What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts from All 1540 Blogs, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 1 - 25 of 2,000
1. Happy Birthday, Hermione Granger!

September 19th marks the birthday of Hermione Granger, the brightest witch of her age. Please join us in wishing Hermione a very happy birthday and in hoping she gets many new books as gifts!

Add a Comment
2. Illustrator Saturday – Sarolta Szulyovszky

Sarolta_SzulyovszkycroppedSarolta Szulyovszky was born and grew up in Budapest (Hungary), she studied Applied Art, after which she moved to Italy. Since 2004 she start activity in the field of graphics and illustration working in a graphic design studio in Udine (Italy). Now she lives and works as a freelance illustrator and graphic designer in a little city in northern Italy: San Daniele del Friuli.

She works for children’ s books, magazines, cover books, Brochure Design and Packaging Design.

Sarolta works both traditionally in acrylics, pencil and digitally.

In 2012 her work has been selected for the ‘Annual Illustratori Italiani 2012′ (Society of Italian Illustrators) and for the 30th edition of the exhibition ‘Le immagini della fantasia’ (Sàrmede, Italy) – 60 illustrators from all over the world.
2011 – selected for the 23rd Biennial of Illustrations Bratislava.
In 2010 she won the 1st Prize (Category Children’s Book) at the ‘Marosvásárhely Book Fair Award (Romania).

Progress_1

Draft drawn in Photoshop, and the final illustration for a magazine. The commission was to illustrate the month of July. (Image: Progress_1)

Progress_2
I needed a model to draw the woman so I photographed my son for the face and my hand for the hand!

Progress_3
I found the fruit and vegetables on the internet.

Progress_4
After sketching out the draft, I prepare an acrylic base for the background colour and, with carbon paper, I transfer the draft I have printed onto the base I have prepared. (Image: Progress_4)

Progress_5
Here is the final illustration entirely painted with acrylics.

76680

Book Covers

137243472544486281

Question18_Cover

Book Covers

2libri_IT+HUcropped

How long have you been illustrating?

I began to illustrate children’s books 11 years ago. My first publication (2003) was a drawing for an anthology of world fables published in Italy, but I have only thought of myself as an illustrator since I began to devote myself entirely to this work in 2009.

76698

Did you go to college to study graphic design?

I began to study drawing at the age of 14, attending evening classes while I was studying at a science academy school in Budapest (Hungary). My dream was always to become a designer, so once I graduated from high school, I attended a textile design college and another college to study interior decoration, then went to the university “Nyugat-magyarországi Egyetem” on a Packaging Design course, but I never imagined that one day I would be illustrating books! I became involved in the world of children’s books illustration in Italy where I attended courses on advertising graphics and editorial illustration.

137243472569618009

What were you favorite classes?

At university, I really liked design and drawing from life, especially portraits.

Fiore_00_Copertine

How did you decide to move from Hungary to Italy?

I moved to Italy not for work but for love. I met my husband in Budapest and, after we got married in 1997, I came with him to Italy.

Sarolta_Artaterme_mostra_REVFb

Do you feel the illustrating opportunities are better in Italy?

I don’t think Italy offers more opportunities for work in the field of illustration compared to Hungary or other European countries. Italy is currently undergoing a severe social, cultural and economic crisis and illustrators (and anyone who works in the cultural sphere in general) is often considered an amateur, and not a professional, and so they are paid little or nothing. However, I do think that Italy is an excellent place to study illustration: it is a country that boasts 50% of the world’s cultural and artistic heritage, a very stimulating environment for an artist, and there are excellent schools specializing in illustration.

It is very true that “no-one is a prophet in his own land” and so the first publications I had in Italy were due to the fact I was a foreigner: they were looking for foreign artists for multicultural editorial projects. After that, I was published in my home country and in other states.

Sarolta_Masha

What was the first art related work that you were paid?

The first paid work was for the illustration of a children’s book translated into Italian from Hungarian, “Ha én felnőtt volnék” (If I were big) by Eva Janikovszky, published by L’Omino Rosso Editore, a small publisher in the region where I live. The book is a major classic in Hungary, a very entertaining story that I illustrated using digital techniques (Adobe Illustrator), which did not turn out to be my style.

