What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Posts

(tagged with 'fantasy')

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
<<August 2014>>
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
     0102
03040506070809
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31      
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: fantasy, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 26 - 50 of 2,589
26. Novella Review: Peanut Goes To School by Thea Harrison

May Contain Spoilers

Review:

I requested Peanut Goes to School because it sounded cute.  Super strong paranormal kid heads off for his first day of school.  I haven’t read any of the Elder Races books (I keep calling them Elder Scrolls because that is one of my favorite video game franchises – sorry!), but that did not deter my enjoyment of this fun novella.  Even though he take down a pack of lions, Liam struggles in a social setting with classmates and unfamiliar adults, and I could not put this down.

Told mainly through Liam’s POV, this six-month-old prodigy is the son of Pia and Dragos.  He’s already the size of a large five-year-old, and he is a power to be reckoned with.  He can read and comprehend books in mere minutes (an ability that gets him into some trouble later on, and one that I wish I possessed), has an insatiable curiosity, and has fears just like any normal kid.  When he overhears his parents talking about him, he begins to wonder if he’s “bad.”  The conversation was taken completely out of context, but being a young boy testing his cloaking powers, he kind of deserved to be a bit unbalanced during his eavesdropping episode.  Wondering what they could mean, he loses his usually healthy appetite and gives himself a stomachache from the stress.  Adding to his discomfort, he’s about to head off to his first day of school, where he worries whether or not he’ll fit in and make any friends.

I loved Liam’s voice.  While he is smart and super powerful, he is like a fish out of water in school.  He has no idea how to relate to his schoolmates, and even recess is a puzzle for him.  He doesn’t understand why he has incurred his teacher’s wrath, and he’s already made enemies while defending a human kid from bullies.  Oh, his troubles seem to never end!  But so then does his wonder and joy at this confusing new experience.  He’s determined to figure things out on his own and not rely on his adult caretakers for cues on how to react to conflict.  There’s even a Dark Fae girl who catches his eye.

If you are looking for a short, endearing read, look no further.  While I thought the resolution with the teacher was wrapped up too abruptly, and brought up issues from out of nowhere, the rest of the story clicked merrily along.  While this was my first foray into the Elder Races, it will not be my last.

Grade:   B/B+

Review copy provided by publisher

From Amazon:

This is a short story (15,100 words or 55 pages) intended for readers of the Elder Races who enjoy Liam Cuelebre, aka Peanut, as a character.

Dragos Cuelebre is no longer the only dragon.

Dragos’s son Liam Cuelebre (a.k.a. Peanut) is springing into existence, reminiscent of the first of the Elder Races who were born at the beginning of the world. At just six months of age, he has already grown to the size of a large five-year-old boy. He can read, write in complete sentences, and his math skills are off the chart.

A white dragon in his Wyr form, Liam also holds more Power than almost anyone else. In an effort to give him a taste of normality, no matter how fleeting, his parents Pia and Dragos enroll him in first grade.

They hope school will help teach Liam how to relate to others, a vital skill that will help him control his growing Power. But school has a surprising number of pitfalls, and relating to others can be a tricky business.

When a classmate is threatened, Liam must quickly learn self-control, how to rein in his instincts, and govern his temper, because there’s no doubt about it—he is fast becoming one of the most dangerous creatures in all of the Elder Races.

PEANUT GOES TO SCHOOL is part of a three-story series about Pia, Dragos, and Peanut. Each story stands alone, but fans might want to read all three: DRAGOS TAKES A HOLIDAY, PIA SAVES THE DAY, and PEANUT GOES TO SCHOOL.

The post Novella Review: Peanut Goes To School by Thea Harrison appeared first on Manga Maniac Cafe.

Add a Comment
27. Crunchyroll Morning: Skip Beat!, Sailor Moon Crystal, and Arslan

I’ve kind of been in a funk the last few days, and  I’m not sure why.  I’m having a hard time finding a book that holds my interest for more than a few chapters, so I set my Kindle down this morning and spent some time playing with Crunchyroll.  If you haven’t heard of the site before, Crunchyroll bills itself as “the leading global video service for Japanese Anime and Asian media.”  They offer free streaming of anime and manga, as well as paid memberships for access to a larger library of titles with no advertising.  Everything I’m going to talk about today I viewed under their free offerings.

 

The Heroic Legend of Arslan Chapter 1 by   Yoshiki Tanaka and  Hiromu Arakawa (author of Fullmetal Alchemist)

About the series:

Someday, a boy will become a man, then in time, the man will become a king. Who is the true hero?! An unprecedented story of the struggle to succeed the throne has begun. Hiromu Arakawa, the creator of “Fullmetal Alchemist” illustrates the great historical fantasy novel in a never before seen style!

My thoughts:

Many years ago, I watched the anime of Arslan.  I loved it.  When I discovered that the anime was based on a series of Japanese novels (13 volumes and still on-going, I believe), and that there was a manga series, too, I kept hoping it would get licensed.  It didn’t, but Hiromu Arakawa reimagined Yoshiki Tanaka’s novels for Bessatsu Shonen magazine, and it did.   As FMA is one of my favorite series, I was excited to see Arslan on Crunchyroll. 

The first chapter introduces 11 year-old Prince Arslan.  He’s a kind-hearted boy, in direct contrast to his cold parents.  His father, King Andragoras, is a fierce warrior and his armies have never been defeated in battle.  When the warriors return victorious from recent skirmishes, Arslan saves some boys from an escaped warrior and gets dragged along on his dash to freedom.  The enemy warrior is also 11, but he couldn’t be different from Arslan.  Tough and a seasoned warrior, he refuses to submit to slavery.  As Arslan is dragged around  his city, he is given a different perspective of his enemies’ beliefs than he’s been taught, which leaves him wondering why his kingdom is at war with their neighbors. 

I enjoyed the pacing of the manga, and I liked Arslan.  We don’t get to learn much about him, except that he isn’t skilled in arms and that he is a kind, caring kid.  I love Arakawa’s art, and I would read this just to get a chance to enjoy her illustrations. 

Rating: B+

 

Skip*Beat! Episode 1

Ahahaha!  I love Skip*Beat!  I am so far behind in the manga, but I figure if I watch the anime up to where I left off, I can start reading again without forgetting too much.  I hope.  This is a very funny series about a normally meek, kind girl who completely loses her shit when she discovers that the boy she has loved since childhood thinks that she’s boring and ugly.  Sho, an idol who is just starting to hit the big time, has only been using Kyoko to pay his bills and clean up after him after they move to Tokyo.  Kyoko thought that Sho asked her to go with him because he cared for her, but NO!  All he ever saw her as was an unpaid maid.

Kyoko’s never-ending grudge is released from the locked boxes in her heart, and after she declares her intention to get revenge on Sho’s crappy treatment of her, he mocks her and tells her the only way a little commoner like her could ever get back at a big star like him is to become famous, too, so Kyoko, all guns blazing, decides that she will make it big in show biz, and she will be a bigger star than Sho.

I love this series because it’s funny, Kyoko goes from being a doormat to a butt-kicker, and Ren, Sho’s biggest rival, is hot.  I’m looking forward to watching all 25 episodes of Skip*Beat!, but I think the manga is still ongoing, so I have to catch up on my reading, too!

Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon Crystal Episode 1

Ah, there is just something comforting about Sailor Moon.  This reboot of the series is fun, fast-paced, and vividly colorful.  I loved revisiting with Usagi and Luna, and I can’t believe the series is 20 years old.  I never get tired of Sailor Moon, regardless of format, and have enjoyed the manga (both Tokyopop’s awful presentation, and Kodansha’s much better packaged release), anime series, and live-action show.  Usagi is so easy to relate to.  She doesn’t want to do anything that’s hard – homework, studying, exercising, chores – and would rather spent her time eating, napping, and playing video games.  Who wouldn’t!  She’s also clumsy and hardly an athletic girl, so, while I fear that the fate of the world is resting on her shoulders, I know that Luna and Tuxedo Mask won’t let her completely screw up.  If you haven’t watched the show before, give it a try.  There is a reason Sailor Moon is still popular after more than two decades, and that’s because the storytelling is fun, and the characters are so likeable.

The post Crunchyroll Morning: Skip Beat!, Sailor Moon Crystal, and Arslan appeared first on Manga Maniac Cafe.

Add a Comment
28. The Imaginary Veterinary: Book 1: The Sasquatch Escape by Suzanne Selfors, illustrated by Dan Santat, 214 pp, RL 3

Along with Adam Gidwitz's phenomenal trilogy that begins with A Tale Dark and Grimm, Suzanne Selfors's Imaginary Veterinary series are very special in my house because they are the first full-fledged novels that my son read on his own, with great enthusiasm AND voraciousness, proving that he has the stamina and drive to move into a new realm of reading. I read and reviewed A Tale Dark and

0 Comments on The Imaginary Veterinary: Book 1: The Sasquatch Escape by Suzanne Selfors, illustrated by Dan Santat, 214 pp, RL 3 as of 7/11/2014 4:45:00 AM
Add a Comment
29. Khristine’s Mad Skillz (And a side review of the Audiobook for Dreams of Gods and Monsters)

Audiobook review by Elisa  DREAMS OF GODS & MONSTERSWritten by: Laini Taylor Narrated by: Khristine Hvam Length: 18 hrs and 11 mins Series: Daughter of Smoke and Bone, Book 3 Format: Unabridged Release Date:04-08-14 Publisher: Hachette Audio Program Type: Audiobook Audible In this thrilling conclusion to the Daughter of Smoke & Bone trilogy, Karou is still not ready to forgive Akiva

0 Comments on Khristine’s Mad Skillz (And a side review of the Audiobook for Dreams of Gods and Monsters) as of 7/11/2014 1:01:00 AM
Add a Comment
30. Cleopatra In Space: Target Practice, by Mike Maihack (ages 8-12)

Do your kids love graphic novels? I know many parents tear their hair out worrying that their kids will only read comic books and graphic novels. But please, please believe me that these books can really feed a child's imagination. They draw us in, asking the reader to be much more actively involved in creating the story than a movie does. One of my students' new favorite graphic novels is Cleopatra in Space: Target Practice. Hand this to fans of Amulet and Zita the Spacegirl.

Cleopatra in Space:
Target Practice
by Mike Maihack
Graphix / Scholastic, 2014
Amazon
your local library
ages 8 - 12
This fun mash-up between ancient Egypt and outer space features a young Cleopatra who’s more interested in combat training than algebra lessons. Cleo is zapped into the future by a mysterious tablet and learns that an ancient prophecy declares that she is destined to save the galaxy from the tyrannical rule of the evil Xaius Octavian.

Maihack pulls in readers with his colorful artwork, charming heroine and plenty of action. I especially love Cleo's spunky, fearless character. Just look at Maihack's use of color, angles and expression.
Here's what my friend and huge sci-fi reader Charlotte has to say about Cleopatra in Space over at Charlotte's Library:
"A must for fans of Zita the Spacegirl and Astronaut Academy.

A must for those who want books with strong girl characters to offer young readers of any gender, and, Cleo being brown girl of ancient Egypt, a great diverse read!"
You can also check out the Kirkus Reviews and SLJ's Good Comics for Kids review. I know kids at our school can't wait for the next in this fun new series!

The review copy was kindly sent by the publishers, Graphix / Scholastics Books. If you make a purchase using the Amazon links on this site, a small portion goes to Great Kid Books. Thank you for your support.

©2014 Mary Ann Scheuer, Great Kid Books

0 Comments on Cleopatra In Space: Target Practice, by Mike Maihack (ages 8-12) as of 7/8/2014 1:48:00 AM
Add a Comment
31. The Luck Uglies by Paul Durham


The Luck Uglies

I finished The Luck Uglies last night and I was satisfied to see that it promises a sequel.

When the (evil, disgusting, arrogant, cruel, etc.) Earl of Longchance captures a young Bog Noblin, he invites doom and terror to the village of Drowning.  Rye, her friends, Folly and Quinn, her mother, Abby and the mysterious tattooed man, known as Harmless, must save the village.  Spells, magical beasts, potions, and incredible escape acts, most occurring in the dark of night, keep the pages turning.

I admit I skimmed.  I often skim through battles because reading about swordplay and how the characters avoid decapitation or mangling makes me itchy.  (I am not an 11-year-old boy.)  I took the time to read one such scene and it was cinematically presented - the type of action/adventure sequence that the target readership will LOVE.

I love the cover and chapter illustrations.   I thought that one or two scenes were dragged out for suspense and action's sake.    Even the villains - except for the Earl, who is beyond the pale - have their not-so-awful moments.  So, yes, I think fantasy and adventure fans, boys and girls alike, will enjoy this book.

ASIDE:  Is there a running around the rooftops meme circulating through kids' fiction right now?  This is not the first, or even the second, book that I've read this year in which city rooftops are used as escape routes or roadways.  Just wondering.



0 Comments on The Luck Uglies by Paul Durham as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
32. THE KISS OF DECEPTION by Mary E Pearson {Review}

Review by Elisa  THE KISS OF DECEPTIONby Mary E Pearson Series: Remnant Chronicles (Book 1)Hardcover: 496 pagesPublisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR) (July 8, 2014)Goodreads | Amazon In a society steeped in tradition, Princess Lia’s life follows a preordained course. As First Daughter, she is expected to have the revered gift of sight—but she doesn’t—and she knows her parents are perpetrating a

0 Comments on THE KISS OF DECEPTION by Mary E Pearson {Review} as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
33. Great Book Signing Event

Great book signing event at Waterstones, Blackpool. Back on 20th Sept!

Great book signing event at Waterstones, Blackpool. Back on 20th Sept!

Add a Comment
34. The Islands of Chaldea by Diana Wynne Jones and Ursula Jones

The Islands of ChaldeaThe books of Diana Wynne Jones were a constant throughout my childhood and teen years. Of the nearly 100 books by her listed in our library system’s catalog, there isn’t a single one that I haven’t read at least once, if not repeatedly.

