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1. Where Did My Clothes Come From? by Chris Butterworth, illustrated by Lucia Gaggiotti

Where Did My Clothes Come From? by Chris Butterworth with illustrations by Lucia Gaggiotti is the fantastic companion to equally fantastic How Did That Get in My Lunchbox?, published in 2011. What I love about both books is the intended audience, which I would say is roughly 3 - 6 years old. The text in Butterworth's books is short and playful, drawing readers in. Gagiotti's illustrations are superb. She captures the absolute cuteness and fun of little kid clothes (and little kids) while also doing a fine job of illustrating industrial machinery and factory work.

Where Did My Clothes Come From? is definitely a global book with Butterworth focusing on textiles that have interesting creation processes, from blue jeans and sweaters to silk, soccer uniforms, boots and fleece. Besides cotton, rubber and wool, Butterworth also notes other plants that clothes are made from, like linen and hemp, and other animals that wool is collected from, like yaks, camels, bison, rabbits and goats.

Where Did My Clothes Come From? gently touches on what has become a national issue, clothing waste. Butterworth makes some friendly suggestions for reusing clothes that you have "grown out of or just don't love anymore" without specifically stating that the influx of cheap and cheaply made clothing encourages Americans to buy more and toss more clothes every year. Apparently not everyone sends cloths to Amvets or Goodwill, nor, according to the infographic below, does everyone know that out of the 13 million tons of textiles trashed every year, only 2 million of that is recovered for reuse or recycling.

This is heady information for the intended audience, but a message that the adults reading the book could probably stand to hear. For readers and listeners who are fascinated by Where Did My Clothes Come From?, check out this book:

For slightly older readers, don't miss:

Source: Review Copy

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2. Friday Linky List - 27 November 2015

From NewStatesman via Fantasy Glasgow: English magic: How folklore haunts the British landscape

From BuzzFeed Books via SCBWI British Isles: If White Characters Were Described Like People of Color in Literature - Surely there must be more appetizing pale foods than mayonnaise, cauliflower, and tapioca?

At Gotham Writers via SCBWI Belgium: Elmore Leonard: 10 Rules for Good Writing. Short, sweet, yup.

From HuffPost via SCBWI Belgium: How To Think Like a Writer

The Trailer for Alice Through the Looking Glass

From OMG Facts: 5 Things You Didn't Know Grimm's Fairytales And Will Now Think About All Differently - interesting.

From the BBC: Orpheus Underground...Novelist Neil Gaiman explores the intricacies of the Orpheus myth, the timeless story of art's place in trying to recover the dead.

From Arts.Mic via Stumble: 14 Brilliant Pieces of Literature You Can Read in the Time It Takes to Eat Lunch

At the poke. Elizabethan Superheroes. They've made the rounds before, but they're worth another look for my costume design friends at the University of Edinburgh.

At The Picture Book Den: Looking at the illustration of eyes in children's picture books - Peony Lewis

At BoredPanda: Fairytales Come to Life in Magical Photos by Russian Photographer Margarita Kareva

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3. What a load of BS: Q&A with Mark Peters

Terms for bullshit in the English language have grown so vast it has now become a lexicon itself. We talked to Mark Peters, author of Bullshit: A Lexicon, about where the next set of new terms will come from, why most of the words are farm related, and bullshit in politics.

The post What a load of BS: Q&A with Mark Peters appeared first on OUPblog.

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4. What We’re Thankful For

Although Thanksgiving was yesterday here in the United States, we PubCrawlers figured it was never too late to be thankful for our blessings and privileges. Without further ado:

S. Jae-Jones (JJ)


I’m thankful for my Skullcandy Aviator headphones because not only do they look good, they tune out everything around me so I can concentrate on writing.

Kelly Van Sant

Kelly Square

I’m thankful for my local library branch!

Hannah Ferguson


I am thankful for my nerdy writing group. We are self named The Fellowship and when we aren’t writing, we’re drinking wine and talking about it. I daresay they’ve saved my sanity on more than one occasion.

Rachel Seigel

Rachel Square

I’m thankful to have a job that I enjoy, and that gives me the opportunity to read amazing books & get paid to sell them!

Julie Eshbaugh

Julie Eshbaugh Square

I’m thankful for my online writing friends. Because of them I never feel like I’m toiling alone.

Kat Zhang

Kat Square

I’m thankful for my writing friends, too!

