What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts from All 1540 Blogs, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 2,000
1. Happy Easter!

easter2104-Kathy

Ana Ochoa sent in this cute Happy Easter illustration to help me wish all of you a Happy Easter. Ana’s illustrations have been exhibited in many countries around the world. Her art is represented by Chris Tugeau and she was featured on January 11th 2014 on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to see her feature.

Easter Parade

This Easter Parade illustration was sent in by Joanne Friar. She has been creating art for children’s books for over 18 years, researching history and nature from ancient civilizations to the Great Depression, from wetlands conservation to endangered species. Her books have won awards such as the CBC Notable Social Studies Book, the CBC Outstanding Science Book, and John Burroughs Nature Books for Young Readers. Joanne is represented by Christina Tugeau and was featured on Illustrator Saturday on March 10th, 2012 - Click here for the link.

easteregg

You never know what is in those Easter Eggs, but Lisa Falkenstern used her imagination to show us in this illustration. Lisa has been a professional illustrator for more than thirty years. She’s illustrated The Busy Tree, published by Marshall Cavendish, and My VeryOwn Pirate Story, published by I See Me, written and illustrated A Dragon Moves. You can read about her new book, “Professor Whiskerton Presents Steampunk ABC”. Here is the link to Thursday’s Post about the book, which includes illustrations. Lisa was also featured on Illustrator Saturday on October 2, 2010. Here is the link to visit her feature.

 

easter bunny bird

This cute Bird in bunny pajamas was sent in by Jennifer Geldard from one of her series illustrations in watercolor, black fine-tip marker and white gel pen. She is a glass artist by trade, and new to the world of illustration. I’m still getting my bearings, and learning the business end of things, but she says, “painting is pure joy for me, and I’m enjoying every minute of my education.” Her website is www.glassgirl.com

easterbulbgarden

Susan Detwiler is the Illustrator Coordinator MD/DE/WV SCBWI illustrator of several picture books including On The Move and One Wolf Howls. She is the author/illustrator of Fine Life For A Country Mouse, which will be published by Penguin in September. Susan was featured on Illustrator Saturday March 9, 2013. www.susandetwiler.com

eastereggsandhen

Katia Bulbenko has been drawing ever since she can remember. After studying printmaking andpainting at Tyler School of Art, she pursued her interests in sculpture and silk painting, then worked as a freelance textile designer for many years, her specialty being “conversationals”—paintings of things like coffee cups and hats, mostly for pajamas ortable linens. In addition to spending her time teaching art to grades pre-k through 8 and creating beaded fiber pieces, Katia is an aspiring children’s book illustrator. Her favorite mediums are watercolor, colored pencil, and gouache. 

I want to thank everyone who sent in an illustration. I loved them all and will be using the rest with my posts in the next few weeks. Please keep sending me your illustrations. They add so much interest to this blog. 

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Filed under: authors and illustrators, illustrating, Illustrator Sites, Illustrator's Saturday, inspiration Tagged: Ana Ochoa, Happy Easter, Joanne Friar, Lisa Falkenstern, Susan Detwiller

0 Comments on Happy Easter! as of 4/20/2014 1:11:00 AM
Add a Comment
2. Call for Novel Submissions from Women of Color: Shade Mountain Press

Shade Mountain Press seeks novel manuscripts by women of color: any topic, any style (as long as it’s literary rather than genre). Please email a query letter, containing a short synopsis of the novel and your bio, including publishing credits, if any, to:

submissionsATshademountainpressDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

If we want to read further, we’ll request hard copy of a longer synopsis and the first ten pages or so.

Deadline: August 1, 2014

Shade Mountain Press is looking for literary fiction that’s politically engaged, that challenges the status quo and gender/class/race privilege. We look for work that’s wise, raucous, joyful, angry, alive. Both realism and its various alternatives (magic realism / fabulism / slipstream / the fantastic/ dystopianism) are welcome, as long as the work is literary rather than genre fiction.

For more information, please visit our website.

Add a Comment
3. National Poetry Month...Celebrate!

