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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: clothing, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 25
1. Mixed Pattern Tank Top

Mixed Pattern Tank Top

This was another little experiment playing around with pattern mashups. I traced a favorite T-shirt to make a pattern, then played around with the shoulder width (the original shirt had sleeves) until it felt right. I finished the arm and neck holes with a banded treatment. I especially like the floral edging with the stripey part.

I’m pretty happy with the results, though there are plenty of imperfections. I’d like to try another using a walking foot on my machine. I think I can get a smoother finish that way.

Unfortunately the color didn’t come out so great on these photos, so I don’t think they quite do it justice, but what can I say? There are only so many hours in a day a girl can spend on modeling, am I right?

My nine-year-old wants to steal this shirt, so that makes me feel pretty successful. The fabrics are once again from Girl Charlee, and I love their softness and fun prints, but I’d also love to see more fabrics that are over 90% natural fibers and am willing to pay. It gets too hot so quickly around here to be wearing fabrics with a fair amount of poly. My two cents.

Okay, back to work. I have to prepare a presentation I’m doing with some fifth graders next week about writing an early reader.

Hope you have a great weekend. I finally have plans to see The Grand Budapest Hotel. Yippeee!

If you want to see more of my sewing adventures/ experiments, click here.

Colorblock Tank Top


2 Comments on Mixed Pattern Tank Top, last added: 4/7/2014
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2. Girl’s Waffle Knit Tunic

Thermal Knit Tunic

My girl loves knits. She’s nine now, but ever since I can remember, comfort has been her style priority. More often than not, this means knit fabrics. I really hesitate to buy her anything that’s made of wovens.

Occasionally, though, I have trouble finding as much variety as we want. (okay, there’s Mini Boden, which I love, but I’m not in love with their prices). This tunic was an experiment that started out as a dress in my mind. Until I ran out of fabric. Actually, I think if the pattern sizing was anywhere near the mark it probably would’ve made a dress, no problem.

I thought I’d try making a raglan T-shirt into a dress by lengthening the bottom, since raglan sleeves can be easier to deal with than the standard set-in kind. I used See & Sew B4322, which is really a pajama pattern, but that was the closest thing to what I wanted that I could find in the fabric store.

The directions are nice and straightforward, but like I said, the pattern sizing is off by a mile. I know my daughter is slim, but she’s not far off normal store-bought sizing. We ended up with, like, six inches of ease on the sides and a Flashdance neck.

But anyway, I made it work. I hacked off the sides, took in the shoulders, and gathered the neck (this was pre-finishing). I added a wide waistband what I had leftover, and I’m actually pretty happy with how it turned out. It’s long enough that she can wear it with leggings, which was the goal in the first place.

I realize I could’ve done a better job with the bow pattern (I’m pretty unexperienced with patterned fabric) but Little Miss doesn’t seem to care, so I don’t, either. Next time, I think I’ll just trace clothes she already has, rather than use that pattern (though the directions are still helpful).

The fabric came from Girl Charlee. I’ve been enjoying sewing with their fabrics. They are good quality and very reasonably priced, cute selection. If you’re a beginner with knits, I’d recommend going with medium weights. They are easier to work with. I do love these bows!

For more of my sewing adventure, click here. Hope you have a great weekend!


0 Comments on Girl’s Waffle Knit Tunic as of 1/24/2014 1:56:00 PM
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3. Shabby Apple Spanish Steps Dress Giveaway

We just cleaned out our house for a yard sale and I really got into the spirit of things.  So much in fact that when I went to get dressed this morning I realized I have almost nothing left.  

I love the women's dresses at Shabby Apple and could easily fill my entire wardrobe from their site.


To Buy - One of my favorites is the Spanish Steps Dress that retails for $86. I love the color and the mix of different fabrics.   It's just so Audrey Hepburn.


To Win - I'm really jealous because one lucky person is going to win this dress that I love so much.

a Rafflecopter giveaway


I received no monetary compensation for this post. By entering this giveaway you agree to my giveaway/disclosure guidelines

1 Comments on Shabby Apple Spanish Steps Dress Giveaway, last added: 6/22/2012
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4. Kidorable LadyBug Rain Boots Review & a 20% off coupon code.

The school year always brings an end to the hot dry season in Utah.  Temperatures cool off, and we finally get some rain.  And if there's rain we must play in it.

My favorite place to get children's rain products is Kidorable.com.

They have a fun selection of umbrellas, raincoats,



 and even backpacks.


Rain gear can be uncomfortable.  Because Kidorable products are so whimsical and fun not only will my girls wear their gear, but they ask too.

Since we'll be walking Kik to the bus stop this year, I thought that Bid needed her very own pair of rain boots.  And since every walk we ever take turns into a bug hunt, I thought the Ladybug Boots would be perfect for her.




When we got them in the mail, she insisted on putting them on and modeling them right away.  


She loves them!

They are always quite an attention grabber.  Someone almost always stops me to ask where we got the girls such cute rain stuff.

To Buy -  Not only are Kidorable Boots adorable, but they are durable as well.  Kik has had the same pair of boots for more than a year and they are still in great condition.  The boots retail for $29.99, but are on sale right now until Aug. 31st for 20% off.  Just enter code SCHOOL888 at checkout on Kidorable.com!








I received a product to review from the above company or their PR Agency. Opinions expressed in this post are strictly my own - I was not influenced in any way. I received no monetary compensation for this post. 



3 Comments on Kidorable LadyBug Rain Boots Review & a 20% off coupon code., last added: 9/8/2012
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5. Oxford Shirtdress

Lisette Traveler Dress

Here’s one of my best sewing creations yet, from this Lisette pattern (the Traveler dress). Yet another pink-ish dress!

Lisette Traveler Pattern

It took me a long time, but I did it! The buttonholes were the scariest part, but turns out my sewing machine salesman was right: if you practice twelve times (on the appropriate fabric) you can make them beautifully.

I made no alterations to the pattern other than to leave off the bottom pockets and to use two different sizes for the top and bottom (aha! That’s why I have trouble fitting in store-bought dresses).

Didn’t my kids do a good job with the photos?

Lisette Shirt Dress

Pattern: Simplicity 2246 by Liesl Gibson

Fabric: pinklish oxford cloth from an open-air market in Germany

Earrings: Ron Cravens

Belt: Target

Boots: Bruno Premi (no, you can’t have them!)


14 Comments on Oxford Shirtdress, last added: 11/5/2013
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6. Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing

wolf in sheeps clothing 450Sheila finally solved the mystery of that wet dog smell in her closet.

Felt like it was time for a nice animal idiom.

“Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing:
One would use this idiom to describe a person or thing appearing to be good but is, well, not so much. There seems to be a few different ideas about it’s origin, but here is what Wikipedia has to say about it.


5 Comments on Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing, last added: 2/13/2014
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7. Go-To Dress

 

I started this dress for my daughter way back in September, during kids clothes week challenge hosted over at elsiemarley, one of my favorite blogs. The idea of the challenge is that for one week you’re supposed to spend an hour a day doing some kind of work on your sewing projects for kids. I did work on the dress every day for a week, but I didn’t get so far, and since then have been pecking away at it for a few minutes at a time. Finally my daughter said, “Why don’t you just give it to me for Christmas?” Ummm….okay. She’s six.

This was my first time sewing anything much with knits. The free pattern is from the blog The Train to Crazy, which has lots of other great stuff as well. It’s a really cute pattern—–the trickiest part is getting the waist elastic done properly, which requires zigzag topstitching, gathering, and elastic placement, all at the same spot. Mine is definitely not perfect in that area, but you know, it’s knit, it’s a playdress, and who cares. I’m sure you can find other mistakes if you’re looking, but please, don’t look that closely. I don’t think my daughter will. Sorry I can’t show a picture of her in it since she hasn’t seen the finished product yet.

I got the fabric from the local stoffemarkt (fabric market) in Hannover, which comes through a few times a year. It was a good deal, and I have the mirror image of the dress already cut out and ready to go, if I can get motivated. I didn’t end up being in love with the color combo. I think I might like the mirror image more.

I read up on knits before starting: good tutorials here and here. It boils down to using the right stitch (according to your machine), a special knit needle, and a fabric stabilizer. I couldn’t find any fabric stabilizer in Hannover, so I used a lot of regular old starch, which worked fine. It definitely made a difference in the ease of sewing. I have a very basic Necchi sewing machine, which has a few stitch options which are great for knits. Love that machine. If you live in Charlotte, NC, you can buy one at Himebaugh’s. They are so nice there.


2 Comments on Go-To Dress, last added: 12/8/2010
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8. Shoe-la-la! by Karen Beaumont - Book Review and Giveaway

My daughter has narrow feet so she must deal with limited options when it comes to purchasing shoes. But that doesn't stop her from dreaming. She likes flashy even when it comes to sneakers. If she could somehow figure out a way to make it happen, all of her clothing and accessories would sparkle. So, when a new, sparkly book called Shoe-la-la! arrived in our mailbox last week, she snatched it up with glee. Fancy Nancy, Pinkalicious and now Shoe-la-la ... her glamour girl books.