After Jones passed away in 2011, I naturally thought that I would never again read a new book by her. But first there was the posthumously published Earwig and the Witch, a short, snappy book about an orphan and her curious adoptive ‘family.’ It was definitely appealing, but it had that abrupt, unpolished quality that posthumously published books often have. I would recommend it to a reader, but it didn’t capture my imagination the way so many of Jones’ books had. Yet again, I thought that was that.

Fully three years after her death, though, a full-length novel by Jones has appeared–it was discovered amongst her papers, and polished and completed by Jones’ sister, Ursula Jones, already an author in her own right. This was the final (?) Diana Wynne Jones novel that I had been waiting for–it has a story that sucks a reader in almost instantly, characters who are defined simply but indelibly, and a setting so well-described that one can see it.

Aileen is an apprentice Wise-Woman, cared for by her Aunt Beck, the Wise Woman of Skarr, one of the group of sovereign islands known collectively as the Islands of Chaldea. Aileen has only just attempted her first initiation when she and her aunt–and a prince, and a castle servant–are sent off on a whirlwind quest that requires them to visit every island.

As is typical for Jones, our heroine has more reserves than she believes (but is never a wet blanket about her insecurities), there are wonderful animal companions, and adult authority figures are often Very Cranky.

I hope that it is taken as a compliment when I say that I cannot tell at all where Ursula Jones’ contributions come in–the book hangs together perfectly as a whole, with no disjointed transitions or developments that ring false. I highly recommend the book, both on its own merits, and as a satisfying send-off to Diana Wynne Jones’ magical oeuvre.

Posted by: Sarah


0 Comments on The Islands of Chaldea by Diana Wynne Jones and Ursula Jones as of 6/30/2014 12:13:00 PM
Add a Comment
35. That Cat who came in off the Roof by Annie M. G. Schmidt

Mr Tibbles – a shy reporter on the local newspaper – has been threatened with the sack. It’s perhaps no surprise: Mr Tibbles is mad about cats, and all his stories end up revolving around felines one way or another. What his editor wants, however, is news!

Photo: Sarah

Photo: Sarah

An act of kindness brings Mr Tibbles into contact with Minoe, a rather strange young woman who appears to be able to talk to cats. Through the town’s network of feline pets and strays Minoe starts starts to deliver interesting titbits of exclusive news to Mr Tibbles; cats across the city overhear all sorts of conversations often revealing juicy gossip and insider information, and when Minoe learns of these pieces of news from kitty comrades, she passes them on to her friend the reporter.

Mr Tibble’s job is looking up until he uncovers information which could lead to the downfall of a local powerful businessman. Will the reporter be brave enough to expose the evil goings on? Will he be believed, when his only witnesses are pussy cats?

Copy_of_Cover_Cat_who_came_in_off_the_RoofA funny and yet quietly profound tale of courage, friendship and what it really means to be human, The Cat Who Came in off the Roof, by Annie M. G. Schmidt, translated by David Colmer is a gem of a story. Ideal for fans of The Hundred and One Dalmatians, or cross-species tales of identity such as Stellaluna or Croc and Bird, this book would make an especially good class read-aloud, with lots of opportunities to discuss what life looks like from different perspectives, helping readers and listeners walk in another’s shoes, as well as perhaps learning a thing or to about overcoming shyness, and how to stand up for what you believe in.

From the mangy, feisty stray cat who you end up rooting for, to the hilarious school cat with a penchant for history lessons and a slight;y different (some might say out-dated) understanding of the term ‘news’, Schmidt has populated her story with a super array of characters. The narrative beautifully unfolds with unseen and fine tuning, climaxing with an exciting and rich ending which is deeply satisfying even though not everything is tied up neatly and not all strands end happily. Despite plenty of kittens and purring, this book never patronises its readership.

Knowing the original Dutch language version as we do as a family, I can also comment on the gorgeous translation. Colmer has wittily and cleverly translated linguistic and cultural jokes. His phrase ‘miaow-wow’ for when the cats meet up for a big parley is genius and has now entered our family parlance. If I nitpick I might personally have chosen -thorpe rather than -thorn for the Dutch -doorn, when translating the town’s name but I feel mean mentioning this as Colmer’s voice is pitch-perfect; at no point will you notice the text as a translation for it reads authentically and smoothly.

This must-read book will make you laugh out loud (whether you are a dog person or a cat fan). It will make you feel like for a brief moment you’ve witnessed and understood the best of humanity. It may also make you rather nervous next time you find a cat sitting ever so quietly next to you whilst you are having a private conversation!

I do so hope Pushkin Press are now thinking about translating Schmidt’s earlier work, Ibbeltje, which shares many characteristics with The Cat Who Came in off the Roof and has the added advantage of brilliant illustrations by another glittering star in the Dutch children’s literature firmament: Fiep Westendorp.

For reasons which will become clear upon reading this charming and magical book Minoe not only can speak the language of cats, she is also known to climb trees when dogs approach. It took about a nanosecond for M to decide she wanted to play-by-this-particular-book by climbing as many different trees as she could one afternoon at the weekend. So, armed with a local map (printed from http://www.openstreetmap.org/) we set off to map all the local trees good for climbing in.

tree1

Each tree we climbed we identified (it seems that around us oaks, ash and willow are the best climbing trees).

tree2

We remembered the last time we deliberately climbed trees in order to read on location.

tree3

Getting out and climbing a tree? Reading a truly terrific book? What more could you ask for as a lovely way to while a way a few hours!

Whilst climbing we weren’t listening to music, but these tracks could go with reading The Cat Who Came in off the Roof:

  • This Cat’s On A Hot Tin Roof by Brian Setzer
  • Everybody Wants to be a Cat from The Aristocats film
  • The Cat theme from Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf

  • Other activities which you might be inspired to try alongside reading The Cat Who Came in off the Roof include:

  • Reading more books in more trees. The very first I’d have to recommend are the Toby books by Timothee de Fombelle, about an entire world of miniature people having giant adventures in an oak tree.
  • Walking around your neighbourhood and greeting the cats you come across. Could you create a backstory for each one? What are they called? What do they get up to when you’re not there?
  • Writing a family newspaper. This is potentially a super project for the summer holidays – and you can get some great tips and downloadables to get you going from this post over on Playful Learning.
  • When did you last climb a tree? What secrets might your cat be able to tell me ;-) ?

    Disclosure: I received a free review copy of The Cat who Came in off the Roof from the publisher.

    And briefly…. thank you with all my heart to all of you who commented on my last post, or got in touch via email, phone, snail mail and more. Life goes on and plots are being hatched and plans being laid. As and when I can reveal more I’ll be sure to let you know the latest.

    3 Comments on That Cat who came in off the Roof by Annie M. G. Schmidt, last added: 6/29/2014
    Display Comments Add a Comment
    36. In Case You Were Wondering . . .