Add a Comment
4. Wee folk, not twee folk

From the wee folk of long ago (fairies, leprechauns, pixies…) to Hans Christian Andersen’s Thumbelina, and to Mary Norton’s The Borrowers, sentient beings of very small size have fascinated, delighted, and horrified us, but they never fail to capture our attention. In writing this piece I discovered there are far more books about wee folk […]

0 Comments on Wee folk, not twee folk as of 4/20/2014 1:19:00 AM
Add a Comment
5. Week in Review: April 13-19

The Shadow Throne. Jennifer A. Nielsen. 2014. Scholastic. 336 pages. [Source: Review copy]
Starstruck. Rachel Shukert. 2013. Random House. 339 pages. [Source: Review copy]
Mansfield Park. Jane Austen. 1814. 464 pages. [Source: Book I Bought]
A Year Down Yonder. Richard Peck. 2000. Penguin. 144 pages. [Source: Library]
Starters. Lissa Price. 2012. Random House. 352 pages. [Source: Review copy]
Mountains Beyond Mountains: The Quest of Dr. Paul Farmer, A Man Who Would Cure the World. By Tracy Kidder. Adapted for Young People by Michael French. 2013. Random House. 288 pages. [Source: Review copy] 
And He Dwelt Among Us: Teachings From the Gospel of John. A.W. Tozer. 2009. Regal. 224 pages. [Source: Bought]
Saved In Eternity (The Assurance of Salvation #1) D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones. 1988. Crossway. 187 pages. [Source: Bought]
Safe in the World (The Assurance of Salvation #2). D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones. 1988. Crossway. 160 pages. [Source: Bought]
The Life of Our Lord: Written For His Children During the Years 1846 to 1849. Charles Dickens. 1934/1999. Simon & Schuster. 128 pages. [Source: Bought]

This week's favorite:

I loved, loved, loved The Shadow Throne by Jennifer A. Nielsen. This series is oh-so-wonderful.

© 2014 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

0 Comments on Week in Review: April 13-19 as of 4/19/2014 8:01:00 PM
Add a Comment
6. Writing Competition: Pressgang Prize 2014

Pressgang Prize

Pressgang, the small press at Butler University, is looking for the following: Novels, memoirs, or book-length collections of stories or essays.
Submissions will be accepted online along with a $25 entry fee. We're okay with simultaneous submissions, and we comply with the CLMP contest code of ethics.

Prize: $1500 + publication + a reading at Butler University

Judging: Winner will be selected by Editor and editorial board, and announced in August. All other entries will be considered for standard publication.

Deadline: 5/31/2014

Add a Comment
7. Badlands/Cynthia Reeves: brief reflections on a stunning novella

I have known Cynthia Reeves for what feels like a long time now. She is a friend, she is a cook, she is the mother of two talented children, she teaches, she writes. She is there, often, telling stories—standing at the counter in Libby Mosier's house, ruling over a platter of fine cheeses in her own home, walking a windy Philadelphia with me not long ago, as we searched (unsuccessfully) for a hostess-gift bottle of wine. We bought Di Bruno Bros. chocolate-covered pretzels instead. We found the party. We talked some more.


But perhaps we don't really know someone until we dwell, quietly, with their work, and over the past several days, when I could tear away for an hour, I have been reading Cyndi's award-winning novella, Badlands, published in 2007 by Miami University Press.

The story—about a dying woman's final hours and the blend of time, about the topography of regret and the last light of clarity, about secret dreams and the collective dream, about the bones we bury or seek to bury or can never bury—is one of the most beautifully rendered stories I've ever read. Devastating. Intelligent. Knowing. True. Locked in tight. Held so close. Never once losing its purpose, nor its rhythm.

Think of Carole Maso channeling Colum McCann. Think of Jack Gilbert stretching out the lines of his poems. This is Cynthia Reeves.

This is how she sounds:
If hearing is the last sense to leave the body, then snowfall whispering over their faces, over itself, is the last thing they hear. Blankets laid gently one on top of another, nothing else. No weeping, no iron nail driving into pine board, no lamentation but snow sweeping over them, whispering its final prayer: Come, Grandmother, Great Spirit, hold them gently in your arms. Caro hears this whispering soft, softer now, and finally the quiet rustling of sheets.
Find Badlands. Read it.