76682

What do you think influenced you style?

I think my style has been influenced by many things: the popular Hungarian art passed on to me by my grandmother, who taught me embroidery, the late Renaissance painters in the Fine Arts Museum in Budapest, where I acted as tourist guide when I was a student and, of course, many contemporary illustrators that I discovered in books, exhibitions and on the web (Gianni De Conno, Gabriel Pacheco, Alice Wellinger, Pierre Mornet……. the list would be very long!).

76683

What type of work did you do right after you graduated?

After university, I gave birth to my two children and for 6 years I concentrated on being a mother….. although it was during that period that I discovered illustrated children’s books!

Sarolta_Szulyovszky_Ranaprincipe_RGB72_Blog

How did you connect with the Wilkinson Studios? When did you join them?

I came across Wilkinson Studios in 2011 thanks to an illustrator friend of mine who was already working for them. I sent them my portfolio and they immediately gave me a job. The client was very pleased with the illustration and so we continued to collaborate and they included me among the artists they represent. It was a great honour for me.

76689

Do you do any exhibits to show off your work?

Yes, I am often invited to take part in joint exhibitions and I have had various personal exhibitions in Italy and abroad. In 2011 and 2013, my work was exhibited at the Biennale of Illustration of Bratislava, Slovakia and, 2007- 2012 every year at the “Le immagini della fantasia” of Sàrmede, the most important exhibition of children’s illustrations in Italy.

The last exhibition has just ended and it was “Il posto delle favole” (The place of fables), a joint exhibition by international artists in Rocca Sinibalda, a picturesque little town in central Italy. The next exhibition will be a personal exhibition of my work in Hungary in October 2014.

76685

When and what was the first children’s book that you illustrated?

The first book that I illustrated was, luckily, the one I mentioned as my first paid work.

76687

How did that contract come about?

The contact with the publisher came about through a friend we had in common, who was a book translator.

76690

Do you consider that book to be your first big success?

My first book was an important experience for me, I learned a lot, but I don’t consider it a great success.

Inverno_Blog_1

Have you published about children’s picture books for a US publisher?

So far, in the United States, they have published my illustrations in academic books and magazines, but I haven’t yet illustrated a whole book in the United States and I can’t wait to do so!

76700

Have you tried to write and illustrate a children’s book, yet?

My first successful book was actually one that I wrote and illustrated: “A hálás virág “(The grateful flower) is an autobiographical book that deals with the subject of diversity and the Great Mystery of death, life and rebirth. The story came from an episode that actually happened in my grandparent’s garden in Budapest. In 2008, the album won first prize for the best unpublished illustrated album for children aged between 6 and 9 years at the 11th International Competition “Syria Poletti: On the wings of butterflies”. It was subsequently published in 3 languages: Italian, Hungarian and Polish.

04SaroltaSzulyovszky_Kobold2

Does the area where you live have a large artist community?

I live in the countryside near a little town in northeast Italy that lies between the Alps and the Adriatic Sea, a land of excellent white wines and ham. There isn’t a large community of artists here, but you live and eat well!

76697

What type of illustration work do you do?

I work both on children’s books and books for adults, and on Packaging. I work both digitally and with traditional techniques. I like to adapt my style to the text and always try out new things so that I continue to grow and renew myself.

76702

Have you won any awards for our art?

I have won various prizes but the most important was the one I received at the Frankfurt Book Fair in 2013: the cover I illustrated of “Folyékony tekintet” / Liquid gaze (published by Libri, Budapest) was selected from the 12 most beautiful covers at the Fair by the Wall Street Journal.

Sarolta_Szulyovszky_India

How many picture books have you illustrated?

So far, I have entirely illustrated 11 books, without counting the anthologies that include the drawings of several artists.

76706

What do you consider your biggest success?

The greatest success has been the last book I illustrated, “Folyékony tekintet” (Liquid gaze), a collection of poetry for which I drew the digital illustrations using only the colours black and red.

Cerkabella_Jonakar_150

Do you feel living in Italy has broaden your career as an illustrator?