Shoe-La-La! by Karen Beaumont, illustrated by Leuyen Pham. Scholastic Press (January 2011); ISBN 9780545067058; picture book
Book Source: Review copy from publisher


At the corner of Hightop and Oxford streets sits a fancy shoe store called Shoe-la-la with aisles and aisles of shoes galore. Four little girls -- Emily, Ashley, Kaitlyn, Claire -- have a party to attend and need shoes to match their fancy outfits. They decide to visit the posh shoe palace, each in search of the perfect pair. A mountain of shoes piles up, and they have a splendid time as they try on pair after pair after pair, ones with leopard spots to shoes with taps. But, they never find exactly what they need and leave empty-handed, much to the frustration of their exhausted salesman. Undaunted, the children-turned-designers use their imagination and crafty talents to fashion their own fabulous party footwear.

With all the glitter on the cover and all the dress-up fun inside, this one is a not-to-miss for every little girl. Shoe-la-la! comes with a full seal of approval from my daughter. The rhyming verses make it a supremely fun read-aloud (wouldn't expect less from the brilliant Beaumont -- love Ain't Gonna Paint know More! & now love Shoe-la-la!) and the text is short and interesting enough to keep the attention of toddlers on up to early elementary. LeUyen Pham's illustrated array of shoes is dizzying! My daughter delights in picking out her favorites from all the piles. She'd be in heaven if she could try them on herself. Pham gives the four multicultural girls their own distinctive styles and personalities. And, her drawings make it easy to get swept up in the girls' enthusiasm for shoes. Even my toddler son can't resist.

27 Comments on Shoe-la-la! by Karen Beaumont - Book Review and Giveaway, last added: 1/18/2011
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9. The Great Pattern-Drafting Experiment

This project looks simple, but it has taken me many months to complete. Okay, I have to admit, over a year, but I wasn’t working on it that whole time. I haven’t sewn much for myself  in the last few years, mostly for my kids and our home. Part of that has been not wanting to spend so much time on something that might not fit me in the end. So when I heard about Cal Patch‘s book, Design-It-Yourself Clothes, I fantasized about making something to fit me perfectly.

Fiber July 1 – 5, 2011: Design (and MAKE!) Your Own Clothes with Cal Patch

I really like this book. The instructions are clear and written with a sense of humor. The projects are just the right speed for me——beyond beginner but simple enough not to be intimidating. But my favorite thing is that the book leaves lots of room for experimentation. So I like to flip through often and just dream about what I might create. For me, dreaming is more than half the fun.

That said, my first project doesn’t involve a lot of experimentation, besides the pattern drafting itself. It’s the first project in the book, with very little deviation besides the added waistband.

I crossed off a lot of firsts with this skirt. Besides my first self-drafted pattern, I also made my first muslin (trial run of the pattern in a cheap fabric), sewed my first invisible zipper, and used my first French seam. I now realize flat-felled seams would be better here, but oh well.

I’m not completely crazy about the skirt. There are a lot of flaws you can’t necessarily see here, and although the fabric is lovely and soft, I’m not sure what to wear it with. Just having made it feels like a big accomplishment, though.

Since I had plenty of fabric left over, I offered to make a skirt for my daughter, too (just a simple gathered rectangle). If you know me well, you know I’m really not a matchy-matchy type. Our bridesmaids didn’t even match. But my Little Miss loves matching, so she was totally hip to it, especially when I offered to add a floral strip at the bottom.

I love her styling choices here. She’s a bold little fashionista. I feel a mother-daughter matching day coming on. Oh, the things we do for our kids!


3 Comments on The Great Pattern-Drafting Experiment, last added: 5/19/2011
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10. The best new read-aloud with rude bits

Tick… Tick… Tick… I just can’t wait for this afternoon…

I’m going into school for my weekly story+craft session with 5/6/7 year olds and today I’ve got a corker of a book to read with them. Sir Scallyway and the Golden Underpants by Giles Andreae and Korky Paul is going to take the kids by storm, I’m sure of it!

Told in undulating rhyme, Sir Scallyway and the Golden Underpants is a rip-roaring read about the theft of King Colin’s “underpants of power”. One night they are stolen by a wicked giant (who walks away wearing them on his head) and in order to restore them to their rightful owner, the King’s bravest knight, six-year old Sir Scallyway (and his loyal steed Doofus) enter in to battle with the thief. But how can a six-year old defeat a giant? Will things turn out all right in this hilarious David and Goliath-esque tale?

Quick thinking, cunning and guile do of course save the day, but along the way readers are treated to hairy, bare bottoms, the threat of heads being chopped off and flushed down the loo and the sight of a poor defeated giant sucking his thumb as he cries for his mummy. I just know the kids are going to adore the pint-sized hero in this story and its perfect mix of rude naughtiness, adventure and laughter.

Text and illustrations © Giles Andreae and Korky Paul

Giles Andreae is a master at writing books that want and deserve to be read out loud – I think he’s a “knack” for apparently effortless rhyme and rhythm that easily matches Julia Donaldson. And Sir Scallyway and the Golden Underpants is no exception – it’s a whole lot of fun to read aloud, to “perform”!

Korky Paul’s illustrations, which have always reminded me a little of those by the late, great Ronald Searle, are delightfully messy, grotesque and detailed; a perfect match for this flamboyant and comical caper.

In the interest of getting kids REALLY excited about books and stories, whilst reading Sir Scallyway and the Golden Underpants this afternoon I shall be wearing some underpants on my head.

Yes, that’s right. I’ll be making the staff wonder why on earth they have this madcap woman come in and tell stories, by going around for the afternoon wearing pants on my head. But these are no ordinary pants. They are underpants of pure gold!

Here’s M modelling them:

They were simple to make – I

3 Comments on The best new read-aloud with rude bits, last added: 2/10/2012
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11. 30 Days of Innovation #2: Get a New Wardrobe

Because of my job I get to travel around to conferences and meetings and talk with librarians all over the place. Wherever I am I spend a lot of time discussing advocacy and the importance of helping members of a community understand the value of teen services. We frequently talk about the image that people have of librarians and how that image is often not based in reality. We also discuss how hard it is to change how people see librarians and libraries.

During these trips and in these conversations, it often feels a bit strange because I’ll be talking to someone about library and librarian image and that person will be wearing a book t-shirt with a cute saying, or book earrings or necklace (or both), or a book themed-watch, or….. you get the idea. I don’t believe I can say during these conversations, “Have you ever thought about the image you portray by wearing book related clothing and accessories?” Even though I really really really want to.

I know it’s fun to have these pieces of clothing and accessories. Sure, it’s entertaining to see them at conferences. But in the outside world when we are working with community members and need to be seen as professionals who are knowledgable about teens, the world they live in, and the way to help connect them to an array of “stuff” (from people to materials to each other to librarians), the book-themed clothing and accessories just has to go. I’d say when at work, whether hanging out with teens or at a meeting with the town council, even wearing just one piece of jewelry that has a book theme is not going to help you gain the respect you deserve.

Think about it: if we want people of all ages in the community to stop thinking of libraries as a place just for physical materials, then we have to stop promoting the library that way. If we want community members to see librarians as well-educated in all things teen and as people who have a strong understanding of education, youth development, and so on, then we have to stop dressing up in book-wear. Cute, book-related attire is not the way to get the message across, to anyone and everyone, that the library is a place that supports teens in their acquisition of skills of all kinds and is a strong and important educational link in the community

For those who know me and are asking, “Would she say the same thing about cute technology-based clothing and jewelry?” the answer is “Yes, I would.” Anything that focuses on one aspect of what a library staff member is passionate about, whether it be a social media t-shirt or a book necklace is a bad idea. Just think about who that clothing or accessory connects to in the community. It likely only connects to one portion of who you serve – teens or adults. If wearing book-themed attire is common in your library, what does that say to teens who are not book focused?

Making sure that community members take libraries and librarians seriously is a key aspect of the job of all library staff members. It requires being able to talk about what teens get out of what we do for and with them. It requires an understanding of youth development, education, literacy, and more. It requires holding back on tendencies to show your passion through clothing and accessories. It requires knowing what not to wear.

Innovation in the clothing of those working with teens doesn’t mean dressing like a teen and it doesn’t mean wearing cute theme-based pieces. Instead, it means getting outside of the library and book box in your dress and thinking about how you present the value of teen services to community members through your wardrobe. It may seem crazy to call this innovative, but if you’ve seen as many library-themed outfits as I have you know that it certainly is. Take the plunge and be professionally innovative in your wardrobe. It will be good for you, and for the teens that you serve.

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12. Questions of the Day: Personal Transparency

 

Aztec mask of Xiuhtecuhtli, c. 1500, of Mixtec...

Aztec mask of Xiuhtecuhtli, c. 1500, of Mixtec-Aztec provenance (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I’m using this poem of mine to lead into my subject of the day.

 

Window to the Soul

My presence acts as a window

To the human known as me.

Through that window you

Can see masks I wear eternally.

 

This mask reflects where I’ve been,

Still more show what I do with time.

Another suggests secrets held within;

Each mask a new persona.

 

Feathers, sequins, jewels, glitter

Before the beholder’s eyes,

Dropping hints about who I am,

Yet leaving me secured, invisible.

 
Each of us has gone through cycles within our lives. The practice is normal and human. We start as children learning all the lessons that will take us to an age where driving and dances are the norm. Some of us also take a path, somewhere along the way, that forces us to grow up all the sooner.

Once we have the ticket to responsibility called “a license,” we move on to planning the next decade of our lives; college or a job, singlehood or marriage, childless or not. They all make it into the mix of aspirations and goal lists.

Rules guard these bastions of normal living in our world. Each culture has its own signposts and traffic tickets. Once in a while, cultures crossover into each other, and create mutual signposts and tickets. It’s up to the average human to learn all of these and navigate the highways of modern living.

For all of the meandering we do in our lives, how much of ourselves do we really put out there for others to see or know?

“Plenty,” you say. But, do we really? The internet has made a public forum of many of our lives’ aspects. We blog, comment, dole out pieces of ourselves on Facebook on a daily basis and think nothing of it. It seems expected of web users to be “Transparent.”

The question remains. How much of our true selves do we reveal to the public?

Are we not merely shedding our masks, one at a time; those masks that protect us from revealing too much of the one who resides within the core of self?

I am a writer. I write about many things for many types of readers. My public image reveals those aspects of my writer’s mask. I’m female. Enough said on that score. I’m opinionated because I was taught to be so. Education will do that when it isn’t stifled by arbitrary bureaucratic controls.

Yet, within all I’ve revealed about who I am, few really know me, and I prefer it that way. Our deeds reveal more about us than anything we can say about ourselves.

My poem says a bit more in its way. It intimates that masks are all we see of each other. We all do it, and we do it because the world isn’t always the safest place to live.

One of 0 Comments on Questions of the Day: Personal Transparency as of 5/2/2012 4:56:00 PM

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13. Questions of the Day: Personal Transparency

 

Aztec mask of Xiuhtecuhtli, c. 1500, of Mixtec...

Aztec mask of Xiuhtecuhtli, c. 1500, of Mixtec-Aztec provenance (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I’m using this poem of mine to lead into my subject of the day.

 

Window to the Soul

My presence acts as a window

To the human known as me.

Through that window you

Can see masks I wear eternally.

 

This mask reflects where I’ve been,

Still more show what I do with time.

Another suggests secrets held within;

Each mask a new persona.

 

Feathers, sequins, jewels, glitter

Before the beholder’s eyes,

Dropping hints about who I am,

Yet leaving me secured, invisible.

 
Each of us has gone through cycles within our lives. The practice is normal and human. We start as children learning all the lessons that will take us to an age where driving and dances are the norm. Some of us also take a path, somewhere along the way, that forces us to grow up all the sooner.

Once we have the ticket to responsibility called “a license,” we move on to planning the next decade of our lives; college or a job, singlehood or marriage, childless or not. They all make it into the mix of aspirations and goal lists.

Rules guard these bastions of normal living in our world. Each culture has its own signposts and traffic tickets. Once in a while, cultures crossover into each other, and create mutual signposts and tickets. It’s up to the average human to learn all of these and navigate the highways of modern living.

For all of the meandering we do in our lives, how much of ourselves do we really put out there for others to see or know?

“Plenty,” you say. But, do we really? The internet has made a public forum of many of our lives’ aspects. We blog, comment, dole out pieces of ourselves on Facebook on a daily basis and think nothing of it. It seems expected of web users to be “Transparent.”

The question remains. How much of our true selves do we reveal to the public?

Are we not merely shedding our masks, one at a time; those masks that protect us from revealing too much of the one who resides within the core of self?

I am a writer. I write about many things for many types of readers. My public image reveals those aspects of my writer’s mask. I’m female. Enough said on that score. I’m opinionated because I was taught to be so. Education will do that when it isn’t stifled by arbitrary bureaucratic controls.

Yet, within all I’ve revealed about who I am, few really know me, and I prefer it that way. Our deeds reveal more about us than anything we can say about ourselves.

My poem says a bit more in its way. It intimates that masks are all we see of each other. We all do it, and we do it because the world isn’t always the safest place to live.

One of 0 Comments on Questions of the Day: Personal Transparency as of 5/2/2012 7:54:00 PM

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14. Child’s Linen Pants
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By: Emily Smith Pearce, on 6/8/2012
Blog: Emily Smith Pearce (Login to Add to MyJacketFlap)
JacketFlap tags:  Crafts, Sewing, children, clothing, craft, Add a tag

My little guy (4), who has seen me make lots of things for his older sister, asked if I’d make him some pants. I was touched, but I hesitated.

“Pants are kind of hard,” I said. I mostly make really simple skirts for my daughter.

“But you could do them like this,” he said, pointing to the elastic waist of the pair he had on. How he knows anything about garment construction is beyond me, but he had a point. Why not? I started them during Kid’s Clothing Week Challenge (when I made the hats and nightdress also).

I think he even picked out the fabric, the same linen I made this dress from. I used this pattern, which is super simple and has very good instructions. I lengthened it a little (it’s a size 3 I think) and added a little width. I made a very wide hem so I can take them out again when he grows.

I’m really happy with how the pants turned out. They look so comfortable I almost wish I had a matching pair for me. They would also be really easy to make as shorts.

I just finished re-reading What Happened in Hamelin. It’s out of print now, but I’d read it as a kid and had to find it again since we are now living close to Hamelin. It’s a realistic retelling of what might have actually happened with the Pied Piper of Hamelin. Pretty dark and a bit scary, which I think is why I liked it in the first place. I was surprised at the images that had stuck in my mind for so many years—don’t want to spoil anything for you by hints, sorry. It’s definitely worth a read if you can get your hands on it. I donated my copy to the international school here.

Have a great weekend, everybody!


2 Comments on Child’s Linen Pants, last added: 6/11/2012
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15. Needing the barkcloth
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By: Claire Louise Milne, on 9/28/2007
Blog: Needle Book (Login to Add to MyJacketFlap)
JacketFlap tags:  barkcloth, sale, crafts, bag, pouches, fabric, messenger, granny, liberty, cath kidston, Add a tag

I've been hoping for years to have lots of things made and be able to rent a table at a Fall/Christmas crafts sale. I've decided this year I'm finally going to do it. I've even ordered "needle book" fabric labels to put in my things. I was inspired recently by Practically necessary's barkcloth bags. I finally won a little bit of barkcloth on ebay and made some messenger bags. I love how they turned out, the hard part will be parting with them.I've also been making granny bags after creating a pattern for myself. A bit tricky but I think anyone could do it. Mine are all one-of-a-kind, depending on how big I want to make them, the amount of fabric I have and where I feel like putting the pleats. I make coordinating lined pockets to go inside and of course attach those before assembling the bag.

I like this one, from a wool tweed:

This ones is from my Cath Kidston circus fabric with olive green straps:
And I've made a bunch of pouches:
My favourite pouch is made from Liberty fabric:My favourite fabric these days is still the scenic barkcloth and I'm trying to buy more on ebay, but I keep getting snipered with 5 seconds to go! One auction went from $75 to $225 in the last 5 seconds. My maximum bid was $220 for 10 yards of barkcloth which I already thought was high. But I loved the pattern and I was very disappointed. It was part of my new plan to think big, and invest in my craft business a bit more so I could make enough things to have a proper table.

It may be for the best though because my dining table is still covered with stacks of fabric...but that's another story.

12 Comments on Needing the barkcloth, last added: 10/12/2007
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16. Picturing Portuguese People
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By: John, on 4/11/2008
Blog: DRAWN! (Login to Add to MyJacketFlap)
JacketFlap tags:  Art, Art History, Clothing, Add a tag

portuguesefriar.jpg

I love, love, love these cartoonish studies of “the costumes of the Portuguese” from an album of sketches dating back to 1836. I spotted these over at the mighty BibliOdyssey. The high-res versions can be found at the National Library of Portugal.

Previously: BibliOdyssey: The Book

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17. Reading is Sexy!
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By: Sondra Santos LaBrie, on 9/22/2008
Blog: Happy Healthy Hip Parenting (Login to Add to MyJacketFlap)
JacketFlap tags:  Reading is Sexy, trade show, clothing, reading gear, Bas Bleu, MPIBA, Add a tag

Apparently, the Reading is Sexy! messenger bags caused quite a stir at the recent MPIBA regional trade show.



I bought a Reading is Sexy! t-shirt from Bas Bleu a few years back but unfortunately, it doesn't fit me anymore. I'm always looking for more great ways to promote reading so any links or suggestions on where to buy great gear like these items is always appreciated!

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18. You Might Be a Writer If...
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By: Stacy A. Nyikos, on 4/10/2009
Blog: Stacy A. Nyikos (Login to Add to MyJacketFlap)
JacketFlap tags:  dissertation, ivory tower, uniform, writer quirks, clothing, writer, Add a tag

This week the weather has been all over the spectrum in Oklahoma. We've gone from low 20s to high 80s all in one week. And all while I'm in the middle of a work in progress. I wouldn't have noticed the weather swings if it hadn't been for the fact that they've made me think about what I'm wearing. Don't I usually at least think about what to put on each day anyway, you wonder?

Well...

You might be an author if...clothing is not high on your list of things to obsess about.

It seems like each profession has its "uniform" of sorts. Businesspeople, lawyers, anyone in corporate America generally wears a suit. Teachers wear more comfortable clothing, kid friendly. Mechanics wear something that can get dirty.

But authors?

We spend all of our time by ourselves in an imaginary world. My imaginary friends don't care what I wear, just so long as whatever I'm wearing doesn't keep me from focusing all my energies on them. Granted, there are moments when authors have to at least act as though they care about personal appearance, like, when we have to talk to large groups of non-authors, who might not understand the baggy sweatpants, oversized shirt, disheveled hair, coffee mug permanently attached to one hand, three pens in your hair secret author uniform, if you can call it that.

When I'm up to my eyes deep in a manuscript, even that can be a high functioning look. I just don't care how I look. It's awful! I'll wear the same clothes for a couple of days on end. Granted I change to sleep and run, but then it's right back into the comfy jeans or sweatpants and baggy shirt, and thick socks. Whatever. Whatever it was I picked out when I was still thinking about clothes.

When I was writing my dissertation, it really got bad. I wore the same pair of loose, ultra comfy sweatpants every day for a year. Okay, okay, I washed them! I changed out of them if I had to leave my writing cocoon and go into the real world - the library was an exception. I didn't change for that. Which probably explains why those pants became my dissertation. I couldn't write without them. I wore them all the time when I was writing, even when I was nine months pregnant.

Yeah, that was a little scary. I retired the dissertation pants when I graduated, but they still call to me (because I couldn't throw them away or recycle them). So far, I've resisted. But only barely. They are the most comfortable pair of pants I own, even if they knees are patched up and the color is fading big time.

Why, why, why are we writers like this? It's almost like keeping the clothing the same, keeps my mood the same, which means I can dive back into the manuscript a little more easily. If I change from one thing to the next, it changes my mood. Bright and cheerful to somber and dark, or heavy to light really affects my mood. And that affects my writing.

Nonetheless, I'm not ensconced in the ivory tower of graduate school anymore. I've got kids. I live in suburbia America. I have to change it up a bit; otherwise what will the neighbors think? Still, I do "secret" stuff like wear the same necklace every single day for a piece until it's done. It helps, but man do I miss those dissertation pants. Miss them...

Honestly, it's no wonder so many writers burrow away from the real world into almost hermit-like isolation. How else can we wear the writer's true uniform that enables one to write that heartbreaking work of staggering genius???

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19. NFB Retro T-shirts
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By: John, on 5/30/2009
Blog: DRAWN! (Login to Add to MyJacketFlap)
JacketFlap tags:  Clothing, Design, Add a tag

nfb-retro-drawn

Hey, we just released these fancy retro NFB T-shirts. The shirt features the classic 1969 “Man Seeing” logo designed by Georges Beaupré. You can pre-order the shirts here.

First person to comment below wins a T-shirt!

Also… I want to get some help from you… Which designs should we print next? Please check off your favourites in the little poll below.

21-87

21-87

About Puberty and Reproduction

about-puberty-and-reproduction

Adventures in History

adventures-in-history

Blackfly

black-fly

Prends-la! et filme-les…

prends-la

Street Musique

street-musique

Waiting for Fidel

waiting-for-fidel

We Are All Picasso

we-are-all-picasso

Also leave a comment and let us know what you think.



Blog Polls

Cheers! (Disclaimer: I work at the NFB).

10 Comments on NFB Retro T-shirts, last added: 6/3/2009
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20. 2 years of woot shirts
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By: John, on 7/14/2009
Blog: DRAWN! (Login to Add to MyJacketFlap)
JacketFlap tags:  Clothing, Fashion, Illustration, Add a tag

Shirt.woot! is celebrating their two year anniversary next week and they’ve invited me to be the guest submissions editor. The site will feature new designs by Mark Frauenfelder, R. Stevens, Mitch Ansara, and myself beginning midnight Central on the 20th.

Our designs are secret until they go live. In the meantime, I’ve sifted through the past two years of woot’s shirt offerings and found a few of my favorites:

robot

LouLou and Tummie’s robot design featured a downloadable papercraft robot. You can see more of their work here.

bird_brainaitdetail

The creepily clever Bird Brain is a recent offering by Jared Stumpenhorst. Visit his site here.

the_thing_that_scootst2kdet

I doubt I’ll ever be as cool as Monsieur Pimpant’s pink monster.

phoenix

Here’s a detail from Miss Monster’s recent phoenix design, which is still available as of this writing. Check out the full design and more of her work on her site.

Shirt.woot has paid over a million dollars to designers over the past two years. Their archives boast scores of illustrators and cartoonists featured here on Drawn! Take a look for yourself. It shouldn’t take too long to find the perfect design waiting to grace your torso.

1 Comments on 2 years of woot shirts, last added: 7/17/2009
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21. Los Fokos: Website Relaunch
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By: John, on 10/27/2009
Blog: DRAWN! (Login to Add to MyJacketFlap)
JacketFlap tags:  Cartooning, Clothing, Illustration, Alejandro Ivan Fuentes, Los Fokos, Moebius, psychedelic, t-shirt design, Add a tag

As far as I can tell from digging in the Drawn! archives its been about three years since we’ve presented the work of Los Fokos, aka Alejandro Ivan Fuentes. Los Fokos is a self-taught artist “born, bred and residing in the LA area,” according to his website bio.

