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1. Scholastic Education Hires Three New Executives

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2. Talk it Up: Promo Power


Pixabay image
I've been thinking lately about how promotion of our services can really make a difference in the public's response to our efforts.

There are traditional methods of promotion in getting the word out: flyers, handouts, posters, press releases to the media and youth serving organizations, online newsletters, social media, email blasts and so on.

Then there is the more subtle - and I might suggest more successful - methods of simple word-of-mouth advocacy.  The information we relay while on the desk working with patrons AND wherever we see our community members - at the grocery store, place of worship, gym, bar, 5K, trail or across the fence - becomes a personal invitation that's hard to turn down.

I've seen some great examples of this over the years:

  • An early literacy librarian who inevitably found her way to each new parent she saw (whether at the library or outside in her civilian life), cooed over their baby and personally invited them to baby storytime. She always carried a business card with the days and times of our storytimes to leave with the family. Our storytimes never lacked for attendees.
  • Desk assistants who, while checking people out, always mentioned upcoming programs of interest to their various children. They relayed excitement and a hint of the fun to come. Our programs were always full of eager kids.
  • Storytime presenters who, when interest in 1000 Books initiative started to falter, promoted the program in their sessions. Sign-ups and participation perked up again.
  • Librarians attending community meetings chatting about our programs and services with tablemates and putting our literacy efforts out front for people to discover. Amazing opportunities resulted.

Like any kind of advocacy, these personal conversations and invites work best if they are ongoing and consistent. Once word-of-mouth promotion becomes a habit for staff, it's as easy as falling off a log to promote services, programs and initiatives. And the results can be amazing!






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3. A rough book cover- Over is out

Its a book idea I've started working on. Its existed in thumbnail form for a while and I've started trying to nail it  down. So here is one of the cover ideas:-

Publishers feel free to shower me with money and offers.....
cheep..cheep...cheep

Bah!
I carry on regardless!

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4. Iowa Children’s Barber Exchanges Cuts For Stories

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5. Discussion Points: Line-Wide Crossovers are Great for Sales, Awful for New Readers

On my lunch break today, I decided to catch up on a few books I had fallen behind on.  Among them was Silk.  I picked up the latest issue, branded with the “Last Days of…” banner given to all Marvel mainline Secret Wars tie-ins, and while I missed the cleanliness of regular artist Stacy Lee’s lines, I found […]

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6. Shelves Filled with Books of All Sizes And Colors

Today’s Guest Blogger is Susan Brunecz, an Instructional Coach at Paul L. Dunbar Academy in Cleveland, Ohio.

IMG_3764When our students entered their classes on the first day of school two weeks ago, a roar of excitement erupted! They had just laid eyes on their new classroom libraries. Their shelves were filled with brand-new books of all sizes and colors. What a way to start the year!

But books weren’t always so plentiful. Last year, many shelves were bare. Only a few classes had established libraries.

Being new to this school, my goal was to get as many books as I could into our classrooms. Thanks to generous supporters, every class now has a library of its own.

Many of the children who attend our school move frequently, living with a friend or a relative. Others live in shelters or temporary housing. Our school is the most stable place our kids have and the best way for them to access books. Here they are encouraged to read all that they can.

IMG_9419-editNow, when you peek into a classroom, you’ll find students exploring the pages of books at their reading level. And when they finish, they’ll find a new book waiting to be read.

There are still schools out there whose shelves are bare. They need your help.

Please donate today to help kids start the school year with classrooms full of books. Your gift will be matched.

 

First Book was able to provide books to the students at Paul L. Dunbar Academy thanks to the support of JetBlue.

The post Shelves Filled with Books of All Sizes And Colors appeared first on First Book Blog.

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7. SPX 2015 programming is here, with new curators

The SPX programming went live today, with a plethora of great programs and a bit of news: Bill Kartalopoulos, programming director for the last nine years, is stepping into an advisory capacity, mostly with international guests. This year's programming was handled by a committee led by Esther Kim of Fantom Comics that includes Michael Cavna and Jen Vaughn, with Kartalopoulos continuing in a consulting capacity with a focus on international guests. 

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8. Australia Children’s Book Week 2015 YA Short List

I didn’t even realise the Australian Children’s Book Week awards were happening until I strolled into my library and ran face-to-face with the display. And better yet?! I’d read 5 out of 6 of the Young Adult short listed books! GO ME. (Clearly I’ve got monstrously good taste in books.) So obviously we need to have […]

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9. New Map ~ After the Ashes

























I love getting snail mail, especially when it's a shiny new book with a map that I worked on earlier this year!

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10. Just One Big Sun

Just one big sun is in the sky
To shower us with light
And like things on which we rely,
We undermine its might.

Unless we see it rise and set,
Its beauty’s often missed.
To many people, I would bet,
It hardly does exist.

But when you see it first appear,
A’glow in neon pink,
It beats the finest chandelier
And makes you stop and think…

That Nature has the upper hand
When majesty’s close by
And sunrise really does demand
The awe we should supply.

So yes, the sun is still the same
No matter where you roam,
But catching it in morning’s flame
We rarely do at home.

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11. Miss Piggy and Kermit: From the Happiness Hotel to the Heartbreak Hotel!


Well, I rarely pay attention to celebrity gossip, but this particular piece has to do with The Muppets!

As I'm sure you've heard, after 40 years, Miss Piggy and Kermit the Frog have split!

Say it isn't so!

Sadly, the news is true, and both have publicly stated that they had come to the mutual decision to end their relationship. The famous Frog and Pig duo announced their break up over (what else?) social media this past August. While Kermit and Piggy have been known to bicker in public, the main source of their choice might just be that Piggy herself, is more in love with the spotlight than Kermit is comfortable. 

This news comes hot on the heels of the new Muppet show, which will be airing on ABC in a few weeks. For those of us who care to relive the glory days of Miss Piggy and Kermit's love, the The Syosset Public Library offers an extensive collection of classic Muppet related media. This includes DVD's, CD Soundtracks, and books! One book in particular interest to this topic is Miss Piggy's Night Out, an early reader, featuring a date between the two when they were just young love birds -- er -- love PIGS and FROGS. 
http://catalog.syossetlibrary.org/search/?searchtype=t&searcharg=miss+piggy%27s+night+out&sortdropdown=-&SORT=DZ&extended=0&SUBMIT=Search&searchlimits=&searchorigarg=Xpiggy%27s+night+out%26SORT%3DD

To rub salt on the wounds of the news, rumor has it that Kermit has already moved on with a new pig named Denise! However, in typical form, Mr. The Frog remains coy, insisting over Twitter that the two (he and Denise) are just good friends. 

-A heart-broken Miss Jessikah


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12. The Mystery of the Golden Christmas Trees, by Carolyn Snelling | Dedicated Review

The Mystery of the Golden Christmas Trees is a sharply written and compelling tale that places religious themes in an inviting, contemporary setting.

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13. Festival Call For Entries: JAPIC Animation Artist Residency, Anima, Animac

Take advantage of our hand-picked list of call for entries from animation festivals around the globe.

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14. Crazy September Ahead!

Can you believe the calendar says September already? Seems like I say that every month, not that’s it’s September, but you know what I mean. August was a decent month for reading. I didn’t finish a huge number of books but I did start reading a huge number! Yes, yes, there is definitely an imbalance there, but I suspect that even if there were some sort of magic pill or vitamin supplement to right the imbalance, I would refuse to take it. Besides, it all works out in the end anyway and there is no reason to get ruffled about it.

What’s on tap for the month? Should I repeat myself from a few August posts? Sure, why not, you may not have read those, or maybe you have forgotten unless you are creepy weird and keeping diligent track of all the titles I mention that I am reading.

Ok, so this is what’s going on:

  • Rare and Commonplace Flowers: The Story of Elizabeth Bishop and Lota de Macedo Soares by Carmen L. Oliveira. Thank goodness I got this one from the university library so I don’t have to rush through it! The book goes along with my study of Elizabeth Bishop. I am also reading the Complete Poems and have made it through the first two books she published. In addition, I am reading her letters, One Art. So very good!
  • The Rider by Tim Krabbé. A classic in the realm of cycling memoirs. The opening is fabulous. It begins just before a race and you can really feel the tension and excitement.
  • The Republic of the Imagination by Azar Nafisi. I am about to begin on her close reading of Huckleberry Finn and I expect it will be good. Even if it isn’t, the introduction of this book is fantastic and is alone worth the price of admission. I plan on writing about that introduction soon because its themes have popped up in a few other places recently.
  • Still Time by Jean Hegland. I am enjoying this one very much. It is about a Shakespeare professor who has Alzheimer’s and is slowly losing his memory. Rich with Shakespeare quotes and references, celebratory, yet sad.
  • I am sorry to say I failed to finish reading The Architect’s Apprentice by Elif Shafak. I have not intentionally dragged this one out so long. Hopefully September will see me getting to the end of it!
  • Karen Memory by Elizabeth Bear. I am loving this book so much right now. I am reading it on my commute and at lunch and I have almost missed my stop a couple times and have been a tad late returning from lunch once or twice.
  • Oscar Wilde’s Women by Eleanor Fitzsimons. This is for a Library Journal review and is about the women in Wilde’s life who influenced him.

Phew, got all that?

Now, just arrived and about to arrive from the library, a number of books that I placed hold requests on at the beginning of the summer!

And speaking of the RIP Challenge, it’s on! This year it is being hosted by The Estella Society. And it is the ten-year anniversary of what has become an annual event for a good many people. Given that pile of in progress books I just listed, I am not certain how much creepy reading I will get in this year, but I will manage at least one book. It runs until October 31st, so maybe I will be able to slip in something else that’s short. You just never know!


Filed under: In Progress

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15. Powell’s Q&A: Salman Rushdie

Describe your latest book. Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights is a fairy-tale of New York (well, mostly New York). New York with added genies (jinn). It's about a jinnia princess, Dunia, who acquires a large number of human offspring, and uses them to help her battle an invasion of our world by the [...]

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16. Guest Post Featuring "Rufus and the Flying Carpet"

I haven't written my own children's book yet, so in the meantime, I can highlight the work of others!
~featuring Rufus and the Flying Carpet by Pauli Murphy


     The Series of adventures with "Rufus and The Flying Carpet" are an invitation. An invitation to Children of ALL ages (i.e.humans) to leap into the furthest reaches of imagination and join Rufus and his Friends as they engage in wonderful and exciting experiences with the help of their Magical Flying Carpet.

     The wonder that young children are naturally drawn to is addressed from the start, with Rufus' ability to see Faeries and Angelic Beings and such-like. To Rufus, as to most of the young, this facility is entirely normal and he is surprised to find that not everybody has it. His belief that you can "Be, Do or Have anything that you wish" is what fuels the intentions of the adventurers and "the sky", as you will see, is by no means "the limit"!

     The stories skip along, ever more expansive and imaginative, inviting the reader (or listener) to begin to guess what could happen next. The illustrations, by Sandra Ingham and Ellie Grant of Truro, add a delight and focus, whilst never detracting from the reader's own ability and desire to imagine the amazing scenes for themselves.

     Mentored, with regard to structure, flow and direction, by Tomos Turtle (15, who won the Barefoot Books, nationwide First Prize for story-telling at the age of 8) Pauli Murphy's series picks the reader up and puts you right there on the Carpet, with the adventurous little rabbits, to travel to places so unknown, peopled by beings of astounding contrast that you will find yourself holding your breath from time to time !

     This 'benevolent' series will not dismay as it builds upon the wonderful inter-relationships of the main characters, each with their delightful humour, strengths, weaknesses and their courage as well as vulnerabilities clearly evident. Beautiful, carefully embedded life lessons pop up and are clarified by the characters and the circumstances, but never "saccharine" or imposing, with choice and free will being paramount.

     The mark of good fiction, leaving the reader very much wanting more, is distinctive in Pauli Murphy's writing. You can tell from the start that he truly enjoys creating these books.We suggest ($3.08 on Kindle) that you might enjoy reading them, perhaps even more so when reading them to children.

     "Rufus and The Flying Carpet - The Beginning" is the 1st in the series. Pauli is currently at work on the 2nd (outer space is mentioned !) and there is a ($1.53) on Kindle, soon to be in print) lovely little booklet, "Rufus' Lessons for Children of ALL ages - How to tie a Bowline" (pronounced "Bo-Lin") The MOST important knot in the World ! Could be a life-saver, while the Flying Carpet Series is a "Life Savour !"


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17. Baby Cries Every Time Book Ends: VIDEO

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18. Illustration Friday: Work

Alas, his work was not yet done.

I finished reading War and Peace this week, which for me is a big deal.  I don't have much time to read, so it took me several months to get through it.  I'm embarrassed to admit that I have dozens of classic books, but I've never read most of them.  So I challenged myself to give them a little love, starting with the biggest and most daunting one.  I was surprised at how contemporary it felt at times, and the characters were wonderfully complex, never entire good or bad.  Very human.

Any suggestions on a favorite classic for me to read next?


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19. Dream Sequence

What works and doesn't work when incorporating a dream scene into your novel.

https://warriorwriters.wordpress.com/2015/07/06/when-dreams-go-bad-dream-sequences-what-works-what-flops/

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20. Wild Simplicity Daybook

wild simplicity daybook by small meadow press

As a member of Wisteria & Sunshine, Lesley Austin’s gentle online community for home-and-hearth inspiration, I’ve had the fun of watching behind the scenes as her beautiful new Wild Simplicity Daybook took shape. Today is a day to celebrate, because the Daybook has landed in her Etsy shop!

wild simplicity daybook cover at small meadow press

It’s a Midori-style cover made with the tender eco-friendly consciousness that suffuses all Lesley’s handmade wares, and she has created a selection of inserts to let you customize your Daybook for your own use. I’m particularly fond of Lesley’s monthly calendars (I’ve been using them in one form or another for almost a decade!), and her new weekly diary pages are the loveliest I’ve seen anywhere. She offers them in insert booklets spanning three months at a time, with the Autumn and Winter inserts currently available.

wild simplicity weekly calendar pages from small meadow press

Besides the monthly and weekly calendar inserts, she is also offering blank inserts for notes or journaling and a “Days to Keep” booklet for recording birthdays, anniversaries, and other special dates.

This probably sounds like a sponsored post, but it isn’t! And Lesley didn’t ask me to write it. I am a longtime fan of her paper goods who has had the pleasure of becoming Lesley’s friend as well, and I’m so excited to see her latest venture take flight. Recently I was chatting with another friend about things we love, and I said, “I think my aesthetic is one part Waldorf kindergarten, one part library, and one part Small Meadow Press.” :)

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21. Stephen King Themed Crossword in The Guardian

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22. BOOK LINKS: The Past through Poetry and Picture Books

You probably know that I'm a big fan of ALA's Book Links magazine and have been writing a poetry column for that publication for over a decade now. And now they're celebrating their 25th anniversary. Very cool! Here is a link to the September 2015 issue of Book Links. Click here.

My column this month focuses on poetry and poetic picture books that depict history and biography. I include an annotated list of two dozen wonderful books that are not-to-be-missed. You can read the entire thing here. If you'd just like a taste, here's an excerpt. 

The Past through Poetry and Picture Books
by Sylvia Vardell
A lovely picture book can take us back to special childhood memories, but it is also a carefully crafted work of art with drama in every page turn. And when a picture book melds history and poetry, something unique emerges—a visual glimpse of people and times of the past, shared in powerful images and spare or lyrical language. Here we examine picture books that feature stories or people from history in poems and poetic language. These books offer a dual opportunity: introducing young children to touchstone moments of our human story, as well as invigorating that study of history for older students by using the visuals of the accessible picture book alongside the distilled language of poetry to heighten interest and understanding. The best historical and biographical picture books tend to be focused on one person or specific event; a story that can be told in the span of a few pages with illustrations that provide a visual window into history, portrayed authentically and accurately.
And here are some of the activities I suggest to accompany the books that are cited. (The link provides the Common Core State Standards for each activity, too.)
In the Classroom: Read the poems or story aloud first without illustrations to savor the language. Then, on the second reading, show the illustrations and discuss the differences in the experiences, such as how the poem looks, how it makes readers feel, and how the illustrator visualized each line, stanza, or the entire verse. Invite students to create a homemade book of original illustrations to accompany a favorite poem (one line per page) or the lyrics of a favorite song, or alongside found poems they create based on researching facts and details. This can help introduce young readers to longer, narrative poems or classic works available in picture-book format, such as Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”; “The Owl and the Pussycat,” by Edward Lear; “Casey at the Bat,” by Ernest Lawrence Thayer; and “A Visit from St. Nicholas” (or “’Twas the Night before Christmas”), by Clement Clarke Moore; and others in the Visions in Poetry series.

In the Classroom: Work with students to understand the setting of the book by looking up images for each locale in an atlas, via Google Maps, or other resources. Then challenge young readers to research what was happening in the world during this time, linking with relevant nonfiction picture books, reference works, and online resources. Using museum resources can add so much to children’s learning of historical content and reading of historical literature. Check to see what local history museums or children’s museums might have available where you live. Do they have personnel who can visit the classroom or library? Exhibits or materials they will loan out? It is also possible to access online resources, such as Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibits, featuring topics such as civil rights and Latino life, and “Today’s Document,” available at the National Archives online, which includes a visual image of an actual historical document. Also useful are the American Memory and Today in History projects, which have links at the Library of Congress online, which offers a wealth of information and visuals to supplement historical study.

In the Classroom: Sharing primary source documents, maps, time lines, and artifacts helps children visualize and conceptualize historical times through hands-on materials. Even audio resources can provide a connection with the voices of the past. For example, the American Rhetoric website offers an online speech bank with audio recordings, transcripts, and visuals for more than 5,000 important speeches. When children can hear, see, or touch the “stuff” of history, it becomes so much more real and memorable for them. Check out Jackdaws Publications, for primary-source materials that support the study of many historical eras. For a model of how to use primary sources and “do history” with kids, check out DoHistory, a website that “shows you how to piece together the past from the fragments that have survived.”

In the Classroom: Bring the historical period of a picture book to life through readers’ theater by inviting children to read bits of dialogue or narration aloud, by having them dress up and speak as the historical subject of the book, or by staging more elaborate dramatic skits. Connecting drama with history makes the people and places real to children through first-hand experience, almost like participating in a living history museum. In fact, Carol Otis Hurst provides helpful guidelines for involving children in creating and participating in their own informal living history museums (follow the links at http://carolhurst.com for more information). Another idea is to look for local reenactors who might want to share their experiences. Even local actors who perform in community or professional theater can be recruited as guests to share their insights on costuming, dialect coaching, and character research for historical dramas. Through one of these several avenues, children will be able to find some spark of personal connection with history and poetry.


Now, don't forget to join the rest of the Poetry Friday bloggers who are gathering at Linda's place, TeacherDance. See you there!






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23. YALSAblog Tweets of the Week - September 4, 2015

A short list of tweets from the past week of interest to teens and the library staff that work with them.

Do you have a favorite Tweet from the past week? If so add it in the comments for this post. Or, if you read a Twitter post between September 4 and September 11 that you think is a must for the next Tweets of the Week send a direct or @ message to lbraun2000 on Twitter.

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24. Inari Konkon Review

Title: Inari Konkon Genre: Slice of Life, Magical Girl, Romance Publisher: Kodokawa Shoten (JP, US) Artist/Writer: Morohe Yoshida Translation: Andrew Gibler & Jenn Forsyth Serialized in: Young Ace Review copy provided by the publisher. I was a big fan of the Inari Kon Kon anime in 2014 and I always hoped that the manga would be licensed as well since ... Read more

The post Inari Konkon Review appeared first on Organization Anti-Social Geniuses.

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25. Preview The 1st Episode of Guardians of The Galaxy on Disney XD This Saturday

Disney XD brings the Guardians of the Galaxy from the theaters to your kids TV in their own series. Our thoughts on the series premiere.

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