For an illustrator, I don’t think it matters much these days where you live, an internet presence is more important because that’s where work meetings take place. 23. Yes, I have worked for Italian and Hungarian magazines and in the United States, for the Christian Reformed Church of North America’s Dwell Dive Magazine. 24. I use acrylic colours and sometimes I add some details in Photoshop.

Masha_SaroltaSzulyovszky

 

La_leggenda_di_Drago_blog

Have you done illustrations for any children’s magazines?

Yes, I have worked for Italian and Hungarian magazines and in the United States, for the Christian Reformed Church of North America’s Dwell Dive Magazine.

SA92C4~1

What materials do you use to paint your color illustrations?

I use acrylic colours and sometimes I add some details in Photoshop.

SA9564~1

What type of things do you do to find illustration work?

To find illustration work, it is important to have a website or a blog, send your portfolio to the illustration agencies and publishers, and go to specialist fairs, like the Children’s Book Fair of Bologna.

Sarolta_Kamor

What is the one thing in your studio that you could not live without?

The thing I miss the most is the view from my window: the hill with the historic centre and the mountains. When I’m at home staring at a sheet of paper or a monitor all day, it is important sometimes to turn and look into the distance!

SaroltaSzulyovszky_Voltegyszer_04

Do you try to spend a specific amount of time working on your craft?

It is very difficult to work set hours when you’re a freelance. I often work at night to meet deadlines…

Szulyovszky_02VARcropped

Do you take pictures or do any types of research before you start a project?

Research is the first phase of working on an illustrated project and that often takes whole days. I have a folder on my computer where I collect photos and texts that inspire me and that might be useful one day. If I don’t find the photos I need on the internet, people in certain poses, for example, then I’ll use relatives or myself, taking the photos I need.

Sarolta_Costituzione_Blog

Do you think the Internet has opened doors for you?

Yes, I think the internet has opened many doors, but it has also increased the competition.

StelediNadal2012_SaroltaSzulyovszky_blog1

Do you use Photoshop or Corel Painter with your illustrations?

Yes, I use Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator.

Loula_2_Final_Art

Do you own or have you used a Graphic Drawing Tablet in your illustrating?

Yes, I use a Graphic Drawing Tablet to sketch out drafts and add details to my illustrations.

SaroltaSzulyovszky_Voltegyszer_Csend01

Do you have any career dreams that you want to fulfill?

My dream is to illustrate the Bible, especially St Paul’s Hymn to Love.

Sarolta_NATALE_2012_mail

What are you working on now?

At the moment, I’m working on two books: an illustrated album: The Garden of Tears, written by the French author, Laurie Cohen, and a Hungarian novel by Zoltán Hajdú Farkas.

Sarolta_TradizioniPopolariFriulane_Blog

SaroltaSzulyovszky_RossoAlbero

Any words of wisdom on how to become a successful writer or illustrator?

Above all, it is important to inquire within and understand ourselves. What would I really like to do? Devote time to personal works that haven’t been commissioned, be humble (we always need to learn), have a little entrepreneurial ability (we have to promote our work ourselves) and great steadfastness.

Sarolta_Zoldlabu_Blog

Question32_Illu2
Thank you Sarolta for taking the time to share your process and journey with us. We look forward to hearing about all your future successes.

To see more of Sarolta’s illustrations visit her at:

Website: http://www.saroltaszulyovszky.com/

Blog: http://saroltaszulyovszky.blogspot.it/  

Please take a minute to leave a comment for Sarolta, I know she would love to heard from you and I always appreciate it. Thanks!

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

 


Filed under: authors and illustrators, demystify, illustrating, Illustrator's Saturday, inspiration, Interview, picture books, Publishing Industry Tagged: 1st Prize (Category Children's Book) at the 'Marosvásárhely Book Fair Award, 30th edition of the exhibition 'Le immagini della fantasia', Applied Art in Budapest, Sarolta Szulyovszky

0 Comments on Illustrator Saturday – Sarolta Szulyovszky as of 9/20/2014 12:30:00 AM
Add a Comment
3. The Original Gone Girl

The Original Gone Girl:

longform:

On Daphne du Maurier and her novel, Rebecca.