0 Comments on Badlands/Cynthia Reeves: brief reflections on a stunning novella as of 4/19/2014 5:29:00 PM
Add a Comment
8. Easter Blessings!




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Best wishes,
Donna M. McDine
Award-winning Children's Author
Connect with


A Sandy Grave ~ January 2014 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc.

Powder Monkey ~ May 2013 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc.

Hockey Agony ~ January 2013 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc.

The Golden Pathway ~ August 2010 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc.
~ Literary Classics Silver Award and Seal of Approval, Readers Favorite 2012 International Book Awards Honorable Mention and Dan Poynter's Global e-Book Awards Finalist















0 Comments on Easter Blessings! as of 4/20/2014 12:03:00 AM
Add a Comment
9. Is Competition Good for Us? by Joan Lennon

Children's writers are a bit like fish in those shrinking ponds in a drought.  We're not yet at the stage of trying to breathe mud, but still, times are tight.  So, is competition good for us?

First, watch the video ...



Now, discuss!


Joan Lennon's website.
Joan Lennon's blog.

0 Comments on Is Competition Good for Us? by Joan Lennon as of 4/19/2014 8:29:00 PM
Add a Comment
10. The Weekend Writer: Writers' Journals

Maintaining a journal is a big cliche in writer world, but it is also helpful. If you're a write-every-day person, it can provide you with opportunities to do that during those times when you're overwhelmed or traveling. Some of my most serious journal work has been done on vacation.

Lisa Catherine Harper has an excellent piece on writers' journals, Using The Writer's Notebook: A Practical Guide at Ploughshares' website. What's particularly good about her article is the variety of suggestions she has for notebooks/journals. You really can do anything with them.

While I do understand her point about handwriting with a journal, a journal computer program has the benefit of being searchable. Writers can go either way.

Here's some particularly good advice from Harper: "Be recursive. Don't write in your notebook and forget about it. Go back to read, underline, annotate, or dog-ear. Use Post-it notes to indicate important passages." I say this is particularly good advice because working on my journals is something I've failed to do. I've definitely been a dump-and-run writer. Paying more attention to my journal could oen a whole new world.
___________________

Remember to comment in order to have a chance at winning an eBook edition of Saving the Planet & Stuff.

0 Comments on The Weekend Writer: Writers' Journals as of 4/19/2014 10:59:00 PM
Add a Comment
11. Our Wonderful World.20 HAPPY BIRTHDAY, FRANKI!!!

Details of my Poetry Month Project can be found here.



20. The Grand Canyon

For the Grand Canyon (and Franki)

You're amazing.
I like to watch people's faces
when they first experience you.
There's no mistaking the power of your energy.

You're inspiring.
We see what you've accomplished,
the vigor and potential in all you do,
and we know we could do more and be more.

You're incredible:
the reach of your influence;
your stamina, your spirit, your passion;
the bubbly joy at your core.

You're a wonder.
You make the world a better place.
You are a force for good.
We are lucky to have you in our world.

©Mary Lee Hahn, 2014




0 Comments on Our Wonderful World.20 HAPPY BIRTHDAY, FRANKI!!! as of 4/20/2014 1:17:00 AM
Add a Comment
12. Children's Books Buzz - April 19, 2014

Cover - The Adventures of Luke Skywalker, Jedi KnightThis week the buzz was all about Star Wars. Disney Publishing Worldwide (DPW) has announced good news for Star Wars fans. DPW is publishing four new children's books based on the original Star Wars film trilogy.

The first book, The Adventures of Luke Skywalker, Jedi Knight,, which is a picture book written by Tony DiTerlizzi (The Spiderwick Chronicles), will be released in October 2014. The additional three Star Wars saga retellings will be written by popular children's authors R.J. Palacio (Wonder), Adam Gidwitz (A Tale Dark and Grimm), and Tom Angleberger (Origami Yoda series). (Source: Star Wars: Disney Media Release, 4/17/14)

(Cover art courtesy of Disney Publishing Worldwide)

Children's Books Buzz - April 19, 2014 originally appeared on About.com Children's Books on Saturday, April 19th, 2014 at 21:32:47.

Permalink | Comment | Email this

Add a Comment
13. Writing Advice Database

UPDATED 4/19/14

Here is a compendium of the top writing advice posts on the blog. Of course, the best source is my guide How to Write a Novel: 47 Rules for Writing a Stupendously Awesome Novel You Will Love Forever. But these posts will hopefully help you along the way:

Before You Start


The Writing Process

Revising

Genres and Classification

Staying sane during the writing/publishing process

0 Comments on Writing Advice Database as of 4/20/2014 1:09:00 AM
Add a Comment
14. Kunderian unbearability

       At Words without Borders Dispatches weblog Sean Cotter considers The Un-X-able Y-ness of Z-ing (Q): A List with Notes, riffing on how (variations on) the famous Kunderian title have taken hold.
       Among the interesting titbits:

  • Kundera's "book was not published in the Czech Republic until 2006"

  • "We might expect the presence of "the unbearable lightness of" to boom with the publication of the translated novel (1984) and the popularity of the movie (1988) and to wane as years pass. The opposite, however, is the case: through 2000, the frequency of "the unbearable lightness of" is rising."
       The piece is from: The Man Between: The Life and Legacy of Michael Heim, Translator forthcoming from Open Letter Books; pre-order your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk.

Add a Comment
15. April Showers: Language and Style

I'm continuing my journey of what waters my writer's soul. I love to read books and I'm touching on a few books this month that have added creative water to my work. This week I'm going to chat about Kathi Appelt's TRUE BLUE SCOUTS OF SUGAR MAN SWAMP.  This one fun read and has a swinging beat. In this story Bingo and J’miah, raccoon brothers are on a mission to save Sugar Man Swamp. Two things standout for me in this book -- language and style.

I love the language here. There is a rhythm in the cadence of the language that reminds me of music. Here's a bit of lyricism : "Nosotros somos paisanos. We are fellow countrymen. We come from the same soil." This bit gives me a good chill. I also love that the language uncovers place. For example: “They say that lightning never strikes in the same place twice, but the same is not true for courage. As it turns out, when courage strikes, it almost always begets more courage.” The choice of begets here coupled with lightning puts me in mind of an old time southern Gospel preacher. I also get some Texas swing and Texas drawl on every page. I kept smiling with each twist of phrase. Specific word choice creates universal appeal. It makes the language breathe. Check the similes in your book. Watch out for the cliches. Do better.

The style of TRUE BLUE SCOUTS is all about the southern storytelling tradition with the Texas tall tale tradition mixed in.  Multiple story lines weave here, and reminded me of a great uncle of mine who was a master basket weaver. He knew just how to bend a strip of bark or a stalk of sugar cane into the perfect basket shape. Appelt jumps from head to head: raccoons, a rattle snake, humans,feral hogs, the Sugarman and more. She captures in her word basket the need to save our natural places, the preciousness of the world around us, and what exactly it means to be a hero. Style has a job, and in this case it's to bring everyone around to the back porch for a stor, to take the chills, the laughs, and riotousness and learn something too. Think about your style and do more.

I hope that you put you best efforts into the language and style of your work this week. It might just transform into something bigger than you thought it could be. I will be back next week with more April showers. I hope you return too.

Also please consider checking out my upcoming ebook PLUMB CRAZY from Swoon Romance. Thanks!

This week the doodle is on a egg. Here is "Spidey Egg."

 
Here is a little quote for your pocket.
 
I admire people who dare to take the language, English, and understand it and understand the melody. Maya Angelou

0 Comments on April Showers: Language and Style as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
16. Science Poetry Pairings - Rain

I may have grown up where snow was the weather that was most talked about, but my favorite form of precipitation has always been the rain. In our old house in the city I used to love to sit outside on the porch swing when it rained and rock to the beat of the drops, and sometimes the thunder. William and I still like to play in the rain in the summer and jump in puddles in our bare feet. My favorite rain is quiet rain, early in the morning.

Today's book trio celebrates rain in all its wonder. 