Stephanie Garber

Stephanie Garber Square

I am thankful for every single thing that has happened this year and for all of the new people who have come into my life. :)

Stacey Lee

Stacey Lee Square

I’m thankful for this post so I can say how thankful I am to join Pubcrawl this year. I’m also thankful for my parents, who are still vibrant (even though Dad’s 81) and I’m also thankful for friends and emojis.🐙

E. C. Myers

EC Myers

I’m thankful to have a family that supports my writing goals and helps me keep my love of telling stories a priority even when life gets busy, demanding, and stressful.

Jodi Meadows

Jodi Hi-Res Square

I’m thankful for so many amazing books to read.

And we are all, of course, thankful for each and every one of our readers. <3

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5. Climate change and the Paris Conference: is the UNFCCC process flawed?

As representatives from 146 countries gather in Paris for the 2015 UN Climate Change Conference, we’ve turned to our Very Short Introduction series for insight into the process, politics and topics of discussion of the conference. Is the UNFCCC process flawed?

The post Climate change and the Paris Conference: is the UNFCCC process flawed? appeared first on OUPblog.

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6. रक्तदान और अमिताभ बच्चन

(गूगल सर्च से साभार तस्वीर)     रक्तदान और अमिताभ बच्चन एक खुलासा हेपिटाइटिस बी और बिग बी की वैक्सीन को लेकर जागरुकता स्वैच्छिक रक्तदान की जागरुकता के लिए ,मैं, अक्सर अपनी मोटिवेशनल स्पीच में ,बच्चन साहब के नाम को भी लेती हूं कि इन्हें भी रक्त की जरुरत पडी थी. रक्त की जरुरत किसी […]

The post रक्तदान और अमिताभ बच्चन appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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7. Joshua David Bellin on Unreliable Narrators, Recycling Characters, and Mashup Pitches

We're thrilled to welcome author Joshua David Bellin to the blog today as our monthly Ask a Pub Pro! Joshua is here to answer your questions on what exactly is an unreliable narrator and how to craft one, how to creatively recycle character types, and the pros and cons of using Book X meets Book Y in pitches. He's also giving away a signed copy of his recent release, SURVIVAL COLONY 9, with the winner also to receive a copy of the sequel, SCAVENGER OF SOULS, when it comes out next year. Be sure to check it out below!

If you have a question you'd like to have answered by an upcoming publishing professional, send it to AYAPLit AT gmail.com and put Ask a Pub Pro Question in the subject line.

Ask a Pub Pro: on Unreliable Narrators, Recycling Characters, and Mashup Pitches by Joshua David Bellin

Hi readers! I’m thrilled to be here on Adventures in YA Publishing to answer some of your questions. Enjoy, and at the end of the post, check out the cool giveaway I’m offering!

1. I keep seeing agents and editors ask for unreliable narrators. I know a bit about what this is but am not real clear. Can you explain what an unreliable narrator is and why they are so popular?

Unreliable narrators come in all forms, but the basic idea is that they’re narrators the reader can’t fully trust. This might be because the narrator lacks important information: for example, the narrator might be suffering from memory loss. Or the narrator might be a young child whose perceptions of the world are immature. The narrator might have a mental illness that leads her/him to misrepresent reality. And so on.

Read more »

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8. My tweets

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9. A Very Special Christmas Tree, by Debra Buchanan | Dedicated Review

A Very Special Christmas Tree is a picture book that helps spread the “true meaning” of Christmas.

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10. Mitochondria donation: an uncertain future?

Earlier this year, UK Parliament voted to change the law to support new and controversial in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) procedures known as ‘mitochondrial donation’. The result is that the UK is at the cutting-edge of mitochondrial science and the only country in the world to legalise germ-line technologies. The regulations came into force on 29th October this year, and clinics are now able to apply for a licence.

The post Mitochondria donation: an uncertain future? appeared first on OUPblog.

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11. La nave di Teseo

       The big news in Italian publishing this year has been the sale of RCS Libri to Mondadori (see, for ecample, the Mondadori press release), with venerable literary imprints including Bompiani and Rizzoli suddenly swallowed into a 'Mondazzoli' juggernaut (apparently controlling half of the local book market, and seventy percent of the paperback market) -- run by a Berlusconi, no less.
       It doesn't come as much of a surprise that many literary types are apparently jumping ship -- led by Bompiani editor in chief Elisabetta Sgarbi, who has now announced the founding of a new publishing house, to be called 'La nave di Teseo'; see, for example, the (Italian) report at Il libraio.
       I'm not so sure about that name -- suggested by no one less than Umberto Eco, who is fully on board with the new venture -- given that it's the (Rizzoli-published) Italian title of a ... J.J.Abrams book (see the publicity page)
       No real English-language coverage that I've seen so far, but there should be some shortly -- this is a big (and nicely messy) story.

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12. My Illustration Masterclass - Big Black Friday Sale!

Okay, much though I personally hate the whole Black Friday bonkers shopping thing, it turns out that there is an very definite up side... (pause for drumroll)... 

... because my Craftsy class is going to be offered at a special SALE PRICE for the whole weekend - hurrah!
So, if you haven't got around to signing up yet (shame on you :-D ) here is the SUPER-DUPER BLACK FRIDAY SALE link to my illustration masterclass, which will teach you how to draw the most expressive and funny picture book characters. I make it easy. Promise.  

Just think what an amazingly original Christmas present idea it would be for an arty friend. Or maybe just an early Christmas present for yourself (the best kind of present...). Go on, treat yourself...

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13. Thankful For Teachers and More

I have the honor of wrapping up the TA Three Weeks of Thanks-Giving.  To read the eloquent posts of my fellow TAs, follow these links: 

Like all of you, I’m thankful for many things like family, friends, church, health, a place to live and thousands of other things that I sometimes take for granted.  But since this is a TeachingAuthors blog, I’ll confine my thankful thoughts –online anyway – to blessings in that part of my life. 

I’m thankful for great teachers.  I recently spoke at the Arkansas Reading Association where I did a session titled “Writing Nonfiction Using Fiction Techniques” which was attended by some amazing teachers.   Teachers today are given the task of teaching students how to write.  It is a tall order and not an easy thing to pull off even for a professional author of books.   I’m thankful for teachers who do their best even though their classes are filled with a wide range of students that include both gifted and talented and struggling readers.

I’m thankful that people, organizations and museums through the years have preserved our history by preserving documents and artifacts.  As a nonfiction author who does lots of primary source research, I can do research like I do because those before me had the forethought of preservation.   

I’m thankful to enter this holiday season with an exciting new project spinning through my mind.  In the last couple of weeks, I’ve had the real treat of having my newest project go to auction.  It is a dream of authors for more than one editor would want to publish their next book.  I know the new publishing house and editor is just as excited about the project as I am. 

What are you thankful for?  

Carla Killough McClafferty 

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14. What I learned about al Qaeda from analyzing the Bin Laden tapes

In the months following the Taliban's evacuation of Kandahar, Afghanistan, in December 2001, cable news networks set up operations in the city in order to report on the war. In the dusty back rooms of a local recording studio, a CNN stringer came across an extraordinary archive: roughly 1,500 audiotapes taken from Osama bin Laden's residence, where he had lived from 1997-2001, during al Qaeda's most coherent organizational momentum.

The post What I learned about al Qaeda from analyzing the Bin Laden tapes appeared first on OUPblog.

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15. सलीका

सलीका खूबसूरती के साथ साथ सलीका  होना भी बहुत जरुरी है . असल में ,कल समारोह में एक महिला को देखा जोकि बेहद खूबसूरत लग रही थी. सलीके से बांधी हुई साडी, आभूषण और हलका सा मेकअप सभी कुछ बहुत फब रहा था. मेरे मन में हुआ कि जाकर उस महिला से हैलो बोल कर […]

The post सलीका appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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16. Holiday Characters Who Would Win

writing_prompt_holidayHoliday Characters Who Would Win

IT’S THE MOST WONDERFUL TIME OF THE YEAR! The holidays are upon us! In case you didn’t notice, I’ve got a really, really bad case of Holiday Cheer. Gingerbread cookies for everyone! Non-stop holiday sing-a-longs! Ugly sweaters galore! Hot chocolate! Hot chocolate! HOT CHOCOLATE!

One of the best parts of the holiday season is the HOLIDAY CHARACTERS! I am so very thrilled to curl up on my sofa with some fuzzy socks (and hot chocolate) and watch my favorite movies: The Grinch, The Nightmare Before Christmas, Elf . . . It’s not the holidays without movie magic!

Some holiday characters have magical powers, while others just have magical hearts. I’d like to think that the holidays makes everyone a little more magical, am I right? So, if these characters had to duke it out (in the name of saving the holidays, obviously), who would win??

  1. The Grinch vs. Ebenezer Scrooge from The Night Before Christmas
  2. Buddy the Elf vs. Tiny Tim from The Night Before Christmas
  3. The Sugarplum Fairy from The Nutcracker vs. The Little Drummer Boy
  4. Frosty the Snowman vs. Rudolf the Red-Nosed Reindeer
  5. The Abominable Snowman vs. The Ghost of Christmas Past
  6. Jack Frost vs. Jack Skellington from The Nightmare Before Christmas
  7. The Nutcracker Prince vs. Cindy Lou Who from The Grinch
  8. Max from The Grinch vs. Kevin McCallister from Home Alone

Who do YOU think would win? Which holiday characters do you want to see included on the list? Share your thoughts in the Comments below!

Happy happy holidays,

En-Szu, STACKS Writer

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17. Catching Up With STAR STUFF: Carl Sagan and the Mysteries of the Cosmos

Fred and I just got back from a quick trip to London where I got to meet a woman I consider a true genius, Viviane Schwarz. We have been "virtual studio colleagues"- a term she coined for ummm.....at least 10 years. Anyhow- we got to hang out for whole day. We went to the Tate modern and went from hot drink to hot drink- which is what she said Londoners do. It was freezing, so I totally get the tea thing now. 

Anyhow- I did a check of STAR STuFF when we got back to Mauritius and found the following stuff: STAR STUFF as a top 20 books of 2015,   the Orbis Pictus Honor for STAR STUFF, What to Read to Your Kids, Common Sense Media and ALA Notable Books and many wonderful bloggers out there . THANK YOU!!

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18. Life, Only Better review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Anna Gavalda's Life, Only Better, just out in English from Europa Editions.

       I'm always curious about bestselling fiction abroad, and Gavalda is one of the few really popular-in-France domestic authors that is also regularly translated (others like Guillaume Musso or Marc Levy have a much harder time getting translated). This is the fourth of her books under review at the complete review, and that isn't even all of them (I drew the line at Billie).
       I do grudgingly have to admit that she's onto something -- indeed, I think these would be good books to dissect in creative-writing classes. I just wish she'd be a bit more (or is it less ?) ambitious with her subject-matter. (It's also why that other very popular French author, Amélie Nothomb, is so much better: Nothomb's aim isn't first and foremost heartstrings-tugging and crowd-pleasing (as Gavalda's so obviously is); Gavalda is a manipulative writer, playing to the crowd, while Nothomb is largely (and wonderfully hopelessly) only caught up/entangled in herself.)

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This book is a gem and a gift, and in order to avoid spoilers I'll say up front: Parker is blind. The dots on the cover are Braille. And now you know ...except, it's not a big secret. Really, Parker would be the first to say, "So? And get over... Read the rest of this post

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20. XMAS GIFTS - white stuff

More pretty gift packaging patterns, which I keep seeing particularly on soaps, this time from White Stuff. This fashion label have created a group of home and gift items to compliment their clothing, bags, and accessories.

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21. Geeking Out at the WHO Shop in London

Anyone home?

Christmas Dalek!

Yes, I think I hear someone in there! 

Weeping Angel! Don't blink. 

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22. Lire books of the year

       French magazine Lire annually selects a top book in twenty different categories -- with one crowned as overall "meilleur livre de l'année". They announced this year's list -- and 2084, by Boualem Sansal, is the not-so-surprising book of the year.
       Other category winners include a two-volume Virginie Despentes as French novel of the year, a Jón Kalman Stefánsson as best foreign fiction (beating out titles by Javier Cercas and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie), and Ryan Gattis' All Involved as best roman noir.
       They also list the finalists in all the catgories, and among the oddities surfacing there: an Elmore Leonard-biography, apparently translated from (though apparently not yet published in) English, by Laurent Chalumeau -- see the Rivages publicity page -- the author of such works as Anne Frank 2, le retour !, and Fuck (see the Grasset publicity page). I wonder whether this will make it (back ?) into English.

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23. Daily Drawing: Turkey 20


It’s the day after Thanksgiving! And this turkey is very happy to see it!

The post Daily Drawing: Turkey 20 appeared first on rob-peters.com.

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24. XMAS GIFTS - hema

Our Friday eye candy this week come from the Dutch chain store Hema whose HQ is in Amsterdam. The company are now in the UK, with a British online shop and retail stores in London, Bromley, Birmingham and Stanstead. I had a browse around the website and it is a place to find something a bit different to the high street. Here are some picks that stood out for their surface prints... Read the rest of this post

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25. Is neuroculture a new cultural revolution?

Are we at the birth of a new culture in the western world? Are we on the verge of a new way of thinking? Both humanistic and scientific thinkers suggest as much.

The post Is neuroculture a new cultural revolution? appeared first on OUPblog.

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