What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts Tagged with: meditation, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 19 of 19
1. The Human Body: An Energy Field Connected to Other Energy Fields

Body as transmitter of information and energy

A Connection of Energy Fields

From Asian cultures we learn that the body is essentially an energy field connected directly or indirectly to all other energy fields in the universe. Because all fields are interconnected, they are capable of transferring information and energy. That means we have access to an infinite amount of information. We are all aware of how we receive and send information through the five senses of taste, touch, smell, sight and hearing.  But what about the so-called sixth sense?

Receiving and Sending Intuitive Information and Energy

Many of us are not so aware how we can send and receive information and energy through intuition in the form meditation and dreams. The intuitive images, sounds, feelings, and sensations that we pick up spontaneously or receive in dreams and meditation are identifying symbols for unique, relevant information and energy within and without us that can be used to help ourselves and others. Any of the senses can be a vehicle for an intuitive message because our bodies are wonderfully designed to transmit information through the five senses as well as the sixth sense of intuition. Just as we pick up data through touch, sight, hearing, smell and taste coming from outside us, we can register intuitive data coming from within us through those same senses.

Sending intuitive information and loving energy is very much like using our senses to send and receive information about what we see or hear except we do it in an intuitive, altered state of awareness such as meditation, deep prayer or dreams. In these states we intend to receive or to transmit information or energy, and it happens! We can intend to have dreams that will help someone else by giving deeper understanding, clues to resolution or a diagnosis of the issue. While in meditation or prayer, we can send healing energy and even information to someone through the imagination and intention.

When you think of the body as a bundle of energy in addition to it’s amazing physical capabilities, it is truly amazing.


2 Comments on The Human Body: An Energy Field Connected to Other Energy Fields, last added: 8/21/2014
Display Comments Add a Comment
2. A question of consciousness

vsi banner

By Susan Blackmore


The problem of consciousness is real, deep and confronts us any time we care to look. Ask yourself this question ‘Am I conscious now?’ and you will reply ‘Yes’. Then, I suggest, you are lured into delusion – the delusion that you are conscious all the time, even when you are not asking about it.

Now ask another question, ‘What was I conscious of a moment ago?’ This may seem like a very odd question indeed but lots of my students have grappled with it and I have spent years playing with it, both in daily life and in meditation. My conclusion? Most of the time I do not know what I was conscious of just before I asked.

Try it. Were you aware of that faint humming in the background? Were you conscious of the birdsong? Had you even noticed the loud drill in the distance that something in your brain was trying to block out? And that’s just sounds. What about the feel of your bottom on the chair? My experience is that whenever I look I find lots of what I call parallel backwards threads – sounds, touch, sights, that in some way I seem to have been listening to for some time – yet when I asked the question I had the odd sensation that I’ve only just become conscious of it.

Back in 1890 William James (one of my great heroes of consciousness studies) remarked on the sounds of a chiming clock. You notice the chiming after several strikes. At that moment you can look back and count one, two, three, four and know that now it has reached five. But it was only at four that you suddenly became conscious of the sound.

William James

What’s going on?

This, I suggest, is just one of the many curious features of our minds that lead us astray. Whenever we ask ‘Am I conscious now? we always are, so we leap to the conclusion that there must always be something ‘in my consciousness’, as though consciousness were a container. I reject this idea. Instead, I think that most of the time our brains are getting on with their amazing job of processing countless streams of information in multiple parallel threads, and none of those threads is actually ‘conscious’. Consciousness is an attribution we make after the fact. We look back and say ‘This is what I was conscious of’ and there is nothing more to consciousness than that.

Are we really so deluded? If so there are two important consequences: One spiritual and one scientific.

Many contemplative and mystical traditions claim we are living in illusion; that we need to throw off the dark glasses of the false self who seems to be in control, who seems to have consciousness and free will; that if we train our minds through meditation and mindfulness we can see through the illusion and live in clearly awareness right here and now. I am most familiar with Zen and I love such sayings as, ‘Actions exist and also their consequences but the person that acts does not’. Wow! Letting go of the person who sees, thinks, and decides is not a trivial matter and many people find it outrageous that one would even want to try. Yet it is quite possible to live without assuming that you are consciously making the decisions – that you are a persisting entity that has consciousness and free will.

From the scientific point of view, throwing off these illusions would totally transform the ‘hard problem of consciousness’. This is, as Dave Chalmers, the Australian philosopher, describes it, the question of ‘how physical processes in the brain give rise to subjective experience’. This is a modern version of the mind-body problem. Almost everyone who works on consciousness agrees that dualism does not work. There cannot be a separate spirit or soul or persisting inner self that is something other than ordinary matter. The world cannot be divided, as Descartes famously thought, into mind and matter – subjective and objective, physical material and mental thoughts. Somehow the two must ultimately be one – But how? This ‘nonduality’ is what mystical traditions have long described, but it is also the hope that science is grappling with.

And something strange is happening in the science of consciousness. The last few decades have seen fantastic progress in neuroscience. Yet paradoxically this makes the problem of consciousness worse, not better. We now know that decisions are initiated in part of the frontal lobe, actions are controlled by areas as far apart as the motor cortex, premotor cortex and cerebellum, visual information is processed in multiple parallel pathways at different speeds without ever constructing a picture-like representation that could correspond to  ‘the picture I see in front of my eyes’.  The brain manages all these amazing tasks in multiple parallel processes. So what need is there for ‘me’? And what need is there for subjective experience? So what is it and why do we have it?

Perhaps inventing an inner conscious self is a convenient way to live; perhaps it simplifies the brain’s complex task of keeping us alive; perhaps it has some evolutionary purpose. Whatever the answer, I am convinced that all our usual ideas about mind and consciousness are false. We can throw them off in the way we live our lives, and we must throw them off if our science of consciousness is ever to make progress.

Susan Blackmore is a freelance writer, lecturer and broadcaster, and a Visiting Professor at the University of Plymouth. She is the author of Consciousness: A Very Short Introduction.

The Very Short Introductions (VSI) series combines a small format with authoritative analysis and big ideas for hundreds of topic areas. Written by our expert authors, these books can change the way you think about the things that interest you and are the perfect introduction to subjects you previously knew nothing about. Grow your knowledge with OUPblog and the VSI series every Friday, subscribe to Very Short Introductions articles on the OUPblog via email or RSS, and like Very Short Introductions on Facebook.

Subscribe to the OUPblog via email or RSS.
Subscribe to only psychology articles on the OUPblog via email or RSS.
Image credit: Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

The post A question of consciousness appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on A question of consciousness as of 4/4/2014 3:53:00 AM
Add a Comment
3. 4 Suggestions to Be More Intuitive

  1. I need to recognize that with my waking mind alone I do not see, and will never see, the complete picture.  There will never be enough facts.  Life is entirely too complex to fully understand a person, an issue or an event.  That is why the Buddha said we are each like blind men touching one small part of the elephant.  What part of the elephant I feel is what gives me the definition of an elephant.  Maybe the guy touching the elephant’s side gets an idea of the huge size of the creature, but he has no clue to the column-like legs while the guy holding the tiny tail thinks the elephant is like a tiny snake. I need to ask if I am seeing the bigger picture.
  2. I need to recognize when my waking mind is on overload, hopelessly yet valiantly trying to figure it all out.  A good indicator of an overworked mind is the constant replay of scenarios or endless chatter going on in the head which can totally absorb and suck me in. It’s time to bail out, and give the brain a rest!
  3. I need to step back.  When I feeling I am getting sucked into this internal whirlpool I need to step back and try something else.  Taking a walk, just walking away from the problem or listening to music can really help give the mind a rest.  Ironically, effective and problem-solving intuitive insights often just “come” after I let the problem go and take a breather.
  4. I can explore methods that work safely and quickly for me to not only get me beyond the pull of the internal mental whirlpool but also can provide desired insights that address the need of the moment.  I can act proactively to get the results I want and not just wait for them to come.  Asian religions and the Judeo-Christian mystical traditions have long explored ways to do this.  Nowadays, non-sectarian methods have been developed based on the findings of these religious traditions. Basically these methods involve:
  • Stating or write down the situation or concern needing a resolution.
  • Invoking higher or inner wisdom to provide an answer to the situation or concern at hand. This can be done either in prayer form to a deity or inner guide, or can be done with intention to learn from higher wisdom.
  • Stilling the mind by focusing on the breath or a still point.  There are many techniques out there to do this.  Try several and use the one that works for you.  A simple and very effective method was developed by Dr. Henry Reed, Ph.D., Director of the Edgar Cayce Institute of Intuitive Studies.  It is called The Inspired Heart Meditation and can be downloaded at: http://edgarcayce-intuitionschool.org/intuitiveheart/world/Inspired Heart Meditation.pdf.
  • Relaxing the body.
  • Allowing any sensations such as images, feelings, sounds, impressions, etc. to well up.  Look for the particularly subtle impressions.
  • Observing these sensations.  No matter how bizarre or irrelevant they seem, there most likely is a connection to the problem at hand.
  • Asking what these sensations have to do with the problem posed.
  • Observing the responses that come to mind.
  • Reflecting on the associations that come to mind.
  • Forming a conclusion.
  • Lastly, but most importantly, acting on the new information received and the conclusion arrived at!

It is important to understand that this exercise is like any other; the more often it is done, the faster you can do it; and the easier and more effective it becomes.  Like riding a bike, in the beginning it may feel a bit awkward but eventually the person gets the “hang” of it.


1 Comments on 4 Suggestions to Be More Intuitive, last added: 3/3/2014
Display Comments Add a Comment
4. Luke 10: Choices of an Empathetic, Intuitive Heart

Story of Martha and Mary

Jesus With Martha and Mary — Tintoretto

Luke 10 is about preparing and sending the disciples out in the world to heal and to preach. The stories told within Luke 10 illustrate the values based choices necessary for someone called to participate in Jesus’ mission. The Parable of the Good Samaritan defines what it means to love my neighbor and the Story of Martha and Mary shows what it means to sit in the presence of divine wisdom. Both involve choices that come from an open, empathetic and intuitive heart.

Treating the Stranger as Oneself

In the Parable of the Good Samaritan, the Samaritan (who was thought to be inferior in class and moral values to the Jews) is ironically the one who treats a stranger beaten and robbed as he would want to be treated—quite unlike the priest and the Levite. The Samaritan is the one who is operating from a moral perspective which recognizes that this is a human being just like himself. Since he wouldn’t want to be left hurt and penniless by the wayside, he simply makes the choice to help the man. This is empathy in action. It shows a heart open to the needs of others.

To Do or to Be Still and Receptive: The Better Choice

The Story of Martha and Mary clearly describes the state of mind of each one of us at any given moment. One part of us is busy, running about taking care of errands, serving others and the performing the tasks of everyday life. This is the doing part of ourselves that make us feel like we have “to do” something in any situation, and often make us feel good when we have done something. The other part of us—which wants to sit quietly, patiently and attentively to hear what comes from silence— however, is often ignored and disparaged in our action-oriented society as being lazy or useless, “navel gazing” with no productive outcome. Jesus makes clear this latter choice to sit in the presence of divine wisdom is the better choice. It is a reminder to us to put aside the busyness of the day and sit in intuitive reflection, open to what comes in the silence.


0 Comments on Luke 10: Choices of an Empathetic, Intuitive Heart as of 2/28/2014 2:30:00 AM
Add a Comment
5. Friday Speak Out!: Words From A Clear Inner Voice, guest post by Irene Cohen, MD

Words From A Clear Inner Voice
by Irene Cohen, MD

In 2009 I undertook a one year course of study with two teachers who created a program called the Voice for Love. This program teaches one how to hear her clear inner voice. The program consisted of meditation, writing, speaking from this voice and learning spiritual counseling. As a psychiatrist I had been interested in the connection between mind and spiritual practices for many years and found this program illuminating.

I didn’t start out to write a book. As a long-time meditator, I prefer to sit in the early morning before the day begins. This practice has always set the course of the day for me and creates the sense of peace and concentrated focus which I bring with me no matter what occurs. Although I did not start out to write a book, I found that during my meditations, when I was quiet and empty of thoughts, words began to come to me with the prompt to write them down. So I started to meditate with my netbook in my lap, sitting on a cushion. Without asking any questions or thinking of any particular subject, messages and contemplative pieces came forth. Through a melding of my mind and my own unique abilities, something greater than myself emerged. The information I wrote down was not channeled, but it was a part of me, a greater and vast part, a larger Self. In this process, during which I am fully conscious and aware, words come forth effortlessly and in a sharper, clearer way than if I were to try to explain them myself.

When my book of 100 short meditative passages was finished, I also edited it from the place of my higher self. Getting myself out of the way, with my ego’s doubts and fears, made the editing and rewriting process much easier. If I am editing from that space of higher knowing, I can think with more clarity about what I am trying to convey and in doing so, create more of what was meant to be.

But isn’t the creative process always so? We write from another place within us which feels compelled to express itself. Artists and writers have often called it inspiration. It is a blossoming of who we truly are. If we gain clarity from a quiet mind, which for me means a regular, daily meditation practice, we can all write with less effort and more ease, knowing that what we mean to say will be distinctly in our voice.

* * *

Irene A. Cohen, MD is a psychiatrist, acupuncturist and interfaith minister who has maintained an integrative practice for almost 30 years. Hay House / Balboa Press just released her first book, Soul Journey to Love: 100 Days to Inner Peace . Visit Dr. Cohen on Facebook, follow her on Twitter, and blog with her at www.drirenecohen.authorsxpress.com.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Would you like to participate in Friday "Speak Out!"? Email your short posts (under 500 words) about women and writing to: marcia[at]wow-womenonwriting[dot]com for consideration. We look forward to hearing from you!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

0 Comments on Friday Speak Out!: Words From A Clear Inner Voice, guest post by Irene Cohen, MD as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
6. The Year That Was - 1971

Enter the psychedelic time tunnel and hang on for an inspirational and amazing story. Zen teacher Don Lubov gives us Story Ten of the One series. It is available now from Trestle Press for ONLY 99 Cents and you can get it here: http://goo.gl/JkFJs

Mark Miller's One
Story Ten
1971
by Don Lubov


100% of the author’s proceeds will be donated to Give Kids the World, a charitable organization where children with life-threatening illnesses and their families are treated to weeklong, cost-free fantasy vacations. www.GKTW.org. The authors, creator and publisher are in no other way affiliated with this organization.
Mark Miller’s One is a spiritual anthology examining True-Life experiences of Authors and their Faith. As the series evolves expect to discover what it means to have faith, no matter what that faith is and no matter where they live. Remember that we are all part of this One World.
In Story Ten, Don Lubov shares a wild and thought-provoking journey. A young man in 1971, the author left home on a cross-country journey that took him to some unexpected places. He did not know what he was looking for, but he found himself. This harrowing tale of self-discovery brought the author near to death and to a rebirth.
0 Comments on The Year That Was - 1971 as of 7/31/2012 9:48:00 AM
Add a Comment
7. Tibetan Dream Journey


Composer: Nawang Khechog
Publisher: Sounds True
Genre: Meditation
Length: 60 minutes
Price: $14.99

Website
Buy it at Amazon

After a rough period of recovery and grief from an auto accident, Nawang Khechog made the decision to take his hardships and tragedies into his spiritual path. Using his own pain as the catalyst, he has tried to alleviate the suffering of others through prayer. As a result of his spiritual growth in this area, Tibetan Dream Journey was created.

The gentle flute music is healing and soothing, bringing the listener to a meditative state. In addition to the music, one track shares chanting of the beautiful message “May all be kind to each other.” The Dalai Lama’s inspirational “Chant of Universal Compassion” is included in another track.

Khechog’s peaceful and compassionate nature is revealed to us through this beautiful music that leads us on a journey to our own spiritual center. May all who listen find happiness and harmony in their own lives.

Reviewer: Alice Berger


0 Comments on Tibetan Dream Journey as of 7/18/2012 11:34:00 AM
Add a Comment
8. A Lamp in the Darkness


Author: Jack Kornfield
Publisher: Sounds True
Genre: Meditation / Spirituality / Buddhism
ISBN: 978-1-60407-642-4
Pages: 103
Price: $19.95

Author’s website
Buy it at Amazon

Trouble is an inevitable part of being human. Although it’s tempting to simply bemoan our fate when something bad happens, it’s far more effective to accept these upsetting issues and integrate them into our whole life experience. In A Lamp in the Darkness, Jack Kornfield shares his thoughts on dealing with difficult times, in an effort to help us get through them.

Suffering can be caused by many things, and Kornfield reminds us that we already have an inner light – “The One Who Knows” – who will guide us. We may be in so much pain that we don’t feel we’re capable of compassion, forgiveness, healing, and wisdom, but these are some of the topics discussed, followed by meditations to explore these characteristics more deeply. An accompanying CD provides audio recordings of these meditations.

Difficulty doesn’t need to destroy us. We can rise above what happens, with our sense of self and peace of mind intact. A Lamp in the Darkness shows us how.

Reviewer: Alice Berger


0 Comments on A Lamp in the Darkness as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
9. Authors of One Interviews: Melissa Studdard and Scott Lutz

 Hopefully by now you have had a chance to read the latest story from the One series. For the Love of All is written by a best-selling, award-winning author along with a counselor who happens to be a talented author, as well as an outdoor enthusiast.




I want to thank Melissa and Scott for sharing such a beautiful story and taking the time to do this interview. Let’s jump into the first question:
MM: What inspired you to write this story?
Scott: A chance meeting that turned out not to be chance at all. In the summer of 2011, during a silent mediation, walking, and writing retreat in Taos, New Mexico, I met a traveler who seemed to be on a journey similar to mine. Brought together by forces beyond both of us, we discovered a connection of remarkable depth and intimacy. What followed was an intense recognition of each other that was so stark and clear, even though we had never met before – at least not in this lifetime. Almost immediately, we began to realize a series of synchronicities so profound and frequent that they were undeniable, pointing us toward relationship, collaboration in writing, and united purpose in matters close to our hearts.
0 Comments on Authors of One Interviews: Melissa Studdard and Scott Lutz as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
10. Afterglow: Life With No-TV

by tatiana de la tierra

It’s a big gray lump in the living room, a has-been that now attracts dust and random clutter—CDs, pens, cinnamon gum, a magnifying lens, a red dragon, notebooks, DVDs, coins, colorful glass figurines, a purse, a salt lamp, a silver bracelet. My very own eyesore. Gone are the days that I worshipped its light into the night. How midnight quickly became three in the morning. How my pulse raced with suspense. How I yelled, outraged. How I got hooked on predictable stories, sappy sentiments, and bimbos. How I attempted to multi-task, working and watching, eventually dropping the “working” part.

How I swore, every time I got the cable bill, This is the last time! No longer will I pay an insane amount of money to submit my subconscious to psychic and mental pollution! How I fantasized giving Charter the finger. How I would chop, chop, cut, cut.

I thought about it seriously for three years, replaying the chop-chop-cut-cut fantasy every month. I thought about all the money I’d save. All the time I’d have to write. All those hikes I was going to do. How I’d make up for all the lost time. How I would sleep a good eight hours each night. How I’d be cooking soups and baking cakes from scratch. How I’d hang out with friends. How I’d go out to poetry readings, live performances, art movies. How I’d read all those novels on my bookshelves. Maybe I’d take up water coloring or spin clay bowls with my hands. Go horseback riding. Who knows. Anything is possible, right?

A writer I know ditched TV. I wrote to her on Facebook and asked her the big question: Is there life after no-TV? Yes! She raved about the 600-page novel she edited and whittled down to 470 pages with no-TV. The article she wrote for publication. The talk she gave at a conference, the workshop she did at a library, on and on. All of this during one month of no-TV.

The TV was her surrogate soul mate. She had several sets on at the same time, so she wouldn’t miss anything as she went from room to room. She sped home to catch her shows. She fell asleep under its glow. And now that she was healed with no-TV, she was rediscovering her soul. Words were pouring out of her. She became attentive to bird song and sunshine. She joined humankind again and became a social butterfly. She even got a little TV in with friends, for special occasions—the Super Bowl, the Oscars, some great flick.

Clearly, her TV grip was even stronger than mine. If she could do it, I could do it. She recommended a 21-day TV fast, to start.

I thought about it for another year. In that time, my no-TV fantasy grew. I would write a novel! Learn how to play the harmonica! I would compost and become an urban farmer! I’d write songs and record a CD! I’d volunteer for hospice care, take in a few foster kids, become a shaman, help save Mother Earth!

Two months ago, I called Charter and did the chop-chop-cut-cut.

Television, my perverse meditation, how I miss you.

Forgive me the cliché, but life hasn’t been the same without you. None of my gr

4 Comments on Afterglow: Life With No-TV, last added: 3/28/2011
Display Comments Add a Comment
11. Write from the bottom of my tummy tum tum...

I was supposed to workout last night - undoubtedly a great way to clear ones head to get ready for some writing time. Yet, alas...instead I went out to partake in some extremely unhealthy eating. And you know how it is when you eat fast food, it's like swallowing a lead weight and makes breathing seem like a chore. So, feeling sleepy and bloated, I decided to try meditation as a means to prepare to write.

Sitting cross-legged, eyes closed, breathing deeply...yes...this is exactly what I needed to relax...except...who knew a stomach could make that much noise! Clearly, I did not consume a burger, but rather a small creature intent on extricating himself from my belly. Ugh!

A handful of Tums and about 20 minutes later, I finally got down to writing. I think I could get use to this again!

Thinking about the kind of books I like to write, I decided that tonight, I would get into the mind of one of my would-be evil characters for the next 12 minutes and I came up with the following:

Rain tap tap tapped like skeletal fingers on the window pane. Embers buried beneath dark soot, gasped for air within the craggy hearth. Darkness consumed everything in the room, even the man that stood in its depths. A heart beat, the tempo slow and even. Fear, harvested with each breath the man takes, fills the air with a putrid stench. Sanity has but a tenuous grip...and it is faltering. Wave after toxic wave of animosity burns from deeply hollow eyes, scalding its way down to that place where a soul should live. He fears no evil. And yet...evil fears him.

I realized after this exercise that there was some real hope of firming up my flabby brain muscles, and all I could think of was...I wanna do it again!

Okie doke -- it's go time! Fourteen minutes of writing.

0 Comments on Write from the bottom of my tummy tum tum... as of 2/4/2011 10:14:00 AM
Add a Comment
12. Illustration Friday: Savour


Good thoughts in,
Bad thoughts out.
Deep breath in,
exhale slowly.

Savour the peace within.


patterned paper, acrylic paint, colored pencil

28 Comments on Illustration Friday: Savour, last added: 11/30/2010
Display Comments Add a Comment
13. Illustration Friday: Spent

~meditation~
~prayer~
~quiet time in nature~
~finding solace amidst chaos~
~painting and writing~
~being kind~

This, to me, is time well spent.

acrylic on canvas, molding paste, gold foil

24 Comments on Illustration Friday: Spent, last added: 11/3/2010
Display Comments Add a Comment
14. Before Jumping Into the Pool

Lately, I’ve taken to walking before sitting down to work each morning.It’s a slow, meditative walk that lets me immerse myself in my story rather than in the neighborhood (and neighbors) around me.With each step, I try to envision my characters in certain situations so that I can sit down at my desk when I return home with a clear picture in my head of the scenes that may unfold during the hours

0 Comments on Before Jumping Into the Pool as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
15. Animal Wednesday: A Day Early

"It's as if you were guided by some greater power and knew just what was needed."

I got this wonderful card in the mail today and it immediately trumped the post I was going to do for Animal Wednesday. The polo pictures will have to wait until next week.
This guy won my heart!
I'm fasting today and will be out of commission for most of tomorrow.
Meanwhile, enjoy this blissful feline :)
This one's for you Annie & Spike

15 Comments on Animal Wednesday: A Day Early, last added: 7/2/2010
Display Comments Add a Comment
16. Animal Yoga

Ever wondered why some creatures appear to be truly ‘at one’ with themselves and their environment?   Yoga has become so popular, it has even extended to the realm of animals.  These pics show the practice of yoga to indeed be universal.

Image source

Just a little warm up.  One leg at a time.  Of course, some creatures have more legs to warm up than others.  A spot of leaf-top leg-bend yoga has become a popular way for these fellas to kick off their mornings before a busy day doing, er… beetley things.

Image source

A candid shot taken at a mid-morning flamingo yoga class.  Now, all together, the “tree” pose.  Hold… and breathe….  Hey, you at the back.  I said “tree” not “teapot”.

Image source
This dragonfly is carrying out a lovely elbow balance known in human yoga as the “feathered peacock pose”.  A true yogi.  Note the focus and stillness required to successfully perform this pose.  Years of practice.  Only a master could achieve this.

Image source
Nice to see a squirrel having a good shot at the “plough” pose  Either that or he’s trying to let loose a little trapped wind.  …. Or he’s dead.

Image source
Yes, it is ultra-sandy.  Oh you said “ustra-sana” - my mistake.  Yes, that’s yoga-ese for “camel” pose.   Although, the camel is refusing to join in  -  he’s got the hump.  (Any other hump jokes - please keep to yourselves)

Image source
Some animals have become so proficient at meditation, they have evolved a middle eye.  This frog now sees only with his third eye, having lost the use of the first two.

Image source

And finally, a beautiful photo captured during  this iguana’s early evening ’sun salutation’ sequence.  Let the photo speak for itself.  Namaste.  (That means “I respect the god within you that is also within me”  or words to that effect.  Yoga people say this a lot)

Add a Comment
17. The Bearable Lightness of Being

In Being Bodies, Lenore Friedman and Susan Moon offer the perspectives of a variety of women with varying Buddhist practices. The result is a contemplative and compelling work dealing with what it means to be female, what it means to fully and consciously inhabit the female body.

The last wave of the Western women’s movement critiqued the idea that a women was her body. In fact, a major focus of that movement was the position that biology was not destiny. This was primarily a response to the social construction of women’s identity, the objectification of a women as nothing more than physical self. However, there was little offered to support women in learning to fully live in that physicality, to know it as both vessel and endpoint.
Being Bodies offers a view that a woman’s self-knowledge is rooted in the flesh. Women’s awareness is based in surrendering to the body’s impermanence, its joy, its suffering, and its death. One of the most thought-provoking essays is Linda Chrisman’s "Birth".

In it, she describes the process of labor, and giving birth to her son. What's striking about this experience was how Chrisman was both deeply enmeshed in that process and separate from it. The most telling lesson, for both Chrisman and the reader, occurred at the height of labor. Here she realizes that all her physical conditioning, all her contemplative practice would not save her from pain. This selection beautifully illustrates the message of
Being Bodies. There may be another path for women, rooted in surrender to the fullness and limits of the body. Through that choice, a woman may find self-knowledge and ultimately, freedom. While the focus of Being Bodies is the female experience, it is a universal and object lesson about Buddhist ideas of impermanence, and becoming fully present in every moment by letting go. I was moved to tears reading this book. It reminds me that true beauty is the sum of both pleasing things as well the scars.

I feel such a strong, visceral connection to the stories of the women profiled in this anthology. (Interesting that "visceral" is the only word that comes to mind in reviewing a book dealing with the experience of being grounded in the body and the odyssey of transcendence.)
This book is a pivotal one as I try to develop a deeper spiritual practice - moving East in order to come West, hoping to re-encounter and reinterpret my own ideas of embodiment, spirituality and existence.

ISBN-10: 1570623244
ISBN-13: 978-157062324


XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

Acentos and AWP Conference News

On Tuesday, January 29th at 7pm, we break from our normal schedule to bring you ACENTOS on a FIFTH TUESDAY, in conjunction with the Bay Area's own Craig Perez and Achiote Press.

The featured poets that night will be two amazing young writers:

Marina Garcia-Vasquez
, acontributor to the press' ACHIOTE SEEDS, Volume 2, and Javier O. Huerta, author of the acclaimed debut collection, SOME CLARIFICATIONS Y OTROS POEMAS. As always, the Uptown's best open mic will precede the festivities, and your host will be John Rodriguez.

On Thursday, January 31st at 6pm, the Con Tinta collective presents its annual awards dinner and reading.

Lifetime achievement awards are to be presented to Nuyorican writers
Sandra Maria Esteves and Tato Laviera. The dinner will take place at Mojitos', located at 227 E. 116th Street, between 2nd and 3rd Avenue. The reading will be held in conjunction with PALABRA, a journal of Chicano and Latino literary arts. Your hosts for the evening will be Urayoan Noel and Rich Villar.

Finally, on Friday, February 1st at 6:30pm, El Centro de Estudios Puertorriqueños presents ACENTOS: A Gathering of Latino and Latina Poets. The event is slated to take place at the School of Social Work at Hunter College, 129 E. 79th Street, at the corner of 79th and Lexington. A lineup of more than 20 emerging and nationally recognized Latino and Latina poets are set to take the stage, including Martin Espada, Sandra Maria Esteves, Brenda Cardenas, Aracelis Girmay, Willie Perdomo, and many more.

It's going to be a busy January for your crew at Acentos, and we wouldn't have it any other way. Keep an eye on this list for further updates, news, features and even more poetry events for the '08, as well as information about our fifth anniversary show in March.

Details for all our January events are listed below. See you all there!

Peaces,
Rich Villar
for the Acentos crew.

Tuesday, January 29th @ 7pm
ACENTOS Bronx Poetry Showcase A reading in collaboration with Achiote Press featuring JAVIER O. HUERTA and MARINA GARCIA-VASQUEZ plus the Uptown's Best Open Mic

The Bruckner Bar and Grill
One Bruckner Blvd. (corner of Third Ave. and Bruckner Blvd.) 6 Train to 138th Street Station Hosted by John Rodriguez FREE! ($5 suggested donation) Thursday, January 31st @ 6pm Con Tinta's Annual Award Ceremony and Reading Honoring the work of Nuyorican poets SANDRA MARIA ESTEVES and TATO LAVIERA Mojitos' Bar 227 E. 116th Street (between 2nd and 3rd Ave.) 6 Train to 116th Street Station Hosted by Urayoan Noel, Rich Villar, and the Con Tinta collective FREE and open to the public.

Friday, February 1st @ 6:30pm ACENTOS: A Gathering and Celebration of Latino and Latina Poets Presented by El Centro de Estudios Puertorriqueñ os at Hunter College and Acentos Bronx Poetry Showcase

Featuring over twenty emerging and nationally recognized Latino and Latina poets
The School of Social Work @ Hunter College 129 E. 79th Street (corner of 79th and Lexington) 6 Train to 77th Street Station, two blocks north to 79th and Lex. FREE and open to the public.

Acentos: The Bronx's Premiere Spot for Poetry
http://www.louderarts.com/acentos

"Acentos is one of the best audiences, one of the best venues, I've ever seen. The organizers do a great job, not only in terms of spreading the word, but also in terms of creating anticipation. I feel like I'm part of a community, part of a movement. Aquí estamos y no nos vamos." Martín Espada



XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

GREAT TEATRO LUNA NEWS!





CURRENTLY PLAYING:
MACHOS



After a sold out run at Chicago Dramatists, MACHOS is moving to the 16th Street Theater in Berwyn, IL, conveniently located near the CTA/Blue Line Austin stop.

Tickets are already on sale, and I hope you will help spread the word!


Here's the scoop:

MACHOS
At 16th Street Theater 4 weeks only! January 25 through – February 17, 2008

Fridays at 7:30 PM Saturdays at 5:00 PM Saturdays at 8:00 PM Sundays at 6:00 PM

BUY TICKETS ONLINE
at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/25539


Lisa Alvarado

0 Comments on The Bearable Lightness of Being as of 1/24/2008 7:59:00 AM
Add a Comment
18. Seeking Inner Peace Through Picture Books


I have never meditated for more than five minutes, tops, and then only because I was in a yoga or martial arts class that required that I sit there and not get up and walk away, so I figured I might as well try. Nonetheless, I think meditation is probably a very good thing. It's one of those activities that I plan to get into someday.

So I was attracted to Peaceful Piggy Meditation by Kerry Lee MacLean when I stumbled upon it at my local library. (Not yours R.F.).

For someone like myself, whose meditation skill is on the level of a preschooler's, this seemed a good introduction to why a person might want to meditate and how to begin.

I kept getting distracted, though, because the pigs were naked. Distraction isn't great for meditation. Of course, I didn't beat myself up for it. I just called my mind back to the book.

Though this book was published back in 2004, I found it on the New Book Shelf in the children's area. That was a very encouraging sight for a writer. I often get the impression that my books are toast as soon as the following season's book catalogue comes out. It was good to see a three-year-old book still selling.

1 Comments on Seeking Inner Peace Through Picture Books, last added: 4/7/2007
Display Comments Add a Comment
19. Mental (In) Stability

How would you describe your mental health? As an underworked author and an overworked publisher, I would say my mental health is sketchy at best. LOL I find myself scouring other author's web sites to see what they are doing and what I might mimic to propel myself to the top of ANY best seller list. I scour other publisher's sites to do the same. I am always looking for some germ of a clue to the "big secret." Who am I kidding?

My mother used to tell me that there would come a day when I realized I did NOT know everything. Thanks, Mom. (note the sarcastic tilt of my font) You were so right. Hope your happy. LOL

Well, I may not know everything, but I am sure as shootin' willin' to try. I have taken a new approach to my hours of scouring. I am no longer looking for ways to mimic, I do still sour, but I constantly remind myself that it is all part of my education. What does this have to do with mental stability? Oh, plenty!

I talk to so many authors and the majority of them are seriously seeking the quick fix to fame and fortune with their book(s). Come on people, there are no quick fixes. It's a lot of hard work and grueling hours of research, both for the material you write and for the business you strive to be an active participant in. Nothing is easy. Was it easy when you first learned to walk? Heck no. Like the rest of us, you probably fell down a lot. Riding a bike? Roller skating? Dating? Don't even get me started. We had to go through hours of grueling activities to become even remotely good at these and so many other things.

So why would you torture yourself with the myth that writing is easy and that just because you write a book, and a few people say it's a good read, that you will become an instant success and wildly rich. Let's ask Nora Roberts how long it took her to reach her level of comfort within the industry. Or even the wildly popular Christopher Paolini who fought his way in kicking and selling. No one did it for him, he worked his young little butt off and probably spent more than one night wishing he was old enough to drink. But he had an awesome support system and he had DETERMINATION!

Back to mental health. It is crucial to your success. Don't make the mistake of thinking this is easy and that it will be all fun. The more you want, the harder you must work. The more you succeed, the more people will talk about you, and it won't always be nice. But I can tell you that there is no greater joy than to look within yourself and find satisfaction and to know that you have done your very best.

Do whatever is necessary to keep your mind at peace, your body in good shape, and your entire being in balance. Meditate (it really isn't all that freaky), exercise, and eat healthy. It is the best defense against mental instability. I never thought I would say this, but my most productive days are begun with a 30 minute workout at Curves, a small, but healthy breakfast, and some quiet reflection on what I will accomplish during the rest of the day.

Do you have any special routines or rituals that you do faithfully to ensure you stay happy and healthy? What role does this play in your writing?

0 Comments on Mental (In) Stability as of 1/1/1970
Add a Comment