    This week I've done a lot of reading (for me), but with exception of ISLA AND THE HAPPILY EVER AFTER, they've all been books that either (1) I didn't finish, (2) ended a series, or (3) weren't Young Adult.  So I thought I'd catch you up on some things I liked, and one that I didn't. * * * IN THE END is the second book in the IN THE AFTER duology.  I really, really liked IN THE AFTER, so I

    0 Comments on In Case You Were Wondering . . . as of 6/28/2014 4:41:00 PM
    Add a Comment
    37. Collision: The Battle For Darracia, by Michael Phillip Cash

    In this second book of the Darracia Saga, Collision, Michael Phillip Cash continues his sci-fi drama with more deception and multiple character developments that take readers deeper into the solar system and the history of its inhabitants. As the battle for Darracia continues, there are internal traitors, blossoming romances, family tensions and everyone, besides the enemy, is questioning their faith in the Elements.

    Add a Comment
    38. M.K. Hutchins Blog Tour: On Mythology, Maya Culture, & More!

    To celebrate the release of her debut novel Drift last week, author M.K. Hutchins has been stopping by blogs throughout the week to talk about her writing process, Maya culture, and more.

    drift, m.k. hutchins

    Here’s a bit about Drift:

    There’s no place for love on the shores of hell.

    Tenjat lives on the shores of Hell, an ocean filled with ravenous naga monsters. His island, a massive Turtle, is slowed by the people living on its back. Tenjat is poor as poor gets: poor enough, even, to condescend to the shame of marriage, so his children can help support him one day.

    But Tenjat has a plan to avoid this fate. He will join the Handlers, those who defend and rule the island. Handlers never marry, and they can even provide for an additional family member. Against his sister’s wishes, Tenjat joins the Handlers. And just in time: the Handlers are ramping up for a dangerous battle against the naga monsters, and they need every fighter they can get.

    As the naga battle approaches, Tenjat’s training intensifies, but a long-hidden family secret—not to mention his own growing feelings for Avi—put his plans in jeopardy, and might threaten the very survival of his island.

    You can read sample chapters from Drift online hereKirkus Reviews has called it “totally fresh” and Sarah Beth Durst, author of Vessel and Conjured, has called it “a fantastic adventure set in a stunning, original world. . . . Some of the best worldbuilding I’ve ever read.”

    M.K. Hutchins’ tour schedule is below, so if you haven’t picked up Drift or you have and loved it, check out the following blogs for some great insight and conversation into this fantastic world!

    June 19: John Scalzi’s Whatever BlogM.K. Hutchins on worldbuilding and cultural ecology here

    June 20: Supernatural Snark – M.K. Hutchins on being inspired by Maya mythology here.

    June 23: It’s All About Books – M.K. Hutchins’ top 5 most influential books here.

    June 25: Read Now Sleep Later - Check back for the link!

    June 26: The Brain Lair - Check back for the link!

    Still want to learn more about M.K. Hutchins and Drift? Check out her blog and follow her on Twitter!


    Filed under: Book News, Diversity in YA, New Releases, Tu Books Tagged: blog tour, debut author, drift, fantasy, m.k. hutchins

    0 Comments on M.K. Hutchins Blog Tour: On Mythology, Maya Culture, & More! as of 6/25/2014 3:41:00 PM
    Add a Comment
    39. Review of Fiendish

    yovanoff fiendish Review of FiendishFiendish
    by Brenna Yovanoff
    High School    Razorbill/Penguin    341 pp.
    6/14    978-1-59514-638-0    $17.99    g

    Yovanoff (The Space Between, rev. 1/12; Paper Valentine, rev. 3/13) here weaves a haunting tale of old magic in a changing world. When Clementine was a child, a torch-bearing mob burned out her family; Clementine escaped by virtue of a magical coma that left her hidden, semi-conscious, in her cellar for years. When she’s found and awakened, the eerie happenings (grotesquely mutated animals, animated plants, uncanny weather) that led to the mob attack in the first place begin to resurge. As Clementine reacquaints herself with the townsfolk and her remaining “crafty” relatives, she tries to sift through the mysteries of her childhood to figure out what is causing the wild magic. Meanwhile, Clementine’s romantic attachment to Fisher, the boy who woke her, shines a spotlight on the divide between the crafty and non-crafty elements of the town, in whose gray spaces Fisher uneasily exists. Yovanoff’s world-building is sophisticated and precise, incorporating both the physical presence of the town and its dangers and the conceptual underpinnings of the supernatural in Clementine’s universe. Powerful, evocative prose brings to life a world close to overflowing with wild magic, seething prejudice, and base fear. For readers who like their fantasies unsettling and morally tangled; hand this to fans of Laini Taylor and Frances Hardinge.

    From the May/June 2014 issue of The Horn Book Magazine.

    share save 171 16 Review of Fiendish

    The post Review of Fiendish appeared first on The Horn Book.

    0 Comments on Review of Fiendish as of 1/1/1900
    Add a Comment
    40. First Chapter Review: The Stolen Herd by K. Madill (Win $25 Amazon GC)

    1st Chapter Review TC&TBC

    K. Madill is touring with Pump Up Your Book this month with her young adult fantasy novel, The Stolen Herd. Read to the end to see how you can enter for your chance to win a $25 Amazon gift card.

    Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000038_00068]

    BLURB: Mandamus is only a foal when his herd is captured by the terrible Rakhana Army. Rescued and raised in secrecy, he knows nothing of his heritage until a dreadful incident in the woods brings him to the attention of the Forest council – and everyone else. Sent away for his own protection, he is determined to seek help on behalf of the many animals who have gone missing from the forest, including his own family.

    With the help of a troubled man and a stout-hearted bat, can Mandamus save his fellow creatures before it’s too late?

    COVER: I’m not usually a fan of dark covers, but this one is stunning. The black of the horse, the white glint of his eyes, and the purples and pinks of the sky make for a fabulous piece of art that attracts readers.

    FIRST CHAPTER: As the Rakhana Army closes in on the herd, Gideon takes their foal and dashes him to Daleth and Mareva to raise in secrecy.

    KEEP READING: Filled with flowing descriptions and a multitude of characters, this opening chapter sets the scene for what will become of Mandamus after his herd is captured by the Rakhana Army. A butterfly, a bat, a herd of horses, a ruthless human army, and a special foal with white eyes who may be the stuff of legends make for an interesting cast. The strength of the world building is easy to see early on.  The hint of magic and the elegant writing in this first chapter definitely encourage me to follow along with the rest of Mandamus’ story.

     

    Title:  The Stolen Herd

    Author: K. Madill

    Genre: Young adult fantasy

    Paperback: 181 pages

    Publisher: CreateSpace (February 20, 2014)

    ISBN-10: 1482640023

    ISBN-13: 978-1482640021

    Kindle:B00GBQ9V8O

    Purchase at http://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B00GBQ9V8O

     

    I received a copy of this book from the author. I have been paid a fee to promote this book with a book tour through Pump Up Your Book. That fee did not include a review. This review contains my honest opinions, which I have not been compensated for in any way.

     

    A chronic “head in the cloudser” K. Madill lives in a rickety house on a well treed street in British Columbia, Canada.  When she’s not hanging out with her best equine friend in the woods she can be found trying to stay upright on her roller skates or mediating the affairs of her various furred and feathered friends that rule the aforementioned rickety house. 

    K. Madill’s website: kmadill.com

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/K-Madill/161159890706088

    Twitter: https://twitter.com/KaraiMadill1

    Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/20643483-the-stolen-herd

     

    Pump Up Your Book and K. Madill are teaming up to give away a $25 Amazon Gift Card!