0 Comments on The Original Gone Girl as of 9/19/2014 11:34:00 PM
Add a Comment
4. Haven't I see you someplace before? Dueling cover of layers across faces

15828079240805_300images-2
imagesUnknown-2

Add a Comment
5. books fly with us

booksfly


Filed under: children's illustration, flying, journeys

0 Comments on books fly with us as of 9/20/2014 12:04:00 AM
Add a Comment
6. 4 Cara Trading Forex Yang Baik Dan Benar

Jika saat ini Anda sedang mencari cara trading forex yang baik dan benar, maka artikel ini akan bisa membantu Anda.

cara trading forex yang baik dan benar
Ilustrasi : google images


Tapi perlu Anda ingat juga, meski Anda sudah mengikuti cara ini, Anda kemungkinan masih akan mengalami kerugian. Tapi tentunya kerugian itu sudah diperhitungkan sebelumnya.

Ok..langsung saja kita lihat 4 cara tersebut :

1. Cari strategi yang paling cocok buat Anda

Strategi Forex sangat banyak dan beraneka ragam , inilah biasanya yang jadi sebab banyak orang gagal di forex. Mereka berganti-ganti strategi, menggunakan satu strategi kemudian berganti ke strategi yang lainnya.

Terus begitu sampai uang di akun mereka habis. Saya juga dulu seperti itu menggunakan banyak strategi yang nyatanya membuat saya rugi banyak.

Hingga akhirnya sekarang saya hanya menggunakan 2 strategi trading yang saya rasa paling cocok untuk saya. Jadi tips 1 :

Carilah strategi trading yg paling cocok untuk Anda, kemudian terapkan strategi tersebut secara terus menerus sambil lakukan review secara mendalam. 

2. Tetapkan rencana keluar Anda

Rencana keluar akan menyelamatkan akun Anda, ini berkaitan dengan rencana trading forex Anda, ingat sebelum masuk pasar Anda harus mempunyai rencana trading terlebih dahulu.

Anda harus menetapkan , apa kondisi ideal untuk masuk pasar, berapa besar Anda siap rugi, berapa keuntungan yang akan Anda ambil dll.

3. Kontrol Emosi Anda

Saya rasa ini hal yang paling sulit dilakukan, karena emosi takut dan serakah akan menguasai ketika kita sudah berada dipasar, untuk itulah rencana keluar Anda diperlukan agar hal ini tidak terjadi.

Saya sendiri sering rugi karena hal ini, dan masih berlatih agar lebih disiplin untuk menerapkan rencana trading saya.

4. Disiplinlah Melakukan 3 Hal Diatas

Ingat pepatah " pisau akan semakin tajam jika diasah " begitu juga kemampuan trading kita, jika kita secara konsisten melakukan rencana yang sudah ditetapkan, maka niscaya lambat laun tujuan kita akan tercapai.

Tujuan untuk menjadi trader forex profesional pun akan bisa kita capai, teruslah berlatih, konsisten dan nikmati prosesnya.


0 Comments on 4 Cara Trading Forex Yang Baik Dan Benar as of 9/19/2014 10:58:00 PM
Add a Comment
7. Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books shortlist

       They've announced the shortlist for this year's Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books -- looks like interesting stuff (and I hope to get around to reviewing the Philip Ball).
       The winner will be announced 10 November.

Add a Comment
8. On This Day: A September 20 Birthday Meme

For me, in the Southern Hemisphere, it's September 20, though Blogger, a Northern Hemisphere program, will stick September 19 above this post. Ignore it. I'm going to write about September 20, okay? 

There is no real literary-related stuff happening on September 20 in history, so here is the closest I can get: on this day, the Greeks defeated the Persians in the Battle of Salamis, in 480 BCE. A lot of stuff has been written about that, starting with Herodotus, the "Father of History" and one of the veterans of that battle was Aeschylus, one of the big three playwrights of ancient Athens. 

There's plenty more if you like wars, plagues, suicide bombings and such, plus a mention of the creation of the first petrol-fuelled car, leading to the great age of pollution and fights over oil that we all know and love, but I might skip it. I only mentioned Salamis because there was a famous writer fighting in it. 

Let's get on to the birthdays.  


There was Arthur, Prince of Wales, born in 1486, to Elizabeth of York and that nasty man Henry VII. Imagine how much would never have been written if the poor boy had survived to become king instead of his brother Henry VIII! I mean, really. The history of Europe would have been so very different, whether for good or ill. A lot of people writing about the reign of Henry would never have had the chance. For starters, no Wolf Hall and Bringing Up The Bodies. ;-). No Six Wives Of Henry VIII. No Anne Boleyn websites. No opera Anna Bolena. Though, knowing Henry, he would have found his own ways to power, even if he was just the kid brother of King Arthur. And maybe Alison Weir and Hilary Mantel would have found plenty of material about the reign of Arthur to inspire them. Still, we'd have missed a lot of literary enjoyment.

Then there's Steve Gerber, a big man in the world of comic book writing, specifically Marvel comics. He's dead, alas, but did a lot during his lifetime, quite apart from his creation Howard the Duck. He has an entry in Wikipedia if you want to look him up for his long list of works.

Today, September 20, is also the birthday of George R R Martin, author of the great mediaeval epic fantasy soap opera The Game Of Thrones! If you don't know about him, you have been hiding under a rock. Who would have thought when I read the first novel of the series back when it first came out, that t would go on to be so huge? To be honest, while I do like it - it has such a wonderful feel of grubby "real" Middle Ages - there are other books of his I like better. 


One of them, Fevre Dream is unlikely ever to be made into a TV series, unless they want something to follow up GOT once it's finished. There are some hints on the Internet that they might be able to get some interest in a film rather than a series. I'll believe that when I see it.  It's standalone, not too thick, and it has vampires in it, but Martin's vampires are a race, not undead. One of them who is tired of killing, has come up with a formula that will enable vampires to avoid drinking human blood. He orders a magnificent paddle-steamer built so he can travel up the Mississippi river finding other vamps with his attitude to join him. It's set in the pre Civil War era because, as Martin said at a Melbourne con I attended, it was a time when slaves could be killed easily without anyone asking questions. Another Martin book I like better than GOT is the delicious Tuf Voyaging, a series of connected short stories set in a seed ship travelling through space, with the title character and his many cats. A good book for SF reading cat lovers!




It's also the birthday of Keith Roberts, author of the wonderful alternative universe novel Pavane, a classic of AU fiction, which starts with the assassination of Queen Elizabeth I and goes on to speculate on a world in which the Church rules.

Today is the birthday of the totally un-writing-related Sophia Loren, but what the heck! Such a beautiful woman and fine actress!

There are a number of Christian feast days, but it's also the seventh day of the Eleusinian Mysteries, which play a big part in literature. Mary Renault's The King Must Die is in there, among others. That's a wonderful book I first read when I was about twelve. My copy is falling apart. I'm holding out for the ebook which isn't yet on iBooks, though some of her other books are.

So, what do you think of this day in history? 

 

0 Comments on On This Day: A September 20 Birthday Meme as of 9/19/2014 7:14:00 PM
Add a Comment
9. What Charlotte Did - Joan Lennon

I've just finished reading a wonderful blog by Penny Dolan over on The History Girls, about a series of connections that lead her from a randomly-chosen book from her shelves, right through a whole string of 19th century names, fictional characters and relationships, all linked by a wooden-legged chap called W.E. Henley.  Which made me think of Charlotte Bronte.  Recently, she's been my W.E. Henley. 




It started with a Facebook post - which sent me to the Harvard Library online site where they have been working on restoring the tiny books Charlotte and Branwell Bronte made when they were children - which led to my own History Girl post Tiny Bronte Books.  (Please, if you go to have a look, scroll down to the bottom and watch the Brontesaurus video - you won't regret it.)

I'm in the midst of editing an anthology of East Perthshire writers called Place Settings and was delighted to read in one of the entries the author's interest in the Brontes, and how "... every night, the sisters paraded round the table reading aloud from their day's writings."

Then I got involved in a project run by 26, the writers' collective, in which writers were paired with design studios taking part in this year's London Design Show, and asked to write a response to one of their objects.  I was given Dare Studio who were putting forward, among other lovely things, a new design - the Bronte Alcove.




The alcove is meant to be a private space within public places, blocking out the surrounding bustle and noise.  Which made me think of bonnets.  Which led me back to the internet, which led me, by way of images of hats, to the passage below, written by Elizabeth Gaskell on her visit to Charlotte at the parsonage:

I asked her whether she had ever taken opium, as the description given of its effects in Villette was so exactly like what I had experienced, - vivid and exaggerated presence of objects, of which the outlines were indistinct, or lost in golden mist, etc. She replied, that she had never, to her knowledge, taken a grain of it in any shape, but that she had followed the process she always adopted when she had to describe anything which had not fallen within her own experience; she had thought intently on it for many and many a night before falling to sleep, - wondering what it was like, or how it would be, - till at length, sometimes after the progress of her story had been arrested at this one point for weeks, she wakened up in the morning with all clear before her, as if she had in reality gone through the experience, and then could describe it, word for word, as it had happened. I cannot account for this psychologically; I only am sure that it was so, because she said it.

Which led me to wonder ... my own practice has always been to try not to think about work when I'm courting sleep.  And I have rarely, if ever walked round my table of an evening, reading aloud from my day's work.  But have I been losing out here?  Do you do as Charlotte did?  I would be most interested to know.

Meantime, I wait for the next popping up of my very own W.E. Henley.

Joan Lennon's website.
Joan Lennon's blog.

0 Comments on What Charlotte Did - Joan Lennon as of 9/20/2014 2:10:00 AM
Add a Comment
10. Poetry Friday - Saved From the Discard Pile

I've frequented some library sales and second hand bookstores recently and have added some lovely titles to my poetry collection. Today I'm sharing two poems from the book Sweet Corn: Poems by James Stevenson.

Screen Door

When fog blurs the morning,
Porches glisten, shingles drip.
Droplets gather on the green screen door.
"Look," they say to one another.
"Look how dry it is inside."


Ladder

The ladder leaning against the barn
Is like the man who used to use it:
Strong at the beginning,
Okay in the middle,
A few rungs missing at the end.


Poem ©James Stevenson. All rights reserved.


I do hope you'll take some time to check out all the wonderful poetic things being shared and collected today by Amy Ludwig VanDerwater at The Poem Farm. Happy poetry Friday friends!

0 Comments on Poetry Friday - Saved From the Discard Pile as of 9/19/2014 9:38:00 PM
Add a Comment
11. Over the Rainbow review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Solomonica de Winter's Over the Rainbow.

       De Winter was born in 1997, which makes her the currently youngest author with a title under review at the complete review (and, I suspect, the youngest ever). But what's most noteworthy about this book is that, although written in English, it has not yet been published in English (and doesn't have a US/UK publisher yet, to the best of my knowledge); instead the review relies on the German translation, Die Geschichte von Blue. (A Dutch translation is also forthcoming, as Achter de regenboog.) This makes for a peculiar addition to the index of foreign-language books under review that are not yet available in English .....
       (This isn't entirely unheard of -- for various reason books sometimes aren't/can't (immediately) be published in the language they were written in -- including some written in English. So, for example, Gabriel Josipovici's Only Joking infamously found a German publisher in 2005, but only appeared in English in 2010; Moses Isegawa's first novels were published in Dutch before they came out in English (Snakepit, for example, appearing in Dutch in 1999 and then only in the English it was written in in 2004).)
       Die Geschichte von Blue was published by (Swiss) German publisher Diogenes -- who happen to be the publishers of Solomonica's dad, Leon's, books (11 titles) and Solomonica's mom, Jessica Durlacher's, books (5 titles) -- possibly making them more ... receptive to publishing Moonie's (as she's apparently nicknamed ...) debut.
       As longtime readers know, I have repeatedly expressed surprise that Leon de Winter never caught on in the US -- a couple of his titles have been translated into English (notably the very good Hoffman's Hunger), but, despite spending a great deal of time in the US (where his daughter also went to school -- hence, presumably, her choice of writing in English), he just never figured the place/market out (a stint as a fellow at the Hudson Institute probably didn't help in that regard, either). Jessica Durlacher also seems to have made no inroads whatsoever in the US/UK; it'll be interesting to see if the daughter can (eventually) break the family curse.
       Seven of Leon's books are under review at the complete review, the Leon-Solominca combo is hardly the first time I've read books both by parent and child -- though it may be the first where I've reviewed books by both. But now I'm really eager to read some of Durlacher's work: I don't think I've ever read books by three so closely related family members (siblings, yes, but not relatives of two different generations).

Add a Comment
12. The Marshmallow Test

From an expert psychologist comes an insightful, fresh take on self-control based on studies given to children on delaying gratification. In this wonderfully accessible read, we come to not only understand our impulses but learn how to effectively tackle and reappraise them. Books mentioned in this post The Marshmallow Test: Mastering... Walter Mischel New Hardcover [...]

0 Comments on The Marshmallow Test as of 9/19/2014 8:32:00 PM
Add a Comment
13. Would you go to this signing?

sketch from my latest penned endeavor.  i am such a duck... Read the rest of this post

0 Comments on Would you go to this signing? as of 9/20/2014 1:56:00 AM
Add a Comment
14. Goodbye Hub Network, Hello Discovery Family

It was fun while it lasted: the underperforming Hub Network, an equal partnership between Discovery Communications and toymaker Hasbro is shutting down.

0 Comments on Goodbye Hub Network, Hello Discovery Family as of 9/19/2014 8:06:00 PM
Add a Comment
15. Pig Smile – Drawing A Day

A Pig character with a Big Smile. His body color is different than his head. He looks like he’s wearing some sort of clothes. The detail in the eyes were fun to do. Drew naturally with my custom brush, color blocked it, added shading, then added texture. Drawn on Corel Painter X3 with custom brush […]

Add a Comment
16. 5 mins quickies



0 Comments on 5 mins quickies as of 9/19/2014 9:04:00 PM
Add a Comment
17. Hachette Audio Moving Giveaway! Part 1

Everything Must Go! Ok, maybe not EVERYTHING, but some things must go. Like, for instance, seven copies of The Young World by Chris Weit! Hachette Audio is moving offices, and needs to get some audiobooks out & into your hands! Lucky you! :D  Thanks so much to Mitch, if you don't know Mitch, you should introduce yourself immediately, we have a bunch of audiobooks to give away. We're starting

0 Comments on Hachette Audio Moving Giveaway! Part 1 as of 9/20/2014 1:34:00 AM
Add a Comment
18. Ask a Book Buyer: Exploring Europe Through Fiction

At Powell's, our book buyers select all the new books in our vast inventory. If we need a book recommendation, we turn to our team of resident experts. Need a gift idea for a fan of vampire novels? Looking for a guide that will best demonstrate how to knit argyle socks? Need a book for [...]

0 Comments on Ask a Book Buyer: Exploring Europe Through Fiction as of 9/19/2014 8:32:00 PM
Add a Comment
19. Prix Médicis longlists

       They've announced the longlists for the prix Médicis -- interesting because they also have a foreign-fiction category. Among the titles to make the best foreign book longlist were the ubiquitous Evie Wyld's, Vladimir Lorchenkov's The Good Life Elsewhere, and Mohsin Hamid's How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia.
       Among the authors placing books on the French longlist are Antoine Volodine and Christine Montalbetti.

       (I will also take this opportunity to note yet again how horrific the French-prize sites (or closest approximations thereto) are. For years one could at least rely on the invaluable Prix-littéraires.net for all necessary French literary prize information, so it didn't matter what the official and quasi-official sites looked like, but since that site is no longer being updated the situation has gotten near-hopeless. Get your acts together, folks !)

Add a Comment
20. Rooms

If ghosts are real, they are probably like these: cantankerous, prone to snits, and deeply curious about the warm bodies living in "their" rooms. Oliver's dysfunctional family reunites in a lost-and-found whirlwind of mystery and secrets, with the housebound spirits as unexpected guests. Books mentioned in this post Rooms Lauren Oliver Used Hardcover $17.95

0 Comments on Rooms as of 9/19/2014 8:32:00 PM
Add a Comment
21. Knittin’ Purl

knittinpurl

This is Purl | I am beginning to explore what she will look like.

