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Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: Marjane Satrapi, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 7 of 7
1. Persepolis still not being taught to seventh graders in Chicago; students stage sit in this morning

As we suspected when the news broke, the removal of Persepolis from the seventh grade curriculum at a Chicago high school turned in to a minor media circus pretty quickly, with school officials saying different things all over the place. If you missed all the confusion, the Chicago Tribune
has the authoritative round up and Claire Kirch covers it for PW. Basically it emerged that the book was not being removed from school libraries or all schools, but it is being removed from the 7-10 grade curriculum where it is is currently being taught. The person who seems to have decided that is at the very top: Chicago Public Schools CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennnet who wrote:

“It was brought to our attention that it contains graphic language and images that are not appropriate for general use in the seventh grade curriculum. If your seventh grade teachers have not yet taught this book, please ask them not to do so and to remove any copies of the book from their classrooms.”


Another spokesperson has more to say at PW:

Even though Persepolis currently is included on Chicago’s common core curriculum for grades 7 and 11, it will not be taught to students in grades 7-10 in the nation’s third largest school district until, CPS office of teaching and learning chief Annette Gurley told PW by phone Friday afternoon, a training guide for teachers wanting to use Persepolis in their classrooms can be drafted by the CPS curriculum department and set in place. Persepolis will continue to be taught in grades 11 and 12 and in Advanced Placement classes.

“We want to make sure that the message about inhumanity [is what] kids walk away with, not the images of someone with exposed body parts urinating on someone’s back or someone’s being tortured,” Gurley said, “We are not protesting the value of this book as a work of art. We just want to make sure that when we put this book into the hands of students, they have the background, the maturity to appreciate the book.”


Just to be clear, here is the torture scene in question:

torture in Persepolis1 Persepolis still not being taught to seventh graders in Chicago; students stage sit in this morning
Author Marjane Satrapi was reached for comment by the Trib, and expressed dismay:

“It’s shameful,” she said. “I cannot believe something like this can happen in the United States of America.”

Regarding the district’s concerns about the depiction of torture, Satrapi said:

“These are not photos of torture. It’s a drawing and it’s one frame. I don’t think American kids of seventh grade have not seen any signs of violence. Seventh graders have brains and they see all kinds of things on cinema and the Internet. It’s a black and white drawing and I’m not showing some


While it’s clear that the ban or removal isn’t as widespread as initially feared, it sparked a statement from the Chicago Teacher’s Union pointing out that “the only place the book is banned is Iran”, a protest and a read-in at Social Justice High School.

201303181247 Persepolis still not being taught to seventh graders in Chicago; students stage sit in this morning

And this morning, students at Lane Tech High School, where the teaching ban originated, staged a sit in that was broken up by authorities after about 20 minutes.

Lane Tech students organized today’s 8 a.m. sit-in in the school’s library on Facebook and other social media platforms, however faculty broke it up about 20 minutes later, according to student reports on Twitter.

Multiple students reported on Twitter that the library was locked and up to 400 students flooded the surrounding hallways.

One student Tweeted shortly after 8 a.m., “The lack of keys at the library was pre-orchestrated librarians, teachers, staff knew well in advance what we were doing.


This story is still developing, and given the much loved nature of the book we suspect some reversals may still be coming. In the meantime, the best thought piece we’ve seen is Julian Darius on just why it may have been the images of torture that upset someone. He also points out that Persepolis was previously challenged in a Washington State school.

In 2009, parents tried to get both the book and movie banned in the Northshore school district. At issue were three specific complaints about content:

language that “would not be acceptable over the open airways via either TV or radio” and that students would be disciplined for using;
a brief sequence depicting torture in Iran, including a man urinating on a torture victim; and
the vague claim that the book is “sexually charged.”
In addition, complaints were made about parents not being notified in advance and that an alternative assignment wasn’t available. The district claimed this wasn’t true, and a curriculum review committee for the district rejected the parents’ complaints.


Also, as Darius point out, it’s also good thing superhero comics aren’t taught in 7th grade.

Batman Joker branding torture 660x8261 Persepolis still not being taught to seventh graders in Chicago; students stage sit in this morning

1 Comments on Persepolis still not being taught to seventh graders in Chicago; students stage sit in this morning, last added: 3/18/2013
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2. Marjane Satrapi to hold first gallery show

While Persepolis remains one of the most important comics of the graphic novel era, creator Marjane Satrapi seems to have moved on to different avenues for her talents, likebooks and making movies, such as the Oscar-nominated animated version of Persepolis. And now she's having her first showing of her paintings in a Paris gallery.

3 Comments on Marjane Satrapi to hold first gallery show, last added: 1/27/2013
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3. TRAILER: “Chicken With Plums” By Marjane Satrapi and Vincent Paronnaud

Marjane Satrapi and Vincent Paronnaud, the directors of the Oscar-nominated French animated featurePersepolis, are back with a new fantasy-drama Chicken With Plums. Sony Pictures Classics will release stateside on August 17. The live-action film, with minor bits of animation, is based on a graphic novel by Satrapi.

The film is set in Tehran, Iran, in 1958:

Since his beloved violin was broken, Nasser Ali Khan, one of the most renowned musicians of his day, has lost all taste for life. Finding no instrument worthy of replacing it, he decides to confine himself to bed to await death. As he hopes for its arrival, he plunges into deep reveries, with dreams as melancholic as they are joyous, taking him back to his youth and even to a conversation with Azrael, the Angel of Death, who reveals the future of his children. As pieces of the puzzle gradually fit together, the poignant secret of his life comes to light: a wonderful story of love which inspired his genius and his music.

Watch the trailer below:


Cartoon Brew | Permalink | No comment | Post tags: , , ,

0 Comments on TRAILER: “Chicken With Plums” By Marjane Satrapi and Vincent Paronnaud as of 1/1/1900
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4. Shoot A Movie!

Little Willow sent us this readergirlz opportunity!Here's an artistic way to encourage conservation:The Intelligent Use of Water Film Competition is accepting submissions. Films will be reviewed by a ... Read the rest of this post

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5. OSCAR NOMINEES for ANIMATION


nominee questionnaire:
"I realize that the film could have become even better."
Vincent Paronnaud


oscar.com/nominees

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6. National Reading Group Month: Yet another list…

Although the Tiger’s Choice, the PaperTigers’ online reading group, selects books that are written for children but can be enjoyed by adults as well, National Reading Group Month has brought to mind those books written for adults that younger readers might adopt as their own favorites, and that could launch impassioned discussions between parents and children, teachers and students, or older and younger siblings.

The books on this week’s list are books recommended for teenagers, with content that may be beyond the emotional grasp of pre-adolescents. All of them are available in paperback and in libraries.

1) Ricochet River by Robin Cody (Stuck in a small Oregon town, two teenagers find their world becomes larger and more complex when they become friends with Jesse, a Native American high school sports star.)

2) The God of Animals by Aryn Kyle (Alice is twelve, growing up on a modern-day Wyoming ranch with a mother who rarely leaves her bed, a father who is haunted by the memory of Alice’s rebellious and gifted older sister who ran off with a rodeo rider, and an overly active imagination.)

3) Winterdance: The Fine Madness of Running the Iditarod by Gary Paulsen (The author of Hatchet tells the true story of how he raced a team of huskies across more than 1000 miles of Arctic Alaska in what Alaskans call The Last Great Race.)

4) Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi (This autobiography of a young girl growing up in revolutionary Iran and told in the form of a graphic novel is rich, original, and unforgettable.)

5) From the Land of Green Ghosts by Pascal Khoo Thwe (An amazing odyssey of a boy from the jungles of Burma who became a political exile and a Cambridge scholar, this Kiriyama Prize winner is a novelistic account of a life filled with adventures and extraordinary accomplishments.)

6) In the Time of the Butterflies by Julia Alvarez (The Mirabal sisters were beautiful, gifted, and valiant women who were murdered by the Dominican Republic government that they were committed to overthrow. Their true story is given gripping and moving life by their compatriot, Julia Alvarez.)

As the weather becomes colder and the days grow shorter, find your favorite teenager, choose a book, and plunge into the grand adventure of reading and sharing!

0 Comments on National Reading Group Month: Yet another list… as of 10/22/2008 7:02:00 PM
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7. Finishing no matter what

“I think if somebody has to make an artistic work, he will finish it no matter what. It has nothing to do with the money, with the time.” — Marjane Satrapi

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