    Terms and conditions:

      • By entering, you confirm you are 18 years of age or older.
      • Raffle runs from 12:00 AM EST on June 2 through 12:00 AM EST on June 28, 2014.
      • Winner will be selected randomly by Rafflecopter.
      • Winner will be notified by email and has 72 hours to claim the prize before a new winner is selected.
      • Prize will be sent via email from the author’s representative.
      • VOID WHERE PROHIBITED.

    a Rafflecopter giveaway

     

    The Stolen Herd Banner


    0 Comments on First Chapter Review: The Stolen Herd by K. Madill (Win $25 Amazon GC) as of 6/24/2014 3:55:00 AM
    Add a Comment
    41. Interview with Gail Z Martin, Author of Deadly Curiosities

    [Manga Maniac Cafe] Describe yourself in five words or less.

    [Gail Z Martin] Writer, author, scribe, imaginer, storyteller.

    [Manga Maniac Cafe] Can you tell us a little about Deadly Curiosities?

     

    [Gail Z Martin] Deadly Curiosities takes place in historic, haunted Charleston. Welcome to Trifles & Folly, an antique and curio shop with a dark secret. Proprietor Cassidy Kincaide continues a family tradition begun 350 years ago – acquiring and neutralizing dangerous supernatural items. It’s the perfect job for Cassidy, whose psychic gift lets her touch an object and know its history. Together with her business partner Sorren, a 500 year-old vampire and former jewel thief, Cassidy makes it her business to get infernal objects off the market.

    When a trip to a haunted hotel unearths a statue steeped in malevolent power, and a string of murders draws a trail to an abandoned section of the old Navy yard, Cassidy and Sorren discover a diabolical plot to unleash a supernatural onslaught on their city.

    It’s time for Kincaide and her team to get rid of these Deadly Curiosities before the bodies start piling up.

    The novel will be out in June in bookstores everywhere and online. I also have a free novella, The Final Death, set in the Deadly Curiosities world that’s available free on Wattpad here: http://www.wattpad.com/story/15334006-the-final-death. And I write short stories in the Deadly Curiosities universe (including several time periods in the past) available on Kindle, Kobo and Nook, with more to come.

    [Manga Maniac Cafe]  How did you come up with the concept and characters?

    [Gail Z Martin] I visited Charleston a few years back for a conference, and then took my family back for a longer visit. It’s a beautiful place with a rich history and a lot of scandal and salaciousness beneath all the propriety. I loved the city, and I realized that it hadn’t been overdone as an urban fantasy setting. I started brainstorming right then about what kind of a series would be a good fit. Charleston’s one of the most haunted cities in the US, so ghosts fit right in, along with other supernatural creatures. An antique/curio shop also was a natural, because Charleston is full of them, and it would be the obvious place to bring an old, haunted object. From there, the characters took on a life of their own.

    [Manga Maniac Cafe] What gave you the most trouble with the story?

    [Gail Z Martin] I wouldn’t say it was “trouble”, but Deadly Curiosities is my first series set in a real place in the modern time, so that means I can’t just make everything up! It required deciding what elements to make fictitious and where to draw on real people/places/history. And it also took a lot of research and fact-checking!

    [Manga Maniac Cafe] What’s one thing you won’t leave home without?

    [Gail Z Martin] A book to read. I don’t mind waiting in line if I’ve got a book.

    [Manga Maniac Cafe] Name three things on your desk right now.

    [Gail Z Martin] Cup of coffee, smartphone, to-do list.

    [Manga Maniac Cafe] If you could trade places with anyone for just one day, who would you be?

    [Gail Z Martin] My dogs. They have it good! Lounge around all day, go for a walk, be waited on paw-and-paw, then on to evening snuggling while watching TV. That’s the life!

    [Manga Maniac Cafe] You have been granted the use of one superpower for one week.  Which power would you choose, and what would you do with it?

    [Gail Z Martin] Super-speed (as long as it came with super-dexterity), so I could finally get caught up on everything I need to do!

    [Manga Maniac Cafe] What are some books that you enjoyed recently?

    [Gail Z Martin] Lately I’ve been alternating through the Harry Dresden books by Jim Butcher and the Secret Histories series by Simon R. Green. (You can actually see most of what I’ve read in the last couple of years on Goodreads. It’s missing older stuff and some ebooks, but it’s got 500 or so of my latest reads!)

    [Manga Maniac Cafe] How can readers connect with you?

    [Gail Z Martin] You can find me at www.DeadlyCuriosities.com, on Twitter @GailZMartin, on Facebook.com/WinterKingdoms, at DisquietingVisions.com blog and GhostInTheMachinePodcast.com. I lead monthly conversations on Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/GailZMartin and post free excerpts on Wattpad http://wattpad.com/GailZMartin.

    Cassidy Kincaide owns Trifles & Folly, an antique/curio store and high-end pawn shop in Charleston, South Carolina that is more than what it seems. Dangerous magical and supernatural items sometimes find their way into mortal hands or onto the market, and Cassidy is part of a shadowy Alliance of mortals and mages whose job it is to take those deadly curiosities out of circulation.

    Welcome to Trifles & Folly, an antique and curio shop with a dark secret. Proprietor Cassidy Kincaide continues a family tradition begun in 1670—acquiring and neutralizing dangerous supernatural items. It’s the perfect job for Cassidy, whose psychic gift lets her touch an object and know its history. Together with her business partner Sorren, a 500 year-old vampire and former jewel thief, Cassidy makes it her business to get infernal objects off the market. When mundane antiques suddenly become magically malicious, it’s time for Cassidy and Sorren to get rid of these Deadly Curiosities before the bodies start piling up.

    About the author: Gail Z. Martin writes epic and urban fantasy, steampunk and short stories. She is the author of the Chronicles of the Necromancer series, the Fallen Kings Cycle series and the Ascendant Kingdoms Saga series of epic fantasy books, as well as the Deadly Curiosities urban fantasy world and coming in 2015, Iron and Blood, a Steampunk novel, co-written with Larry N. Martin. Gail is a frequently contributor to US and UK anthologies. She also writes two series of ebook short stories: The Jonmarc Vahanian Adventures and the Deadly Curiosities Adventures

    When she’s not writing, Gail also enjoys reading, cooking, watching anime and Dr. Who, and hanging out with her husband, kids and dogs.

    The post Interview with Gail Z Martin, Author of Deadly Curiosities appeared first on Manga Maniac Cafe.

    Add a Comment
    42. Interview with Altblackpool!

    My book ‘Caution: Witch in Progress’ and my book signing event in Blackpool on Saturday 21st June from 1pm to 3pm has been promoted today by an interview with Altblackpool!

    Click here to read interview.