0 Comments on Knittin’ Purl as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
22. oooo baby, here i am. signed, sealed, delivered. i'm yours

For those who have enquired, I have had another delivery of books from my publisher and so they are back in stock HERE. Cheers.

0 Comments on oooo baby, here i am. signed, sealed, delivered. i'm yours as of 9/19/2014 8:36:00 PM
Add a Comment
23. Knockout Knits

  image.jpg  

Knockout Knits by Laura Nelkin

ISBN 10: 038534578X
ISBN 13: 978-0385345781

Publication date: 2 September 2014 by Potter Craft

Category: Adult nonfiction

Keywords: Knitting, crafts

Format: Paperback, ebook

Source: Finished paperback copy from publisher

 You guys! This book! I can't contain myself. I can't even right now. It's SO good. 

You have to understand, I love cables. I love lace. I love dropped and elongated stitches. I love twists and wraps... and they're all in here. 

It has not one, but two--TWO!--tams. My favorite kind of hat to knit. 

I even learned something new after 13 years of knitting. I'd never heard of a life line before, but now it makes total sense to string a piece of thread through your work at intervals so that if you have to rip out a few rows, you won't lose too much ground.

There is also a great but somewhat scary section on beading. But don't worry, the book reassures me, "All these designs will be beautiful without beads!" So I can maybe attempt the Laden Cowl without before trying my hand at beading.

Ahem.

Laura Nelkin's book of accessories has everything I look for in a knitting book. Gorgeous photography shows off the designs, almost all of which are something I would not only make for myself (no gifts! all mine!) but also look fun and interesting to knit. it's well-organized and easy to read. It offers helpful information about choosing yarn fibers and colors for each project, and the looks are very modern and wearable. I think the techniques in this book will definitely flex my lace and cable muscles. I can barely believe this is her debut book, though I do recognize her style (my friend Stephanie teaches the Mudra Cuff in one of her Knitting University classes).

I'm not a huge fan of knitted jewelry, but I can definitely see myself knocking out a few of the cuffs and bracelets for holiday gifts. Ditto the tams and the great Folly Cloche (which reminds me of something the fabulous Miss Fisher would wear).

The fabulous Miss Phryne Fisher

The fabulous Miss Phryne Fisher

For more photos from the book, go to nelkindesigns.com

For more photos from the book, go to nelkindesigns.com

For myself, the Laden Cowl and Las Cruces Shawl are high up on my list to cast on. Really, the only project I don't ever see myself making are the Bootsy Boot Toppers (only because I am not a boot-wearer, and not anything to do with the pattern itself).

I would definitely recommend Knockout Knits to an intermediate knitter who knows how to read a pattern and has the basics down pat, maybe someone who is a little bored with the same-old same-old drill. You have to be willing to drop and pick up stitches, a scary trick for a beginning knitter who isn't yet comfortable with tensioning and pattern repeats. 

I received this book for free from Blogging for Books for review purposes.

For photos of the projects, visit nelkindesigns.com.

0 Comments on Knockout Knits as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
24. Happy Captain Blood Day!

This is a formal apology for not having anything special to post.

But here, check out some of Sabatini’s early short stories. It’s fun to guess beforehand a) whether or not it will be terrible, b) whether or not he recycled the story into a novel later, and c) whether the hero will have a lean sardonic countenance.


Tagged: sabatini, stuff

1 Comments on Happy Captain Blood Day!, last added: 9/20/2014
Display Comments Add a Comment
25. GIRL DEFECTIVE by Simmone Howell {Review}

Review my Books Review by Meghann @ Becoming Books Title: Girl Defective Author: Simmone Howell Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers, imprint of Simon and Schuster Genre: Young Adult Fiction - Contemporary Release Date: September 2, 2014 Source: Review copy provided by the publisher, opinions are honest and my own. In the tradition of High Fidelity and Empire Records

0 Comments on GIRL DEFECTIVE by Simmone Howell {Review} as of 9/20/2014 1:34:00 AM
Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts