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1. The Pulitzers and Graywolf Press Rocks!

Oh Pulitzer Prize! Such an interesting mix of winners, but isn’t that mostly the case? How did I miss knowing bout the Margaret Fuller biography that won? And am I happy that Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch won? (or, as the Pulitzer Committee originally tweeted it The Goldfish) I have not read Tartt’s book, had decided not to actually because every time I would read a review of it I found myself changing my mind. First it was, oh it sounds good! Then it was, oh sounds like I won’t like it. And back and forth I went until I just decided that I won’t worry about reading it at all and find something else to read instead. But now it has won a Pulitizer and one moment I thought, well I guess I will read it after all and a little after that while reading commentary on the fiction selections in general I decided I wouldn’t read it. Why do I torture myself so? Do other people do this to themselves? Please tell me I am not alone in my craziness.

What I am really excited about is that the poetry winner was published by Graywolf Press. Graywolf is an indie publisher in Minneapolis. They published Tracy K. Smith’s Pulitzer Prize winning poetry collection Life on Mars. I’ve always been proud that they are in Minneapolis and impressed by the quality of the books they publish, but now I am simply over the moon.

I have not read the winning book or poet. The book is 3 Sections by Vijay Seshadri. You can read three of the poems from the book at the link and two more previously published poems at Poets.org. I like them enough that I want to read more.

Have you read any of the prize winners and if so, what did you think? Deserved? Or would you have preferred a different choice?


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2. Book Review: Savage Girl by Jean Zimmerman

From Goodreads:
Jean Zimmerman’s new novel tells of the dramatic events that transpire when an alluring, blazingly smart eighteen-year-old girl named Bronwyn, reputedly raised by wolves in the wilds of Nevada, is adopted in 1875 by the Delegates, an outlandishly wealthy Manhattan couple, and taken back East to be civilized and introduced into high society.

Bronwyn hits the highly mannered world of Edith Wharton era Manhattan like a bomb. A series of suitors, both young and old, find her irresistible, but the willful girl’s illicit lovers begin to turn up murdered.

Zimmerman’s tale is narrated by the Delegate’s son, a Harvard anatomy student. The tormented, self-dramatizing Hugo Delegate speaks from a prison cell where he is prepared to take the fall for his beloved Savage Girl. This narrative—a love story and a mystery with a powerful sense of fable—is his confession.
Writing
I have very few complaints regarding the quality of the writing.  Zimmerman has done an excellent job researching her subject and capturing the era and setting, from the western mining towns to the upscale parlors of New York.  She also does a great job of capturing a consistent voice in her narrator.  The plot is certainly original, and I truly appreciated the author's use of her research throughout the story.

My main concern regarding the quality of writing is in the pacing of the novel.  There were moments where the story became so slow and so bogged down in detail that the flow of the plot really suffered.  For the first three quarters of the novel, we are getting the narrator's story as he is relating it to his lawyers.  It's told in past tense, but this is occasionally interrupted by his lawyers, which managed to throw me off quite a few times, as there's no real demarcation, other than the switch into present tense.  The final quarter of the book is also told in present tense, and moves at a much quicker pace than the rest of the novel.  It felt a bit disjointed and disorienting.

Entertainment Value
I really wanted to love this book.  I have this fascination with the idea of feral children and was quick to add this to my TBR list when I read about it in School Library Journal.  Unfortunately, the book just fell flat for me.  A huge problem was that I just couldn't bear the narrator.  I'm normally fine with unlikable and unreliable narrators, but this character's voice just grated on my ever nerve.  He's whiny, spoiled, and self-indulgent.  While this isn't a fault with the novel (the author intended for the narrator to sound that way and she does a great job at maintaining consistency), my dislike for him really hampered my personal enjoyment of the book.

There's also the whole issue of the Savage Girl and why our narrator falls in love with her.  While my dislike of the narrator was an issue of personal preference, I feel something was missing from the novel in terms of explaining why she is so wonderful and so beguiling.  Why do people just keep falling in love with her for no reason?  Did I miss something?  I would have liked to get to know more about her, I think, and less about our narrator.