Speaking of his website, Fuentes, who creates t-shirt designs by day, relaunched this venue for his personal work last month. Its brimming with mind-blowing artwork that makes me wonder if Los Fokos mixed peyote in his tattoo ink and scrawled a Moebius-inspired fever dream on his quivering psyche. This stuff is a heavy trip – but what a sweet ride!

For his own part, the artist claims his influences include a “life long interest for the metaphysical, the surreal, nostalgic memories”… and most importantly, he says, “my kids have been a heavy influence in my art.”

Los Fokos new website – check it out.


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22. Steffi Schütze
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By: John, on 11/29/2009
Blog: DRAWN! (Login to Add to MyJacketFlap)
JacketFlap tags:  Blogs, Cartooning, Clothing, Colour, Comics, Digital art, Illustration, fashion illustration, germany, Steffi Schütze, vector, Add a tag

Steffi Schütze, AKA “Miss Matzenbatzen” is a vector artist with a passion for fashion. On her blog she takes designs by Moschino, Versace and many others and dresses ladies of her own creation in them.

Steffi is one half of the Berlin art studio “nusillu!”, where she and partner Christian Nauck work both alone or together as a team to provide clients with a wide range of styles.

I love Steffi’s fun illustrations in cheerful colour schemes – especially her images of women in all shapes and sizes. Be sure to take a long, loving look at her (mostly) plus-size “ladies of burlesque” series on Flickr — they’re absolutely delightful!

Steffi Schütze’s blog and website


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1 Comments on Steffi Schütze, last added: 12/25/2009
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23. Doinky Doodles!
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By: John, on 1/19/2010
Blog: DRAWN! (Login to Add to MyJacketFlap)
JacketFlap tags:  Clothing, Fashion, Illustration, Recycled Materials, Toys, Crafts, painting, Singapore, Weng Pixin, Xin, Add a tag

26-year-old Singaporean shopkeeper, toy maker, painter and all around crafty gal, Weng Pixin (aka Xin) creates some of my most favorite things these days. Using second-hand clothing and recycled fabric, Xin has been cranking out wonderful goods for the past four years, with hopes to keep working ’til she’s “an all white-haired kooky granny from the shop around the corner who sews funny toys.” Xin admits her work process involves very little planning and that most of her ideas spring from the sketchy doodles in her head, which must be why her creations feel so spontaneous and spirited.

She is currently working on a comic journal about a failed relationship, documenting all the “weird, funny, quirky and mundane conversations, like a shared science project.” If it’s anything like the rest of Xin’s charming creations, I’m certain it’ll bring a smile to the face of all who read it.

To see more of her work, please visit her website, blog or flickr page.


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24. Exclusive contest for Drawn! readers, doodlers and pattern lovers alike!
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By: John, on 2/24/2010
Blog: DRAWN! (Login to Add to MyJacketFlap)
JacketFlap tags:  Use Tags - Not Categories, Bubi Au Yeung, Clothing, contest, Dana Zimmerling, Funkrush, Gaston Caba, patterns, TobyHK, We Love Patterns, Add a tag

Pattern design studio We Love Patterns and Funkrush clothing have teamed up for an exclusive contest for the readers of Drawn! They’re looking to select their 3 favorite pattern ideas or themes submitted and each winner will get a free We Love Patterns squirrel t-shirt (pictured above). Submissions must be sent to gaston.caba@welovepatterns.com with the subject “We Love Patterns Too.” Here’s some more information about We Love Patterns, courtesy of the talented Mr. Caba himself:

We Love Patterns is a family company created in 2010 by Gastón Caba, Silvana Marino and Lara Caba. We are devoted to create a growing collection of extra-cute, colorful & optimistic pattern artworks, hoping to help to add charm and whimsy to all different kind of products. We decided to offer a different style from the standard pattern artwork. What we specially like about patterns is the ability to tell a tiny story or to catch a whole complex concept with the sum of tiny objects & words. Some of our original designs are also created by queen of cute Bubi Au Yeung, the multi-talented Dana Zimmerling & Mr. TobyHK. We are selecting more artists to add to our catalogue which we update every month.


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12 Comments on Exclusive contest for Drawn! readers, doodlers and pattern lovers alike!, last added: 2/24/2010
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25. End of Summer Sale (Vintage)
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By: jen, on 8/25/2010
Blog: the fabled needle | an art, craft and sewing blog! (Login to Add to MyJacketFlap)
JacketFlap tags:  Vintage, le Shop, clothing, gingham, sale, summer, Add a tag

end-of-summer-lavender-gingham-dress

I’m popping in to let you all know that everything in my vintage shop is on sale: 25% off!

I’d like to send this stuff to good homes so that I may focus on other things.  That being said, I’m totally open to a little haggling, flea market-style, so if you see something you like make me an offer via the “contact” link in my Etsy shop.

If you think you have a friend that might be interested in something here, please spread the word, thanks dears!

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