Poetry Book
One Big Rain: Poems for a Rainy Days, compiled by Rita Gray and illustrated by Ryan O'Rourke, is a collection of 20 poems about rain through the seasons. Beginning with autumn, each section opens with a haiku about the season. Four additional poems follow. Gray includes eight haiku, two poems translated from other languages (Norwegian and Spanish), works by well-known poets like Robert Frost, Carl Sandburg, and Eve Merriam, as well as works by poets whose names may not be familiar to readers. The illustrations in muted browns, grays, blacks and greens beautifully capture the mood and subject of the poems.

The book opens with an introduction that describes rain through the seasons. The introduction closes with these thoughts.
A gentle rain can shower, sprinkle, drizzle, or mist. Powerful rains beat down in storms and downpours, fall in streams and sheets, or race, rush, and gush in torrents. Rain can play a pinging beat as it falls will-nilly from the sky: pitter-patter, plip-plop, drip-drop, plink-plink. And puddles are perfect to splish-splosh. Poets have captured the language and rhythm of the rain, creating images that stay with us throughout the year.
          As you read about the rain, in various poetic forms,
          Ripple in it, float in it, boat in it.
          Go on, get wet.
Text © Rita Gray. All rights reserved.

Following the introduction is a note about haiku translations. Adapted from a work by poet and translator William J. Higginson, the emphasis is not on counting syllables, but on finding the best rhythm for the haiku in the new language.

Here's the poem that opens the season of spring.
Haiku—Rogetsu  
tree-frogs
calling . . . in the young leaves
a passing shower
And here's another poem from spring.
Little Snail—Hilda Conkling 
I saw a little snail
Come down the garden walk.
He wagged his head this way . . . that way . . .
Like a clown in a circus.
He looked from side to side
As though he were from a different country.
I have always said he carries his house on his back . . .
To-day in the rain
I saw that it was his umbrella!
Here's a sample spread from the book. You can download this from the Charlesbridge site as a double-sided poster.

The small trim size may make this one go unnoticed, but don't pass it up. It's a lovely little book of poems.

Nonfiction Picture Books
This Is The Rain, written by Lola Schaefer and illustrated by Jane Wattenberg, is a picture book about the water cycle that uses the familiar cumulative pattern of "The House That Jack Built." Bold, vibrant photo-collages accompany the text. It begins this way.
This is the ocean,
blue and vast,
that holds the rainwater from the past.
Can you guess where this goes? Next comes the sun to warm the oceans, which eventually forms vapor that fills the clouds, which produce the rain that falls. Here's the text from the page on rain.
This is the rain,
falling all day,
the forms in clouds,
low and gray,
full of vapor, moist and light
made when sunshine,
hot and bright,
warms the ocean, blue and vast,
that holds the rainwater from the past.
Text © Lola Schaefer. All rights reserved.

After passing through all stages of the water cycle, Schaefer circles back to the rain falling "somewhere every day." The book ends with a short note about the water cycle on planet earth.

When Rain Falls, written by Melissa Stewart and illustrated by Constance Bergum, is a picture book that explains what happens to animals in different habitats when it rains. Each habitat section begins with the words "When rain falls ..." and goes on to describe how different animals respond. Stewart provides readers with glimpses of 22 different animals in a forest, field, wetland, and desert. The soft, watercolor illustrations are realistic and provide subtle details regarding each habitat.

Here's an excerpt from the section on a field.
When rain falls on a field . . . 
...plump little caterpillars crawl under leaves and cling to stems. Adult butterflies dangle from brightly colored heads. 
A raindrop knocks a ladybug off a slippery stem. The insect bounces into the air and then tumbles to the ground.  
A spider watches and waits as the rain beats down on its carefully built web.
Text © Melissa Stewart. All rights reserved.

The text is clear, concise, engaging, and easy to understand. Readers will learn much about how animals adapt to inclement weather.

Perfect Together
All three of these books explore rain in different forms. Whether studying weather or the water cycle (really, they should be taught together, but often aren't!) students can learn about what causes the rain and how people and animals react to the weather. In my classroom I'd start with Schaefer's book and look closely at the water cycle. Then I'd focus specifically on rain by reading a few poems and following up with Stewart's look at how animals respond to the rain.

For additional resources, consider these sites.