Overall
I think this book definitely has an audience, particularly among those who love historical fiction, but there were aspects that made it really difficult for me to get behind.  While the narrator was well-developed (if incredibly irritating), most of the other characters were flat and unbelievable.  And the pacing and flow left a lot to be desired in terms of how engrossed I became (or did not become) in the book itself.  I love the subject and I greatly appreciate how well researched the book is, and I might try the author again in the future, but this one didn't blow me away.

Thank you to Penguin for providing a copy for me to review!

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3. lauramcphee: Colette et Louis XIV, chez elle au Palais Royale,...



lauramcphee:

Colette et Louis XIV, chez elle au Palais Royale, c1950 (Sanford H. Roth)



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4. How’s and Why’s of Dream Journaling

Dream Journaling

Keeping a Dream Journal

If you are serious about developing a deep connection with your inner self, this task is perhaps the best practice you can do. Keeping a dream journal involves writing down your dreams as they occur. Ideally, this would be just as you are waking up while the dream is still fresh in your mind. So keep a notebook and a pen (or digital diary–there are apps for that now if you can get technical while half awake!) next to your bed. If you are one of those people who can’t seem to remember your dreams, then try keeping a journal of whatever comes to mind that is important to you on a daily basis. For any kind of journaling, keep it simple. That will be the best assurance for encouraging you to be faithful about making regular entries into it. At a minimum each entry in a dream journal should include:

  • The date
  • A title for the dream (this will help you remember the dream as you remember a movie)
  • A detailed description of the dream written in the present tense. Include every color, character, object, background, place, emotional feeling, and emotional nuance. Pay attention to the number of things occurring such as recording if there are 3 books or 2 people. It is important. Find and use a good dream dictionary—one that gives many meanings to each symbol and teaches dreamwork exercises. I like Cloud Nine: A Dreamer’s Dictionary by Sandra A. Thompson.

This practice will usually be all you have time to do on a regular basis. However, depending upon how thorough you want to be, you can do the following:

  • Reserve a section either below or next to the dream where you make a note of any dreamwork done on the dream such as making associations with the dream symbols or make notes on what the dream may be about by using the other dream methods described below.
  • If you have asked to have this dream prior to dreaming it, you should by all means write down the question or intention before having the dream. The point isn’t to be so thorough in analyzing every dream but to keep an ongoing consistent recording of every important dream and even the minor ones, if you have the self-discipline. You can always come back later and do additional dreamwork on any dream if you have done a good job of recording the dream in detail.
  • If you have seen how this dream has helped, you may want to reserve space to add a note about this in the margin or in a space below the dreamwork section.

Also, what appears to be a minor dream to your waking mind can actually end up being of profound importance for the rest of your life, so please pay attention to the very short dreams and ones that don’t seem important. It might not be apparent at the moment, but you will see the dream’s significance in ten or twenty years down the road. You will see that your deeper consciousness is already preparing you for the major tasks that lie years ahead. Also you will want to record dream encounters with healers and guides whose presence you might want to honor later


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5. AND SPRING IS…..

Wanting to wish EVERYONE a very happy Spring/Easter week and weekend! Do believe it Spring is finally here…. in most places anyway.  (sorry Cleveland!)  Even The Cat has his ears on for the occasion!

easter blast


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6. Pinkwater Backlist Bonanza!

I'm delighted to announce that a whole bunch of Daniel Pinkwater books that have never before been digitized are now available in DRM-free electron versions for reading on your magical device. No more will you be forced to suffer the indignity of touching paper to get your Pinkwater fix!

