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1. Cartoon – Justice

cartoon justice by monica gupta

Cartoon – Justice

जिस तरह से संसद नही चलने दी जा रही और हर रोज लाखों रुपयों का नुकसान हो रहा है ऐसे मे न्याय इन लोगो को नही न्याय मुझे चाहिए !!! I WANT JUSTICE !!!!

 

The post Cartoon – Justice appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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2. Miss Me?

Hello! I’ve been away. Did anyone notice? What have I been away doing? Well, first, Thursday last week was Bookman’s birthday. He turned forty-eleven, something worth celebrating, eh? So we did. We went out to breakfast at our favorite breakfast place and I baked him a cake. Per Bookman’s request, the cake was chocolate chocolate chip with peanut butter cream frosting. I am not the cook of the house but that does not mean I don’t know how to cook, and I made a freaking awesome cake if I do say so myself. We had a meandering kind of quiet day with a little of this and a little of that. Some of that included packing because Friday morning we flew to Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Bookman’s brother lives there and his niece got married on Saturday. We were very happy we could make it for the wedding. Bookman and I don’t often get to travel anywhere together, our slow times at work don’t exactly coincide and we both work places with a small staff which requires a whole other level of scheduling consideration. We knew about the wedding though since last winter and were able to make sure everything coordinated.

A friend of ours stopped by and took care of Waldo and Dickens. We travel so little, and, as I said, rarely together, that we had never left the cats alone like this before and they are 8-years-old! They survived just fine though. They were a bit mad at us when we got home last night, did the “I’m going to sniff you but you are not allowed to touch me” bit. Waldo is also an expert at making big sad eyes so he mooned around the house trying to look as wounded as possible to elicit sympathy and then not let us touch him. Ah, the cats, they know how to make their people feel guilty. They soon got over being mad though, their desire for cuddles outweighing their resentment. When I woke up this morning I had Waldo snuggled up and purring on one side of me and Dickens snuggled up and purring on the other. Today they have been sticking to me like glue. Bookman and I left for an hour to go grocery shopping and upon our return they tried to play the “you’re causing us trauma” card but they dropped it pretty fast when they realized we weren’t buying it.

It was a good trip. A Beautiful wedding that even had vegan food! And it was great to catch up with Bookman’s family, many of whom I haven’t seen in a very long time. The flight to and from wasn’t completely terrible. The only snag was on our return yesterday. I opt for the pat down instead of going through those full-body x-ray machines. The TSA agent got a false-positive for explosives on her gloves after the pat down. So then she took everything out of my carry-on bag that had just gone through being x-rayed and had passed and tested it all for evidence of explosives. In the bag was a sealed, just bought container of hummus and some pita bread that was going to be my and Bookman’s lunch. Well, apparently hummus is considered a potential hazard and even though the luggage screener had let it through, the TSA agent emptying my bag refused to. When I told her it was sealed and it was my lunch she told me I could go back out of the airport, eat it and then come back in. And go through all this again? My flight leaves in an hour! She was not sympathetic and tossed my hummus in the trash. I suspect after I left she fished it out and had it for her own lunch.

After going through my bag and finding no explosives, the TSA agent took me to a private room and gave me another pat down. I’m not sure why I needed a private room for this because the pat down was exactly the same as before only she used the palm of her hand down the inside of my legs rather than the back of her hand. Bookman gives them the benefit of the doubt and says they are offering privacy, but I suspect it is meant to be intimidating. Of course on the second go-round everything was fine. Except it wasn’t because Bookman and I no longer had any lunch.

Albuquerque airport does not have an abundance of restaurants like the one in Minneapolis does. There was no decent food to be found so we ended up having a big plate of overly priced, greasy french fries for lunch. I have not had french fries in quite a few years and this “lunch” had the curious effect of feeling both like a naughty treat and disgusting at the same time. But between that, some almonds the TSA agent did not deem a threat, and a tiny bag or airplane peanuts, we made it back to Minneapolis a little hungry but not starving.

There wasn’t much time for reading during our stay in Albuquerque but of course I had plenty of reading material! I had my Kobo with several books on it, my iPad with magazines, and I finished reading The Martian by Andy Weir on the airplane yesterday.

It’s nice to be home, sleeping in my own bed that doesn’t sag in the middle, not having to breathe dry desert air and dry, overly air conditioned air, having my garden-gone-wild and being surrounded by brilliant greens instead of the dusky desert colors, which are pretty but don’t exactly satisfy me.

Oh, one last thing! Thursday last week while weeding in the garden around some milkweed and feeling a bit sad about not hosting any monarchs this year, I came upon a big fat monarch caterpillar! It was huge and I suspect, close to being ready to spin a cocoon. I will have to keep my eyes out for it!

Back to work for me tomorrow and back to a regular schedule. Breaking up your routine is good to do now and then, but it is also nice to get back to one as well.


Filed under: Personal

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3. Ten Fairytale Retellings I've Read/Want To Read

From Becca's Shelves... Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by The Broke & The Bookish.  This week's topic is Ten Fairytale Retellings I've Read/Want to Read (or fairytales I want to be retold or fairytales I love). Belzhar by Meg Wolitzer - I actually can't remember if I read this one this year or last (I'm getting old, okay?), but I remember really being blown away by what happens in Belzhar!

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4. Kishaz Reading Corner: One Night With the Sheikh by Penny Jordan

Disclaimer: I received no compensation from the author or publisher for this honest review.




About the Book

The searing attraction between Sheikh Xavier Al Agir and Mariella Sutton was instant and all consuming.When a storm left Mariella stranded at Xavier's desert home, passion soon took over…. It was a night she would never forget!

But having always yearned for a child of her own, Mariella planned just one more night with the sheikh—to conceive his baby….


Here's what I'm giving it:

Rating: 3.5 stars

Here's why:

Must be something about the desert, sand, and men so hot they raise the temperature up several degrees.

I understand that when a woman's biological clock starts ticking we do crazy things but I'm not sure I liked how Mariella went about scratching her urge. Xavier was very arrogant but also vulnerable. Mariella had her share of issues, too. The pairing was decent.

I didn't have a problem with the story overall. It was a solid read.



Would I recommend this book? Yes.

0 Comments on Kishaz Reading Corner: One Night With the Sheikh by Penny Jordan as of 8/3/2015 6:07:00 PM
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5. Amusement Park Ride Personality Quiz

amusement parkWhat Amusement Park Ride Are You?

Going to amusement parks is my most favorite summertime activity (aside from reading a billion books by the beach). So our next quiz for y’all is an Amusement Park Ride Personality Quiz! Are you a wild upside down roller coaster, a hot-headed bumper car, or a silly Tilt-a-Whirl? Take the quiz to find out!

  1. Your amusement park treat of choice is a) cotton candy. b) nachos. c) churros. d) hot dogs. e) a slushie.
  2. Your amusement park must-have is a a) cute outfit. b) backpack. c) bottle of sunscreen. d) baseball hat. e) cool sunglasses.
  3. Your favorite animal of the following is the a) koala. b) shark. c) giraffe. d) otter. e) tiger.
  4. You are most afraid of a) heights. b) clowns. c) gross bugs. d) the dark. e) zombies.
  5. Your favorite summertime outdoor activity is a) freeze tag. b) jungle gym acrobatics. c) tennis. d) swimming. e) water balloon fight.
  6. Your favorite rainy day summertime activity is a) learning a new craft. b) bowling. c) reading indoors. d) watching movies with your friends. e) napping.
  7. You most enjoy the color a) yellow. b) silver. c) blue. d) purple. e) red.
  8. Your favorite video game involves a) dancing or singing. b) racing cars. c) solving puzzles. d) building or creating something. e) combat fighting.
  9. Your dream ride would be a a) unicycle. b) really, really fast sports car. c) hot air balloon. d) sailboat. e) motorcycle.

Read on for your results!

If you picked mostly A’s, you are a TILT-A-WHIRL.
Your imagination has no limit! You are a free-spirited soul who never has to look far to find adventure. You are not only great at expressing yourself, you are also able to understand other people’s feelings well and be a great source of support. You’re usually able to find something to smile about—and you’re great at making other people smile, too!

If you picked mostly B’s, you are an UPSIDE-DOWN ROLLER COASTER.
You’re a daredevil!  You have never been afraid to speak your mind or try weird, new things. Even people you’re not friends with yet admire how brave you are! You are loud, you are proud, and you can never sit still. You don’t follow trends; you start them.

If you picked mostly C’s, you are a FERRIS WHEEL.
You aren’t flashy or noisy, and sometimes you can be overshadowed by louder people, but you are a steady and true friend. What’s more perfect than that? You are thoughtful and find joy in the little things, like first snowfall or a great hug from your best friend. You are calm, strong, and wise. Your levelheadedness will get you really, really far in life. You go, Ferris Wheel!

If you picked mostly D’s, you are the LOG FLUME.
Like the Log Flume, you’re popular because people think you’re lovable and fun. You don’t put on airs or try to be trendy. You’re just yourself, and people love inviting you to things because you’re so easy to get along with. You are reliable and know how to have a lot of fun without breaking any rules! Now that’s skill.

If you picked mostly E’s, you are BUMPER CARS.
You know what you like, and you stick to it! Nobody is as tough as you, but your friends all know that you are the most loyal person ever and will stand up for them no matter what. You always have something interesting to say, and your lively personality inspires people around you to believe in themselves, too. Bravo, Bumper Cars!

What amusement park ride personality are you? Share your result in the Comments below!

See ya around,

En-Szu

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6. Book-Jumper Summer Reading Series: Exploring Norse Runemarks

I hope all of you are enjoying summer and can you believe this is Week 10 of our Book-Jumper Summer Reading Series??!! What fun it has been!

Book-Jumper Summer Reading Series

I can share with you that I’m up to my eyeballs in Norse Mythology. The ever-talented Roscoe Welply and I are working on a new book from Audrey Press all about the Norse Gods. Some of you might not know this about me but my family comes from the Island of Gotland in the Baltic sea. There on this magical island is buried Thor,the hammer god himself. So I guess I can technically say that Thor is a part of my geneology.

Thor

Source

Runemarks by Joanne Harris is one of my son’s favorite reads. He has read it several times and has continued on with the series as well. He highly recommends it with five golden stars and thumbs up.

Runemarks

All of us know about the ancient Greek and Roman Gods. We read about their magical world both in school and for pleasure. But now a new realm of Gods has been introduced—the Norse Gods.

Maddy Smith is a unique, chaotic girl in a plain, orderly world. The age of the Æsir—Odin, Frigga, Thor, Tyr—is long gone. 500 years gone to be exact, after Ragnorak, the changing of the worlds. Now the Order rules, under the guidance of the Nameless, and anything seen as demonic or different is cleansed.

But in Maddy’s little town of Malbry she is no more than hated by the rest of her simple villagers. Until One Eye comes along. This mysterious traveller tells her stories of the old age and confirms that she does in fact have powers, powers of the Gods. But old One Eye only tells Maddy half-truths, only trains her in what she needs to know. She does not understand what is going on beneath the Middle World or what is happening at the End of the World where the Order congregates.

Life changes drastically for Maddy when One Eye sends her on a wild goose chase for something called “The Whisperer.” All she has to go on is that it will call to her and that it is very important that she trusts no one and bring the whisperer back to Maddy.

But forces are at work against Maddy and her old friend. The Order has now become suspicious of the town of Malbry and the paranormal activity occurring there. And One Eye’s old friend, Lucky, isn’t quite as dead as One Eye hoped he’d be.

In her journey through the tunnels of the underworld, Maddy uncovers the truth about her birth, her friends, and what is truly going on in the nine worlds. The Æsir are rising, but the Nameless has other plans for the nine worlds. After hearing the first prophecy in five hundred years, Maddy must figure out how to save her friend, herself, and the Nine Worlds from the Chaos that rests in the bottom of the world.

I know this summary is quite vague, but I do not want to give anything away. All the surprises that were around the corner in this book were so exciting to me that I’d hate to deprive you of such a feeling.

We have read books upon books upon books about the Greek and Roman gods and goddesses. Well, Joanne Harris’s Runemarks is the start to the rise of the Norse gods. Well read in classical language and mythology, Runemarks is full of Norse history, but is also an exciting new tale to the old Gods. Her exciting tale of a nearly unknown world summits interest from the very beginning—from the curious Runemarks, to the alternative use of the word faerie, to these new, powerful Gods that we will soon get to know as well as we know Athena and Zeus. May the Greek Gods rest in peace, and may we welcome the Norse Gods with open arms! Be sure to finish out the series with Runelight and The Gospel of Loki.

Something to Do

1. Check out this complete list of Norse runes and their meanings HERE.

Interested in learning more about Norse mythology? Go HERE.

2. Even though in Runemarks, Thor has lost his hammer, we still know it exists. And he’ll need it back eventually so lets help him out by making our own Thor Hammer!

Thors hammer craft

3. Idun is the goddess of healing. She heals the sick, wounded and dying, with her dried apples—the food of the gods. Make your own healing fruit!

DIY Dried Fruit

***

It’s the End of Summer Audrey Press Book Sale!!

book sale

Summer is slowly winding down and thoughts are turning to the upcoming school year and reads that will take us into (and through) the colder months ahead. Instead of being sad to see summer go, I choose to Celebrate! And what better way to do it than with an End of Summer Audrey Press Book Sale. For two weeks only readers can get a great deal on two of my most popular books. But don’t delay; this super special sale ends August 14, 2015.!

First up The Waldorf Homeschool Handbook: The Simple Step-by-Step guide to creating a Waldorf-inspired #homeschool. And for a limited time, this best-selling book by Donna Ashton, The Waldorf #Homeschool Handbook is now only $17.95 until August 14th, 2015 !

Enjoy more month-by-month activities based on the classic children’s tale, The Secret Garden! A Year in the Secret Garden is a delightful children’s book with over 120 pages, with 150 original color illustrations and 48 activities for your family and friends to enjoy, learn, discover and play with together. AND, it’s on sale until August 14th ! Grab your copy ASAP and “meet me in the garden!” http://amzn.to/1DTVnuX

Two great children’s books-Your choice, $17.95 each!

The post Book-Jumper Summer Reading Series: Exploring Norse Runemarks appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

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7. On Debriefing the Summer Reading Club

Maybe you are lucky like me and your Summer Reading Club is finished or winding down, or maybe you still have some weeks to go. Either way, let’s talk about debriefing after the Summer Reading Club is over.

I always dedicate our early August/late July department meeting to discussing the Summer Reading Club. We talk about what worked and what didn’t. We make notes for what we should change or keep for next year. We go ahead and pencil in dates so that we’re all clear about our schedule.

Here are some things we did this summer that we had discussed last summer:

Photo by Abby Johnson

Photo by Abby Johnson

Our prize cart was decorated and we always pushed it out on one side of our desk (the side without shelving carts) because last year we had some confusion about which books were prize books. This worked really well for us this summer and having a special, decorated cart got the kids even more excited about choosing a free book.

Last year, we had a huge issue with registration for programs. We decided to try out having NO REGISTERED PROGRAMS this summer and it went smashingly. The only programs we had capacity issues with were our large performers where we give out tickets to ensure we’re staying within the fire code. And it was amazing the amount of work it saved us in not having to sign up kids for all those programs. That was a benefit we hadn’t even really considered, but it was huge.

And here are some things we discussed this year and that you should consider as you’re winding down your program and making notes for next year:

  • Is the registration and/or logging process easy for patrons and staff? If not, how can we make it easier?
  • Do the prizes given out encourage kids to read and are they easy for staff to manage?
  • How was your program attendance? If it was low, how could you bolster it? If it was unmanageable, how can you make it easier for staff to handle?
  • What great programs did you offer that you might like to repeat? What programs would be good to repeat with some changes?
  • How did you feel at the end of the summer? If you felt like you wanted to die, what made the summer so hard? Is there anything you can change to make it easier?
  • How did your Summer Reading Club affect other departments? Is there anything you can change to make it easier for Circulation, Pages, IT, Marketing, etc.?

Do you meet to debrief about the Summer Reading Club? What items do you make sure to discuss?

— Abby Johnson, Youth Services Manager
New Albany-Floyd County Public Library
New Albany, IN
http://www.abbythelibrarian.com

The post On Debriefing the Summer Reading Club appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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8. I have the best job!

Meet Brooke W., who chose The Girl Who Was Supposed to Die for her school project. She had to analyze the book, write a journal entry (which she did on a napkin which is what the character Cady did in McDonalds) and deliver a monolog while dressed as Cady, among many other things. Do you know how amazing that something I wrote alone day after day is inspiring people I've never met who live halfway across the country!?!

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9. Thank You And We'll See You In New York For #NY16SCBWI

From left to right: Lee Wind, Martha Brockenbrough, Jolie Stekly, Jaime Temairik and Don Tate

From all of us at SCBWI Team Blog, thanks for following along!

We hope you'll join us for the 17th Annual SCBWI Winter Conference in New York City, February 12-14, 2016.

Featuring:

Full-day intensives for both writers and illustrators,
The juried portfolio showcase with Grand Prize,
The opportunity to network with top editors, agents and publishers
Workshops,
Keynotes
and much more!

Craft. Business. Inspiration. Opportunity. Community.
We're your SCBWI.



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10. A Visit with Artist Keith Mallett


“And let’s say one day when you were a little older,
you sat right down at a black piano and you commenced to play …”


 

There’s a new picture book biography on shelves, Jonah Winter’s How Jelly Roll Morton Invented Jazz (Neal Porter/Roaring Brook Press, June 2015), illustrated by Keith Mallett (pictured right). The book opens in a tremendously inviting way:

Here’s what could’ve happened if you were born a way down south in New Orleans, in the Land of Dreams a long, long time ago.

Let’s say you had a godmother, and she put a spell on you because she was a voodoo queen. …

Voodoo queen? Hoo boy, my attention is piqued.

Author and illustrator go on to lay out the musician’s early life and rise to fame, as well as his contributions to jazz. They address the whole who-invented-jazz conundrum—“And, to tell the truth of it, maybe Mister Jelly Roll didn’t invent jazz, not exactly, ’cause it took a lot of cooks to make that stew … but he sure did spread it around the towns”—and in an informative closing author’s note [“How Jelly Roll Morton (Might Have) Invented Jazz”], Winter goes into more detail about this and what distinguished Morton from his fellow musicians. Robin Smith captured the book well in the Horn Book’s review: “Much like jazz itself, Winter has created a book filled with ebbs and flows, rhythm and rhyme, darkness and light, shadow and sunshine.”

This is Mallett’s first picture book, though he’s been an artist and designer for more than thirty years. His acrylic paintings in this bio, bustling with energy and filled with beguiling shadows, are rich and reverent. He’s visiting today with some art (sans text) and early sketches from the book — and to talk a bit about his work. He even shares a bit of other art (not from this biography). I thank him for visiting.

* * *

Keith: From the time that I first saw Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are, I dreamed of illustrating a children’s book. But my career took me in a different direction. I became an artist working mainly in the fine art print industry. About ten years ago I was asked to illustrate a children’s book, but I realized the time it would take, so due to my busy schedule I had to decline.

Once I retired, I had plenty of time, so when Neal [Porter] reached out to me to illustrate Jonah Winter’s new book, I was thrilled.

 


“And let’s say that when you were a baby, your godmother brought you to an old saloon and set you down on top of the bar, which is not a place for a little baby. Let’s say that some trouble broke out, and she got arrested and thrown in jail,
and you got tossed in the can as well.”

(Click to enlarge spread)


 

When I first read Jonah’s unconventional manuscript, I felt a little intimidated. The script was beautifully written, kind of like a jazz riff with some linear storytelling, some rhyming, and even a bit of stream-of-consciousness thrown in. Both Neal and Jennifer [the art director] pointed out that, because the story was so unusual, I would have a lot more freedom with my interpretation. So I dove in.


“And let’s say you just wouldn’t stop crying unless all the roughnecks sharing your cell commenced to singing—’cause music was the only thing that calmed you down.”


 


Early sketch
(Click to enlarge)


 

Doing the research for Jelly Roll was fun. I loved reading about early New Orleans and the dawn of the Jazz Age. The Library of Congress was a great resource for the architecture of New Orleans at the turn of the century; I also scoured the Internet in search of the clothing styles of the late 1800s. Jennifer helped me understand the importance of accuracy in interpreting details, even as small as the style of an early New Orleans police badge.

 



Early sketch and final art: “… and you learned to play so well that soon you were playing with grown-ups, sneaking out when the evening sun went down, playing in bars, surrounded by lowlifes and dangerous people and folks who loved to hear you play,
and making more dollars a night than you knew what to do with.”

(Click each to enlarge)


 

I chose to do the book using acrylic paints because of their fast drying time. They allow you to quickly do numerous glazes and easily build up texture. I also like printing aquatint etchings on my press.

I’d love to do another book. It was fun illustrating this one.

 


“… and only one thing, just one thing in the world, could make the crying stop: And this is why and this is how a thing called JAZZ got invented by a man named Jelly Roll Morton. Leastwise, that’s what I thought I heard Mister Jelly Roll say. Sing it …”
(Click to enlarge spread)


 



Early sketch and final art: “If you’d been Jelly Roll Morton you would’ve known that the only way to rise up and fly away was one piano at a time. One piano note at a time you’d show the folks in New Orleans who was the best. You’d show the folks in
New Orleans how it was done—jazz, that is.”

(Click sketch to enlarge)


 



 


Above: One of Keith’s aquatint etchings


 


Above: One of Keith’s open edition fine art prints


 



 

* * * * * * *

HOW JELLY ROLL MORTON INVENTED JAZZ. Copyright © 2015 by Jonah Winter. Illustrations © 2015 by Keith Mallett. Published by Neal Porter Books/Roaring Brook Press, New York. All images here reproduced by permission of Keith Mallett and the publisher.

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11. Kishaz Reading Corner: Claimed by Evangeline Anderson

Disclaimer: I received no compensation from the author or publisher for this honest review.



About the Book

Brides of the Kindred Book One—Claimed

Olivia Waterhouse has just graduated from nursing school and has her whole life ahead of her—until she gets drafted. Problem is, she isn’t being forced into the Army, she’s been chosen as a Kindred bride.

The Kindred are huge alien warriors—a race of genetic traders whose population is ninety-five percent male. After saving Earth from the threat of invasion they demand a reward—the right to find brides among the population. The chances of being chosen are about the same as those of winning the lottery—guess it’s just Liv’s lucky day.

Baird is a Beast Kindred who recently escaped imprisonment and torture at the hands of the malevolent Scourge. Through the torment and pain only one thing kept him sane—the thought of finding and claiming his bride—Olivia. His need to possess her is a burning intensity that threatens to consume them both.

Angry at having her future and her family taken away from her, Liv vows to fight back the only way she can—by resisting. She has one month on the Kindred Mothership with Baird—their claiming period. If she can keep from having bonding sex with him during that time, she can go home and get on with her life on Earth.

But Baird isn’t going to make it easy for her. Every week he is allowed to touch Liv more and more intimately and according to the contract she signed, she has to let him. She’s determined to resist him but his touch sets her on fire. And just as she thinks she knows what she wants, a twist of fate and an attack by the faceless Scourge AllFather changes everything…

More about the Brides of the Kindred series
A race of Genetic Traders from beyond the stars
Three very different types of men
All looking for one thing…their brides

Beast Kindred—Savage in battle these dark, brooding warriors from Rageron bring their passion and intensity to the bedroom. They possess a very special endowment that ensures every sexual experience is a tantric one.

Blood Kindred—Cold as ice to their enemies, these tall, blond warriors from Tranq Prime warm up when they find the right woman. But be careful…they bite.

Twin Kindred—Muscular and rugged, these warriors from Twin Moons always come in pairs and cannot be separated. They experience physical pain when parted from each other…or the one woman they both choose to love.

And then there is the enemy…

The Scourge—A genetic trade gone wrong, these menacing outsiders have twisted desires and sexual needs fierce enough to frighten away even the most adventurous. Their need to dominate and possess their women completely has led to a strange prophesy that they must fulfill…or die trying.

Buy the Book

Here's what I'm giving it:

Rating: 3.5 stars

Here's why:

I like the premise of this first novel in the Brides of the Kindred series. The different types of Kindred and their specific needs in "brides" is interesting. However, there were a couple of things that irritated me about the story.

One of the things that drove me nuts was Olivia's constant denial of her situation and her whiny behavior at being selected as a bride for the Beast Kindred, Baird. Also her unwillingness to even try to get to know him better as well as her rule breaking were hard things to handle. And her quick change of behavior to a "save me, save me" mentality whenever her poor decisions landed her in hot water had me yelling at Baird to get rid of her and find someone better.

I like Baird. He had infinite patience and he bent over backwards to try to accommodate his unwilling and annoying bride to be. His attempts to move ahead with his life after suffering horribly at the hands of the enemy made me want to get to know him better.

The flow of the story was fine as was the overall writing of this story.

Would I recommend this book? Yes, but be prepared for the overflow of the whiny cup.

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12. Front Door

Visit a place where you’ve not been before
And the first thing you face is the sturdy front door.
Of fiberglass, oak, tempered glass, even steel,
The entryway should have a certain appeal.

My country home door, though, was streaky with rust.
The paint was all puckered, the cracks filled with dust.
The glass in the windows no longer got clean;
My husband was tired of changing the screen.

So I finally gave in and we got a new door,
A portal to spiff up the entry décor.
It isn’t embellished, just simple and plain
But it’s neat, a condition I hope to maintain.

When visitors come, they may notice or not
For most likely, the old one was one they forgot
But I’ll welcome them all with the door opened wide
And embrace every one that I usher inside.

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13. Tuesday Slice of Life Story Challenge

"Your life is your story. Write well. Edit often." -Susan Statham

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14. Fall Preview: Gregory Benton’s Smoke is a wordless fantasy

Rolling along with the Fall line-up for comics, here's another September release. Brooklyn's Hang Dai Studios has teamed with Alternative Comics to release their fall schedule, which includes three titles Smoke by Gregory Benton, Beef with Tomato by Dean Haspiel, and Schmuck by Seth Kushner and an all-star line-up of cartoonists. It's a powerhouse line-up of talent, each book with its own distinctive voice born of living life in New York City. In Benton's case, however urban life has inspired a wordless fantasy epic about two kids, apparently the children of migrant workers, who are swept away to a magical land beset by perils who are befriended and protected by a magnificent dog straight from the Day of the Dead. It's a wordless narrative that's part Amulet, part Adventure Time, but all original, with a bittersweet ending that packs a punch. We emailed Benton with a few question about his work and Smoke:

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15. Our free e-book for August: Traveling in Place

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Our free e-book for August:

Bernd Stiegler’s Traveling in Place: A History of Armchair Travel

Armchair travel may seem like an oxymoron. Doesn’t travel require us to leave the house? And yet, anyone who has lost herself for hours in the descriptive pages of a novel or the absorbing images of a film knows the very real feeling of having explored and experienced a different place or time without ever leaving her seat. No passport, no currency, no security screening required—the luxury of armchair travel is accessible to us all. In Traveling in Place, Bernd Stiegler celebrates this convenient, magical means of transport in all its many forms.
Organized into twenty-one “legs”—or short chapters—Traveling in Place begins with a consideration of Xavier de Maistre’s 1794 Voyage autour de ma chambre,an account of the forty-two-day “journey around his room” Maistre undertook as a way to entertain himself while under house arrest. Stiegler is fascinated by the notion of exploring the familiar as though it were completely new and strange. He engages writers as diverse as Roussel, Beckett, Perec, Robbe-Grillet, Cortázar, Kierkegaard, and Borges, all of whom show how the everyday can be brilliantly transformed. Like the best guidebooks, Traveling in Place is more interested in the idea of travel as a state of mind than as a physical activity, and Stiegler reflects on the different ways that traveling at home have manifested themselves in the modern era, from literature and film to the virtual possibilities of the Internet, blogs, and contemporary art.
Reminiscent of the pictorial meditations of Sebald, but possessed of the intellectual playfulness of Calvino, Traveling in Place offers an entertaining and creative Baedeker to journeying at home.
Download your copy here.

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16. Do not get mad - write it down!


Whenever someone has upset me, and I felt pretty stressed anything, I did not let me finish, and it drives me crazy because it just ends up not more problems in the long run!

Instead, I take a piece of paper and a pencil and write down everything I pretend that I'm writing a letter to someone (no matter who), as a rule, try someone I know I can rely on choice and have a good talk not disappointed with them because they do not hear (this person may also be imaginary, not real).

Source : nwlug

I write down everything I feel and write as if it were a discussion with them about everything that was bothering me, if mom and dad are always complaining about the side listening, in this letter, I want to say I was the problem, brothers and sisters try to fight, people at school, friends who had an argument with. By the time you write a letter to the person who actually trust (or invent) their own quiet now even read the letters and read what you have finished writing.

When I think about the letter to him, the argument was really her fault, or that part of the blame? If I'm a little homework Mom and Dad give me a break? etc., and use it to improve.

It is also good practice to control your temper and instead write angry at someone.

It also helps children and young people who feel lonely and feel that they have someone to talk to when she had to understand, to confront their problems, not really anyone.

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17. Sordid Taglines: Doing Children’s Lit Classics a Wrong

Moving house, home, and family does something to a woman’s brain. If that woman is me, it makes her ponder great intricacies of life, to say nothing of ballsy marketing plans. And today it all began with this book:

LittlePrincess5

I suspect that we Americans are generally more familiar with The Secret Garden as our preferred Frances Hodgson Burnett classic than this little number. Still, it shows up on the occasional Summer Reading List and occasionally gets adapted into films, for good or for ill. As long as you can bust through the child reader’s expectation that the book is going to be about an actual princess, you’re generally in the clear.

Still and all, it got me to thinking. Originally published in 1905 the book is technically in the public domain. And so I wondered what an enterprising soul might do with it if they wanted to hock it to the masses. How could you sell it to 21st century child readers in the most blatant, shameless manner possible? The answer? Kooky taglines, my friend.

With that in mind, here is a crazy conglomeration of famous children’s books with brassy, ridiculous taglines, possibly more likely to cause perturbation amongst the adult masses than interest with child readers. It’s the B-movieazation of classic children’s literature. And I love it.  Here they are, along with some of the odder images I’ve found over the years of these books.

A Little Princess: One orphan has the power to conjure up magic in an attic. But is any of her spellcasting true?

LittlePrincess14

The Little Prince: In the desert, no one can draw you a sheep.

littleprincestatue

Holes: Treasure, blood, revenge and more.

Holes8

Half Magic: Be careful what you wish AND WISH for.

HalfMagic2

When You Reach Me: Sometimes the life you save is your own.

WhenYouReachMe3

One Crazy Summer: Fight the power.

OneCrazySummer

A Wrinkle in Time: Science, God, Magic and one crazy pulsating brain.

WrinkleInTime5

The Secret Garden: You only THINK you’re alone.

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Harriet the Spy: You only THINK you’re alone.

HarrietSpy4

Charlotte’s Web: You only THINK . . . oh, fine fine. The idea’s played itself out.

WilberCharlotteStatue

Any you’d care to come up with as well?

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18. Alyson Waters Q & A

       At the Asymptote blog Katrine Øgaard Jensen has a Q & A with translator Alyson Waters.

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19. Boom Snot Twitty: this way that way by Doreen Cronin


This is the second book featuring the bear (Boom), a snail (Snot) and a bird (Twitty). Once again, the trio have differing agendas. The three animals are all packed to go on an outing, but none of them are packed for the same place. Boom wants to go splash in the water, Twitty wants to go hike in the mountains and Snot could go anywhere but all he has is snacks. Of course, it's up to the one with snacks to solve the dilemma. The illustrations by Renata Liwska are fuzzy, soft and simple and match the spare text. A good introduction to compromise for younger kids.

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20. Creating Classroom Environments: Paper Choices

Kids do need room to grow. Not only do they outgrow clothes in the blink of an eye, they also grow as readers and writers. This is why we need classroom libraries stocked with a wide range of levels, and it's why we need writing centers stocked with paper choices.

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21. Waiting for a Response

What should you do if you don't hear back from an editor or agent?

http://elizabeth-law.squarespace.com/blog/2014/9/30/the-art-of-following-up-5-things-to-do-when-you-havent-heard-back-from-an-editor-or-agent/

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22. Carol Brown Janeway

       Longtime Alfred A. Knopf editor and translator Carol Brown Janeway has passed away -- apparently rather suddenly; see Sonny Mehta's company-memo (warning ! dreaded pdf format !).
       The fact that she was the first recipient of the annual Friedrich Ulfers Prize (for the promotion of German-language literature) in 2013, and the second recipient of the Ottaway Award for the Promotion of International Literature (2014) should give you some idea of the significance of her role in fostering foreign literature in the US.
       Among her translations are also several works by Daniel Kehlmann, Thomas Bernhard's My Prizes -- and, in a near-unforgivable misstep, Márai Sándor's Embers.

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23. Monday Review: ALL THE RAGE by Courtney Summers

Summary: I finished reading this one today…and I just started reading it last night, right before bed. When I picked it up again this morning to enjoy with my coffee, it turned out to be basically un-put-down-able. It's easy to see how this... Read the rest of this post

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24. Fragments of Lichtenberg review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Pierre Senges' quite remarkable Fragments of Lichtenberg, due out shortly from Dalkey Archive Press (and, yes, this is a very 'Dalkey' title -- all for the best, to my mind).

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25. Here Is the World (of Leslea Newman)

Author Leslea Newman
Leslea Newman has written over 60 books for children and quite a few for adults as well. She is well known as an author of Jewish books and LGBT books, and wrote the groundbreaking title Heather Has Two Mommies (reissued in 2015 with new illustrations). Her newest picture book, Here is the World, is a joyful celebration of Jewish holidays around the year.

AUDIO:
 
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CREDITS:

Produced by: Feldman Children's Library at Congregation B'nai Israel 
Supported in part by: Association of Jewish Libraries 
Theme music: The Freilachmakers Klezmer String Band 
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