    Book Jacket

    Add a Comment
    43. Out today: Drift and Rebellion

    Warm weather is finally here! Get those summer reading lists ready because we’re excited to announce the release of two new YA novels from our Tu Books imprint: Drift, a high fantasy adventure that takes place on the shores of Hell, and Rebellion, the thrilling final book in Karen Sandler’s Tankborn series.

    drift, by m.k. hutchins

    In Drift, Tenjat lives on the shores of Hell, an ocean filled with ravenous naga monsters. His island, a massive Turtle, is slowed by the people living on its back. Tenjat is poor as poor gets: poor enough, even, to condescend to the shame of marriage, so his children can help support him one day. But Tenjat has a plan to avoid this fate. He will join the Handlers, those who defend and rule the island. As an epic naga battle approaches, Tenjat’s training intensifies, but a long-hidden family secret—not to mention his own growing feelings for his trainer—put his plans in jeopardy, and might threaten the very survival of his island.

    Read an excerpt. Learn more about Drift and author M.K. Hutchins here.

    rebellion

    In Rebellion, the Tankborn story comes to its thrilling conclusion as questions are answered after the devastating bomb blast that ended Awakening. Kayla has been brought to the headquarters of the organization that planted the bomb, and many others like it, in GEN food warehouses and homes. Her biological mother tells her that Devak is dead and that Kayla must join their terrorist group, which is ramping up for something big. Now Kayla must pretend to embrace this new role in an underground compound full of paranoia as she plots a way to escape and save her friends.

    Read an excerpt. Learn more about the Tankborn trilogy and author Karen Sandler here.

    Happy book birthday to our newest releases! You can purchase them on our website, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or your local independent bookseller (if copies are not in stock, they can always order them for you). And of course, they’re also available as e-books.


    Filed under: Book News, Diversity in YA, New Releases, Tu Books Tagged: diverse YA, drift, fantasy, Karen Sandler, m.k. hutchins, rebellion, Science Fiction/Fantasy, ya books, young adult

    0 Comments on Out today: Drift and Rebellion as of 6/18/2014 10:57:00 AM
    Add a Comment
    44. Author Interview with Pauline Holyoak

    Welcome to this week’s edition of Author Interview Thursday.Pauline Holyoak Today’s special guest writes in multiple genres. She’s traditionally published but don’t let that fool you into thinking that she has her feet up smoking a pipe in comfy slippers while the minions at her publishers do all the donkey work. No way José! She works hard to market her books and is passionate about improving her craft as a story-teller. I got introduced to her by Cynthia Echterling who was on our hot seat way back in February. She has a lot to share with us today so please join in welcoming Pauline Holyoak.

     

    Can you tell us a little bit about yourself and the first time someone complemented you on something you had written?

    I grew up in England, in a coal mining village lovingly nicknamed, “The place that time forgot.”  I immigrated to Canada when I was 21 in search of adventure and a new life.  I currently live in Alberta with my husband, beautiful Sheltie and ginger cat. I am the proud mother of two grown children and one adorable grandchild. As far back as I can remember the pen and paper have been my faithful companions and story telling my forte. As a child I lived in my inner world of fantasy and make-believe, preferring the company of Mother Nature and my imaginary friends, than that of other children. Often, I would sneak away from the mundane adult world, find a private retreat (usually behind the garden shed) and imagine. There in my own little sanctuary with tools in hand, I’d conjure up all kinds of intriguing tales, colorful characters and magical places. I recall the first time I wrote a real story, at school. I must have been about 8 years old, at the time. It was about a rabbit and a hare, cousins I think, running away from home to a strange country and getting into all kinds of mischief. I still remember my teacher’s reaction after she read it. She looked at me with a stern faced and asked, “Did you copy this?” “No, Miss Finn, I pleaded, “It just, came right out of my head.” “Hmmmm” she scoffed suspiciously. I was devastated but it never stopped me. “I’ll show her.” I mumbled. And I kept writing, whatever came out of my head. I have spent the past 25 years writing editorials, articles, short stories and books.

     

    What can a reader expect when they pick up a Pauline Holyoak book?

    If you were to pick up my trilogy, you will find… A chilling tale of love, lust, sorcery and sacrifice; laced with mystery and tied with humor. Inspired by my own experiences at a remote little cottage near Stonehenge. If you picked up my Children’s book you will find, fantasy, humor, colorful illustrations and fun!

     

    You write in the Fantasy genre which is very popular and competitive. What advice would you have for someone who wants to write in this genre?Ultimate Sacrifice COVER

    Unlike some other genres, you can let your imagination run wild, while writing fantasy. Read the classics for ideas and use some of the established legends and myths for your fantasy world. But be sure to make your work original. Draw from your childhood world of make-believe. Even though your story is fantasy, your characters have to seem real and believable. Make sure your character’s name fits with your fantasy world, its time and culture. Unless you’re writing a series, your villain must die! I like to finish with an epilogue, so that my reader can be sure that the hero is living happy-ever-after.

    You’re published with Whiskey Creek Press. Can you tell us how this came about and the benefits of being with a traditional publisher?

    The benefits of having a traditional publisher are – No cost. Publisher pays for editing, printing, cover design, illustrations, etc. More exposure for your book, promotions, help and advertising.

     

    What would you say is the greatest challenge facing authors in this day and age?

    Getting your book ‘out there!’

     

    What have you found to be a successful way to market your books?

    People often ask me. “Do you spend much time marketing?”….. Oh yes, much more than I care to. Years ago one would write a book, get it published then sit back and collect the royalties. It’s not that way anymore.  Most authors are not salesmen, public speakers or comfortable being in the limelight but we are expected to promote ourselves, as well as our books, even by the big publishing houses. The internet of course, is the most powerful tool an author has. There are literally hundreds of sites that will promote your book, some are free and some are very costly.  I blog, do online interviews, reviews and try to keep a consistent online presence. It can be extremely time consuming but it’s an important element in establishing one’s writing career.

    What were some of your favourite books as a child?

    Grimm’s Fairy Tales, Alice In Wonderland, Nancy Drew Mysteries, Jane Eire, Great Expectations, The Secret Garden, Anne Of Green Gables…I could go on…and on..

     

    What three things should writers avoid when writing dialogue? Malevolent Spirit

    Make it clear who is talking. Keep it short. Show rather than tell.

     

    What book or film has the best dialogue that inspires you to be a better writer and why?

    I have read many wonderful books that have inspired me. I have just finished a book called, This House Is Haunted, by John Boyne. It is written in first person and the dialogue is amazing. It has inspired me to improve my own dialogue. The book that has inspired me the most would have to be Anne of Green Gables. I read it at an early age. The writing, the dialogue and the story encourage me to pursue my dream of becoming a writer.

     

    What is your definition of success as an author?

    It may seem cliché to say that ‘success’ isn’t just about money or fame, but obviously that’s the way the world defines it, including the publishing industry. But, if that’s how we define our ultimate success, most of us are going to be doomed to disappointment. Ever noticed that the ‘top ten’ best-sellers list, by definition, only have ten spots. People like Steven King usually have at least two of those spots. Ask anyone on the street to name a successful author and their likely to mention Stephanie Meyers, Steven King or J.K. Rowling’s, yet these people do not strike me as being any happier than the average Jo and certainly not as people who have been ‘made’ happy by their success. I have this quote framed and sitting on my desk. “Successful, is the person who has lived well, laughed often, and loved much, who has gained the respect of children, who leaves the world a better place than they found it, who has never lacked appreciation for the worlds beauty, who never fails to look for the best in others or give the best of themselves.” If and when I become that person, then I will be successful.

    Toy Story or Shrek?

    Shrek!!

    What three things should a first time visitor to your home town do?

    Get a visitor’s guide (online or off) to Spruce Grove and Stony Plain, Alberta, Canada. We have so many wonderful tourist attractions in this area and it’s only a four hour to the Rocky Mountains.

     

    What can we expect from Pauline Holyoak in the next 12 months? Merryweather Lodge

    I am working on paranormal romance and another children’s book. It’s about a little girl who has an incredible dream and visits the land of make-believe. I hope to have both books published by next spring.

    Where can readers and fans connect with you? 

    Facebook - www.facebook.com/PaulineHolyoak 

    Twitter - @PaulineHolyoak

    GoodReads - www.goodreads.com/author/show/4415532.Pauline_Holyoak

    Amazon - Amazon.com/PaulineHolyoak

    Website - http://www.paulineholyoak.com/

    LinkedIn - LinkedIn/PaulineHolyoak

     

    Any advice for authors out there who are either just starting out or getting frustrated with the industry?

    Writing a successful novel depends on four things –a little talent, lots of determination, a vivid imagination and skill. No one can teach you the first three but skill is something you ‘can’ learn…

    Try to spend some of your time lurking around the internet – read authors blogs, Facebook pages, websites, read comments and critiques. The internet is a treasure trove of information…

    When writing, whether it’s a novel, article or short story, you must grab your reader in the first few sentences. People are much too busy these days to spend the time reading something that doesn’t grab their attention on the first page. Lure them in, give them a hint of what’s to come, tempt them with the breadcrumb trail that will lead them deeper into the thicket.

    Be descriptive; convince your reader that she is there, by assaulting each of her senses, with color, sound, taste and texture. If your reader can feel the sun on her face, the wind fluttering in her shirt sleeves, envision the landscape and feel for your characters, half your job is done…

    I’m sure you’ve heard this one before. ‘Show’ don’t ‘Tell.’ I was confused when I first heard this but it is a simple concept. You can ‘Tell’ your reader how two characters meet, or you can ‘Show’ the characters meeting, making eye contact, checking each other out.

    Don’t ever try to compete with others. In this competitive market, one needs to be unique, build your own brand, whatever that might be…

    Brush up on your grammar and punctuation. If you have grammatical errors in your book proposal or article query, they are not going to look at your manuscript. If you can afford it, get yourself a professional editor, or find someone with an English degree to go over your work for you. And, never give up!!

     

    Thanks for spending time with us today Pauline. You’ve touched on so many topics that authors and aspiring authors will derive great value from. I think you summed it perfectly when you advocated never giving up. You can connect with Pauline by clicking one of the links she gave and you can also grab one of her books at the link below.

    Pauline Holyoak on Amazon

     

    5 Comments on Author Interview with Pauline Holyoak, last added: 6/13/2014
    Display Comments Add a Comment
    45. Writing Competition: Fairy Tale Review Awards in Poetry and Prose

    Fairy Tale Review Awards in Poetry and Prose

    2014 Prose & Poetry Contest Guidelines

    Fairy Tale Review is thrilled to announce the debut of an annual contest, beginning this year with Prose & Poetry awards. We’re interested in poems, stories, and essays with a fairy-tale feel—mainstream to experimental, genre to literary, realist to fabulist. Sarah Shun-lien Bynum will judge prose; Ilya Kaminsky will judge poetry. Both contests will award $1000, and all submissions will be considered for publication in The Mauve Issue. Reading fee: $10.

    Submit online or to:

    Fairy Tale Review, c/o Kate Bernheimer
    Department of English
    University of Arizona
    Tucson AZ 85721

    Deadline: July 15th, 2014

    Awards: $1,000 each

    Eligibility & Procedure

    All submissions must be original and previously unpublished. For prose, please send works of up to 6,000 words. For poetry, no more than five poems and/or ten pages per entry. Simultaneous submissions are acceptable, but please withdraw your manuscript immediately upon acceptance elsewhere, and note that the reading fee is nonrefundable. Multiple submissions are acceptable, but please note that you will need to pay a reading fee for each submission.

    Online submissions link.

    Reading Fee: $10.00
    Ten percent of your reading fee will be donated to Tucson Youth Poetry Slam as part of Fairy Tale Review’s interdisciplinary outreach efforts. (Fairy Tale Review has no official affiliation with Tucson Youth Poetry Slam.)

    CLMP Contest Code of Ethics

    CLMP’s community of independent literary publishers believe that ethical contests serve our shared goal: to connect writers and readers by publishing exceptional writing. We believe that intent to act ethically, clarity of guidelines, and transparency of process form the foundation of an ethical contest. To that end, we agree to 1) conduct our contests as ethically as possible and to address any unethical behavior on the part of our readers, judges, or editors; 2) to provide clear and specific contest guidelines—defining conflict of interest for all parties involved; and 3) to make the mechanics of our selection process available to the public. This Code recognizes that different contest models produce different results, but that each model can be run ethically. We have adopted this Code to reinforce our integrity and dedication as a publishing community and to ensure that our contests contribute to a vibrant literary heritage.

    Fairy Tale Review Annual Contest Selection Process

    1st Round of Judging: Non-Blind Read by Genre Editor and Editor. Finalists (approximately 15 poems, 15 pieces of prose) will then be forwarded to the contest judges for the 2nd Round of Judging.
    2nd Round of Judging: Blind Read by Contest Judges. Judges change on a yearly basis.
    Conflicts of Interest: Students, faculty, staff, or administrators currently affiliated with University of Arizona are ineligible for consideration or publication. Anyone with a substantial personal or professional affiliation with a judge is ineligible to enter in that category; if you have questions as to your eligibility, please contact ftreditorial (at) gmail (dot) com, and we will assess the situation together. Upon learning the Judges’ selections, the Editor will assess any potential conflict of interest before finalizing the result. We ask that past winners of our contest refrain from entering until three years after their winning entry was published.

    Fairy Tale Review was established in 2005 and is an annual publication of Wayne State University Press.

    About the Judges

    Sarah Shun-lien Bynum is the author of two novels, Ms. Hempel Chronicles, a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award, and Madeleine Is Sleeping, a finalist for the 2004 National Book Award and winner of the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize. Her fiction has appeared in many magazines and anthologies, including the New Yorker, Tin House, the Georgia Review, and the Best American Short Stories 2004 and 2009. The recipient of a Whiting Writers’ Award and an NEA Fellowship, she was named one of “20 Under 40” fiction writers by the New Yorker. She lives in Los Angeles and teaches in the Graduate Writing Program at Otis College of Art and Design.

    Add a Comment
    46. Fantasy FTW!

    Review by Andye MIDNIGHT THIEF Midnight Thief #1 by Livia Blackburn Age Range: 12 - 18 years Grade Level: 7 - 12 Hardcover: 384 pages Publisher: Disney-Hyperion (July 8, 2014) Goodreads | Amazon Growing up on Forge's streets has taught Kyra how to stretch a coin. And when that's not enough, her uncanny ability to scale walls and bypass guards helps her take what she needs. But when the

    0 Comments on Fantasy FTW! as of 6/13/2014 11:57:00 PM
    Add a Comment
    47. Waterstones Event!

    Great to see Waterstones advertising my next book signing on their website! ‘Caution: Witch in Progress’ at Waterstones Blackpool on Saturday 21st June 2014!

    Click here to see website promotion.

    Add a Comment
    48. World Building Rules

    Sometimes it's okay to break the rules when you're building a world for your book.

    http://kidlit.com/2014/05/12/breaking-the-rules-in-world-building/

    0 Comments on World Building Rules as of 6/15/2014 1:57:00 PM
    Add a Comment
    49. Interview with Auralee Wallace, Author of Sidekick and Giveaway

     

    [Manga Maniac Cafe] Good morning, Auralee!  Describe yourself in five words or less.

    [Auralee Wallace] Funny. Smartish. Kind. Careful. Offbeat.

    [Manga Maniac Cafe] Can you tell us a little about Sidekick?

    [Auralee Wallace] I like to think that Sidekick is just like Cinderella…if Cinderella wanted to be a superhero instead of a princess…and was a smartass. 

    [Manga Maniac Cafe]  Can you share your favorite scene?

    [Auralee Wallace] Oh, that’s a tough one. If I have to pick a favourite, there is this one scene where my main character, Bremy St. James, makes a very Mission Impossible type escape from a dire situation. I like this scene because I think it’s a turning point for her in that she realizes maybe, just maybe, she can do the impossible…and she has a cool exit line. I like cool exit lines.

    [Manga Maniac Cafe] What gave you the most trouble with the story?

    [Auralee Wallace] A lot of the humour in Sidekick has to do with stereotypes and the expectations surrounding those stereotypes. For example, Bremy’s landlord is a Russian mobster with a glass eyeball, but he’s also a pretty nice guy in a semi-psychotic kind of way. Not crossing the line from exploring a stereotype to exploiting a group of people can be difficult, so I am always struggling to keep these issues in mind while I’m writing. I don’t want to take the jokes too far.

    [Manga Maniac Cafe] What’s one thing you won’t leave home without?

    [Auralee Wallace] Hmm, the only thing I can’t really leave home without is, well, my children. I have forgotten just about everything else you could possibly imagine: wallet, glasses, phone, the cat on my way to the vet…but I have yet to forget my kids. High-five me!

    [Manga Maniac Cafe] Name three things on your desk right now.

    [Auralee Wallace] 1. Empty coffee mug.

    2. Love note from my five year old.

    3. Books…lots and lots of books.

    [Manga Maniac Cafe] If you could trade places with anyone for just one day, who would you be?

    [Auralee Wallace] Serena Williams. I bet she has never struggled to open a pickle jar.

    [Manga Maniac Cafe] You have been granted the use of one superpower for one week.  Which power would you choose, and what would you do with it?

    [Auralee Wallace] Ah! This one is so hard! Seriously, I seem to give this question more gravitas than it deserves…like it might actually happen, and  I had better choose wisely. Okay so, I really want to fly, but I also really want to be invisible – and yes, I would absolutely do creepy things with that power. There’s also mind control to consider…that would be pretty great. Then I could compel David Tennant to put on his old Doctor Who costume and we could role-play some of my favourite episodes! Okay, that’s pretty creepy too. How’s about we just stick with the flying thing?

    [Manga Maniac Cafe] What are some books that you enjoyed recently?

    [Auralee Wallace] Lately I’ve read quite the mix. Hmm, let’s see there was The Almost Girl by Amalie Howard, The Luckiest Lady in London by Sherry Thomas and the first installment of Jonathan Janz’s Savage Species, Night Terrors. And may I just say in regards to Savage Species, well, I haven’t read any horror like that since I was a teenager. It was…really…wow. There’s this scene with a machete and an alien/insectoid type creature with a really big…well, you may not want to know about that…but wow. It reminded me of the movie Piranha 3D…and now I’ve just admitted that I’ve watched Piranha 3D. I’m just going to stop now.

    [Manga Maniac Cafe] How can readers connect with you?

    Website: auraleewallace.com

    Facebook: Auralee Wallace Author

    Twitter:@AuraleeWallace

    Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/8119821.Auralee_Wallace

    Thank you!

    Sidekick

    Auralee Wallace

    Genre: Fantasy/Superhero

    Publisher: Escape Publishing

    Date of Publication: 1 June 2014

    ISBN: 9780857991591

    ASIN: Will be available end of April

    Number of pages: Approx 172

    Word Count: 73 818

    Cover Artist: Danielle Mait

    Book Description:

    Heroes meets Kick-Ass in this brilliant and hilarious debut about a girl who just wants to save the world…

    Bremy St James, daughter of billionaire Atticus St James, has been cut off from the family fortune and is struggling to survive in a world that no longer holds its breath every time she buys a new outfit. To make matters worse, her twin sister is keeping secrets, loan sharks are circling, and the man of her dreams — a newspaper reporter — is on assignment to bring down everyone with the last name St James.

    Things are certainly looking bleak for the down-and-out socialite until a good deed throws her into the path of the city’s top crime-fighter, Dark Ryder. Suddenly, Bremy has a new goal: apprentice to a superhero, and start her own crime-fighting career.

    Ryder has no need for a sidekick, but it turns out the city needs Bremy’s help. Atticus St James is planning the crime of the century, and Bremy may be the only one able to get close enough to her father to stop him.

    Now all she needs to do is figure out this superhero thing in less than a month, keep her identity secret from the man who could very well be The One, and save the city from total annihilation.

    Well, no one ever said being a superhero would be easy…

    About the Author:

    Auralee Wallace has played many roles in her life, including college professor, balloon seller, and collections agent. She is now living her dream of writing humorous women’s fiction. When this semi-natural blonde mother of three children (and psychiatric nurse to two rescue cats) isn’t writing or playing soccer, she can be found watching soap operas with lurid fascination and warring with a family of peregrine falcons for the rights to her backyard.

    http://auraleewallace.com/

    https://twitter.com/AuraleeWallace

    https://www.facebook.com/auraleewallace.author

    Tour giveaway details

    5 ebook copies of Sidekick

    a Rafflecopter giveaway

    The post Interview with Auralee Wallace, Author of Sidekick and Giveaway appeared first on Manga Maniac Cafe.

    Add a Comment
    50. DARK METROPOLIS by Jaclyn Dolamore

    "Review My Books" Review by Emily @ Books & Cleverness DARK METROPOLIS by Jaclyn Dolamore File Size: 1429 KB Print Length: 304 pages Publisher: Disney Hyperion (June 17, 2014) Goodreads | Amazon Sixteen-year-old Thea Holder's mother is cursed with a spell that's driving her mad, and whenever they touch, Thea is chilled by the magic, too. With no one else to contribute, Thea must make a

    0 Comments on DARK METROPOLIS by Jaclyn Dolamore as of 6/17/2014 2:09:00 AM
    Add a Comment

    View Next 25 Posts