In alphabetical order -- choose your favorites (or heck, buy them all for the low-low price of $2.99 each, I mean really, what a bargain):

Young Adults





 

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7. Aunt Crete’s Emancipation

When I get in a certain kind of mood, there’s nothing that I want more than stories about downtrodden people being showered with care and nice things and the people who have been metaphorically treading on them having that shoved in their faces. And Aunt Crete’s Emancipation, by Grace Livingston Hill, is the distilled essence of that. And you guys know me pretty well, I guess, because a number of you have recommended it to me over the past few years. It’s my own fault for not giving in and reading it sooner.Aunt Crete is Lucretia Ward, a dumpy middle-aged spinster who lives with her sister Carrie and her niece Luella. They’re not particularly nice to her, in just about every way they can manage. They pass off to her the greater share of the housework, deprive her completely of anything she wants for herself, and put down everything about her: her looks, her intelligence…even the kindness and love for her dead eldest sister that make her look forward to a visit from her unknown Western nephew.  Carrie and Luella are much less excited about the nephew, who they picture as gawky and uncivilized, and flee to a seaside resort just before he arrives, leaving Aunt Crete to receive him — and also to finish trimming some of Luella’s dresses and make jam and whitewash the cellar. The nephew, of course, is neither gawky or uncivilized. He’s handsome and wealthy and well-educated and kind, and he both appreciates and returns Aunt Crete’s affection. He also quickly grasps the actual nature of the situation, hard as Aunt Crete tries to hide it from him, and immediately starts making up for it. First he takes her shopping for clothes, sparing no expense — an essential part of this kind of book — and then he takes her to the same resort Carrie and Luella have run off to. From there on, Hill wallows in gentle malice. And she does it with such balance. She’s less gentle than, say L.M. Montgomery, but less malicious than Mary Jane Holmes, who would have had Luella die at the end of the book, but not before all her hair had fallen out. Hill only makes Luella marry a plumber, but she rubs Aunt Crete’s newly acquired advantages in Luella and Carrie’s faces exactly as much as I wanted her to.  To paraphrase Jimmy Carr on 10 o’ Clock Live, Grace Livingston Hill has clearly found my level. I’m just kind of impressed by the purity of this book, for lack of a better word. It’s the platonic ideal of this trope, whatever this trope is called. It’s unsullied by romance and there’s no plot to speak of – just nice things being showered on Aunt Crete and not on Carrie and Luella, and Carrie and Luella having that rubbed in their faces. It’s petty, and vindictive on behalf of a character who couldn’t be, and I love it. I should go figure out where I left that copy of Cloudy Jewel.


Tagged: 1910s, cinderella, gracelivingstonhill

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8. Just in case you still haven't figured out my love of Vin Diesel.

From an interview about Chronicles of Riddick:

I was literally playing Dungeons and Dragons with Judi Dench and Karl Urban at nights after shooting. I will tell you that I was showing her Dungeons and Dragons books and showing her the different properties of Elementals.

Picturing that scene is just so adorable that I can't even.

Speaking of Karl Urban, WHAT THE HELL, FOX, WHY WON'T YOU JUST RENEW ALMOST HUMAN ALREADY??

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9. Feedback Request


The author of the book featured in Face-Lift 1161 requests feedback on a revision, which you'll find in the comments there.

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10. 2 Spring Must Read Junior Novels with Wonderful Girl Protagonists

If your young independent reader is looking for a great read with a wonderful girl protagonist, or maybe she's looking for a new series to latch onto, you can't go wrong with either of these two books or their prequels.

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11. Author Visits

Mom has two author visits coming up. One this week and one next week. Both are call-backs, so she kind of knows what to expect. One thing she expects is fun! Rejection is the downside of writing. School visits are the upside AND her most favorite thing about being an author. Bar none.

school visit

Fifth graders and college students make for very different visits, which means Mom will pack up her school visit stuff  TWICE. I love when Mom packs up her bag.

bookbag2

Sometimes there are candies in there. Or gum. Or tissues.  And sometimes stuffed toys, depending on where she’s visiting. I ALWAYS check the bag out, just in case.

bookbag

Once I found (and ran with) a smaller bag from inside the bigger bag. It had a fork, a beanie baby, a paintbrush, and a baseball inside. Mom said, “I need them for a game.” and “You wouldn’t understand.” and “Eeeewww. They’re slimy with dog spit!”

gamebag2

Although I love the bag, I hate the leaving. Why does every upside need a downside? When Mom says, “I have to go,” I hear the word GO and head for the door.

Ready!

Ready!

She says, “Not this time.” and “I’ll be back in a little while.” and “Do you want a treat?” which is EXACTLY what I want. And that’s how the downside becomes the upside again.

milkbone toothbrush

 


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12. Bologna, Bamboo, Bookworms, and More


I do love this time of year, when everything begins to bloom, and we are gifted with occasional beach days. I've been doing plenty of spring cleaning with my girls and reveling in getting the garden into some sort of shape. Many of the plants we put in last year are beginning to thrive, including the BIG bamboo we planted. If all goes well, I'll be able to use the bamboo sheaths for my woodcut barens one of these years. (And then, I can write off the cost of the bamboo planting and containment, yes?)

Along with my non-virtual spring cleaning, I'm realizing it's time to dust the cobwebs off the blog as well. I've been cocooned in my studio making books and pictures. I did find my way out to visit the Bologna Children's Book Fair, which was mind boggling in all of the best ways. See photos below of my two purchases from the show. First, Mare, a stunning large format picture book with the most amazing watercolors I have seen in...I don't know how long. (My iphone camera does not do these justice, but you get the idea, at least.)



Second, how could I resist Il Piccolo Teatro di Rebecca? It's not brand new (2011 publication), but it is unbelievably intricate and beautiful. Yes, those are all diecuts. 



Both books are from Rizzoli. In fact, I spent an inordinate amount of time at the Rizzoli booth examining all of their amazing offerings. I also enjoyed a lively dinner with my agent Elena Giovinazzo and fellow pip Isabel Roxas. The balance of the week was spent in Siena with my husband where we researched old (OLD!) maps...so expect to see those make an appearance in some form at some point.

The third book in the Zoe series, Zoe's Jungle, will be arriving in May. I'll have more about that soon, including a trailer that is almost finished. For now, here is the springtime-colored cover with Zoe in action!


In August, I Feel Five will be published by Candlewick. This is my first book with Candlewick and also my first book with a male protagonist. Meet Fritz:


Finally, in December, The Best-Ever Bookworm Book will be published by Little, Brown. This one was written by Alice Kuipers, and I really enjoyed having the opportunity to illustrate such an imaginative story. It's also been very gratifying to try a completely new illustration style. There will be plenty more about this one in the months to come, including some posts about the process (which was unlike anything I've undertaken before). Here's a sneak peek of the cover:

I am looking forward to being on the faculty of the Book Passage Children's Conference in June (here in Marin County, CA). I'll be doing a pajama night at Diesel (also in Marin) on June 6th. Otherwise, I am digging into 2015 titles including the second book in the Best-Ever series, a Christmas themed book with the characters from I Feel Five, and a new book for Scholastic. Happy Spring!




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13. Intuitive Collaging

I have been mentoring my friend's daughter as she is making her way to Massachusetts College of Art so she can become an art therapist. One thing she loves doing is making intuitive collages with me.
The idea isn't to make a pretty picture, but rather select images, colors and patterns that resonate with your feelings on a gut level, put them together and see what story they tell.
These are my two from last night.

This top one speaks to me in a couple of different ways. One about evolution, and perhaps the other about ancestry or the circle of life.



  
This second one tells me that this person is clearly at a crossroads in his life. His posture may appear that all things seems lost or impossible, but the symbol of the bird with outstretched wings is a sign of hope, as well as the "all-knowing" eye in the sky. The building can mean a place or safety and respite, or even a church. This one really pulled me in as I created it.

It's so good to be back on the blogs! I hope to make at least weekly posts again.
Thanks for stopping by♥

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14. Synopsis Checklist

Make sure your synopsis covers all these points before you send it out. 

http://kathytemean.wordpress.com/2014/03/20/synopsis-check-list/

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15. Don Bartlett Q & A

       At the World Literature Today weblog Sarah Smith has a Q & A with translator (of Knausgaard, among others) Don Bartlett, Translating Norway's Love of Literature.

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16. Publishing Jobs: HarperCollins, Random House, Thieme Publishers

This week, HarperCollins is hiring a senior marketing manager, and Random House needs a manager of children’s paperback publishing. Thieme Publishers is seeking a managing editor, and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt is on the hunt for an associate designer. Get the scoop on these openings and more below, and find additional just-posted gigs on Mediabistro.

harpercollins

Find more great publishing jobs on the GalleyCat job board. Looking to hire? Tap into our network of talented GalleyCat pros and post a risk-free job listing. For real-time openings and employment news, follow @MBJobPost.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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17. Bad Kitty: Drawn to Trouble

As a published author and someone who has taught creative writing, I have read many books on how to write. (And I do mean many. A quick count of the books on the shelves yields 45 books on the subject.) None, however, managed to crack me up--until, that is, I read Nick Bruel's latest. It must be the seven-year-old in me, but Bruel never fails to make me laugh. In Drawn to Trouble, Bruel inserts himself into the storyline, showing kids how to create their own stories. He begins by introducing himself as the author and illustrator of the Bad Kitty books, going so far as to draw a mirror so readers can see how handsome he is. (Bruel's definition of an author (found in the handy appendix) is: "An incredibly beautiful person who writes books and always smells like lavender, even in hot weather."

After Bruel has kids draw Bad Kitty, giving them step-by-step instructions, he tackles the various elements of fiction: character, setting, conflict, plot, etc.  He does it all humorously, putting poor Kitty in dangerous situations to illustrate his points. For instance, when discussing setting, Bruel dunks Kitty in the ocean, plops her down in the middle of a jungle, and then in a zombie-filled graveyard, before finally settling on Kitty's home. (Not that home is any safer. In one instance a giant octopus comes oozing through the door.) As usual, Uncle Murray chimes in in the series' Fun Facts spreads. In this book, he tackles the difference between plot an theme, the importance of using dictionaries, and ways to end stories. Inspired by the Looney Tunes short classics Duck Amuck and Rabbit Rampage (as well as Winsor McKay's 1914 short cartoon Gertie the Dinosaur), this wacky book is sure to have budding authors scribbling away.

Favorite line: "Like all children's book authors, I am extremely good-looking."

Bad Kitty: Drawn to Trouble
by Nick Bruel
Roaring Brook Press 128 pages
Published: January 2014

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18. Best Translated Book Awards - poetry finalists

       As a judge for the fiction category for the Best Translated Book Awards (and, let's face it, someone whose reading is entirely dominated by fiction (as I noted recently, 91 of the past 100 titles reviewed at the complete review were of works of fiction)) I focus almost exclusively on that half of the BTBA (see also yesterday's mention) -- but, of course, there's also a poetry half to the BTBA, and the finalists for that were also announced yesterday.
       I've only even seen one of these -- but that one is under review at the complete review: The Unknown University by Roberto Bolaño.

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19. In a Pickle


Would you rather....




...face an angry prickle of hedgehogs with dirty sporks...





 ...or a grove of well meaning teddy bear cacti who want to play trampoline with you?





Oh dear.  What to do.


This image was brought to you tax-free.

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20. New Asymptote

       The April issue of Asymptote is now out -- and worth your while, top to bottom. Nevertheless, a few of the highlights:

       But don't overlook the rest, either !

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21. Rusalka

 
 A quick color study from last week.

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22. Your Weakness is Your Strength

This might get weird. I’m just gonna put that out here, right up front. I’ve been in an especially reflective mood lately, and I’m pulling this post from that painfully honest well. Because something’s been on my mind. A series of questions, actually…

 

When did I start second guessing my every move?

 

Why have I become so self-critical?

 

When did I turn into a walking apology?

 

Maybe I’m alone in this. I dunno. But somehow I’ve let toxic self-sabotage become my go-to move. And I need to shake it off. These days, over and over, I find myself thinking…

 

You’re too emotional.

 

You’re too easily played.

 

You’re too naive.

 

You’re not smart enough.

 

You’re not tough enough.

 

You’re not good enough at this game.

 

And on and on and on. Yes, it’s good to reflect and push yourself. And a healthy dose of self-doubt is an extremely useful thing. Without at least a little of it, it’s almost impossible to grow. But too much? Too much, and there’s no room for growth at all. Instead, there’s only room for the echo of self-destructive thought.

 

I think it hit me tonight, when I was driving home from an especially long day at work. Tonight, on a long stretch of highway, I had the music cranked up as I was listening to Pharrell’s Happy. And you know what? I was singing along and acting completely goofy and un-ironic and just being… unapologetically happy. I was just being myself, feeling good like no one was watching, no apology necessary. And yanno what? It was great.

 

All that toxic self-talk had completely disappeared.

 

And on that cloud of joy-for-no-reason, I came home and reread a recent interview with Pharrell in Red Bulletin. And over and over, he talks about emotion and the power of human feeling and how hard he works to listen and stay open to it as he creates new things. Without apology, he acknowledged this empathy and emotion, and his inability to push it aside. He owns it not as a weakness, but as a strength. A strength that fuels everything he does:

 

“…Always shooting for that and using feeling as a compass. We are so dismissive of our feelings. Yet…our feelings can lead us to do really crazy things or really amazing things…”
“…Steve Jobs. He so genuinely bought that product to the world; it is called a computer. But we are human, and that is what a computer will never be able to do is feel. That is what makes us the superior species of this planet…”

 

“…When I realized that thinking is not my path and feeling is for me, I started to realize that people are so dismissive about other people’s feelings…Ferraris, jewelry, all of those things mean nothing…You can’t take that when you go. You take your feelings with you and your experiences that gave you those feelings. That is the wealth, man. An experience. The coolest thing that you talk about is your trip where you went and you had a good time. The first thing you talk about it in terms of description, “Man, it was awesome.”

 

I’m no creative genius like Pharrell, but I think he might be on to something. Maybe our weaknesses are also our strengths. Sure, I should still try to hone my critical thinking skills, but maybe, I don’t need to dismiss the core of who I am. Maybe I need to embrace it. Maybe I need to flip that thought loop until it sounds more like…

 

I’m empathic enough to care deeply about others.

 

I’m optimistic enough to stay open to possibility.

 

I’m forgiving enough to look past flaws and shortcomings.

 

I’m headstrong enough to take chances.

 

I’m resilient enough to ante up, again and again.

 

I’ve got enough heart to know which games really matter.

 

So if I’m not alone, and you’re feeling self-critical, this is my long-winded way of passing it along to you: whatever your weakness is, no matter what your critical thought loop says, the flaws in you are probably also your biggest strengths. Be you, and no one else. Be you and work it, baby.

 

Clap along if you feel like a room without a roof…

 

 

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23. Live Coverage of the 2014 Quidditch World Cup on Pottermore

We have some really exciting news from Pottermore: J. K. Rowling is adding new content to the site about the current Quidditch World Cup as it takes place in real time. Information about the opening ceremonies and the first match, which was between Norway and the Ivory Coast, can be viewed in the newly opened area of the Daily Prophet offices, which is in Diagon Alley. The reporting was done by none other than Ginny Potter:

Hot off the press! Reporting from the Patagonian desert for the Daily Prophet, Ginny Potter brings you the latest news of the 2014 Quidditch World Cup. 

Visit the Daily Prophet offices in Diagon Alley, recently opened on Pottermore.com, to read all about the opening ceremony of the tournament, and why it is bound to reignite the debate about restricting mascots ‘to herbivores, creatures smaller than a cow and nothing that breathes fire’. 

Find out why the Argentinian Council of Magic has come under fire from Chief Consulting Magizoologist, Rolf Scamander, and read his exclusive interview with the Daily Prophet. 

You can also read the report from the official Daily Prophet Quidditch correspondent, Ginny Potter, about the eventful first match of the 2014 Quidditch World Cup between Norway and Ivory Coast, which was played on Sunday. The last time these two teams met, the match lasted for five days. Find out which team was victorious this time around, and read more post-game analysis. 

Visit the Daily Prophet offices in Diagon Alley on Pottermore.com to read this exclusive writing by J.K. Rowling. Remember to keep an eye out for more reports from the Patagonian desert!

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24. MORTAL ENCHANTMENT Cover Reveal and $50 Gift Card Giveaway from Stacey O'Neale

Today, Stacey O'Neale and Phoenix Reign Publishing are revealing the cover for MORTAL ENCHANTMENT, releasing on May 20, 2014! Check out the awesome cover and enter to win a $50 Amazon or Barnes & Noble Gift Card!!! On to the reveal! “Mortal Enchantment spins a unique twist on elemental mythology. This series is not to be missed.” Jennifer L. Armentrout, #1 New York Times

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25. It's National Bookmobile Day: Bookmobiles in WWII


Yesterday, I went to the library to pick up some books that they had gotten for me through interlibrary loan.  I have always been fortunate enough to live within walking distance of a public library and a short subway ride to one of the greatest research libraries in the country, the New York Public Library at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street.  And since it is National Library Week, I would like to give a shout out to my local library and the librarians who have gotten me many of the books I have used for this blog, as well as my other blog, Randomly Reading:



It may be National Library Week all week long, but April 16th is National Bookmobile Day.  


Bookmobiles have played an important part in providing library services to people to can get to their local library, or in areas that are too rural for a library to be built.  During World War II, bookmobiles helped bring books to factories, where workers who had little enough free time could browse and check out books.
1943 Chicago Public Library Bookmobile (University of Illinois at
Urbana-Champaign, University Archives
 And they played a major role bringing books to people in the armed forces, both here and abroad.
The 31st Division's Mobile Library at Camp Polk, Louisiana 1943
A small mobile library for soldiers stationed in the Middle East
And of course, they were there for schoolchildren and their parents



Two Bookmobiles serving New York City
1942 Bookmobile, Stamford CT
Today, there are just under 1,000 bookmobiles in the United States, still serving people in all different areas, the bustling cities to rural farms.  And then there is the Camel Library Service in Kenya, the mobile library in Zimbabwe pulled by a donkey, an well as in Columbia, South America, in remote areas of Norway there is the book boat, Epos and in Thailand, the bookmobile is an elephant. (Wikipedia)

If you would like to know more about the history of bookmobiles, you might want to visit Orty Ortwein blog, Bookmobiles: A History

Here are some books that feature mobile libraries for young readers:
Picture Books:
Hannah's Bookmobile Christmas by Sally Derby
That Book Woman by Heather Henson
The Book Boat's In by Cynthia Cohen
Miss Dorothy and her Bookmobile by Gloria Houston
Wild About Books by Judy Sierra

Nonfiction:
Biblioburro: a true story from Columbia by Jeanette Winter
My Librarian is a Camel by Margaret Ruurs (nonfiction)
Down Cut Shin Creek: the pack horse librarians of Kentucky by Kathi Appelt and Jeanne Cannella Schmitzer (nonfiction)

Chapter Books:
Clara and the Bookwagon by Nancy Smiler Levinson
Mystery of the Bewitched Bookmobile by Florence Parry Heide and Roxanne Heide Pierce

YA/Adult:
Lending a Paw: a Bookmobile Cat Mystery by Laurie Cass
Taliling a Tabby: a Bookmobile Cat Mystery by Laurie Cass

Be sure to visit the ALA National Bookmobile Day 2014 for more resources and activities.  And you can download this nice PDF and put together your own bookmobile, like the one below:

Cardboard Bookmobile bringing books to the toy soldiers


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