0 Comments on Science Poetry Pairings - Rain as of 4/20/2014 1:13:00 AM
Add a Comment
17. Haven't I seen you someplace before? More dueling skulls

Unknown-2images-1images

Add a Comment
18. Live as Ambassadors of Christ

        Generational curses are sneaking up on families and many don’t even see it coming! Separation and resentfulness are creeping up on those who aren’t aware of the enemy’s tactics. The tools of the devil are devious. The word of God is powerful. Speak the Word over our family’s and claim healing and reconciliation where needed.

I have seen generational issues show up as families struggle with forgiveness and restoration. In a century of drug and alcohol addiction outpouring, families are experiencing trauma and heartbreaking issues.

Young people carelessly step into  the world’s view on many Biblical issues and allow the enemy to blind their eyes to God’s view on issues such as sex before marriage, substance abuse, anger, violence, lack of forgiveness, thievery, and don’t follow the golden rule of doing to others what we would want them to do unto us.

How can we break these generational curses and have freedom in our family’s lives. Freedom in Christ is freedom that no man can steal from us. As Christians, we can make changes that will affect our family members’ lives forever. Stepping into the spiritual realm and praying for our families will open the windows of heaven. God will rain down blessings as we seek his will in our lives.

As we deal with the issues in our lives, we can make a difference by speaking positive things into place. Our words can bring healing and restoration. Helping those who are hurting find professional and spiritual assistance will allow them to get the counseling and advice they need. Many times, our family members won’t hear what we say, but will listen to someone else. Pray for God to bring that person of importance their way.

Schedule times to contact those who are astray. Pray for those who won’t respond. Speak positive words into their lives. Love and forgive. The first step for breaking those generational curses comes from our steps. Extend forgiveness, change an angry spirit, and forgive those who have been cruel, bury the anger that comes from the incident of theft, adultery. Forgive yourself. And finally, you should also ask forgiveness of anyone you’ve injured or offended.

 Forgiveness isn’t a feeling or emotion; it is something you do. To forgive is to release. Forgiveness brings change. Forgiveness releases them from bondage and allows them to walk away into a brand-new life.

Finally, walk as we are called to walk; as an Ambassador of Heaven. Represent the convictions we have as followers of Christ. Live as a person with values, positive attitude and the power of a higher call. Show others God’s way. Show kindness, grace and compassion. Leave a trace of healing wherever you go. Be the ultimate agent of forgiveness in an unforgiving world. Break those generational curses in Jesus’ name!

You have no idea what kind of blessings will flow. Families are set free, forgiveness and healing will come simply because you took the role of an ambassador of peace seriously. Our Lord – the One we represent will make “all things new.”

 


0 Comments on Live as Ambassadors of Christ as of 4/19/2014 11:21:00 PM
Add a Comment
19. #IF NOT FOR FRANKI



Happy Birthday, Franki!

It's a landmark birthday for you today
and we celebrate you
by reflecting on all the ways
you have made our world a better place.

(Thank you, Ruth, for the cute button!)

IF NOT FOR FRANKI
I wouldn't have written a book.
("You should write a book.")


IF NOT FOR FRANKI
I wouldn't be the blogger I am today.
("What's a blog? If you start it, I'll do it.")


IF NOT FOR FRANKI
I wouldn't have written for Choice Literacy.
("There's an article in that.")


IF NOT FOR FRANKI
I wouldn't be the professional I am today.
("Why do you think that?")


IF NOT FOR FRANKI
I wouldn't attend nearly so many conferences!
("Want to go to ______?")


IF NOT FOR FRANKI 
I wouldn't be on Twitter.
("Bill (Bass) will teach us.")


IF NOT FOR FRANKI
I wouldn't have gambled at all in Las Vegas.
("It's fun!")


IF NOT FOR FRANKI
There would be less laughter,
less book buying, and
less Starbucks Venti Awake Tea.


BECAUSE OF FRANKI
the world is a better place!





0 Comments on #IF NOT FOR FRANKI as of 4/20/2014 1:17:00 AM
Add a Comment
20. Call for Poetry Submissions: Pinwheel


Pinwheel’s Online Submission Party Invitation

Welcome to the party! You are cordially invited to submit YOUR BEST WORK to the online poetry journal Pinwheel during the month of May. We want to read the poems you have labored over. Define “labored” in any personal context you want, but you better feel bad if your submission isn’t the kind of poetry you’re ready to set on a gilded altar. Read poems in our ARCHIVE to get an idea of what we prefer to publish.

What: Pinwheel Open Submissions Period

Email to submit: 
 
pinwheelsubmissionsATgmailDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to . )

When: May 1­ – May 31

Disclaimer: Any unsolicited submissions sent to us outside of our submission period will be discarded.

Send us up to 5 poems totaling 10 pages during the month of May. We want poems that will throw and take a goddamn punch. Rock the boat and burn the bridge, send us those poems. Simultaneous submissions are fine, as long as you let us know immediately via the email address above. Any poems we accept will be eligible for publication in future issues of Pinwheel during 2014.

Add a Comment
21. Son of Batman: Freak’n Awesome Movie

Son of Batman(Spoilers ahead: So if you wanted to watch the movie first, then I suggest you turn off the computer or mobile device, sit in the corner, and wait like a good boy or girl.)

This year DC Entertainment is celebrating Batman’s 75th birthday. “Nice pecs for an old dude,” you might be saying to yourself. Or is that just me? Anyway, aside from this momentous occasion, there are a few things in the works for our favorite caped crusader coming out this year. In October we’ll be seeing a third and final video game for the Batman Arkham franchise (fourth if you count Batman Arkham Origins, which was not done by Rocksteady Studios), and this month we’ll be seeing the release of the animated film Son of Batman. However, this reporter got to see the early screening here at beautiful Wondercon.

Assembled for the exclusive showing of Son of Batman at the Anaheim Wondercon were DC producer James Tucker, director Ethan Spaulding, character designer Phil Bourassa, dialogue director Andrea Romano, Jason O’Mara (his second time voicing the iconic Batman/Bruce Wayne), Stuart Allan (voice of Damian Wayne), Xander Berkeley (voice of Dr. Kirk Langstrom), Sean Maher (voice of Nightwing), and guest moderated by Rich Sands.

For those who aren’t familiar, Son of Batman is a loose adaption of the 2006 comic story arc written by Grant Morrison, which has come to be known as Batman and Son. In this, we discover that Batman had a drugged up tryst with the curvaceous and deadly Talia al Ghul, which leads to the the Dark Knight never knew he had. Being raised by Talia and his grandfather, Ra’s al Ghul, Damian has been trained all his life in the League of Assassins to later become it’s heir. After an attack on the compound which leaves the league in ruins, and leaves Ra’s beyond the help of a Lazarus pit, Talia sends her son to live with the father he’s never met.

The movie’s animation first made me feel like I was watching an episode of Avatar: The Legend of Korra, which would make sense because the director, Ethan Spaulding, worked on its precursor, Avatar: The Last Air Bender. After two minutes in however, when the bodies start hitting the floor, I realized it wasn’t going to be a light hearted cartoon. The movie’s dialogue was comedic at times, but in a good way. It was the action however that kept me going. The fight scenes and violence left nothing to be desired, intense and fully fleshed. And any time you can work in “bat-men” and “bat-guerrillas” into an animated movie, what else do you need?

I think DC Entertainment hit it out of the park with this straight to home animated movie. Batman fan’s who either are or are not familiar with the Grant Morrison comic can appreciate the story and action that went into this feature. Son of Batman will be available for digital download on April 22nd, and available on DVD and Bluray May 6th.

~Nicholas Eskey

1 Comments on Son of Batman: Freak’n Awesome Movie, last added: 4/20/2014
Display Comments Add a Comment
22. Call for Fiction Submissions to Anthology: Cozy-Noir Fiction

An Anthology of Cozy-Noir Fiction

The submission period is now open and will remain open through June 30th.

For this anthology, we're seeking stories in the 2500 to 7500 word range, though if it's knockout material, we'll consider any length.

eBook versions for every major platform will be released with POD paperback copies available through a distributor.
Each author will receive royalty payments in an equal share between the other authors and the editor.

Submissions will be accepted through midnight (PDT) June 30th. Each story will be read by the editorial team, and all authors will receive a reply by August 15th. The anthology will contain between twelve and twenty stories, depending on the overall length.

We will only accept MS Word .doc and .docx files. Submissions must be in proper manuscript format.

Submissions may be sent to:

 
submissionsATdarkhousebooksDOTcom (Change AT to @ and DOT to .)

Please leave "Submission-" in your subject line and add the name of your story

Add a Comment
23. Library Loot: Third Trip in April

New Loot:
  • Lost in Shangri-La by Mitchell Zuckhoff
  • Kinfolk by Pearl S. Buck
  • The Living Reed by Pearl S. Buck
  • East Wind, West Wind by Pearl S. Buck
Leftover Loot:
  • Richard Scarry's Best Nursery Tales Ever by Richard Scarry
  • English German Girl by Jake Wallis Simons
  • Mommy & Me Craft (DK)
  • Mommy & Me Start Cooking (DK) 
  • The Diary of A Young Girl: The Definitive Edition by Anne Frank, edited by Otto H. Frank and Mirjam Pressler; translated by Susan Massotty.
  • How The Beatles Changed the World by Martin W. Sandler
Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

© 2014 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

0 Comments on Library Loot: Third Trip in April as of 4/19/2014 10:55:00 PM
Add a Comment
24. (Mis)translation into Korean

       In The Korean Times Yun Suh-young reports on Lost in translation: New book explores mistranslation in Korean literature.
       I'd love to see more studies on mistranslation ! Though, of course, it's really just a matter of perspective, isn't it ? All translation is mistranslation, and it's just a matter of whether your focus is on the miss or the translation, so to speak.
       Still, interesting that, for example:

In Korea, writer Ahn Jung-hyo, was one of the first movers in translating his Korean work into English on his own. The English works of Ahn are significantly different from the Korean version because in writing the Korean novel into English, he freely translated, added and re-wrote some parts into the foreign language.
       (Not really the kind of thing I want to hear, I have to say.)

Add a Comment
25. book review: Ask Me

book_askme_100title: Ask Me

author: Kimberly Pauley

date: Soho Teen; April 2014

main character: Aria Morse

 

 

Ask Me is the most recent offering from Kimberly Pauley who self describes as “half Chinese half everything else”. She was born in California and now lives in London. Pauley is the founder of YA Books Central, one of the largest teen book websites in the world.

Ask Me is a the story of Aria, a paranormal teen growing up in Florida with her grandparents. Like her grandmother, Aria has the ability to give and honest answer to any questions she hears. She provides an answer whether or not the question is directed at her. And, the answer is sometimes more of a riddle. This ability came to Aria at the age of twelve. Imagine being a 12 year old girl living with your grandparents who struggle to make ends meet and you suddenly find yourself blurting our answers to every question you hear. Aria was not very popular.

As a defense mechanism, she chose to wear earbuds as much as possible  to block the questions. But, when Jade, the one classmate who defended her turns up dead, the questions fly so fast that Aria cannot avoid hearing or answering them. She hears herself speak truths that she does not know how to handle. And she actually begins connecting to people.

She gets to know Will and Alex, the two boys who had been involved with Jade. Each of them warns her about the other and Aria follows her instincts in deciding who to trust. Readers wonder who will bring harm to Aria and who may be behind the murders but Aria trusts that she knows. Pauley maintains the intrigue about who really killed Jade until the very end.

Aria was meant to be a weak character, one with no friends and little confidence in herself but in giving her so little support, Pauley neglected to develop her beyond her supernatural ability. She was simply a girl who answered questions. When she finally begins to have a relationship with Will, he manages to speak to her in a way that doesn’t ask questions; that allows her to have a choice in what she says. While this had to be so empowering for her, why did this freedom have to come from a male friend?

Nonetheless, Pauley wrote this scene so well that readers will feel the flip of the switch when Aria becomes turned on to him.

The ability to answer questions is an usual talent in which Pauley explores the power of truth and coming of age by embracing both our talents and our voice. Ask Me is a fun, smooth read that keeps you wondering to the end.


Filed under: Book Reviews Tagged: Kimberly Pauley

0 Comments on book review: Ask Me as of 4/19/2014 9:45:00 PM
Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts