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Results 26 - 50 of 657,252
26. A gentle reminder

You can buy my books at: http://mattiasadolfsson.tictail.com/ ships almost everywhere...

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27. Face-Lift 1316


Guess the Plot

Some Kind of Eternal

1. Mira is an immortal. She will live forever, as long as she doesn't get killed, contract an illness, or grow old. She travels to the Eternal City in order to escape an age-old curse; otherwise she will die. 

2. A 450-year-old vampire longs to leave Earth and become a god, but to do so he needs a bottle of special blood that is also being sought by Freemasons, Russian billionaires, and a Mayan king's ghost, at least one of whom wants the blood . . . to destroy humanity!

3. When Ninet promised Ramses her eternal love, she didn't mean being mummified alive after he died of the plague. He, unfortunately, did. Now she must escape across the eternally shifting sands with a camel and a cute waterboy (girl). Also, scarabs.

4. New nurse Javad Shah can't understand why Mr. "Bats" Linstall and Mr. "Superman" Chen are tampering with each other's wheelchair brakes and tossing nutrisweet packs at breakfast. As Javad talks to the other residents, he uncovers an old baseball feud that has the entire town in its grip.

5. It's a story as old as the hills, but instead of summarizing the plot I'm just gonna list the characters and their occupations. If you want to know what happens, let me know.

6. Lost in the Okefenokee Swamp, Trent stumbles upon the legendary Fountain of Youth. Now that he has an eternity to do so, he's sure to find his way back to civilization eventually. But can he do so before the alligators get him?



Original Version

Dear Mr. Evil Editor:

Oliver, a 450-year-old vampire, longs to leave Earth and become a god with no need for human blood, while Hugh wishes he could remember his hedonistic past. [You toss out the name Hugh as if we already know who he is. You need to add "Oliver's fellow vampire" or "Oliver's immortal servant," or "really old amnesiac."] Who was the beautiful woman who gave him his ruby necklace over two centuries ago? [If only I could remember who she was so I could finally send her a thank-you card.] [Usually when there are two main characters who are allies, they're working toward the same goal. Becoming a god and remembering who gave him his necklace aren't of the same order of magnitude. It would be like Superman and Batman teaming up because one of them wants to save humanity and the other wants to find his missing sock.]

Together Oliver and Hugh journey deep underground to fight the ghost of a Mayan king, Russian billionaires, ancient vampires, and 33rd degree Freemasons looking for the same bottle of powerful blood. [Putting all that together in a list makes it feel like the book is a comedy. I'd drop the ghost, even if the ghost is the one who wants to destroy humanity. And we don't need to know the freemasons' degree.] [I suspect Oliver and Hugh didn't go underground to fight all these people, as you claim, but because the bottle of blood is there. If so, you can say "racing against" instead of "to fight."]  Each wants the blood for a unique and evil purpose, the worst being the destruction of humanity. [You're only calling that the worst because you're a human.]

Oliver and Hugh vow to find the blood to spare humanity, and transform into gods, [So, Hugh wants to be a god too. Perhaps that should be mentioned earlier instead of telling us he wants to know where he got his necklace.] but saving the lives of the women they love could get in the way. [Who are the women they love? Are they human? If Hugh's necklace woman was  human, it's too late to send her that thank-you card. Why are the women's lives in danger? Are the guys planning to take the women with them when they leave Earth?]


SOME KIND OF ETERNAL is a 73,000-word paranormal novel. The glamorous life of a real German prince I knew a few years ago, [As opposed to a fictional German prince you knew.] Oliver von Anhalt, inspired this book. [Was he a vampire?] The poetry of Lord Byron, Edgar Allan Poe, and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, as well as works of gothic literature from Ann Radcliffe to Elizabeth Kostova have greatly influenced me.

Thank you for your time and consideration,



--The title was inspired by a Sisters of Mercy song, Some Kind of Stranger, which makes me imagine a lonely vampire trying to make friends. I am not that attached to the title and don't mind changing it if asked to do so by a future editor (hopefully).-- [Ninety-nine percent of those told your title was inspired by a song will assume the song is "Some Kind of Wonderful," by Grand Funk Railroad.]



Notes

We can do without the necklace, as it's importance to Hugh isn't made clear. 

There's space enough in a query to provide more than five sentences of plot. And if you're low on space, feel free to cut the list of your favorite poets. 

Vampires Oliver and Hugh long to leave Earth and transform into gods; to do so they must drink the blood of Lilith, hidden deep underground centuries ago. But they aren't the only ones after the legendary phial of blood. Other vampires, Freemasons and Russian billionaires are racing to find the powerful elixir, all for their own evil purposes.

That's your setup, and leaves plenty of room to tell us what the plan is, what goes wrong, what will happen if the guys fail, how their girlfriends figure in...

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28. Author Chat with Beth Vrabel, Camp Dork (Pack of Dorks #2), plus Giveaway!

Today on the YABC blog we are happy to sit down with author Beth Vrabel and talk with her about her upcoming release, Camp Dork, which released on shelves on May 3rd, 2016.   YABC: What surprised you most while writing your latest book? I was surprised how much fun I had going back to...

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29. Letters in the Sand

Imagine how overjoyed I was to see my books being recommended on the Letters in the Sand website created by Caitlin, who is a mother of two and has experience as an educator in both public and private schools, as well as the being a home-schooling parent and teaching in community educational playgroups.




These particular books were written for QED Publishing and are illustrated by Sue Hendra. They were designed to help children to distinguish between different shapes. The emphasis is on making learning fun. In the book s I use the environment to reinforce what the reader sees to help them recognise shapes by using familiar, everyday objects in the world around them.





In the United States it is possible to buy all four books in one volume, entitled Shapes Around Me and published by Scholastic.

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30. My Q&A with Faith Ringgold

“I do love the creativity and energy of children. My foundation, the Anyone Can Fly Foundation, is devoted to teaching children about the African American artists that have been left out of the historical canon.” * * * Over at Kirkus today, I talk to author-illustrator Faith Ringgold, pictured here. Tar Beach, her first picture […]

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31. Jeanie Loiacono to speak at OWL August 2016 Conference

Jeanie Loiacono to speak at OWL August 2016 Conference
http://www.loiaconoliteraryagency.com/jeanie-loiacono-to-sp

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32. Harts Pass No. 300!!!!!!!!


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33. Drawings from "Moses" a Children's Story

Characters I drew for a children's story so many years ago and it is filed, with all the other stories I have written over the years. The yellowing of my drawing pad.  (c) by Mary Nida Smith

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34. Spanish Edition of I.R. Coming


Here's something in the works for a July release — a Spanish edition of Imaginative Realism.
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Previously: Luz y Color, "Color and Light" in Spanish

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35. X-Men: Apocalypse

I promise, at some point I'll go back to writing about things that aren't superheroes.  Though that would require Hollywood to stop blasting superhero stories at us in such close succession (I haven't even written anything about the second season of Daredevil, though you can get a sense of the existential despair it plunged me into from the thread starting at this tweet).  Coming at the end of

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36. Rain, Hula-Hoops, Music, Muffins and Mud...


John and I bought a new tent recently, and a little one-ring stove. We were getting ready for last weekend. Like half the residents of Nether Edge, we were all excited, because our favourite music venue, Café #9, had decided to put on a mini music festival!


It was very do-it-yourself: Jonny hired a field, a generator, a couple of portaloos and some hay bales, bought a big star-shaped marque, then divvied up the cost between about 40 participants and everyone else mucked in to make it happen. Various people offered their different skills and we had a bunting-making evening at the café. 

On the Friday afternoon, John and I helped to get things set up.


The sun was shining and the reservoir was glinting behind tall pine trees. Jonny's wife India unpacked buckets of beautiful things and turned our little encampment into a colourful paradise of flowers and lights, pom-poms and cushions. The stage was set!


The music was mainly in the evenings, but people had offered to run different activities during the day. John organised a Saturday morning walk. I offered a sketching session for Saturday afternoon. Unfortunately the rain put paid to most of that... Yes, there was rain. Then more rain.


At least we got our tent up before it hit. By Friday night though, it was pouring down and those coming after work weren't so lucky.


It poured and poured. India's paper stars dissolved. The wind blew the rain in and her cushions and throws wicked up water. It put out the fires. The rain might have dampened everything in sight, but it didn't dampen our spirits. Oh no. We Nether-Edgers are a tough lot.


We huddled under our marquee and ate and drank and chatted and sang. People played guitars, someone brought out a mandolin. Someone arrived with home-baked cheese muffins. someone else brought out a wind-up gramophone and a pile of old 78 records:


In moments when the deluge slowed to a drizzle, kids ran around and people hula-hooped:


Somehow the time became half past two in the morning and we dashed back through the rain to our tents.


Next day started dry, so John's walk went ahead. It was great to see where we actually were. We walked up onto the moors and around the reservoir. We were out for two and a half hours and only got rained on once. It was saving itself...


Yep. Saturday afternoon and evening were EVEN WETTER! Was this possible? John described it best: the rain was biblical. The thing was, even though we couldn't do all the dancing, painting, yoga and star-gazing we had planned, the weather almost did us a favour. Because we spent the whole time together in the marquee, sitting on our hay bales, we really got to know each other and I made so many new friends.


Then in the evening, when the bands arrived the wonderful music totally eclipsed the rain. The main act were the fabulous Goat Ropers Rodeo Band, all the way from Rhyl. Fantastic.


As you can see, I did plenty of painting, though it got tricky as it got dark and we were operating with decorative lights alone.


Some time around midnight the rain stopped. Dan, who had set up a cocktail bar from the back of his van, brought out a record player and a massive pile of LPs. We danced in the mud, in wellies and walking boots, cocktails in hand, to hits from the 70 and 80s mostly. The best boogie I've had in a long while. Numbers dwindled gradually. At half three, John and I gave it up, but apparently the last few stopped up until 5.30!


Sunday was glorious. While those who had to get home packed up their stuff,  we put on the kettle for constant tea and a small encampment of 'morning-afters' lounged around our tent.


There was some guitar playing, a bit more hula-hooping, but mostly we just wanted to chill. The Café #9 bus served coffees.


A bass player was discovered asleep under a hay bale. 


And then it was time to pack up ourselves. The stragglers mucked in to help clear up and ferry things back into Jonny's van and we said our final goodbyes. not that final though - Jonny is already planning another one for mid summer!


Thanks to various people for taking such great photos, especially Charlie Osguthorpe. And of course thanks to Jonny, for such a brilliant idea and having the energy to make it happen.

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37. Video Portrait of Hong Kong


(Via BoingBoing) There's some interesting camera work and sound design in this portrait of Hong Kong by filmmaker Brandon Li.
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If you like this, you'll also like his other film "Tokyo Roar," set against the poem by A.D. Hope.

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38. When When You Were Small Was Small

Is it possible that When You Were Small was published a decade ago? Sometimes it feels like it was just last week. Sometimes it feels like it was a century ago.


In the time since the book was published some very lovely things have happened. It has won a few prizes and gone a few places. It still makes me happy to think of the time the Mexican Ministry of Education printed 60,000 copies to give away to primary students. There have been two more Henry books since that first one and I've got a site that rounds up reviews and such if anyone's interested.

Part of the success of this book (and its fellows) is due to the brilliant book designer, Robin Mitchell Cranfield. Along with Dimiter Savoff, publisher of Simply Read Books, she came up with such a beautiful, stripped-down, timeless aesthetic for the book. I couldn't love it any more than I do.

photo: Summer Hall/Appyreading

My great hope is to go on making books with Julie Morstad. There are many, many reasons for this but the best one, for me, is that we find the same things funny. And in that vein, is this wonderful photo I came across on Instagram a little while ago. It was posted by Summer Hall of Appyreading and she's given me permission to share it here.

When You Were Small is being released in paperback this month (I'll have more on that soon) and is available for pre-order now.

Here are a few places you can find the book. I'll be adding in more and if you have suggestions please feel free to comment. I'm always happy to learn about independent booksellers that are new to me.

Indigo  Indiebound  Amazon.com   Amazon.ca  Amazon.uk   WH Smith  Powell's Barnes & Noble



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39. Honoring Memorial Day with LEE & LOW BOOKS

Memorial Day weekend is upon us and we can’t think of a better way to remember and celebrate than with some of our award-winning books!

Teachers- Looking for a way to talk to your students about war this Memorial Day?

Parents- Trying to make your kids understand the importance of remembering those who gave their lives for our country?

We have some great titles that will get your kids interested and help them understand the great sacrifices made by our men and women at arms, what really makes someone a hero, and the impact of war on a level they can relate to.

Heroes by Ken Mochizuki, illustrated by Dom Lee

Set during the ’60s with the Vietnam war going on and World War II popular in the media, Japanese American Donnie Okada always has to be the “bad guy” when he and his friends play war because he looks like the enemy portrayed in the media. When he finally has had enough, Donnie enlists the aid of his 442nd veteran father and Korean War veteran uncle to prove to his friends and schoolmates that those of Asian descent did serve in the U.S. military.

Check out the Teacher’s Guide for additional discussion ideas! Purchase the book here.

Quiet Hero: The Ira Hayes Story written and illustrated by S.D. Nelson

A biography of Ira Hayes, a Pima Indian who was one of the six soldiers to raise the United States flag on Iwo Jima during World War II, an event immortalized by Joe Rosenthal’s Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph.

Don’t miss out on the interview with S.D. Nelson, or the accompanying Teacher’s Guide. Purchase the book here.

When the Horses Ride By: Children in the Times of War by Eloise Greenfield, illustrated by Jan Spivey Gilchrist

Through rhythmic words, photos, and original art, this collection of poems about children throughout history focuses on their perceptions of war and how war affects their lives. A great way to introduce the topic of war into discussion with your children and the ramifications they may not have considered.

For some insight from the author, take a look at this interview with Eloise Greenfield. Purchase the book here.

Be sure to leave comments below on how discussions about war went in your classroom or with your own children; we’d love to hear from you!

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40. Honoring Memorial Day

Holidays, Festivals and Celebrations: Memorial Day

By Trudi Strain Trueit; illustrated by Ronnie Rooney

 

In searching out picture books for Memorial Day, I try to find those that both give a historical background of the day, how it morphed from Decoration Day, following the Civil War to around 1890, when it became known as Memorial Day.

I try to find picture books that spotlight all the components and elements of time honored traditions, celebrations, speeches, places, symbols, and even poetry and songs, that are an integral part of the Memorial Day tribute to those that sacrificed  their lives for our freedoms.

Trudi Strain Trueit has put together a picture book that, I think, collects all these elements for picture book readers’ understanding of Memorial Day. And Ronnie Rooney’s art perfectly complements the narrative, portraying the historical progression of this traditional American holiday.

Though there were some things that I knew of concerning its origins and observations, there were others that were both informative and humbling, when looked at thought the prism of time, which is the true leveler and test of what is enduring in a culture.

There is a quiet question that lingers as you shut the pages of this book. And it is this. What is it that we want our children and future generations to glean from the marking of Memorial Day?

Is it the start of the summer season? Is it barbecues and family gatherings? Is it the word Memorial Day Sale, writ large at malls across America? Or is it something more than all of these put together, though they indeed each have their place in the celebration?

I suppose in some sense, I want to say they are not, and shouldn’t be, the defining reason for the marking of Memorial Day.

In this small, simple, eight chapter book, parents will find a delightful and densely packed picture book with information that will help their child understand the meaning and morphing of Memorial Day, both as it stands today…and how it evolved. A memorial, as the book states is “a lasting tribute.”

 

                It helps us to remember

                an important person, group

                or event.

 

They will learn that the day was created, and initially called Decoration Day, where, during the Civil War between the North and South, families found themselves on opposite sides in the war. Father fought against son, and even brother against brother. “In these sad times women in the South began decorating the graves of southern Confederate soldiers with flowers. They decorated the graves of northern Union soldiers, too.”

By 1865 the Civil War ends, with some 600,000 soldiers killed in a war fought on both economic and slavery issues.

1868 finds Union General John Alexander Logan declaring that each May 30th will be a day to remember those who died in the Civil War.

And the first national day of celebration is, as I said, initially termed Decoration Day, and was held at Arlington National Cemetery; a military cemetery in Virginia.

Young readers will hear of Moina Michaels and her desire, following WWl, after hearing the John McCrae poem, “In Flanders Fields,” a determination to make and wear a silk poppy as a symbol for fallen soldiers. It was later expanded to honor all soldiers in the armed forces who died in wartime, and this small idea and enterprise of poppy making and sales has generated over $200 million for veterans groups in the United States and England.

In 1948 she was honored with a stamp by the United States Postal Service.

From the explanation of the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington, to the year 2000’s Congressional creation of a National Moment of Remembrance at 3P.M. on Memorial Day, when all Americans are asked to pause and remember the “nation’s fallen soldiers,” this remembrance continues through both time, and generations of Americans, young and not so young.

Young readers will learn the meaning of the color concept surrounding the American flag, figured so prominently in parades and on porches that day.

Did you know that it is a tradition to lower the American flag to half staff until noon on Memorial Day, as a sign of respect? Here are what the flag’s colors symbolize:

 

 

    White stands for purity and innocence

 

     Red stands for valor and hardiness.

 

     Blue stands for vigilance, perseverance

     and justice.

 

 

Sidebars on each page of this picture book are filled with quotes from presidents including Lincoln, Reagan, Clinton and George W. Bush, as well as historical figures quoted from General Robert E. Lee, General John A. Logan, and Nathan Hale.

Young readers can read about “Joining in the Spirit of Memorial Day” at the close of the book, suggesting some seven ways to participate in the day, and honor those, including their own relatives, who may have died in the line of duty.

I guess my favorite part is the last chapter; the poems and songs that evoke the essence of Memorial Day. Some I knew,  some I had forgotten or never knew in their completeness.

But “Taps,” with words in their entirety, is featured in the “Song” portion. Played by a single trumpet as the traditional music played at funerals of fallen soldiers, it’s  pureness and poignancy in sound and symbol is what Memorial Day is about.

And here are the words:

 

Taps

 

Fading light dims the sight,

And a star gems the sky, gleaming bright.

From afar drawing nigh comes the night.

Day is done, gone the sun.

From the lakes, from the hills, from the sky.

All is well, safely rest, God is nigh.

 

words and music by Major

General Daniel Butterfield (1831-1901)

 

 

 

*Here is “Taps,” played at Arlington National Cemetery, both in summer, and in a driving snow storm.

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41. Rachel Havrelock on the Sykes-Picot Agreement for Foreign Affairs

9780226319575

 

The Sykes-Picot Agreement, ratified on May 16, 1916, was a concord developed in secret between France and the UK, with acknowledgement of the Russian Empire, that allocated control and influence over much of Southwestern Asia, carving up and establishing much of today’s Middle East, along with Western and Arab sociopolitical tensions. The real reason for the divide? The region’s petroleum fields, and the desire to share in its reserves, but not its pipelines. Rachel Havrelock’s book River JordanThe Mythology of a Dividing Line considers the implications of yet another border in the region, the river that defines the edge of the Promised Land in the Hebrew Bible—an integral parcel of land for both the Israeli and Palestinian states. With her expertise in the ideologies that undermine much cartography of the region (her book includes a map of the Sykes-Picot Agreement’s splitting of territories), Havrelock understands how the demarcation of influence was central to the production of very specific oil-producing nation states.

In a recent piece for Foreign Affairs, appearing a century after the Sykes-Picot Agreement, Havrelock writes about the potential for the region to remake itself, in the self-image of its peoples and their local resources:

The dissolution of oil concessions could hold the key to this transformation. Consider the Kurdish case. Following the Second Gulf War, private oil companies flocked to Iraq. Iraq’s national oil company reserved the right to pump existing wells with partners of its choosing, but local bodies such as the Kurdistan Regional Government were allowed to explore new wells and forge their own partnerships—a boon to the Kurdish economy.

Kurdish oil shares made all the difference when ISIS emerged in 2014. The largely effective Kurdish Peshmerga fight against ISIS owes to Kurds’ desire to protect not just their homeland but also the resources within it. Kurds harbor longstanding desires for autonomy, but their jurisdiction over local oil is a form of sovereignty—over resources rather than territory—that models a truly post‑Sykes–Picot Middle East. Because Sykes–Picot divided territory in the name of extracting and transporting oil to Europe, reforming the ownership of oil is the first step in dissolving the legacy of colonial administration and authoritarian rule.

Ideally, people across the Middle East should hold shares in local resources and have a say in their sale, use, and conservation. In an age of increased migration, this principle could help people inhabit new places with a sense of belonging and stewardship. Of course, local officials will still need to partner with global firms to drill, refine, and export oil, but such contracts will work best when driven by local needs rather than corporate profits. The Kurdish case proves that local stakeholders will raise an army where oil companies will not.

To read Havrelock’s piece in full at Foreign Affairs, click here.

To read more about River Jordan, click here.

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42. बहादुरी की मिसाल पायलट अमित

बहादुरी की मिसाल पायलट अमित सरकार को कोसना हो हमारी जुबान हाजिर है.. अंट शंट कुछ भी बोलते चले जाएगे..  चाहे मोदी जी हों या अरविंद जी किसी की कमी निकालनी हो  तो पीछे नही हटते और कमिया हजारों निकालते चले जाएगें  पर अगर किसी की प्रशंसा करनी हो तो जुबान लडखडा सी जाती है.. […]

The post बहादुरी की मिसाल पायलट अमित appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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43. THE SQUARE ROOT OF SUMMER by Harriet Reuter Hapgood \\ I Miscalculated How Much I'd Like This

Review by Jackie The Square Root of Summer by Harriet Reuter HapgoodAge Range: 12 - 18 yearsGrade Level: 8 - 12Hardcover: 304 pagesPublisher: Roaring Brook Press (May 3, 2016)Goodreads | Amazon This is what it means to love someone. This is what it means to grieve someone. It's a little bit like a black hole. It's a little bit like infinity. Gottie H. Oppenheimer is losing time. Literally.

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44. FOODFIC: Please Welcome Charles W. Jones, Author of Circus Tarot


“Get your Cotton Candy! A token a fluff!” the man in the red-and-white-striped suit yells, though he doesn’t need to raise his voice as he walks the fairway; the Ladies and Gentlemen flock to him wherever he is. His completion is the midget peddling popcorn, and his brother, Six of Poles, who sells roasted peanuts. Of course, he sells more Cotton Candy than the combination of both his rivals.

Cotton Candy, after all, is the food of the gods. In World Circus you can live your entire life eating nothing else. Though your tastes may change for a moment, craving the saltiness of fresh popped corn, or the earthy meat of the peanut, you will always return to the main staple.

During periods of being “flipped”, the stomach won’t grant the sweet floss access to touch its lining, allowing only raw flesh from a fellow member of World Circus inside. Then with the blink of an eye, the condition rights itself, and the patron craves nothing else but Cotton Candy.

The children who come to the Circus, swarm around him, jumping and reaching for the delectable treat. Gripping the white, paper cone, their faces disappear behind the bright pink or blue fluff, before they giddily scatter inside World Tent to watch the show.


Thanks for stopping by to share your food for thought, Chuck!



Find the author and his books here:





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45. Nurtured and Nuzzled - a bookwrap






Celebrating the bond between parent and child!

In two languages!


Unwrapping...





Nurtured and Nuzzled
Criados y Acariciados

By Mike Speiser
Ages 0-5


Unwrapping some illustrations for you...














Editorial Reviews...



"My 2 young boys and I love this charming little book! They think the animal family pictures are "SO cute" and I really appreciate how it normalizes the nurturing relationship between parents and their children. It makes cuddling during storytime that much sweeter." (Sarah Reece-Stremtan, MD, Pediatric Pain Medicine Doctor and Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine Board Member in Washington, DC)


“The beautiful illustrations in this book can be used to teach all four areas of STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) to young children. I can't wait to use this with my little ones!" (Sue Cahalane, Science for Kids, Science Teacher (grades PK-4), Holmdel, NJ)



“What a wonderful read for families―beautifully illustrated and with an important message about the meaning of parenting.” (Thelma Lager, Advocate for Families, Great-Grandmother (of three), Los Angeles, CA)



About the book...


Every parent knows that a baby truly is a gift.  A gift to be nurtured and cherished.  This book is a celebration of the bond that is created between a child and  his beloved parent.  

This educational, bilingual, (English and Spanish), early childhood science book highlights the importance of good parenting in an infant's life.  It illustrates how a baby needs feeding, grooming and specific care to have his needs taken care of.  The simple vocabulary, in two languages, will provide a lovely learning experience for your young child.

The illustrations are realistic and beautifully executed with bold colours and loving expressions.  



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46. thewinterotter: petermorwood: dduane: “Little lynx kitty!...



thewinterotter:

petermorwood:

dduane:

“Little lynx kitty! https://t.co/poKj7DBucy”

Not a lynx, a caracal. Here’s a comparison…

The caracal’s moustache, eyebrows and ear-tips are a giveaway even from birth…

…and it looks like the ears grow before the legs…

…which soon follow…

If Elves had cats, they’d look like caracals.

I’m sorry to interrupt but that comparison picture of the caracal and lynx is clearly a wedding photo and I’d like to take a moment to wish the joyous couple every happiness.



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47. PubCrawl Podcast: Genres – Romance

This week JJ and Kelly conclude their series on genres in publishing with ROMANCES. Also, we reveal the depth of our Harry Potter nerdery and our deep fandom past. TRIGGER WARNING: We discuss rape and consent in Old School romances.

Subscribe to us on iTunesStitcherSoundcloud, or use this feed to subscribe through your podcast service of choice! If you like us, please, please, please leave a rating or review, as it helps other listeners find the podcast. We cherish each and every one of you who have taken the time to leave us feedback; you’re the stars in our sky!

Show Notes

  • Smart Bitches, Trashy Books (and their podcast!)
  • Romance is the largest market of publishing in terms of sheer number of books being published, units being sold, as well as cash flow.
  • We discussed the hallmarks of other genres, but romance really only has the one: your main couple must end up in a relationship by the end of the book (the so-called HEA, or Happily Ever After, or the HFN, or Happily For Now).
  • Romance is a staple of publishing, and is a large part of what we now consider the literary “canon” but the modern romance novel as we knew it first came into existence in the 1970s. According to the Smart Bitches, the “first” modern romance novel is The Flame and the Flower by Kathleen E. Woodiwiss.
  • Romance novels are divided into Old School and New School romance: Old School are the books published pre-1990s.
  • Old School romances may be partially responsible for the “trashy” reputation around romance novels because there were forceful, rapist male romantic leads, but for other reasons, not the least because the stories were centered around female leads and female pleasure.
  • Old School romances were also about awakening the female lead, sexually, emotionally, etc. so some hangups about “virginity” (actual or metaphorical) linger.
  • Romance publishing is divided into two segments: category and single-title.
  • Category romances are specific lines from a publisher focusing on specific tropes and storylines. As a romance writer, it may be easier to break into publishing by starting to write for categories.
  • Single-title romances are focused more on the author’s name than the tropes, e.g. Nora Roberts. The stories and tropes are created wholesale by the author and is more similar to other trade publishing genres.
  • In terms of content, romances can literally contain anything. Anything! That’s the greatest thing about romance; it’s like Mad Libs: put in what you want and you’ll pretty much guaranteed to find a romance novel that fits that criteria. Romances span every genre: mystery, thriller, science-fiction, fantasy, contemporary, et al. What constitutes a ROMANCE as opposed to another genre is the centrality of the love story.
  • Romances can have series, either where friends or different family members get their own romances in separate books, or else it’s one central couple throughout multiple books.

Books Discussed/What We’re Reading

What We’re Working On

  • Kelly is continuing to work on her WIP, not by writing words, but by journaling and thinking and creating.
  • The project JJ couldn’t talk about last week was a companion novel to Wintersong! Cue the panic.

Off Menu Recommendations

That’s all for this week! We will be on hiatus for the next two weeks as both JJ and Kelly will be on vacation (not together, alas!). When we return, we will be starting a new series, wherein we break down stories to see what makes them successful or not. As always, sound off in the comments if you have any questions and we’ll see you in two weeks!

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48. Exclusive Reveal: Check Out Pasqual Ferry’s CIVIL WAR II #1 Variant & Celebrate the First Fried Pie Con

CivWarIIBannerFried Pie Comics, a line dedicated to producing special variant covers for comic books, has been making a splash since it debuted in October 2015.  They’ve produced collectible versions of huge titles titles including Dark Knight III #1 and Rick and Morty #14.  Now, they’re hosting their first convention. Fried Pie Con will take place in Kennesaw, […]

1 Comments on Exclusive Reveal: Check Out Pasqual Ferry’s CIVIL WAR II #1 Variant & Celebrate the First Fried Pie Con, last added: 5/26/2016
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49. Measuring and Marking


My grandfather passed away last week. While he'd been in declining health, nothing was expected so soon and the news was a shock. Over the past few months, I'd been able to spend more time with my grandparents, giving me a wealth of memories and joy. I feel so very, very lucky to have had him in my life then and still.

As we've been taking care of things, I've been able to collect a few of his work tools. My grandfather was a civilian design engineer for the Navy, close to 30 years. I swear by his Eagle pencils and a small, homemade T-Square is quickly becoming my go-to for measuring.

And while I miss him profoundly, there's a joy and a connection that comes in giving his tools a new life.

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50. Presidential Polar Bear Post Card No. 158 - 5.25.16


Astro Bears!

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