out of Darkness,” by Ashley Hope Pérez and published by Carolrhoda Lab™, an imprint of Carolrhoda Books, a division of Lerner Publishing Group, and “The Ghosts of Heaven,” by Marcus Sedgwick and published by Roaring Brook Press, an imprint of Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group.

Schneider Family Book Award for books that embody an artistic expression of the disability experience:

“Emmanuel’s Dream: The True Story of Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah,” written by Laurie Ann Thompson, illustrated by Sean Qualls and published by Schwartz & Wade Books, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Random House LLC, a Penguin Random House Company, New York, wins the award for children ages 0 to 10.

“Fish in a Tree,” written by Lynda Mullaly Hunt and published by Penguin Group, Nancy Paulsen Books, and “The War that Saved My Life,” by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley and published by Dial Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, are the winners of the middle-school (ages 11-13).

The teen (ages 13-18) award winner is “The Unlikely Hero of Room 13B,” written by Teresa Toten and published by Delacorte Press, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Random House LLC, a Penguin Random House Company, New York.

Alex Awards for the 10 best adult books that appeal to teen audiences:

“All Involved,” by Ryan Gattis, published by Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

“Between the World and Me,” by Ta-Nehisi Coates, published by Spiegel & Grau, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House LLC.

“Bones & All,” by Camille DeAngelis, published by St. Martin’s Press.

“Futuristic Violence and Fancy Suits,” by David Wong, published by Thomas Dunne Books, an imprint of St. Martin’s Press.

“Girl at War,” by Sara Novic, published by Random House, an imprint and division of Penguin Random House LLC.

“Half the World,” by Joe Abercrombie, published by Del Rey, an imprint of Random House, a division of Random House LLC, a Penguin Random House Company.

“Humans of New York: Stories,” by Brandon Stanton, published by St. Martin’s Press.

“Sacred Heart,” by Liz Suburbia, published by Fantagraphics Books Inc.

“Undocumented: A Dominican Boy’s Odyssey from a Homeless Shelter to the Ivy League,” by Dan-el Padilla Peralta, published by Penguin Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC.

“The Unraveling of Mercy Louis,” by Keija Parssinen, published by Harper, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

Andrew Carnegie Medal for excellence in children’s video:

Weston Woods Studios, Inc., producer of “That Is NOT a Good Idea,” is the Carnegie Medal winner. In an innovative adaptation of this read-aloud favorite, Goose accepts an invitation to accompany Fox on a simple stroll – or is it? Watch along with a comical chorus of goslings as they react to this cautionary tale.

Laura Ingalls Wilder Award honors an author or illustrator whose books, published in the United States, have made, over a period of years, a substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children.

The 2016 winner is Jerry Pinkney, whose award-winning works include “The Lion and the Mouse,” recipient of the Caldecott Award in 2010. In addition, Pinkney has received five Caldecott Honor Awards, five Coretta Scott King Illustrator Awards, and four Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honors.     

Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in writing for young adults:

David Levithan is the 2016 Edwards Award winner. His books include: “The Realm of Possibility,” “Boy Meets Boy,” “Love is the Higher Law,” “How They Met, and Other Stories,” “Wide Awake” and “Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist,” all published by Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC.

May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture Award recognizing an author, critic, librarian, historian or teacher of children’s literature, who then presents a lecture at a winning host site.

Jacqueline Woodson will deliver the 2017 May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture. Woodson is the 2014 National Book Award winner for her New York Times bestselling memoir, “Brown Girl Dreaming.” The author of more than two dozen books for young readers, she is a four-time Newbery Honor winner, a recipient of the NAACP Image Award, a two-time Coretta Scott King Award winner and was recently named the Young People’s Poet Laureate by the Poetry Foundation.

Mildred L. Batchelder Award for an outstanding children’s book translated from a foreign language and subsequently published in the United States:

“The Wonderful Fluffy Little Squishy” is the 2016 Batchelder Award winner. Originally published in French in 2014 as “Le merveilleux Dodu-Velu-Petit,” the book was written and illustrated by Beatrice Alemagna, translated by Claudia Zoe Bedrick and published by Enchanted Lion Books.

Three Batchelder Honor Books also were selected: “Adam and Thomas,” published by Seven Stories Press, written by Aharon Appelfeld, iIllustrated by Philippe Dumas and translated from the Hebrew by Jeffrey M. Green; “Grandma Lives in a Perfume Village,” published by NorthSouth Books, an imprint of Nordsüd Verlag AG, written by Fang Suzhen, illustrated by Sonja Danowski and translated from the Chinese by Huang Xiumin; and “Written and Drawn by Henrietta,” published by TOON Books, an imprint of RAW Junior, LLC and written, illustrated and translated from the Spanish by Liniers.

Odyssey Award for best audiobook produced for children and/or young adults, available in English in the United States:

“The War that Saved My Life,” produced by Listening Library, an imprint of the Penguin Random House Audio Publishing Group, is the 2016 Odyssey Award winner. The book is written by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley and narrated by Jayne Entwistle.

One Odyssey Honor Recording also was selected: “Echo,” produced by Scholastic Audio/Paul R. Gagne, written by Pam Muñoz Ryan and narrated by Mark Bramhall, David de Vries, MacLeod Andrews and Rebecca Soler.

Pura Belpré (Illustrator) Award honoring a Latino writer and illustrator whose children’s books best portray, affirm and celebrate the Latino cultural experience:

“The Drum Dream Girl,” illustrated by Rafael López, is the Belpré Illustrator Award winner.  The book was written by Margarita Engle and published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Three Belpré Illustrator Honor Books for illustration were selected: “My Tata’s Remedies = Los remedios de mi tata,” illustrated by Antonio Castro L., written by Roni Capin Rivera-Ashford and published by Cinco Puntos Press; “Mango, Abuela, and Me,” illustrated by Angela Dominguez, written by Meg Medina and published by Candlewick Press: and “Funny Bones: Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras,” illustrated and written by Duncan Tonatiuh and published by Abrams Books for Young Readers, an imprint of ABRAMS.

Pura Belpré (Author) Award:

“Enchanted Air: Two Cultures, Two Wings: A Memoir,” written by Margarita Engle, is the Belpré Author Award winner. The book is published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division.

Two Belpré Author Honor Books were named: “The Smoking Mirror,” written by David Bowles and published by IFWG Publishing, Inc.; and “Mango, Abuela, and Me,” written by Meg Medina, illustrated by Angela Dominguez and published by Candlewick Press.

Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award for most distinguished informational book for children:

“Funny Bones: Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras,” written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh, is the Sibert Award winner. The book is published by Abrams Books for Young Readers, an imprint of ABRAMS.

Four  Sibert Honor Books were named: “Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans,” written and illustrated by Don Brown and published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; “The Boys Who Challenged Hitler: Knud Pedersen and the Churchill Club,” by Phillip Hoose and published by Farrar Straus Giroux Books for Young Readers; “Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom: My Story of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March,” written by Lynda Blackmon Lowery as told to Elspeth Leacock and Susan Buckley, illustrated by PJ Loughran and published by Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC; and “Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer, Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement,” written by Carole Boston Weatherford, illustrated by Ekua Holmes and published by Candlewick Press.

Stonewall Book Award – Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s & Young Adult Literature Award given annually to English-language children’s and young adult books of exceptional merit relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender experience:

“George,” written by Alex Gino and published by Scholastic Press, an imprint of Scholastic Inc., and “The Porcupine of Truth,” written by Bill Konigsberg and published by Arthur A. Levine Books, an imprint of Scholastic Inc., are the winners of the 2016 Stonewall Children’s and Young Adult Literature Awards respectively.

Two honor books were selected: “Wonders of the Invisible World,” written by Christopher Barzak and published by Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Penguin Random House LLC; and “Sex is a Funny Word: A Book about Bodies, Feelings, and YOU,” written by Cory Silverberg and Fiona Smyth, illustrated by Fiona Smyth and published by Seven Stories Press.

Theodor Seuss Geisel Award for the most distinguished beginning reader book:

“Don’t Throw It to Mo!,” written by David A. Adler and illustrated by Sam Ricks is the Seuss Award winner. The book is published by Penguin Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA), LLC.

Three Geisel Honor Books were named: “A Pig, a Fox, and a Box,” written and illustrated by Jonathan Fenske and published by Penguin Young Readers, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC; “Supertruck,” written and illustrated by Stephen Savage and published by A Neal Porter Book published by Roaring Brook Press, a division of Holtzbrinck Publishing Holdings Limited Partnership; and “Waiting,” written and illustrated by Kevin Henkes and published by Greenwillow Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

William C. Morris Award for a debut book published by a first-time author writing for teens:

“Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda,” written by Becky Albertalli is the 2016 Morris Award winner. The book is published by Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollins Publisher.

Four other books were finalists for the award: “Because You’ll Never Meet Me,” written by Leah Thomas and published by Bloomsbury Children’s Books; “Conviction,” written by Kelly Loy Gilbert and published by Hyperion, an imprint of Disney Book Group; “The Sacred Lies of Minnow Bly,” written by Stephanie Oakes and published by Dial Books, an imprint of  Penguin Young Readers; and “The Weight of Feathers,” written by Anna-Marie McLemore and published by Thomas Dunne Books, an imprint of St. Martin’s Press.

YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults

“Most Dangerous: Daniel Ellsberg and the Secret History of the Vietnam War,” written by Steve Sheinkin, is the 2016 Excellence winner. The book is published by Roaring Brook Press, an imprint of Macmillan’s Children’s Publishing Group.

Four other books were finalists for the award: “Enchanted Air: Two Cultures, Two Wings: A Memoir,” written by Margarita Engle and published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing; “First Flight Around the World: The Adventures of the American Fliers Who Won the Race,” written by Tim Grove and  published by Abrams Books for Young Readers, an imprint of ABRAMS; “Symphony for the City of the Dead: Dmitri Shostakovich and the Siege of Leningrad,” written by M.T. Anderson and published by Candlewick Press; and “This Strange Wilderness:  The Life and Art of John James Audubon,” written by Nancy Plain and published by University of Nebraska Press.

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10. Reflecting on ALA Midwinter #alamw16

I’m all packed and ready to catch a plane back home, tired but re-energized & excited to begin to utilize some of the resources and information I’ve learned while at ALA Midwinter in Boston.

Reflecting on the highlights of the conference, I think of:

  • The information I learned at the ALSC Collection Management Discussion Group session and the decision to create a Facebook page for the group; this will surely be a good place for ongoing discussions.
  • The announcement of Pat Scales as the 2016 recipient of ALSC’s Distinguished Service Award. A former middle school and high school librarian and a passionate advocate for children’s intellectual freedom, it was exciting to see her receive this well-deserved award.
  • Sitting in on book discussions
  • Visiting the exhibits and talking with vendors
  • The number of ARCs in my suitcase which I will bring back to my library to offer to excited young readers and to start work on our 2017 Mock Election programs
  • Learning new ideas about creative programming in libraries
  • Networking
  • Participating in ALSC Board meetings and working to move the division forward
ALSC Board of Directors Midwinter 2016

ALSC Board of Directors Midwinter 2016

  • Meeting authors & illustrators and hearing them speak about their work
  • The excitement of being among the hundreds and hundreds of people at the YMA Press Conference as the 2016 Awards were announced.
YMAs

Hundreds of librarians excitedly listen to the announcement of winners at the 2016 YMAs

  • Seeing old friends and colleagues; meeting new friends

So much to process!

Thanks, Boston! It’s been a great conference.

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11. Top Ten Blog Posts of 2015

While we can still view 2015 somewhat clearly in the rearview mirror, here are the top ten posts of the last year:

  1. Turning Your Library into a Haunted House  by Christopher Brown, a Curator of the Children’s Literature Research Collection at the Free Library of Philadelphia.
    Learn how to create a haunted house in your library! This post includes suggestions and plans for a haunted house which will remind community members that the library is vibrant and exciting and about much more than just books.
  2. 3D Printing Programs for Kids  by Claire Moore, a member of the ALSC Digital Content Task Force, and the Head of Children’s Services at Darien Library in Connecticut.
    A sampling of 3D Printing programs for children including Makerbot 101, Tinkercad Design, 3D Printing and Crafting, and Gift Giving 3D Style.
  3. An A-Maze-ing Library Experience by Amy Seto Forrester, a children’s librarian at the Denver Public Library.
    Imagine! A 75’ long, 15’ wide, and 6’ tall maze, sitting right in the middle of the main hall of Denver Public Library’s Central Library. Details and hints for creating a maze in your own library.
  4. Mock Election Results compiled by Mary R. Voors, the ALSC Blog manager and the manager of Children’s Services at the Allen County Public Library.
    Every year, libraries and schools gather to discuss children’s books and select YMA  2016 Mock winners. Find out what titles libraries, book clubs, and media centers selected in their Mock Elections for Newbery, Caldecott, Geisel, Pura Belpre, and more!
  5. Notable Children’s Books Nominees — Summer 2015 #alaac15
    The ALSC Notable Children’s Books committee is charged with identifying the best of the best in children’s books, discussing books at the ALA Annual Conference and the Midwinter Conference. This is the complete list of titles discussed at the Annual Conference in Summer 2015.
  6. Survey on Summer Reading Trends by Jennifer Cummings, Youth Services Manager at the Frisco Public Library in Frisco, Texas.
    Learn about how libraries around the country are handling their summer reading programs and activities.
  7. Notable Children’s Books — 2015 Discussion List
    The ALSC Notable Children’s Books committee is charged with identifying the best of the best in children’s books, discussing books at the ALA Annual Conference and the Midwinter Conference. This is the complete list of titles discussed at the Midwinter Conference in January 2015.
  8. Code for Parents by Sylvia Aguiñaga, LSSPCC Committee Member
    Ways to offer parents opportunities to understand the importance of code in today’s world in order to support and encourage their child as they learn to code.
  9. Leveling and Labeling: An Interview with Pat Scales by the ALSC Intellectual Freedom committee
    The recently announced winner of the 2016 ALSC Distinguished Service Award shares information on leveled reading systems, labeling, and their relationship to intellectual freedom.
  10. Engaging Adults in Storytime by Sharon McClintock
    A Youth Services Librarian at the City of Mountain View Public Library in Mountain View, CA shares top techniques for helping adults, as well as kids, stay engaged during programs

Did you have a favorite ALSC Blog post from 2015? Let us know in the comments below.

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12. ALSC Member of the Month — Bina Williams

Each month, an ALSC member is profiled and we learn a little about their professional life and a bit about their not-so-serious side. Using just a few questions, we try to keep the profiles fun while highlighting the variety of members in our organization. So, without further ado, welcome to our ALSC profile, ten questions with ALSC member, Bina Williams.

1.  What do you do, and how long have you been doing it?

BinaI have been a children’s librarian at the Bridgeport Public Library for 18 1/2 years. Right now, I am at our North Branch but have also worked at another branch and at the main library.  I spent a year at the Stratford Library Association while I was in library school. Before that, I was a children’s book buyer in several independent bookstores around New Haven CT for about 20 years.  I spent my childhood wandering around the Wallingford CT Public Library while my mom attended board meetings.

2.  Why did you join ALSC? Do you belong to any other ALA divisions or roundtables?

I am a firm believer in professional involvement–whether it be on the local, state or national level. Fortunately, my supervisors and library board have been very supportive of my work with ALA and ALSC.  I also belong to YALSA and EMIERT. I have been very fortunate to be on ALSC committees of both the nuts and bolts type and the notables/awards type. For all that I may (or may not) have contributed to these committees, I have received back so much more. I have made deep and lasting friendships with people from all types of libraries in all kinds of places through this work. Thank you, ALSC!

3.  What do you think children’s librarians will be doing ten years from now?

Much the same as we are now but with newer technology thrown into the mix. Storyhours, craft programs, technology classes, book talking, advocacy, community outreach and customer service will never go out of style for we children’s librarians.

4.  If you could enjoy a dinner conversation with any author – living or dead – who would it be?

Just one??? Jane Austen? I would love a table with Jane Austen, Ashley Bryan, Clyde Edgerton, Laurie Halse Anderson, Maya Angelou, Lois Lowry, Jason Reynolds, and maybe a few more…mixing up genres as much as possible!

5.  You’ve just been given a million dollars to donate to a worthy cause. How do you give it away?

Is it just one? I would split it (not necessarily equally) to ALA/ALSC for Early Education, Save the Children, FIrst Book, Reading is Fundamental, and Reach Out and Read.

6.  What is one thing you wish people knew about you?

I used to do Vintage Dancing which is historic ballroom dancing. We performed and put on events including balls from the 1850s era and jazz nights from the 20s. I made two Victorian ballgowns along with the corset to wear underneath! We did lots of research into the clothing, foods, and manners of the era as well as the dance and music. Very fun!

7.  Do you prefer winter or summer?

Winter because I don’t like hot hot weather. I love to bundle up under several quilts while watching it snow. Sitting by a crackling fire with a good book is a great way to wile away the cold days. Spring because of the beauty of each day being filled with different shades of green or yellow as trees and flowers begin to bud.  Summer because I don’t like driving 35 miles each way to work in a snow storm. I love to sit on a dock with friends and watch the clouds overhead and reflected in the water.  Or lying on the dock looking for the Perseid Meteor showers. Fall because it is when I was born and there is nothing like the New England trees in autumn. And the air is so crisp  with the scent of fireplace smoke.

8.  Are you a dog person or a cat person?

Dog person who has a cat. I live too far from work for a dog to be happy at home…I love my cat even if she isn’t a dog!

9.  What’s your favorite thing to do at your Library?

I have two programs for 0-3 year olds…Little Bears is a storyhour for them with a caregiver and Little Hands is an artsy crafty program involving crayons, paper, cutouts, rubber stamps, paint, and lots of glue! I love these little people! Watching the progression from a silent observer to an active participant is so rewarding…and feedback from parents is wonderful especially when I hear that a particularly shy child talks about the library and what we do all the time when at home.

10.  What was your favorite book as a child? 

The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett because I loved the idea of renewal and growth. The sourpuss Mary Lennox was redeemed by the wonderful family of Dickon and went on to save her crotchety cousin Colin who was the only person more selfish than Mary. And who doesn’t love a secret place that comes back to life?

*********************************************************************************

Thanks, Bina! What a fun continuation to our monthly profile feature!

Do you know someone who would be a good candidate for our ALSC Monthly Profile? Are YOU brave enough to answer our ten questions? Send your name and email address to alscblog@gmail.com; we’ll see what we can do.

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13. ALSC Member of the Month – Cassandra Freeman

Each month, an ALSC member is profiled and we learn a little about their professional life and a bit about their not-so-serious side. Using just a few questions, we try to keep the profiles fun while highlighting the variety of members in our organization. So, without further ado, welcome to our ALSC profile, ten questions with ALSC member, Cassandra Freeman.

1.  What do you do, and how long have you been doing it?

Courtesy photo from Cassandra Freeman

Courtesy photo from Cassandra Freeman

I have been a Children’s Librarian for DC Public Library for the past two and a half years. Before that, I was a Library Associate at the Chicago Public Library while I was in graduate school at the University of Illinois’ Graduate School of Library and Information Science.  I work in an extremely busy neighborhood branch of DCPL in a community full of children of all ages.  Our neighborhood especially has a lot of little ones under the age of three, which is fortuitous as I love working with babies and am passionate about creating early literacy development opportunities for these tiny little learners.  It is so rewarding to see how quickly they learn and grow!

2.  Why did you join ALSC? Do you belong to any other ALA divisions or roundtables?

I joined ALSC because it seemed to be the best way to get started in and involved with ALA as a Children’s Librarian.  I am also a member of PLA.  Being relatively new to the career of librarianship, I joined these divisions so that I could create connections with and learn from other librarians.  I have always considered one of my roles as a librarian as being a lifelong learner!

3.  Do you have any big plans in the coming weeks/months?

In fact, I do! I will be changing many diapers as my husband and I will be welcoming our first child, a baby boy, to the world sometime towards the end of this month.  I think it’s funny when other parents and caretakers make comments that I will be a great mother since I’m so “experienced” with babies.  We’ll see!  I have a feeling that taking care of one baby 24/7 is going to be a very different experience than leading a 25 minute storytime for 75 babies!  Either way, I cannot wait to experience motherhood!

4.  Do you ever attend library conferences?

I just recently returned from my first-ever conference, Midwinter in Boston!  It was a wonderful experience and I can’t wait to go to another.  I was 33 weeks pregnant at the time so I was just pushing the envelope on travel limitations, but I’m very glad I waddled my way over there.  Awarded with the opportunity to participate in the 2016 Bill Morris Seminar Book Evaluation Training, I was able to meet and learn from many extremely intelligent librarians and book award committee members and chairs.  I am beyond grateful for this unique learning experience.

5.  What was your favorite book as a child?

Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder, and it still is one of my favorite books to this day.  The whole series makes me feel warm and cozy and grateful for my family.  It is the first book I can remember my mom reading to me before bed, before I could read independently.  I still sometimes reread it when I’m feeling nostalgic!

6.  Are you a dog person or a cat person?

Both!  I grew up with cats, but since my husband is allergic to those furry creatures, we have two dogs whom I just adore.  Cats are a lot easier to take care of than dogs, but nothing really beats the love you get from a dog.  Oliver is our two year old mini labradoodle.  He is extremely smart and sensitive, and would be happy cuddling and sleeping on your lap for 24 hours a day.  Pepper is our 9 month old goldendoodle, and she is a complete goofball.  Her tail is always wagging and she would be happy playing fetch for 24 hours a day if she was allowed.

7.  Have you ever told someone that a book would “change their life?” What book was it?

I’m sure we’ve all heard this before, but J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series WILL change your life.  It certainly changed literature and the childhood of an entire generation, my own included! Whenever I see people checking out Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stonefor the first time, I feel a bit of a thrill for the reading journey that they are about to embark upon, the magical world that they are about to enter purely through words and language!  The Harry Potter series has an incredible ability to get readers of all ages immersed in the magic and joy that reading can bring.  I truly believe it has the ability to change lives by getting people to love the act of reading.

8.  Are you a participant in the recent “adult coloring” craze?​

Absolutely!  Our library’s “Adult Coloring Club” program is the most highly attended adult program this branch has seen since I have worked here.  And I am going to be one of those annoying people who eagerly claims that they were coloring long before it was cool.  I was actually coloring when it was pretty un-cool.  I’ve always found it to be a very relaxing, centering activity.  And I’m also a five year old at heart.

9.  What’s your favorite riddle or joke?

Two atoms are walking down the street.  One says to the other, “Hey!  I think I lost an electron!”  The other says, “Are you sure?” To which the other atom replies, “Yes! I’m POSITIVE!” I can’t tell you how many times I’ve told this joke.  And I’m usually delivering it terribly because I’m laughing so hard before I even get to the punchline.

10.  What do you think libraries will look like fifty years from now?

While libraries play a significant role in new technology and making those technologies accessible to the community, I think that the general public will be surprised at how much library services will remain consistent over the years.  No technology is ever going to replace the wonderful human interactions and smiles we get during storytime, or the crisp pages of a brand new book!  And anyone who ever said libraries are in danger of becoming obsolete has not been in my library’s children’s room at 3:30 pm on a school day.

*********************************************************************************

Thanks, Cassie! What a fun continuation to our monthly profile feature!

Do you know someone who would be a good candidate for our ALSC Monthly Profile? Are YOU brave enough to answer our ten questions? Send your name and email address to alscblog@gmail.com; we’ll see what we can do.

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14. Would you like be a Live Blogger? #PLA2016

Are you going to the PLA Conference in Denver next month? Are you willing to share  information about what is happening at the conference with blog readers? Would you be interested in live blogging for the ALSC Blog?

Many of our readers look forward to hearing about what’s happening at conferences through the posts created by volunteer live bloggers. They are anxious to hear about:

If you plan to attend the PLA Conference and are interested in lending your thoughts about the Conference to the blog, please contact Mary Voors, ALSC Blog manager, at alscblog@gmail.com to find out everything you need to know to become a live blogger.

We look forward to your contributions!

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15. ALSC Member of the Month – Angela Hubbard

Each month, an ALSC member is profiled and we learn a little about their professional life and a bit about their not-so-serious side. Using just a few questions, we try to keep the profiles fun while highlighting the variety of members in our organization. So, without further ado, welcome to our ALSC profile, ten questions with ALSC member, Angela Hubbard.

Photo courtesy of Angela Hubbard

Photo courtesy of Angela Hubbard

1. What do you do, and how long have you been doing it?

I’ve been with the ALSC office since May, which seems like just yesterday, and I am thrilled to be to go-to person on the ALSC team for projects and partnerships. In addition to sharing information with our partner organizations, I promote our members’ Día activities throughout the year and manage grant opportunities like Curiosity Creates.

2. Why did you join ALSC? Do you belong to any other ALA divisions or roundtables?

My background is in elementary teaching and early childhood advocacy, and I have always been amazed by librarians’ ability to—simply put—do SO much for such a broad range of people. ALSC seemed like the perfect fit because of my passion for education and my desire to make sure that all children have the opportunity to experience the joy of wandering through row upon row of books in the welcoming setting of their local library.

3. Would you rather bring a lunch from home or eat out at lunch?

Oh, from home, hands down. First off, I eat little tidbits of things throughout the day… a yogurt here, a few grapes there… so I pack a lot in my lunch. I also LOVE to garden, so right now everything we make at home is packed with fresh tomatoes or zucchini. There’s nothing tastier than food made fresh from the garden, in my book.

4. E-books or Print?

I am still very much a print person. I don’t knock e-readers for others, but I remember what I read much better when there is actual page turning involved. I also like that I can give (print) books to friends after I’ve read them. Have they added that function to e-readers yet… digital re-gifting?

5. If you could have any superpower, what would it be?

I’m going to go with something completely within the realm of possibility… I would have the superpower of making the subway train run express to and from the station of my choosing. Ahhh what a glorious commute that would be!

6. What’s your favorite season?

Photo courtesy of Angela Hubbard

Photo courtesy of Angela Hubbard

Summer is my favorite, although we really only have two here in Chicago, so that’s not a very difficult choice! Since summer is filled with streetfests, playing sports and gardening, it beats shoveling crusted over snow any day!

Did I mention that I love gardening?

7. What do you love most about working in the ALSC office?

Working in the ASLC office allows me an opportunity to hear about some of the awe-inspiring work our members are doing all over the country. I especially love getting the chance to know our members through their committee work and figuring out ways to amplify their impact.

8. What’s your favorite form of exercise?

I prefer to exercise by playing team sports. Volleyball is my favorite, followed by softball and dodgeball. Yes, we actually have adult dodgeball leagues in Chicago… because Chicago is awesome and you should move here.

9. Favorite age of kids to work with?

This is a tough one because each age has its charm, but I would have to say the three to five year old range is my favorite to work with. I love how quickly they grow and make connections at that age. I haven’t worked with children under three yet, but I’m sure the rapid development is even more amazing in the birth to three range.

10. What do you think libraries will look like fifty years from now?

I’m sure technology will change some content formats and delivery systems, and perhaps the architecture will have entered a new era, but fundamentally I think the library will still look as magical as it always has. There will be an enormous amount of information available and people of all walks and stages of life will be tucked into reading nooks here and there, asking an occasional question to the librarian who probably remembers them from the last time they were in and suggests something else they might find interesting.

*********************************************************************************

Thanks, Angela! What a fun continuation to our monthly profile feature!

Do you know someone who would be a good candidate for our ALSC Monthly Profile? Are YOU brave enough to answer our ten questions? Send your name and email address to alscblog@gmail.com; we’ll see what we can do.

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16. Happy Birthday, ALSC Blog!

ALSC Blogger Theresa Walls

First ALSC Blog manager, Teresa Walls

Eight years ago, under the able leadership of our first Blog Manager, Teresa Walls, the ALSC Blog was born. Since then we have worked to fulfill our mission “to provide a venue for coverage of time sensitive news in children’s librarianship, current issues in the field, and programs, conferences, initiatives, resources, and activities of interest to ALSC members and those interested in children’s librarianship.” In 2010, when Teresa decided to devote more time to her family, I was honored to take over as the ALSC Blog Manager.

As I write this, I find it hard to decide which of many amazing numbers related to the Blog I should share…

Since our first post in 2007, we have had:

  • nearly 3100 posts; in the last 12 months, we have had 533 posts. That’s an average of almost 1 1/2 posts per day!
  • 398 Guest Bloggers
  • live bloggers at ALA Conferences, ALSC Institutes, and PLA
  • thousands of comments

We only started keeping analytics stats in December 2010. Since that time, we have had:

  • 1,385,679 page views
  • 572,956 unique users

The top ten posts of all time on our blog are:

  1. The Three Little Pigs and the Preschool Science
  2. Body Science for Preschoolers: Using our brains to learn about our bodies
  3. Where to Download Classic Children’s Books for Free
  4. Color Science: A STEM Program for Preschoolers
  5. Beyond Legos: Coding for Kids
  6. Best Multicultural Books of 2014
  7. It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane… It’s a Superhero Training Academy
  8. STEM Takes Flight: Airplane Science
  9. Unusual Storytime Themes
  10. Sensory Storytime: A (brief) How-To Guide

Many, many of our posts elicited comments. The posts receiving the most comments were:

  1. A Great Loss in ALSC (115 comments)
  2. Pick Me! Pick Me! (53 comments)
  3. The Three Little Pigs and the Preschool Science (52 comments)
  4. Anti-Gay Books and Your Library (44 comments)
  5. Using Evernote for a Storytime Archive (29 comments)

The success of the ALSC Blog would not be possible without our ALSC Bloggers, children’s librarians from around North America who write intriguing and interesting  posts each month; to them I offer a heartfelt “Thank You!”

I truly value working with the ALSC Blog and am looking forward to seeing it celebrate many more anniversaries.  I’d love to know what you value about this Blog. How has it impacted your professional life? What issues would you love the ALSC Blog to cover? Let us know in the comments below.

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17. ALSC Member of the Month — Lorianna Giarrizzo

Each month, an ALSC member is profiled and we learn a little about their professional life and a bit about their not-so-serious side. Using just a few questions, we try to keep the profiles fun while highlighting the variety of members in our organization. So, without further ado, welcome to our ALSC profile, ten questions with ALSC member, Lorianna Giarrizzo.

Courtesy photo from Lorianna Giarrizzo

Courtesy photo from Lorianna Giarrizzo

1. What do you do, and how long have you been doing it?

I am a children’s librarian for the Palo Alto City Library, at the Children’s Library branch. I work primarily with kids 5th grade and younger but have dabbled with programs and reference for teens and adults.  I have been in this position for a little over a year, but I have been working in libraries on and off for the last 8 years.

2. Why did you join ALSC? Do you belong to any other ALA divisions or roundtables?

I joined ALSC because I wanted to get more involved with my professional peers, keep up to date on trends in youth services, and gain new ideas and experiences from all the resources ALSC has to offer. I am currently not a member of any other ALA divisions.

3. What’s your favorite thing about Fall?

I love to bake, and I have many pie-related plans for fall. Fall is also time for my favorite holiday, Halloween. It’s the only time of year I can buy housewares with my desired number of bats, spiders, and skeletons on them.

4. If you could be on a reality show, which one would it be?

My favorite reality shows are Project Runway, and RuPaul’s Drag Race, but seeing as I’m neither a fashion designer nor drag queen, I don’t think I could be on either of those. I’d rather be on a gameshow, I think I could excel at Family Feud.

5. What do you think children’s librarians will be doing ten years from now?

I don’t think storytime will ever go away, nor will readers advisory interviews. A lot of people have fond memories of coming to the library as children, so I think future generations will want these same library services for their own kids. I think children’s librarians will spend a lot more time outside of traditional library buildings in the future, doing much more outreach into the schools, businesses and the community. I believe lot of tools of the trade will likely change too, with more e-resources available and a variety of types of items for loan. I think the main goals of children’s librarians will stay the same

6. Have you ever played a practical joke on someone?

I’m not a big fan of pranks, but when I was in fifth grade I stuffed the fingers of my gloves with paper towels and crayons and offered to “shake hands” with classmates. When they grabbed my hand, I made the crayons snap so it seemed like they had broken my fingers. My teacher and classmates did not find this quite as hilarious as I thought they would.

7. Would you rather go to a 5 star restaurant or on a picnic?

5 star restaurant. The fancier and more unpronounceable the sauces, the better. I would like it if the menu also mentioned “mouthfeel”.

8. Are you a social media addict?  What do you use daily… Twitter? Tumblr? Facebook? LinkedIn? Pinterest? Instagram? Flickr? Vine?  Something else?

I’m not necessarily an addict, but I do like browsing Instagram daily (@lorianna_g). I also like browsing Pinterest for craft ideas, and I am just recently figuring out what Snapchat is.

9. What’s your favorite way of promoting services at your library to your customers?

I love doing outreach to schools and community events. It is so fun to run into customers outside of the library, especially when it’s the kids that come to my storytime! I also really enjoy being able to tell people who haven’t visited the library in years all the services we offer.

10. Would you rather watch trash TV at home or go to a play?

Go to a play. I love musicals especially, and if time and money permitted I would go all the time!

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Thanks, Lorianna! What a fun continuation to our monthly profile feature!

Do you know someone who would be a good candidate for our ALSC Monthly Profile? Are YOU brave enough to answer our ten questions? Send your name and email address to alscblog@gmail.com; we’ll see what we can do.

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18. Do YOU dress up for Halloween?

It’s almost Halloween!  Do staff at your library dress up? Do you take inspiration from your favorite children’s books?

halloweenStacey Rattner, the librarian at Castleton Elementary School in upstate New York, along with a teacher and a student, were inspired by Victoria Jamieson’s Roller Girl.

Let us know in the comments below how YOU mark October 31st at YOUR library.

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19. ALSC Member of the Month — Stephanie Smallwood

Each month, an ALSC member is profiled and we learn a little about their professional life and a bit about their not-so-serious side. Using just a few questions, we try to keep the profiles fun while highlighting the variety of members in our organization. So, without further ado, welcome to our ALSC profile, ten questions with ALSC member, Stephanie Smallwood.

1.  What do you do, and how long have you been doing it?

Photo courtesy of Jamie Johnson

Photo courtesy of Jamie Johnson

I am the early literacy specialist for the Springfield-Greene County Library District in Springfield, Missouri. I provide training, support and mentorship in early literacy and early childhood development for internal staff, conduct an outreach program which serves families and community organizations, and of course, advocate for families with young children. And like many other librarians, assist with ALL THE THINGS.

2.  Why did you join ALSC? Do you belong to any other ALA divisions or roundtables?

Youth librarianship, much like other professions that serve children and teens, is sometimes not regarded with the respect it deserves. ALSC works very hard to improve that. I am not currently a member of other ALA divisions, but I am a long time member of NAEYC.

3.  Who is your favorite book character?

Olivia! I give those books to the kids in my life all the time, but it turns out that the only Olivia book I own myself is in Latin… (because I have the kind of friends that buy you your favorite picture books in Latin. It’s ok, you can be jealous.)

4.  What are three things you are thankful for?

Only three?

1) My support system, which includes my fiancé (A.K.A my biggest fan), incredibly close circle of friends, my family, and my supervisor and colleagues.
2) My career. I’m nurturing the roots of my community every day, what is better than that?
3) Beauty. Whether it is nature, music, art or people’s actions, beautiful things remind us that life is worth living.

5.  What’s the scariest book you’ve ever read?

I’m not sure if it is the scariest, but I just finished The Nest by Kenneth Oppel. It has an intense, underlying creepiness on multiple levels, I thoroughly enjoyed it!

6.  Are you a dog person or a cat person?

While I appreciate dogs, I’m definitely a cat person all the way. I have a black and white kitty named Dani who has been my furry companion for 11 years and I adore her.

7.  What’s your favorite thing to do at your Library?

Telling families how amazing they are and all the wonderful things they are doing for their children. So many caregivers feel uncertainty about how well they are raising their kids, my happiest moments are the ones where I watch a mom (dad, grandparent, foster family, etc) become visibly lighter when I tell her that those tiny things she does everyday are exactly what her child needs. And I give kids free books which is pretty awesome too!

8.  What do you wish every children’s librarian knew?

That they are having a positive impact on their community every single day. It is so easy to forget that when facing the everyday challenges and frustrations, but every reference interaction, safe place for a teen to be a teen, collection decision, carefully planned program, behind the scenes work, and smile we provide matters. And it matters a lot.

9.  What was your favorite book as a child?

Owliver by Robert Kraus, illustrated by Jose Aruego and Ariana Dewey. No existential reason other than I just loved it. And The Poky Little Puppy which I checked out of the library every other week until one time it was overdue, my mother swore we had returned it, and then we found it months later. Oops…

10.  What is a hobby you are working on?

I really enjoy cooking, which is a surprise because I never thought I could cook. I like the challenge and creating things that I and others can enjoy. And garlic. I really like garlic.

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Thanks, Stephanie! What a fun continuation to our monthly profile feature!

Do you know someone who would be a good candidate for our ALSC Monthly Profile? Are YOU brave enough to answer our ten questions? Send your name and email address to alscblog@gmail.com; we’ll see what we can do.

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20. Wanted: Live Bloggers at #alamw16

alamw16After the holidays, in just over 5 weeks, thousands of librarians will be heading to Boston for ALA’s Midwinter Conference.

 

The ALA Midwinter Meeting, to be held January 8th through the 12th, brings together more than 10,000 leaders in the library and information industry for some 2,000 meetings and events.  The exhibit hall features the latest in books, videos, computers and other materials.  And, of course, a highlight of the Midwinter Conference is the announcement of the Youth Media Awards, including the Newbery and Caldecott Awards.

Are you heading to Boston for these meetings? If so, the ALSC Blog would love to have you volunteer to help those who are #leftbehind by writing short pieces telling about the people you are meeting and the meetings you are attending as well as offering information about what you are experiencing and learning. It’s easy and fun, and is a powerful tool for sharing information with other librarians. Take a look through our live blogging archives to read some of the information which has been shared from past conferences.

Sound interesting? Sound fun? Sound like something you’d like to do?  Contact Mary Voors at alscblog@gmail.com with your questions or to volunteer to liveblog from Midwinter.

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21. ALSC Member of the Month — Polly Ross

Each month, an ALSC member is profiled and we learn a little about their professional life and a bit about their not-so-serious side. Using just a few questions, we try to keep the profiles fun while highlighting the variety of members in our organization. So, without further ado, welcome to our ALSC profile, ten questions with ALSC member, Polly Ross.

Courtesy photo from Polly Ross

Courtesy photo from Polly Ross

1. What do you do and how long have you been doing it?

I’m a children’s librarian, I’ve had that title since I finished my MLIS in 2008,first at a couple of branches of DC Public Library, and now at Aurora Public Library in Aurora, Ontario, Canada. Currently, my job description is a little more supervisory and administrative than it was in DC, but I still do tons of programs and outreach, and think I have the best job in the world!

2.  Why did you join ALSC? Do you belong to any other ALA divisions or roundtables?

Because it would be insane to be a children’s librarian and not belong. Even though I’ve been home in Canada now, I still belong to ALSC (and PLA, and GLBTRT) because delightful though Canadian library associations are, they just can’t offer the same breadth of awesomeness that ALA and its divisions, round tables, etc. do.

3.  Do you have a favorite holiday treat to prepare or eat?

Springerle, a type of German Christmas cookie flavoured with anise seed—nothing beats German Christmas cookies of any kind! Although Peanut Blossoms, a peanut butter cookie with a Hershey’s Kiss on top, are also pretty fabulous.

4.  What’s the last book you recommended to a friend?

The Fionavar Tapestry by Guy Gavriel Kay, which is one of the best fantasy stories ever—but not for children.

5.  Are you a dog person or a cat person?

Both. I have three cats currently (Tabitha Twitchit, Christopher Robin and Bartholomew Cubbins), but the minute I stop living in small apartments I’m getting at least one dog as well—oh, and I’m also a rat, fish, hamster and ferret person.

6.  Who is the last person you said thank you to?

The Teacher Librarian at the school I’ve spent all week demonstrating 3D printing at—she did a lot of work arranging it so we could visit all the classes, and she’s letting us take over half her library for the duration.

7.  Coffee, tea, water… or something else?

Coffee. I would never be able to survive the morning-heavy (story time) nature of my job without it!

8.  What was your favorite book as a child?

At different times, Outside Over There (Sendak), Gumdrop Finds a Ghost (Val Biro), Babar Visits Another Planet, Nancy Drew: Captive Witness, and Simon (Rosemary Sutcliff).

9.  Do you have any tattoos or piercings?

Currently just piercings, my ears and a small nose stud, but I have a yearning for a picture book character tattoo, or possible something from Edward Gorey—maybe for my next birthday.

10.  What volunteer or altruistic activities are you involved with?

I’m a Brownie Leader— just got my 20 year pin in the mail from Girl Guides of Canada (and I was also with Brownies for two years with GSUSA while I worked in the US)! I also mentor (if that counts), currently just with ALSC, but sometimes also with the Ontario Library Association. I’ve also been known to teach Sunday School and I’m about to see if I can sign up to mind a donations kettle for the Salvation Army this holiday season. And I can almost always be guilted in to giving help with any cause, at least in the short term.

*********************************************************************************

Thanks, Polly! What a fun continuation to our monthly profile feature!

Do you know someone who would be a good candidate for our ALSC Monthly Profile? Are YOU brave enough to answer our ten questions? Send your name and email address to alscblog@gmail.com; we’ll see what we can do.

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22. Notable Children’s Sound Recordings — 2016 Discussion List

Barbara Scotto, the chair of the 2016 Notable Children’s Recordings Committee, and the entire NCR committee, invite you to join them at their Midwinter discussions, taking place in the Renaissance Waterfront, Room Georges, at the following times:

Friday, January 8, 8:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Saturday, January 9, 8:30 am – 5:30 pm
Sunday, January 10, 1:30 pm – 9:00 pm

The complete discussion list is below:

A Dragon’s Guide to the Care and Feeding of Humans, 3 hrs 58 min, cd, $30.00, Listening Library, 9781101891582

A House for a Hermit Crab, 11 min, cd+bk, $12.95, Weston Woods, 9780545875004

A Plague of Bogles, 7 hrs 16 min, cd, $45.00, Listening Library, 9780553556261

All American Boys, 6 hrs 30 min, mp3, $17.99, Simon & Schuster, 9781442398672

All Around This World: Africa, 1 hr 24 min, cd, $18.99, CD Baby/Sugar Mountain

All Fall Down, 8 hrs 34 min, cd, $74.99, Scholastic, 9780545788342

Appleblossom the Possum, 3 hrs 39 min, cd, Listening Library, 9781101892374

Bayou Magic, 4 hrs 45 min, cd, $46.75, Recorded Books, 9781490694269

Best Friend Next Door, 4 hrs 44 min, cd, $25.99, Weston Woods, 9780545857710

Betty Bunny Wants a Goal, 12 min, cd+bk , $29.95, Live Oak Media, 9781430120087

Brother Hugo and the Bear, 14 min, cd, $14.99, Dreamscape, 9781681416236

Bugs in My Hair, 6 min, cd+bk, $12.95, Weston Woods, 9780545790154
Calling All Elephants, 38 min, cd, $14.98, Song Wizard Records

Cartwheeling in Thunderstorms, 6 hrs 30 min, cd, $66.75, Recorded Books, 9781490664330

Circus Mirandus, 6 hrs 19 min, cd, $40.00, Listening Library, 9781101892336

Classic Songs and Traditional Tunes, 41 minutes, $14.98, Andyland Music

Cody and the Fountain of Happiness, cd, 1hr 54 min, $14.99, Brilliance Audio, 9781501215827

Completely Clementine, cd, 3 hrs 15 min, $30.75, Recorded Books, 9781490625225

Crystal, 5 hrs, cd, $51.75, Recorded Books, 9781470392963

Cuddlebug Parade, 37 min, cd, $12.00, Sweetly Spun Parade/D Baby.com, 889211153558

Dante of the Maury River, 7 hrs 7 min, cd, $22.99, Brilliance Audio, 9781501215834

Deep Woods Revival, 35 min, cd, $15.00, Red Yarn Productions

Dork Diaries 9: Tales from a Not-So-Dorky Drama Queen, 3 hrs, $14.99, Simon & Schuster Audio, 9781442370234

Echo, 12 hrs, cd, $79.99, Scholastic Audio, 9780545788373

Evil Spy School, 6 hrs, cd, $29.99. Simon & Schuster Audio, 9781442382626

Finding the Worm, 7 hr 1 min, cd, $40.00, Listening Library, 9780553552447

Firefly Hollow, 4 hrs 45 min, cd, $46,75, Recorded Books, 9781490651101

Fish in a Tree, 5 hrs 45 min, cd, $35.00, Listening Library, 9781101890691

Galactic Hot Dogs 1: Cosmoe Wiener’s Cosmic Getaway 2 hrs, cd, $14.99, Simon & Schuster Audio, 9781442385221

Glory Be, 4 hrs 27 min, download, $24,50, Scholastic Audio, 9780545735292

Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs, 14 min, cd+bk, $12.95, Weston Woods, 9780545842709

Goodbye Stranger, 6 hrs 59 min, cd, $35.00, Listening Library, 9781101916315

Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins, 21 min, $14.99, Dreamscape, 9781681416724

Home, 37 minutes, cd, $19.99, Independent release

Hot Air, 38 min, cd, $16.99, Recess Monkey

Infinity and Me, 12 min, cd+ bk, $29.95, Live Oak Media, 9781430120049

Ivan: The Remarkable True Story of the Shopping Mall Gorilla, 12 min, cd+bk,Weston Woods, 9780545879187

Jack: The True Story of Jack in the Beanstalk, 7 hrs 58 min, cd, $45.00. Listening Library, 9780553551259

Jazz for L’il Jumpers, 42 minutes, cd, $10.00, Independent release

Juba, 4 hrs 27 min, download, $15.00, Harper Audio, 9780062188304

Judy Moody and Stink: The Wishbone Wish, 1 hr 3 min, cd, $14.99, Brilliance Audio, 9781501200199

Jump Back, Paul: The Life and Poems of Paul Lawrence Dunbar, 2 hrs 37 min, cd, $24.99, Brilliance Audio. 9781491502211

Kay Thompson’s Eloise Audio Collection, 1 hr 30 min, cd, 14.99, Simon & Schuster Audio, 9781442391741

Look Both Ways in the Barrio Blanco, 6 hrs 12 min, $22.99, Brilliance Audio, 9781501215872

Magic Treehouse Super Edition #1: Danger in the Darkest Hour, 3 hrs 2 min, cd, $19.95, Listening Library, 9780553552652

Mark of the Thief, 8 hrs 28 min, cd, $79.99, Scholastic Audio, 9780545788564

Midnight Thief, 12 hrs, cd, $108,75, Recorded Books, 9781490651545

Mister Max: The Book of Kings, 10 hrs 15 min, cd, $50.00, Listening Library, 9780804122139

Most Dangerous, 7 hrs 52 min, cd, $45.00, Listening Library, 9780553552775

Ms. Rapscott’s Girls, 3 hrs 40 min, cd, $27.00, Listening Library, 9781101890653

Nooks & Crannies, 7 hrs 27 min, cd, $39.99, Dreamscape, 9781681410678

Nursery Rhyme Parade, 37 min, cd, $13.00, Furious Rose Productions

Nuts to You, 2 hrs 45 min, cd, $30.75, Recorded Books, 9781490651224

Old Wolf, 3 hrs 30 min, cd, $19.99, Simon & Schuster Audio, 9781442389953

Once Upon a Timeless Tale, 1 hr 3 min, cd, $19.99, Brilliance Audio, 9781486263769

Orphan Army, 9 hrs 47 min, mp3, $17.99, Simon & Schuster Audio, 9781442 389526

Papa Is a Poet, 18 min, cd+bk, $12.95, Weston Woods, 9780545842570

Paula Danziger’s Amber Brown Is Tickled Pink,1 hr 54 min, cd, $22.95, Live Oak Media, 9781430118923

Pip Bartlett’s Guide to Magical Creatures, 4 hrs 12 min, cd, $49.99, Scholastic Audio, 9780545838337

Pluto: A Wonder Story, 2 hrs 10 min, cd, $14.99, Brilliance Audio, 9781491524138

Ratscalibur, 3 hrs 36 min, $27.00, cd, Listening Library, 9781101915301

Saddlebottom, 1 hr 41 min, cd, $11.99, Brilliance Audio, 97814862473349

Sing-Along History, Vol.1: Glory! Glory! Hallelujah!, 35 min, cd, $10.00, CD Baby/Sugar Mountain

Smek for President!, 6 hrs, cd, $30.00, Listening Library, 9780553395686

Sophie’s Squash, 15 min, cd+bk, $15.75, Recorded Books, 9781490683409

Stella by Starlight, 6 hrs 30 min, cd, $24.99 Simon & Schuster, 9781442380394

Stolen Magic, 7 hrs 37 min, download, $19.99, Harper Audio, 9780067388544

Stradivari’s Gift, 37 min, cd, $12.99, Atlantic Crossing/Naxos of America, 701807997837

Switch, 7 hrs 26 min, cd, $40.00, Listening Library, 9781101925713

That Is Not a Good Idea, 5 min, cd+bk, $12.95, Weston Woods, 9780545875330

The Boy in the Black Suit, 7 hrs 45 min, cd, $77.75, Recorded Books, 9781490658827

The Boys in the Boat, 5 hrs 36 min, cd, $35.00, Listening Library, 9781101924874

The Cottage in the Woods, 12 hrs 46 min, cd, $55.00, Listening Library, 9780553556223

The Curse of the Buttons, 3 hrs 9 min, $24.99, Brilliance Audio, 9781491502143

The Eagles Are Back, 11 min, cd+bk, $29.95, Live Oak Media, 9781430117773

The Enchanted Files: Diary of a Mad Brownie, 4 hrs 58 min, cd, $35.00, Listening Library, 9780553552294

The Friendship Riddle, 7 hrs 45 min, cd, $77.75, Recorded Books, 9781490666778

The Hired Girl, 12 hrs 45 min, cd, $87.75, Recorded Books, 9781490632230

The Honest Truth, 4 hrs12 min, cd, $24.99, Brilliance Audio, 9781491519011

The Hope Chest, 7 hrs 9 min, cd, $55.00, Listening Library, 9781101915769

The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place, Bk. 5: The Unmapped Sea, 9 hrs 40 min, download, $24.99, Harper Audio, 9780062397935

The Jumbies, 5 hrs 15 min, cd, $51.75, Recorded Books, 9781490664651

The League of Beastly Dreadfuls, 6 hrs 41 minutes, cd, $40.00, Listening Library, 9781101891667

The Lightning Queen, 8 hrs, 16 min, cd, $34.99, Scholastic Audio, 978054592117

The Mr. Men Collection, 59 min, cd, $10.00, Listening Library, 9781101891285

The Mr. Men Collection, #3, 53 min, download, $22,00, Listening Library, 9781101891438

The Mr. Men Collection, #4, 57 min, download, $22.00, Listening Library, 978 110 1891452

The Nest, 3 hrs 30 min, cd, $14.99, Simon & Schuster Audio, 9781442391260

The Odds of Getting Even, 8 hrs 15 min, cd, $40.00, Listening Library, 9781101892411

The Terrible Two, 6 hrs 15 min, download, $30.00, Blackstone Audio, 9781481515306

The Unlikely Adventures of Mabel Jones, 3 hrs 46 min, cd, $27.00, Listening Library, 9781101915400

The Wainscott Weasel, 4 hrs 30 min, mp3, $19.99, Simon & Schuster Audio, 9781442383425

The War That Saved My Life, 7 hrs 38 min, cd, $40.00, Listening Library, 9780553556537

The Worst Class Trip Ever, 3 hrs 59 min, cd, $19.99, Brilliance Audio, 9781491585658

These Shallow Graves, 13 hrs 32 min, cd, $60.00, Listening Library, 9781101916261

This is the Rope, 9 min, cd + bk, $12.95, Weston Woods, 9780545790512

This Side of Wild, 3 hrs, cd. $14.99, Simon & Schuster Audio, 9781442389618

Timmy Failure, #3: We Meet Again, 2 hrs 15 min, cd, $25,75, Recorded Books, 9781490620879

Tombquest, Bk.1: Book of the Dead, 4 hr 37 min, cd, $49.99, Scholastic Audio, 9780545788403

Trollhunters, 7 hrs, cd, $66.75, Recorded Books, 9781490694320

Trouble Is a Friend of Mine, 8 hrs 49 min, cd, $49.99, Listening Library, 9781101892497

Under the Egg, 5 hrs 55 min, cd, $35.00, Listening Library, 9781101915509

Upside-Down Magic, 3 hrs 8 min, cd, $39.99, Scholastic Audio, 9780545881715

Vendetta, 6 hrs 45 min, cd, $77.75, Recorded Books, 9781490677477

We Are All Made of Molecules, 5 hrs 45 min, cd, $35,00, Listening Library, 9780553556308

Woof, 7 hrs 4 min, cd, $64.99, Scholastic Audio, 978054583835

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You might also be interested in looking at the 2016 Notable Children’s Videos discussion list which will be posted tomorrow and the Notable Children’s Books discussion list which will be posted on Thursday.

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23. Notable Children’s Videos – 2016 Discussion List

The 2016 (Andrew) Carnegie Notable Children’s Videos Committee, chaired by Liz Deskins, will be discussing more than 30 DVDs published in 2015 and invite you to listen in. This committee is tasked with two functions: first, to select the most distinguished American Video (DVD) for children; and second, to select and annotate a list of notable videos of interest to children. Check out the times and location in the ALA Midwinter Scheduler.

Titles to be discussed will include:

  • A Dance for Starlight : One Ballerina’s Dream. Dreamscape
  • A House for Hermit Crab. Scholastic
  • Benno and the Night of Broken Glass. Dreamscape
  • Benny Goodman & Teddy Wilson: Taking the stage as the first black-and white jazz band in history. Dreamscape
  • Billy and Goat at the State Fair. Dreamscape
  • Boom Snot Twitty: This way that way. Dreamscape
  • Go to Sleep, Groundhog. Dreamscape
  • Going Places. Dreamscape
  • Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs. Scholastic
  • Greenhorn: A Story of Friendship & Tragedy in the Aftermath of the Holocaust. TMW Media Group
  • Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins. Dreamscape
  • I Had a Favorite Dress. Dreamscape
  • I’m Brave! Scholastic
  • Ivan: the remarkable story of the shopping mall gorilla. Scholastic
  • Looking at Lincoln. Dreamscape
  • Mogie: the heart of the house. Dreamscape
  • Mumbet’s Declaration of Independence. Dreamscape
  • Nino Wrestles the World. Dreamscape
  • On a Beam of Light: a story of Albert Einstein. Dreamscape
  • Once Upon a Star: The Magic Mirror. Dawnsign Press
  • Peanut Butter and Jellyfish. Scholastic
  • Reason for Hope, Reasons to Live: Preventing youth suicide. Human Relations Media
  • Say NO to Negative Peer Pressure. Human Relations Media
  • Scaredy Squirrel at Night. Scholastic
  • That is Not a Good Idea. Scholastic
  • The Basic Hygiene Video. Human Relations Media
  • The Legend of Marshmallow Island. Mystic Drumz
  • The Moon Book. Dreamscape
  • The Rocket’s Red Glare: Celebrating the history of the Star Spangled Banner. Dreamscape
  • The Sweet Beat. Jump with Jill
  • The Tiny Seed. Scholastic
  • The Toxic Life Cycle of a Cigarette. Human Relations Media
  • The Watcher. Dreamscape
  • The Weatherman and the Shadow Boxer. National Film Board of Canada
  • The Whispering Town. Dreamscape
  • Thomas Jefferson: Life, liberty, and the pursuit of everything. Dreamscape
  • Viva Frida. Dreamscape
  • Zoe’s Jungle. Dreamscape

**********************************************************************

 You might also be interested in looking at the 2016 Notable Children’s Sound Recordings discussion list which was posted on Tuesday and the 2016 Notable Children’s Books discussion list which will be posted tomorrow.

The post Notable Children’s Videos – 2016 Discussion List appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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24. Notable Children’s Books — 2016 Discussion List

Micki Freeney, the chair of the 2016 Notable Children’s Books Committee, and the entire NCB committee, invite you to join them at their Midwinter discussions, taking place in the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, Room 162AB on:

Friday, January 8, 1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Saturday, January 9, 1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Sunday, January 10, 1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Monday, January 11, 1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

The complete discussion list is below. Titles with an asterisk indicate that the book was already discussed at the Annual Conference last summer.

PICTURE BOOKS

*3, 2, 1, Go! by Emily Arnold McCully. Holiday House.

8: An Animal Alphabet by Elisha Cooper. Scholastic Inc,/Orchard Books.

A B See by Elizabeth Doyle. Simon & Schuster/Little Simon.

Ask Me by Bernard Waber. Illus. by Suzy Lee. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Ballet Cat: The Totally Secret Secret by Bob Shea. Disney/Hyperion

Bear and Hare Go Fishing by Emily Gravett. Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers

*The Bear Ate Your Sandwich by Julia Sarcone-Roach. Random House/Alfred A. Knopf.

Beep! Beep! Go to Sleep by Todd Tarpley. Illus. by John Rocco. Little Brown and Company.

Big Bear, Little Chair by Lizi Boyd. Chronicle Books.

Boats for Papa by Jessixa Bagley. Roaring Brook Press/A Neal Porter Book.

*Click! by Jeffrey Ebbeler. Holiday House.

Counting Lions by Katie Cotton. Illus. by Stephen Walton. Candlewick Press.

Crybaby by Karen Beaumont. Illus. by Eugene Yelchin. Macmillan/ Henry Holt and Company.

Double Happiness by Nancy Tupper Ling. Illus. by Alina Chau. Chronicle Books.

Drive: A Look at Roadside Opposites by Kellen Hatanaka. House of Anansi Press/Groundwood Books.

*Drum Dream Girl: How One Girl’s Courage Changed Music by Margarita Engle. Illus. by Rafael López. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Families, Families, Families by Suzanne Lang. Illus. by Max Lang. Random House.

*Fetch by Jorey Hurley. Simon & Schuster/A Paula Wiseman Book.

Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear by Lindsay Mattick. Illus. by Sophie Blackall. Little Brown and Company.

*A Fine Dessert: Four Centuries, Four Families, One Delicious Feast by Emily Jenkins. Illus. by Sophie Blackall. Random House/Schwartz and Wade.

Float by Daniel Miyares. Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers.

The Fly by Petr Horáček. Illus. by the author. Candlewick Press

*Fly! by Karl Newsom Edwards. Random House/Alfred A. Knopf.

Friendshape by Amy Krouse Rosenthal. Illus. by Tom Lichtenheld. Scholastic Press.

*Grandma in Blue with Red Hat by Scott Menchin. Illus. by Harry Bliss. Abrams.

*The Grasshopper and the Ants by Jerry Pinkney. Little Brown and Company.

Have You Seen My Monster? by Steve Light. Candlewick Press.

Hoot Owl, Master of Disguise by Sean Taylor. Illus. by Jean Jullien. Candlewick Press.

*How to Draw a Dragon by Douglas Florian. Beach Lane Books.

Hurry Home, Hedgehog! A Bilingual Book of Sounds by Belle Yang. Candlewick Press.

I (Don’t) Like Snakes by Nicola Davies. Illus. by Luciano Lozano. Candlewick Press.

I Yam a Donkey by Cece Bell. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Clarion Books.

*If You Plant a Seed by Kadir Nelson. HarperCollins/Balzer + Bray.

*In by Nikki McClure. Abrams/Appleseed.

In a Village by the Sea by Muon Van. Illus. by April Chu. Creston Books.

*It’s Only Stanley by Jon Agee. Penguin Group/Dial Books for Young Readers.

The King and the Sea: 21 Extremely Short Stories by Heinz Janisch. Illus. by Wolf Erlbruch. Translated by Sally-Ann Spencer. Gecko Press.

Lailah’s Lunchbox: A Ramadan Story by Reem Faruqi. Illus by Lea Lyon. Tilbury House Publishers.

*Last Stop on Market Street by Matt de la Peña. Illus. by Christian Robinson. Penguin/Putnam.

Lenny & Lucy by Philip C. Stead. Illus. by Erin E. Stead. Roaring Brook Press.

Leo: A Ghost Story by Mac Barnett. Illus. by Christian Robinson. Chronicle Books.

Lillian’s Right to Vote by Jonah Winter. Illus. by Shane W. Evans. Random House/Schwartz & Wade.

Look! by Jeff Mack. Penguin Group/Philomel Books.

Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation by Edwidge Danticat. Illus. by Leslie Staub. Penguin/Dial Books.

Mango, Abuela, and Me by Meg Medina. Illus. by Angela Dominguez. Candlewick Press.

Maya’s Blanket/La Manta de Maya by Monica Brown. Illus. by David Diaz. Translated by Adriana Domingue. Lee & Low Books/Children’s Book Press.

*Meet the Dullards by Sara Pennypacker. Illus. by Daniel Salmieri. HarperCollins/Balzer + Bray.

Miracle on 133rd Street by Sonia Manzano. Illus. by Marjorie Priceman. Simon & Schuster/Atheneum Books for Young Readers.

The Moon Is Going to Addy’s House by Ida Pearle. Illus. Penguin Group/Dial Books for Young Readers.

Moving Blocks by Yosuke Yonezu. Michael Neugebauer Publishing Ltd./Minedition

Mr. Squirrel and the Moon by Sebastian Meschenmoser. Translated by David Henry Wilson. NorthSouth Books.

My Cousin Momo by Zachariah OHora. Dial Books for Young Readers.

*My Pen by Christopher Myers. Disney/Hyperion.

My Two Blankets by Irena Kobald, iIlus. by Freya Blackwood. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

My Wild Family by Laurent Moreau. Chronicle Books.

The New Small Person by Lauren Child. Candlewick Press.

*New Shoes by Susan Lynn Meyer. Illus. by Eric Velasquez. Holiday House.

The Night World by Mordicai Gerstein. Little Brown and Company.

On the Ball by Brian Pinkney. Disney-Hyperion.

One Family by George Shannon. Illus. by Blanca Gómez. Farrar Straus Giroux/Frances Foster Books.

One Word from Sophia by Jim Averbeck. Illus. by Yasmeen Ismail. Atheneum Books for Young Readers.

Oskar and the Eight Blessings by Richard Simon and Tanya Simon. Illus. by Mark Siegel. Roaring Brook Press.

Outstanding in the Rain: A Whole Story with Holes by Frank Viva. Little Brown and Company.

*P. Zonka Lays an Egg by Julie Paschkis. Peachtree.

The Plan by Alison Paul. Illus. by Barbara Lehman. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

* Poem in Your Pocket by Margaret McNamara. Illus. by G. Brian Karas. Random House/Schwartz & Wade Books.

Pool by JiHyeon Lee. Chronicle Books.

The Princess and the Pony by Kate Beaton. Scholastic Press/Arthur A. Levine Books.

The Queen’s Hat by Steve Antony. Scholastic Press.

Red by Jan De Kinder. Translated by Laura Watkinson. Eerdmans Books for Young Readers.

*Red: A Crayon’s Story by Michael Hall. Harper Collins/Greenwillow Books.

Roger Is Reading a Book by Koen Van Biesen. Translated by Laura Watkinson. Eerdmans Books for Young Readers.

*Should You Be a River: A Poem about Love by Ed Young. Little Brown and Company.

*Sidewalk Flowers by JonArno Lawson. Illus. by Sydney Smith. House of Anansi Press/Groundwood Books.

*Skunk by Mac Barnett. Illus. by Patrick McDonnell. Roaring Brook Press.

The Snow Rabbit by Camille Garoche, Enchanted Lion Books.

Special Delivery by Philip C. Stead. Illus. by Matthew Cordell. Roaring Brook Press/A Neal Porter Book.

*Spectacular Spots by Susan Stockdale. Peachtree.

Spots in a Box by Helen Ward. Candlewick Press/Templar Books.

Squid Kid the Magnificent by Lynne Berry. Illus. by Luke LaMarca. Disney/Hyperion.

Stella Brings the Family by Miriam B. Schiffer. Illus. by Holly Clifton-Brown. Chronicle Books.

*Stormy Night by Salina Yoon. Bloomsbury.

Strictly No Elephants by Lisa Mantchev. Illus. by Taeeun Yoo. Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books.

*Such a Little Mouse by Alice Schertle. Illus. by Stephanie Yue. Scholastic/Orchard Books.

*Supertruck by Stephen Savage. Roaring Book Press/A Neal Porter Book.

Thank You and Good Night by Patrick McDonnell. Little Brown and Company.

That’s (Not) Mine by Anna Kang. Illus. by Christopher Weyant. Two Lions.

This Is Sadie by Sarah O’Leary. Illus. by Julie Morstad. Random House/Tundra Books.

Tiptoe Tapirs by Hanmin Kim, translated by Sera Lee. Illus. by Hanmin Kim. Holiday House.

*Toad Weather by Sandra Markle. Illus. by Thomas Gonzalez. Peachtree.

Toys Meet Snow: Being the Wintertime Adventures by Emily Jenkins. Illus. by Paul O. Zelinsky. Random House/Schwartz & Wade Books.

Two Mice by Sergio Ruzzier. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Clarion Books.

Two White Rabbits by Jairo Buitrago. Illus. by Rafael Yockteng. Translated by Elisa Amado. House of Anansi Press/Groundwood Books.

Wait by Antoinette Portis. Roaring Brook Press/A Neal Porter Book.

Waiting by Kevin Henkes. HarperCollins/Greenwillow Books.

We Dig Worms! by Kevin McCloskey. Toon Books.

*Whale Trails: Before and Now by Lesa Cline-Ransome. Illus. by G. Brian Karas. Henry Holt and Company/Christy Ottaviano Books.

*When Otis Courted Mama by Kathi Appelt. Illus. by Jill McElmurry. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Where’s the Baboon? by Michaël Escoffier. Illus. by Kris Di Giacomo. Enchanted Lion Books.

Where’s Walrus? and Penguin? by Stephen Savage. Scholastic Press.

The Whisper by Pamela Zagarenski. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

The White Book by Silvia Borando, Elisabetta Pica and Lorenzo Clerici. Candlewick Press.

Who Done It? by Oliver Tallec. Chronicle Books.

Whose Tools? by Toni Buzzeo. IIllus. by Jim Datz. Abrams/Appleseed.

Wolfie the Bunny by Ame Dyckman. Illus. by Zachariah OHora. Little Brown and Company.

*A Wonderful Year by Nick Bruel. Roaring Brook Press/A Neal Porter Book.

Yard Sale by Eve Bunting. Illus. by Lauren Castillo. Candlewick Press.

Zen Socks by Jon J. Muth. Scholastic Press.

FICTION (INCLUDING FICTION, VERSE NOVELS AND GRAPHIC NOVELS)

Adventures with Waffles by Maria Parr. Translated by Guy Puzey. Illus. by Kate Forrester. Candlewick Press.

All the Answers by Kate Messner. Bloomsbury.

Another Kind of Hurricane by Tamara Ellis Smith. Random House/Schwartz & Wade Books.

Appleblossom the Possum by Holly Goldberg Sloan. Illus. by Gary A. Rosen. Penguin Group/Dial Books for Young Readers.

*Audacity by Melanie Crowder. Penguin/Philomel Books.

Baba Yaga’s Assistant by Marika McCoola. Illus. by Emily Carroll. Candlewick Press.

The Bamboo Sword by Marge Preus. Abrams/Amulet Books.

*Bayou Magic by Jewell Parker Rhodes. Little Brown and Company.

*Blackbird Fly by Erin Entrada Kelly. Harper Collins/Greenwillow Books.

Blackthorn Key by Kevin Sands. Simon & Schuster/Alladin.

Book Scavenger by Jennifer Chambliss Bertman. Henry Holt & Company/Christy Ottaviano Books.

Circus Mirandus by Cassie Beasley. Illus. by Diana Sudyka. Penguin/Dial Books for Young Readers.

Completely Clementine by Sara Pennypacker. Illus. by Marla Frazee. Disney/Hyperion.

*The Cottage in the Woods by Katherine Coville. Random House/Alfred A. Knopf.

Crenshaw by Katherine Applegate. Macmillan/Feiwel and Friends.

Cuckoo Song by Frances Hardinge. Abrams/Amulet Books.

The Curious World of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly. Henry Holt and Company.

Dear Hank Williams by Kimberly Willis Holt. Henry Holt and Company/Christy Ottaviano Books.

Detective Gordon: The First Case by Ulf Nilsson. Illus. by Gitte Spee. Translated by Julia Marshall. Gecko Press.

Detective’s Assistant by Kate Hannigan. Little Brown and Company.

The Doldrums by Nicholas Gannon. HarperCollins/Greenwillow Books.

*A Dragon’s Guide to the Care and Feeding of Humans by Laurence Yep and Joanne Ryder. Illus. by Mary GrandPré. Random House/Crown Books for Young Readers.

Dream On, Amber by Emma Shevah. Illus. by Helen Crawford-White. Sourcebooks/Jabberwocky.

*Echo by Pam Muñoz Ryan. Illus. by Dinara Mirtalipova. Scholastic Press.

*Finding Serendipity by Angelica Banks. Henry Holt and Company.

Finding the Worm by Mark Goldblatt. Random House.

Firefly Hollow by Alison McGhee. Illus. by Christopher Denise. Simon & Schuster/Atheneum Books for Young Readers.

*Fish in a Tree by Linda Mullaly Hunt. Penguin Group/Nancy Paulsen Books.

Flop to the Top! by Eleanor Davis and Drew Weing. Toon Books.

*Footer Davis Probably Is Crazy by Susan Vaught. Simon Schuster/A Paula Wiseman Book.

Full Cicada Moon by Marilyn Hilton. Penguin Group/Dial Books for Young Readers.

Fuzzy Mud by Louis Sachar. Random House Children’s Books/Delacorte Press.

George by Alex Gino. Scholastic Press.

Gone Crazy in Alabama by Rita Williams-Garcia. HarperCollins/Amistad.

Goodbye Stranger by Rebecca Stead. Random House/Wendy Lamb Books.

The Great War: Stories Inspired by Items from the First World War by multiple authors. Illus. by Jim Kay. Candlewick Press.

Hamster Princess: Harriet the Invincible by Ursula Vernon. Penguin Group/Dial Books for Young Readers.

A Handful of Stars by Cynthia Lord. Scholastic Press.

Hiawatha and the Peacemaker by Robbie Robertson. Illus. by David Shannon. Abrams Books for Young Readers.

The Hired Girl by Laura Amy Schlitz. Candlewick Press.

*Honey by Sarah Weeks. Scholastic Press.

*The Imaginary by A. F. Harrold. Illus. by Emily Gravett. Bloomsbury.

Juba! by Walter Dean Myers. HarperCollins/Armistad.

The Jumbies by Tracey Baptiste. Algonquin Young Readers.

The Lightning Queen by Laura Resau. Scholastic Press.

*Listen, Slowly by Thanhhà Lại. HarperCollins.

Listen to the Moon by Michael Morpurgo. Macmillan/Feiwel and Friends.

Lost in NYC: A Subway Adventure by Nadja Spiegelman. Illus. by Segio García Sánchez. TOON Graphics.

Lost in the Sun by Lisa Graff. Penguin Group/Philomel.

The Lunch Witch by Deb Lucke. Papercutz.

Mars Evacuees by Sophia McDougall. HarperCollins Publishers.

The Marvels by Brian Selznick. Scholastic Press,

*Moon Bear by Gill Lewis. Illus. by Alessandro Gottardo. Simon Schuster/Atheneum.

Moonpenny Island by Tricia Springstubb. Illus. by Gilbert Ford. HarperCollins/Balzer + Bray.

Murder Is Bad Manners by Robin Stevens. Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.

A Nearer Moon by Melanie Crowder. Simon & Schuster/Atheneum Books.

The Nest by Kenneth Oppel. Illus. by Jon Klassen. Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.

Nooks & Crannies by Jessica Lawson. Illus. by Natalie Andrewson. Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.

The Only Child by Guojing. Random House/Schwartz & Wade.

Orbiting Jupiter by Gary D. Schmidt. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Clarion .
Paper Things by Jennifer Richard Jacobson. Candlewick Press.

*The Penderwicks in Spring by Jeanne Birdsall. Random House/Alfred A. Knopf.

Piper Green and the Fairy Tree by Ellen Potter. Illus. by Qin Leng. Knopf Books for Young Reader.

*Princess Academy: The Forgotten Sisters by Shannon Hale. Bloomsbury.

*The Question of Miracles by Elana K. Arnold. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

*Red Butterfly by A. L. Sonnichsen. Illus. by Amy June Bates. Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.

*Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson. Penguin/Dial Books for Young Readers.

The Seventh Most Important Thing by Shelley Pearsall. Random House/Alfred A. Knopf.

Shadows of Sherwood: A Robyn Hoodlum Adventure by Kekla Magoon. Bloomsbury.

*Stella by Starlight by Sharon M. Draper. Simon & Schuster/Atheneum.

The Story of Diva and Flea by Mo Willems. Illus. by Tony DiTerlizzi. Disney/Hyperion.

Sunny Side Up by Jennifer Holm. Illus. by Matthew Holm. Scholastic Graphix.

The Tale of Rescue by Michael J. Rosen. Illus. by Stan Fellows. Candlewick Press.

The Thing about Jellyfish by Ali Benjamin. Little, Brown and Company.

*This Side of Home by Renée Watson. Bloomsbury.

The Tortoise and the Soldier: A Story of Courage and Friendship in World War I by Michael Foreman. Henry Holt and Company.

Under a Painted Sky by Stacey Lee. Penguin/G P Putnam’s Sons.

Unusual Chickens for the Exceptional Poultry Farmer by Kelly Jones. Illus. by Katie Kath. Random House/Alfred A. Knopf.

*The War That Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley. Penguin/Dial Books for Young Readers.

The Way Home Looks Now by Wendy Wan-Long Shang. Scholastic Press.

We Are All Made of Molecules by Susin Nielson. Random House/Wendy Lamb Books.

*Wish Girl by Nikki Loftin. Penguin/Razorbill.

Written and Drawn by Henrietta by Ricardo Siri Liniers. Toon Books.

INFORMATION PICTURE BOOKS

The Amazing Age of John Roy Lynch by Chris Barton. Illus. by Don Tate. Eerdmans Books for Young Readers.

An Ambush of Tigers: A Wild Gathering of Collective Nouns by Betsy R. Rosenthal. Illus. by Jago. Lerner Publishing Group/Millbrook Press.

The Blue Whale by Jenni Desmond. Enchanted Lion Books.

The Book Itch: Freedom, Truth & Harlem’s Greatest Bookstore by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson. lllus. by R. Gregory Christie. Lerner Publishing Group/Carolrhoda Books.

A Chicken Followed Me Home! Questions and Answers about Familiar Fowl by Robin Page. Simon & Schuster/Beach Lane Books.

*Draw What You See: The Life and Art of Benny Andrews by Kathleen Benson. Illus. by Benny Andrews. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Clarion Books.

*Earmuffs for Everyone: How Chester Greenwood Became Known as the Inventor of Earmuffs by Meghan McCarthy. Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers/A Paula Wiseman Book.

*Egg: Nature’s Perfect Package by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page. Illus. by Steve Jenkins. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

*Emmanuel’s Dream: The True Story of Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah by Laurie Ann Thompson. Illus. by Sean Qualls. Random House/Schwartz and Wade.

*Flowers Are Calling by Rita Gray. Illus. by Kenard Pak. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

The Flying Birds by Eun-sun Han. Illus. by R. Ju-kyoung Kim. TanTan Publishing.

Frederick’s Journey: The Life of Frederick Douglass by Doreen Rappaport. Disney/Jump at the Sun.

Game Changer: John McLendon and the Secret Game by John Coy. Illus. by Randy DuBurke. Lerner Publishing Group/Carolrhoda Books.

*Gingerbread for Liberty: How a German Baker Helped with the American Revolution by Mara Rockliff. Illus. by Vincent X. Kirsch. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Growing Up Pedro: How the Martinez Brothers Made It from the Dominican Republic All the Way to the Major Leagues by Matt Tavares. Candlewick Press.

Hippos Are Huge! by Jonathan London. Illus. by Matthew Trueman. Candlewick Press.

The House That Jane Built: A Story about Jane Addams by Tanya Lee Stone. Illus. by Kathryn Brown. Henry Holt and Company/Christy Ottaviano Books.

How to Swallow a Pig: Step-by-step Advice from the Animal Kingdom by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

I’m Trying to Love Spiders (It Isn’t Easy) by Bethany Barton. Penguin Group/Viking.

*In Mary’s Garden by Tina and Carson Kügler. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

My Story, My Dance: Robert Battle’s Journey to Alvin Ailey by Lesa Cline-Ransome. Illus. by James E. Ransome. Simon & Schuster Books for Young People/A Paula Wiseman Book.

A Nest Is Noisy by Dianna Hutts Aston. Illus. by Sylvia Long. Chronicle Books.

The Nutcracker Comes To America: How Three Ballet-Loving Brothers Created A Holiday Tradition by Chris Barton. Illus. by Cathy Gendron. Lerner Publishing Group/Millbrook Press.

*One Plastic Bag: Isatou Ceesay and the Recycling Women of the Gambia by Miranda Paul. Illus. by Elizabeth Zunan. Lerner/Millbrook Press.

Poet: The Remarkable Story of George Moses Horton by Don Tate. Peachtree Publishers.

Queen of the Diamond: The Lizzie Murphy Story by Emily Arnold McCully. Farrar Strauss Giroux/Margaret Ferguson Books.

*Raindrops Roll by April Pulley Sayre. Simon & Schuster/Beach Lane.

Small Wonders: Jean-Henri Fabre & His World of Insects by Matthew Clark Smith. iIlus. by Giuliano Ferri. Two Lions.

Swan: The Life and Dance of Anna Pavlova by Laurel Snyder. Illus. by Julie Morstad. Chronicle Books.

*Swing Sisters: The Story of the International Sweethearts of Rhythm by Karen Deans. Illus. by Joe Cepeda. Holiday House.

Tree of Wonder: The Many Marvelous Lives of a Rainforest Tree by Kate Messner. Illus. by Simona Mulazzani. Chronicle Books.

*Trombone Shorty by Troy Andrews. Illus. by Bryan Collier. Abram Books.

Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt by Kate Messner. Illus. by Christopher Silis Neal. Chronicle Books.

Water Is Water: A Book about the Water Cycle by Miranda Paul. Illus. by Jason Chin. Roaring Book Press/A Neal Porter Book.

Woodpecker Wham! by April Pulley Sayre. Illus. by Steve Jenkins. Henry Holt and Company.

NON-FICTION (INCLUDING INFORMATION PICTURE BOOKS, POETRY AND FOLKLORE)

*28 Days: Moments in Black History That Changed the World by Charles R. Smith Jr. Illus. by Shane Evans. Roaring Brook Press/A Neal Porter Book.

*Big Red Kangaroo by Claire Saxby. Illus. by Graham Byrne. Candlewick Press.

*Bird & Diz by Gary Golio. Illus. by Ed Young. Candlewick Press.

The Boy Who Fell off the Mayflower, or John Howland’s Good Fortune by P.J. Lynch. Candlewick Press.

The Boys Who Challenged Hitler: Knud Pedersen and the Churchill Club by Phillip Hoose. Farrar Straus Giroux.

Breakthrough! How Three People Saved “Blue Babies” and Changed Medicine Forever by Jim Murphy. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/Clarion Books.

*The Case for Loving: The Fight for Interracial Marriage by Selina Alko. Illus. by Sean Qualls and Selina Alko. Scholastic/Arthur A Levine Books.

Child Soldier: When Boys and Girls Are Used in War by Jessica Dee Humphreys & Michel Chikwanine, Illus. by Claudia Dάvila. Kids Can Press/CitizenKids

Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans by Don Brown. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Emu by Claire Saxby. Illus. by Graham Byrne. Candlewick Press.

*Enormous Smallness: A Story of E. E. Cummings by Matthew Burgess. Illus. by Kris Di Giacomo. Enchanted Lion Books.

Enchanted Air: Two Cultures, Two Wings: A Memoir by Margarita Engle. Simon & Schuster/Atheneum Books for Young Readers.

Extraordinary People: A Semi-Comprehensive Guide to Some of the World’s Most Fascinating Individuals by Michael Hearst. Illus. by Aaron Scamihorn. Chronicle Books.

*Fatal Fever: Tracking Down Typhoid Mary by Gail Jarrow. Highlights/Calkins Creek.

*First Flight around the World: The Adventures of the American Fliers Who Won the Race by Tim Grove. Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum/Abram Books.

Funny Bones: Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras by Duncan Tonatiuh. Abrams Books for Young Readers.

Gordon Parks: How the Photographer Captured Black and White America by Carole Boston Weatherford. Illus. by Jamey Christoph. Albert Whitman and Company.

Honor Girl by Maggie Thrash. Candlewick Press.

Human Body Theater by Maris Wicks. Roaring Brook Press/First Second.

I Will Always Write Back: How One Letter Changed Two Lives by Caitlin Alifirenka and Martin Ganda, with Liz Welch. Little Brown and Company.

The Inker’s Shadow by Allen Say. Scholastic Press.

The Inventor’s Secret: What Thomas Edison Told Henry Ford by Suzanne Slade. Illus. by Jennifer Black Reinhardt. Charlesbridge Publishing.

Ira’s Shakespeare Dream by Glenda Armand. Illus. by Floyd Cooper. Lee and Low Books.

Iron Rails, Iron Men, and the Race to Link the Nation: The Story of the Transcontinental Railroad by Martin W. Sandler. Illus. by Karen Minot (map illustrations). Candlewick Press.

Lincoln’s Spymaster: Allan Pinkerton, America’s First Private Eye by Samantha Seiple. Scholastic Press.

Mad about Monkeys by Owen Davey. Flying Eye Books.

March: Book Two by John Lewis and Andrew Aydin. Illus. by Nate Powell. Top Shelf Productions.

Mesmerized: How Ben Franklin Solved a Mystery That Baffled All of France by Mara Rockliff. Illus. by Iacopo Bruno. Candlewick Press.

The Most Amazing Creature in the Sea by Brenda Z. Guiberson. Illus. by Gennady Spirin. Henry Holt and Company.

Most Dangerous: Daniel Ellsberg and the Secret History of the Vietnam War by Steve Sheinkin. Roaring Brook Press.

The Octopus Scientists: Exploring the Mind of a Mollusk by Sy Montgomery. Photos by Keith Ellenbogen.

*Rad American Women A to Z: Rebels, Trailblazers, and Visionaries Who Shaped Our History… and Our Future by Kate Schatz. Illus. by Miriam Klein Stahl. City Lights Books.

Rhythm Ride: A Road Trip through the Motown Sound by Andrea Davis Pinkney. Roaring Brook Press.

Sand Swimmers: The Secret Life of Australia’s Desert Wilderness by Narelle Oliver. Candlewick Press.

Sex Is a Funny Word: A Book about Bodies, Feelings, and YOU by Cory Silverberg. Illus. by Fiona Smyth. Seven Stories Press/Triangle Square.

Spidermania: Friends on the Web by Alexandra Siy. Illus. by Dennis Kunkel. Holiday House.

Steve Jobs: Insanely Great by Jessie Hartland. Random House/Schwartz & Wade Books.

Stonewall: Breaking Out in the Fight for Gay Rights by Ann Bausum. Macmillan/Roaring Brook Press.

Terrible Typhoid Mary: A True Story of the Deadliest Cook in America by Susan Campbell Bartoletti. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Tommy: The Gun that Changed America by Karen Blumenthal. Roaring Brook Press.

A Tower of Giraffes: Animals in Groups by Anna Wright. Charlesbridge Publishing.

*Tricky Vic: The Impossibly True Story of the Man Who Sold the Eiffel Tower by Greg Pizzoli. Penguin Group/Viking.

*Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom: My Story of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March by Lynda Blackmon Lowery. Illus. by P J Loughran. Penguin/Dial Books.

The Underground Abductor: An Abolitionist Tale by Nathan Hale. Abrams/Amulet Books.

Untamed: The Wild Life of Jane Goodall by Anita Silvey. National Geographic.

Welcome to New Zealand: A Nature Journal by Sandra Morris. Candlewick Press.

A Year without Mom by Dasha Tolstikova. House of Anansi Press/Groundwood Books.

POETRY

Amazing Places. Compiled by Lee Bennett Hopkins. Illus. by Chris Soentpiet & Christy Hale. Lee & Low Books.

Beastly Verse. Compiled and illustrated by JooHee Yoon. Enchanted Lion Books.

*Death of the Hat: A Brief History of Poetry in 50 Objects. Compiled by Paul B. Janeczko. Illus. by Chris Raschka. Candlewick Press.

Flutter & Hum = Aleteo y zumbido: Animal Poems = Poemas de animals. Complied by Julie Paschkis. Illlus. by Julie Paschkis. Henry Holt & Company.

*Lullaby & Kisses Sweet: Poems to Love with Your Baby. Compiled by Lee Bennett Hopkins. Illus. by Alyssa Nassner. Abrams/Appleseed.

My Seneca Village by Marilyn Nelson. Namelos.

National Geographic Book of Nature Poetry: More than 200 Poems With Photographs That Float, Zoom, and Bloom! Compiled by J. Patrick Lewis. National Geographic.

Over the Hills and Far Away: A Treasury of Nursery Rhymes. Compiled by Elizabeth Hammill. Illus. by multiple artists. Candlewick Press.

The Popcorn Astronauts: And Other Biteable Rhymes by Deborah Ruddell. Illus. by Joan Rankin. Simon & Schuster/Margaret K. McElderry Books.

Sail Away by Langston Hughes. Illus. by Ashley Bryan. Simon & Schuster/Atheneum Books.

The Sky Painter: Louis Fuertes, Bird Artist by Margarita Engle. Illus. by Aliona Bereghici. Two Lions.

Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer, Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement by Carole Boston Weatherford. Illus. by Ekua Holmes. Candlewick Press.

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You might also be interested in looking at the 2016 Notable Children’s Sound Recordings discussion list which was posted on Tuesday and the 2016 Notable Children’s Videos discussion list which was posted yesterday afternoon.

The post Notable Children’s Books — 2016 Discussion List appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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25. #alamw16 – Live Blogging

The ALA Midwinter Meetings begin today. Are you #alscleftbehind and unable to make it to Boston? Are you wondering how you can keep up with all that’s going on? We’ve got you covered! Check the ALSC Blog for photos, videos and information about what’s going on at Midwinter. You can also check in on Twitter; just track the hashtag #alamw16.

Fourteen bloggers have committed to offering short, frequent posts throughout the conference. They are:

  • Alison Glass2016 ALA Midwinter Meeting
  • April Mazza
  • Ashley Waring
  • Barb Langridge
  • Beth Munk
  • Dan Bostrom
  • Gwen Vanderhage
  • Helen Swinyard
  • Linda Ward-Callaghan
  • Lisa G. Kropp
  • Lisa Nowlain
  • Mary Voors
  • Sara Deignan
  • Stacy Dillon

Let me be the first to thank this wonderful group of volunteers!

Are there activities you hope we cover? Let us know in the comments below.

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