What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Posts

(from all 1562 Blogs)

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts from All 1562 Blogs, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 642,819
1. Scholastic Kids Council: Kayla

Hi!Welcome Kayla to the 2015-16 Scholastic Kids Council!

kaylaI’d like to introduce you to Kayla who will be one of the special contributors to the STACKS this year.

Look for more to come from Kayla this year!

Add a Comment
2. Happy Thanksgiving!

0 Comments on Happy Thanksgiving! as of 11/26/2015 12:05:00 AM
Add a Comment
3. विविधता मे एकता

विविधता मे एकता विविधता मे एकता ये हैं मेरी सहेलियां मारिया , जाहिदा और प्रीत कौर … और हम बहुत मिल जुल कर रहती है. वो मुस्लमान हो या ईसाई या फिर पंजाबन … मुझे मजहब नही पता बस इतना पता है कि वो बहुत अच्छी हैं  और एक दूसरे के दुख दर्द  मे काम […]

The post विविधता मे एकता appeared first on Monica Gupta.

Add a Comment
4. Scholastic Kids Council: Alex

Hi!Welcome Alex!

Hi! My name is Alex, and I was one of the lucky ones chosen for the 2015-16 Scholastic Kids Council! I made a display about things that represent me and here is why I chose some of those items.Alex

I made everything around the boogie board because every summer, my family rents a beach house. I spend a lot of time in the ocean boogie boarding and surfing. I get to spend a lot of time with my family and I really enjoy it. I am a big baseball player and fan, so I put my baseball glove, bat, and trophy in the display. I also enjoy skateboarding, and I do that a lot in my free time with my friends and my older brother.

I absolutely LOVE Star Wars and LEGOs. I think Star Wars LEGOs are amazing! This is one of my favorite ships I have built so far. I included my saxophone and my headphones because I love music. I love to play saxophone, especially jazz and pop music. I also like listening to dubstep with my headphones while I play video games. I got the red bear for being on my school’s student council as Activity Director.  I named it Juan Pablo. I love to read and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is one of my favorite books! I am looking forward to writing for the 2015-16 Scholastic Kid Council. Thanks for reading this!

Alex, Scholastic Kids Council

Add a Comment
5. Happy Thanksgiving!

On behalf of the co-author team, I’d like to thank you for your dedication to the writers you teach. As the eight of us know, the work of a teacher of writers is… Continue reading

Add a Comment
6. DESIGNER - malu lenzi

Today's featured designer is Malu Lenzi who has just joined the P&P Directory. Malu (short from Maria Luiza) is an illustrator, designer and 'cute maker' - originally from Brazil but currently based in Berlin. Malu used to work as marketing/planner in Ad agencies in São Paulo but since moving to Europe three years ago, she has been following her passion of being an illustrator with love and

0 Comments on DESIGNER - malu lenzi as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
7. Computer History

Computer History सुनने में बेशक अजीब लगे पर एक समय ऐसा था जब बहुत लोगों ने कम्प्यूटर का नाम ही नही सुना था . उन्हें लेख के माध्यम से बताना पडता था कि कम्प्यूटर क्या होता है… दैनिक नवज्योति, जयपुर से प्रकाशित बच्चों के लिए लेख Computer History

The post Computer History appeared first on Monica Gupta.

Add a Comment
8. XMAS 2015 - emily emerson

Today's Christmas designs are brand new portfolio pieces from aspiring illustrator and surface pattern designer Emily Emerson. Emily works in illustration for children's publishing and also creates designs for greetings cards, etc. and would love to see these designs used on products, fabrics, gift wrap etc.

0 Comments on XMAS 2015 - emily emerson as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
9. Wordless Wednesday!

It may be late in the day, but I'm participating in Wordless Wednesday from Comedy Plus.

Wordless Wednesday is "a simple blog post featuring a photo which conveys a message that speaks for itself without using words." 

0 Comments on Wordless Wednesday! as of 11/25/2015 7:30:00 PM
Add a Comment
10. An A-Maze-ing Library Experience

Sometimes you get a big idea. And sometimes you get to make that idea a reality. This year my department was given funds to create big family programming, and I got the chance to build my idea: a giant cardboard maze that would encourage caregiver-child interaction and create a memorable library experience for customers of all ages.

Photo credit: Kahla Gubanich

Photo credit: Kahla Gubanich

The Event

Photo credit: Amy Seto Forrester

Photo credit: Amy Seto Forrester

A families-only Harry Potter-themed after-hours party kicked off the maze, which measured 75’ long, 15’ wide, and 6’ tall, and sat smack-dab in the middle of the main hall of Denver Public Library’s Central Library. Customers lined up out the door to wait for their turn to explore the maze. A staff member at the maze entrance spaced out families in two minute intervals to avoid traffic jams. We also hid the four Hogwarts house crests inside the maze. Kids were given maze passports, and when they found a crest there was a staff member dressed as a Harry Potter character waiting to stamp their passport. This allowed us to have staff in the maze in case of emergency.

Other party activities included pin the sock on Dobby, magic wand decorating, and, of course, tasty themed snacks. Having a theme for the maze wasn’t necessary, but it did make the event easier to promote. Plus, it meant lots of kids came dressed as their favorite Harry Potter character.

After the party we left the maze up in our main hall for a week so customers of all ages could explore the maze. In addition to walking through the maze, customers could look down from the 2nd and 3rd floors to plan their route or watch others go through the maze.

DPL staff putting the maze together. Photo credit: Kahla Gubanich

DPL staff putting the maze together. Photo credit: Kahla Gubanich



Children’s librarian, Warren Shanks, showing off a stack of newly purchased cardboard. Photo credit: Amy Seto Forrester

Children’s librarian, Warren Shanks, showing off a stack of newly purchased cardboard. Photo credit: Amy Seto Forrester

I’d seen pictures of cardboard mazes online (thanks, Pinterest!), but I couldn’t find anything tall enough for adults. My goal was to create something that children and their caregivers could explore together. I wasn’t able to find any instructions online, so I decided to figure it out on my own. This process included lots of brainstorming and several mini-maze mock-ups. Here’s a list of things to consider, based on my experience.

  • Safety and Space. Measure your space and learn about your library’s safety rules and regulations. I met with the security, custodial, and facilities departments to get their input. From this meeting it was decided that we would have a minimum of 5’ of space on all sides of the maze. We also decided to include a third side entrance/exit to the maze in case of emergency.
  • Design the Maze. I had never designed a maze before so I was grateful to find some wonderful online resources. Jo Edkins has great info about maze layout and design and the tips on avoiding bottlenecks on Amazeing Art were useful. I found it helpful to first determine the entrances/exits and then divide the space into three “mini mazes.”
  • Shelvers Sarah Cosoer and Sallie King take a break from cardboard prep. Photo credit: Amy Seto Forrester

    Shelvers Sarah Cosoer and Sallie King take a break from cardboard prep. Photo credit: Amy Seto Forrester

    Planning and Paperwork. Make sure your plans are written down so others can understand them. This is the kind of project that requires teamwork and delegation, so it’s important that your paperwork is detailed and clear. Here’s a copy of the maze layout.

  • Purchase Materials. I purchased my materials from the following companies:
  • Purchasing Considerations.
    • Some companies require a minimum number of a particular item per order.
    • Freight shipping can add a significant amount to the cost of materials.
    • Height of your loading dock. Ours is very low, so this impacted delivery.
    • Talk to a representative. I was able to get more accurate quotes and ultimately a
      Warren uses a template to measure and cut a cardboard sheet. Photo credit: Amy Seto Forrester

      Warren uses a template to measure and cut a cardboard sheet. Photo credit: Amy Seto Forrester

      lower price by emailing and talking on the phone with a representative.

  • Prep as much of your maze ahead of time as possible. Call in your volunteers, friends, and family! Cutting and labeling our boxes required approximately 20 hours of prep time.
  • Putting It Together. It took us approximately 10 hours with 5 people working steadily to put the maze together with the prepped materials. This includes the 5 hours we used to construct 45 maze units the day before the event and stored them in our storytime room. The day of the event we had another 5 hours to assemble the other units and zip-tie them all together. Check out the step-by-step Maze Construction Instructions.
Templates used for cardboard prep. Photo credit: Amy Seto Forrester

Templates used for cardboard prep. Photo credit: Amy Seto Forrester


Yes, this maze took a ton of planning and staff labor, but it was worth it. From a numbers point of view, it was gratifying to have 300+ people come to the after-hours party. But it was even more satisfying to see the smiles, hear the laughter, and watch our customers find joy in exploring the maze. The maze was also an entry point for staff-customer interaction and encouraged customers to visit our 2nd and 3rd floors to look down on the maze. In short, it was an unforgettable library experience!

Photo credit: Will Forrester

Photo credit: Will Forrester


Amy Uke

Photo Credit: Sherry Spitsnagle, Denver Public Library

Our guest blogger today is Amy Seto Forrester. Amy  is a children’s librarian at the Denver Public Library and has her MLS from Texas Woman’s University. She is always on the look out for creative ways to incorporate the arts into children’s services and programming to extend books beyond the page. Check out Amy’s blogs: http://picturebookaday.blogspot.com/http://chapterbookexplorer.blogspot.com/

Please note that as a guest post, the views expressed here do not represent the official position of ALA or ALSC.

If you’d like to write a guest post for the ALSC Blog, please contact Mary Voors, ALSC Blog manager, at alscblog@gmail.com.

The post An A-Maze-ing Library Experience appeared first on ALSC Blog.

0 Comments on An A-Maze-ing Library Experience as of 11/26/2015 12:09:00 AM
Add a Comment
11. Fifteen Dogs review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of André Alexis' Fifteen Dogs.

       Yes, I was led to this by its recent Scotiabank Giller Prize-win -- that, and the promise/premise of talking dogs, Greek gods still doing their mischief, and the mention of some Oulipo poetry. Also: I seem to be sucker for titles that begin with numbers ..... Read the rest of this post

Add a Comment
12. कहानी

कहानी सिमटते दायरे बहुत साल पहले लिखी कहानी है इसमे चित्रण है साधारण परिवार के मेधावी बच्चे  का . जो कक्षा की परीक्षा में तो हमेशा अव्वल आता है पर जिंदगी की परीक्षा मे बहुत पीछे रह जाता है. कहानी

The post कहानी appeared first on Monica Gupta.

Add a Comment
13. We must try harder to stop the drug cheats

Reports of a Russian state doping programme are jarring reminders of times when victorious athletes were offered as evidence for the superiority of political ideologies. The allegations have certainly complicated aspirations to keep drugs out of the Olympics. If your state colludes in your doping then you have only to arrange to be clean around the dates of competition.

The post We must try harder to stop the drug cheats appeared first on OUPblog.

0 Comments on We must try harder to stop the drug cheats as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
14. How My NaNoWriMo Went

My NaNoWriMo ends today.1 The following is what I thought of the NaNo experience, which let’s be honest, is not aimed at someone like me, who’s already a professional writer with multiple novels already published for whom writing is my job. So take it with a massive grain of salt.

I have been writing every day for 56 days in a row.2 Twenty-five of those days took place during NaNo. Before NaNo I was averaging about 300 words a day. During NaNo I averaged 700 words a day.3

I already knew that gamification works on me. I’ve been using Scriveners’ Project Targets for years so that when I reach my word count goal my program congratulates me. Why, yes, I do take a bow.

Obviously, for me the NaNoWriMo word count goal is too high. It’s been at least a decade since I averaged anything like 1,667 words a day. So I went in with the lower goal of 10k words for the month in mind. I passed that goal on Day 12.

NaNoStatspageI enjoyed watching the word counts of my “writing buddies” going up. There definitely was an increased sense of camaraderie. I am not in this alone! Look at all these other people striving to finish their novels! Look at their bar graphs going up! I would love to have a stats page like the NaNo one for all my novels. I loved that bar graph.

But . . . by the second week the 1,667 words a day expectation was starting to get to me and the ever-increasing words per day in order to finish on time was really freaking me out. The line on the bar graph shows you every day where you’re supposed to be and I was never even close. I only hit 1,667 twice. I was starting to feel like a failure for not hitting 1,667 words a day and falling into the bad habit of typing in order to hit the word count, rather than choosing the right words. I was starting to hate that bar graph.

On day 16 I had a stern talk with myself: Are you a writer, Justine, or are you a typist?

I spent that day reading everything I’d written of this new novel, rearranging and deleting loads of it. It was my best writing day of the month. Not because it was a 1k day but because I was really happy with those words. I’d started to figure out what the novel’s about and where it’s going. I was beaming.

From that day on I went back to my usual practice of starting each writing day by reading over what I wrote the day before, editing it, and only then writing new words. I was back in the rhythm of my novel and feeling happy. I wasn’t thinking about word counts, I was thinking about the novel.

NaNo didn’t work for me because I struggled to get that massive word count goal out of my head. Yes, I wrote more, but much of that excess of words was more typing than writing.

I would have loved NaNoWriMo back when I was a teen writing obsessively and feeling like I was the only one on the planet who was trying to write novels. It would have given me a structure and a community. I would have been in heaven. And, wow, would I have blitzed that measly 1,667 words a day goal. Those were the days when I could write a 5k story in a day without breaking a sweat.4

Also back then I had no clue about rewriting. I thought you were supposed to produce perfection in your first draft. NaNo dedicating January and February to Now What? would have clued me into the whole rewriting thing much much sooner. How lucky you all are!

I won’t be doing NaNo again. I’m too competitive. I really wanted to hit that word count goal even though it would have played havoc with my RSI. Despite my self-pep talk I’m still annoyed I didn’t come close to 50k. But I’m really glad I tried it. I’ve been recommending NaNo for years without actually knowing how it worked. It really is a pretty sweet and easy to use interface.

It’s proven itself over and over again to be just the thing for new writers who keep getting in their own way. Finally, someone is giving them permission to just write! And they do.

It also had the lovely side effect of getting me to check in more frequently with my writer friends on where they are with the latest. Knowing that you’re not alone with your novel, that there other people sweating over theirs, is reassuring. We humans are social creatures. We mostly prefer to suffer together.

The following are some little tweaks I’d love to see on the NaNo pages:

I would love it if you could edit your stats page to put your own word count goal in. Mine would have been 300. It would have made that line on the bar graph far less intimidating.

More writing achievement badges! At the very least one for ever 5k increment would be lovely. The jump from the 10k badge to the 25k badge and then from the 25k one to the 40k one is too steep. More rewards = more better!

I’d also love it if the word counts continued to be visible even after people hit their 50k goal. So instead of just seeing that those writing buddies are WINNERS! you can see that they’ve continued writing. It would be a good reminder that hitting 50k is not the end goal—finishing a novel is. (For those who didn’t know 50k is a very short novel. Most are at least 60k. Razorhurst was 90k. It’s not a long novel.)

TL;DR: NaNo’s fab but didn’t work for me. However, my younger self would’ve loved it.

  1. I’m ending early because I’m off to Adelaide for the historic first day/night test. I can’t wait!
  2. That’s unusual for me. I usually take at least one day off a week but more usually two. I’ve been experimenting to see whether it makes my RSI worse. So far so good. I did have a flare up but that seems to have had more to do with trying a new treatment.
  3. I also stopped blogging for the month of November so the jump in word count is not quite as dramatic as it looks but it’s still pretty dramatic.
  4. Those are the days that led me to having RSI now. But I digress . . .

0 Comments on How My NaNoWriMo Went as of 11/25/2015 8:09:00 PM
Add a Comment
15. Prize: Prix Ivoire

       The Prix Ivoire pour la Littérature Africaine d'Expression Francophone has announced its 2015 winner -- and it's Je suis vivant, by Haitian author Kettly Mars; see, for example, the Haiti Libre report, as well as the Mercure de France publicity page for the book.

       Mars' Savage Seasons recently came out in English, but has attracted disappointingly little review (or other) attention.

Add a Comment
16. चलो स्कीम बनाए

चलो स्कीम बनाए ये व्यंग्य दैनिक भास्कर में प्रकाशित हुआ. बाजार में त्योहार आते नही कि स्कीमें शुरु हो जाती है. फलां के साथ फलां फ्री आदि  अब शापिंग की शौकीन महिलाओ को स्कीम के तहत कुछ भी फ्री का मिले तो खुश होना स्वाभाविक ही है पर स्कीम का अंत होता क्या है बेशक […]

The post चलो स्कीम बनाए appeared first on Monica Gupta.

Add a Comment
17. Beyond the Chrysalis, by Naya H. Jones

In this new world, Ravin follows the ancient paths unfolding before her; battling a two-headed dragon; flying with the fairies of Will-o-Myst, befriending a crystal unicorn and her mate, a pegasus with a gold horn.

Add a Comment
18. Love

0 Comments on Love as of 11/25/2015 6:41:00 PM
Add a Comment
19. Prizes: Irish Book Awards

       They've announced (albeit not very conveniently at the official site) the winners of this year's Irish Book Awards, with The Green Road, by Anne Enright, taking book of the year honors.

Add a Comment
20. Gabba Gabba Hey!

Summary: I share some of my process creating a faux Rolling Stone magazine cover of the Ramones. Giclee prints of the image are also made available! One of the assignments for my MFA program is that we are asked to create an illustration by look back into illustration history and finding an artist whom we admire, then we […]

via Studio Bowes Art Blog at http://ift.tt/1XgS0ut

0 Comments on Gabba Gabba Hey! as of 11/25/2015 9:18:00 PM
Add a Comment
21. Prize: Jan Michalski

       The Jan Michalski Prize for Literature is an impressive (if shockingly poorly publicized) prize, without language or genre restrictions, and they've announced the winner of this year's prize -- Birth Certificate, Mark Thompson's Danilo Kiš biography. (My preference is, of course, always for fiction, but they do always select interesting titles, regardless.)
       See also the Cornell University Press publicity page, or get your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk.

Add a Comment
22. The Fine Print

Had a coupon, browsed the shelves
For longer than I’d planned
To find an item worthy of
The discount in my hand.

At last, when something caught my eye,
I joined the line to pay,
With just a few ahead of me –
Quite lucky, I would say.

The cashier gave my phone a glance,
The coupon on the screen,
And pointed out, in tiny print,
The dates I hadn’t seen.

“The pre-Black Friday sale begins
Tomorrow, not today.
You still want this?” he questioned
As I meekly said okay.

I felt like such a sucker
Rushing there to save a buck
When the writer of the fine print
Knew that I’d be out of luck.

0 Comments on The Fine Print as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
23. Live, Love and Sketch


The post Live, Love and Sketch appeared first on Make Awesome Art.

0 Comments on Live, Love and Sketch as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
24. Splash

0 Comments on Splash as of 11/25/2015 6:41:00 PM
Add a Comment
25. On Thanksgiving

Two poems for my readers . . . and wishes for a joyful Thanksgiving.

By Emily Dickinson

The morns are meeker than they were,
The nuts are getting brown;
The berry's cheek is plumper,
The rose is out of town.

The maple wears a gayer scarf,
The field a scarlet gown.
Lest I should be old-fashioned,
I'll put a trinket on.

In Harvest
By Sophie Jewett

Mown meadows skirt the standing wheat;
I linger, for the hay is sweet,
New-cut and curing in the sun.
Like furrows, straight, the windrows run,
Fallen, gallant ranks that tossed and bent
When, yesterday, the west wind went
A-rioting through grass and grain.
To-day no least breath stirs the plain;
Only the hot air, quivering, yields
Illusive motion to the fields
Where not the slenderest tassel swings.

Read the poem in its entirety.

0 Comments on On Thanksgiving as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts