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1. Artist: Katie Hampson

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K Hampson

After attending the Buy Art Fair 2014 in Manchester at the weekend, I saw the lovely work of Katie Hampson, a fine artist and illustrator from the North West of England. Hampson’s work initially struck me with their looseness and vibrant colour depicting several animals. At the art fair, the artist was undertaking a live art demonstration where she proved her skills and talent. I was able to briefly meet Hampson and ask about her main inspirations which she responded by telling me her main influences are drawn from animals, music and from her own imagination.

K Hampson Live

Katie Hampson Live

If you want to view more of Katie Hampson’s work see her website or Facebook page.

 

Thanks for reading,

Carla

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2. Giraffosaurus


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3. INTERVIEW of ‘CAT’ artist: Lisa Fields

black march FieldsI hope you’ll check out the wonderful interview on the Temean daily blog…. of our own very talented Lisa Fields!

And check out our newly designed website too:  http://www.catugeau.com

Illustrator Saturday – Lisa Fields

by Kathy Temeanhttp://kathytemean.wordpress.com


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4. Love My Library

I was quoted on The Geeky Blogger's Book Blog during her "LOVE YOUR LIBRARY" month.



Stop by to see all the quotes if you like...use this link.


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5. BOBBEE BEE: (2013) DUPLIN COUNTY ENRICHMENT PROGRAM


While some people, choose to hate.

And, others, plot to boycott.

The show doesn't stop.

Why? Because....

Bobbee Bee made another guest appearance at the Duplin County Summer Enrichment Camp  at E.E.Smith Junior High School in Kenansville, North Carolina on Thursday, June 26, where he had a gymnasium full of children from kindergarten through 3rd grade, plus  students from grades 4 through 8,  laughing out loud, and singing songs, while learning a few valuable lessons about life, love and hate.

Yeah, hate.
Because, their were a few haters in the crowd.

But, when it was over.

The frowns turned into smiles.

Why? Because....laughter is the best medicine.

Plus, it's contagious.

Because during Bobbee Bee's  potential life-changing presentation, children volunteered to act silly, while dressing up in different costumes from the Graham Brother's classic children's book "In the Mind of Bobee Bee," which is a part of their successful "BACK TO SCHOOL WITH A NEW ATTITUDE" literacy program, which attempts to teach students about the importance of self-esteem, academic success, bullying, personal hygiene, self-defense, self-control, and personal responsibility in the classroom and at home

Graham, who attended E.E.Smith Middle School as a child, said he got chill-bumps returning to the school, which he had created so many memories at.

"I love coming back to E.E.Smith. This school has a special place in my heart because my mother and father graduated from this school along with my aunts and uncles, plus my brother." Graham admitted.

"And today, I made a little history. By coming back, on the shoulders of my ancestors and those who have been forgotten to give back a little piece of that old E.E.Smith legacy."


Truthfully, it is a celebration every time Bobbee Bee presents his twisted brand of education, which allows children to examine their hearts, face their internal struggles in order to discover their true identity.

Also, while attending E.E.Smith, Bobbee Bee addressed the issue of not using drugs, avoiding  gangs, and making school a place of peace by not bringing guns on campus.

Along with all of that, he did a little shameful self-promotion as well, as he announced the premiere of his NEW controversial up-and-coming movie "BOBBEE BEE THE HATER THE MOVIE," which is scheduled to be shown at James Sprunt Community College in Kenansville, NC on September 21, 2013.
So, get your popcorn ready!!

For more information about Bobbee Bee, send question and request to Eric D.Graham at lbiass34@yahoo.com

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6. Fall Fell

One of the final images from my recently completed Profile Picture Project.

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7. Onijoins the Humble Bundle brigade

oni humble bundle1 Onijoins the Humble Bundle brigade

And as Valiant ended, Oni has taken up the Humble Bundle comics slot. $360 worth of comics including The Sixth Gun, Letter 44 and more. And you benefit the charity Direct Relief. Here’s more:

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8. ‘Foodfight’ Director Larry Kasanoff is Making An ‘Epic Sci-Fi’ Tetris Movie with “Intergalactic Significance”

While there may be some truth to the old adage that in Hollywood, no one knows anything, people in Hollywood do know a few things, namely that the animated feature "Foodfight!" is an epic work of genius and the film's director Larry Kasanoff is a hot commodity.

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9. The World of Publishing: 1991 vs. 2014

The Diamond Lane, published in May 1991, was my second novel, and what is most striking about the difference between the publishing process 23 years ago and now is not that the book was written on a Kaypro, Xeroxed at Kinko's, and sent overnight in a FedEx box to G. P. Putnam's Sons, but that [...]

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10. Sensitive, Empathic or Celery?

celery

Not everyone that is sensitive is empathic. Not all folks that are sensitive are highly sensitive. And some, are celery. I realized this a few months back when I met a bunch of folks all at once who were sensitive (I tend to draw in lots of sensitive people, I’m guessing because like attracts like, or perhaps, because I wrote a book on it), but not all were empathic, or even highly sensitive. You can be one that is very feeling-sensitive, meaning, your feelings are easily hurt, but you don’t have a clue what someone else is feeling. Some folks don’t even care, and then fall into the Insensitive category.

Sensitive Empathic.

A sensitive empathic person, who I like to write about it here on the blog, is one that is not only sensitive to the environment, energy or feelings, but who is also empathetic to others’ feelings. This type of person can feel what others are feeling as if those feelings are their own. They are great at reading others, and tuning into a room and knowing what “radio dial” of emotion that room is set at, and have the habit of picking up lots of stuff that isn’t their own.

Sensitive.

A sensitive person is one that can have their feelings easily hurt, may feel some things deeply and others things not so deeply, can understand other people sometimes, but may not be empathic in anyway, or tuned in to intuition, or that spiritual connection or energy. Some sensitive people can be very un-empathic with others’ feelings because they fall more in the celery category, and it can be very confusing to other sensitive people, who assume because someone is sensitive, they are also tuned into the feelings of others.

Highly Sensitive.

I just love Elaine Aron’s book, The Highly Sensitive Person. She talks of the special class of folks that are Sensitive Empaths who are, you guessed it, also highly sensitive. Not a freak of Nature, but I think, more of an evolution, these sensitive have bodies that are wired to pick up all kinds of energies and frequencies, that many can not. They process and take in a great deal at one time.

Celery.

Celery are not bad or good, and no judgement by the way, I just chose the word Celery because it came to mind, and I think I’m hungry. (Yeah, now that I think of it, I’m craving a big salad). Celery folks are not sensitive or empathic. They are the thick-skinned which most the time stuff, just bounces off their backs. They are the opposite of the empathic and are here for balance,  and the empaths are here to balance them. We need the folks that are not empathic at all and can live in a world that pretty much just includes their feelings and that’s it. To the empath, this would be like a vacation! And the Celery need desperately to learn how to be more empathic and consider others’ feelings too. The Celery are often extroverts that are able to have a bubble around them that is just their world.

The Insensitive.

We can all have our moments when we are insensitive, especially times when we are too involved in our own stuff to think of others, or when we are so overloaded that we just shut down and off (common in the highly sensitive or sensitive empathic). No one is immune to this dilemma. But then there are the category of folks that are just insensitive and mean. I tend to believe that deep, deep down, these folks are very sensitive and have big walls up to protect themselves that have harden to clay and now they don’t feel not much at all. It is best to avoid the insensitive and remind yourself, it is not your job to melt their clay, nor can you.

So, which are you? Have you met the different degrees of sensitivity? Do you recognize any of these in yourself or others?

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**Hey, I just posted October classes for the Sensitive. Registration is open now. Hop on over to see HERE.


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11. Our free e-book for October: In Defense of Negativity

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Americans tend to see negative campaign ads as just that: negative. Pundits, journalists, voters, and scholars frequently complain that such ads undermine elections and even democratic government itself. But John G. Geer here takes the opposite stance, arguing that when political candidates attack each other, raising doubts about each other’s views and qualifications, voters—and the democratic process—benefit.

In Defense of Negativity, Geer’s study of negative advertising in presidential campaigns from 1960 to 2004, asserts that the proliferating attack ads are far more likely than positive ads to focus on salient political issues, rather than politicians’ personal characteristics. Accordingly, the ads enrich the democratic process, providing voters with relevant and substantial information before they head to the polls.

An important and timely contribution to American political discourse, In Defense of Negativity concludes that if we want campaigns to grapple with relevant issues and address real problems, negative ads just might be the solution.

“Geer has set out to challenge the widely held belief that attack ads and negative campaigns are destroying democracy. Quite the opposite, he argues in his provocative new book: Negativity is good for you and for the political system. . . . In Defense of Negativity adds a new argument to the debate about America’s polarized politics, and in doing so it asserts that voters are less bothered by today’s partisan climate than many believe. If there are problems—and there are—Geer says it’s time to stop blaming it all on 30-second spots.”—Washington Post

Download your free copy of In Defense of Negativity here.

Watch “The Bear,” one of those 30-second spots (less an attack ad, and more a foray into American surrrealism) produced  for Ronald Reagan’s 1984 presidential campaign, below:

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12. Libraries, Peanut Butter, and Bears

School has started, and with it, I'm back in the classroom once a week, reading to second graders. So far we have read these picture books:

Tomás and the Library Lady, written by Pat Mora and illustrated by Raul Colón. A friendly bookseller at Manhattan's charming La Casa Azul recommended this one, which is sprinkled with Spanish words. Tomás, the child of migrant Texas farm workers, find a place of refuge in an Iowa library and enjoys the attention of two mentors in the "library lady" and his grandfather. It's based on the childhood experiences of Tomás Rivera, who went on to become a university chancellor.

Peanut Butter and Homework Sandwiches, written by Leslie Broadie Cook and illustrated by Jack E. Davis. A silly tale of a kid who just can't get it right, homework-wise, through no fault of his own.

The Three Bears, written and illustrated by Paul Galdone. Before hearing Mo Willems' parody Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs, the second graders needed some familiarity with the fairy tale, and Galdone's is a straight-forward rendering. Of course some knew the story already, but the discussion afterward was our longest so far. Among the kids' contributions were Destiny's keen observations about the illustrations and Miguel's announcement of his birthday. Oh, and Huynh will soon have a baby brother or sister.

Some years ago I found Galdone's work through the recommendations in Esmé Raji Codell's How to Get Your Child to Love Reading. Along with Jim Trelease's Read-Aloud Handbook, Codell's guide is a must-have resource for people who share books with young children.

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13. Fun Fall at the Farm


It's getting to be pumpkin picking time. Illustrations from PICK A CIRCLE, GATHER SQUARES, A Fall Harvest of Shapes. Written by Felicia Sanzari Chernesky, illustrated by Susan Swan
     



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14. Jack Kirby and Marvel Settle: what we know, what we don’t

jack kirby alex ross Jack Kirby and Marvel Settle: what we know, what we dont

Tribute to the King by Alex Ross.

Friday’s announcement of a settlement between Jack Kirby’s heirs and Marvel seems like good news—but is it? And what does it mean?

I’m told Jeff Trexler, whose identification of the “instance and expense” aspect of the lawsuit may have helped get that into the petition to the Supremes, is writing his summary for TCJ.com, so while we all eagerly await that, here’s a little of the known knowns and known unknowns:

First off, Mark Evanier, a Kirby family confidant, a witness at various Kirby-related trials and filier of an amicus curiae brief is certainly in a position to know more of the Kirby position and this is all he had to say on the matter:

It was announced this morning that the family of Jack Kirby has settled with Marvel Comics (i.e., Disney) ending a very long dispute. The Supreme Court was only days from considering whether to take on the case and obviously, the timing of this settlement has much to do with both sides’ concern with what would get decided there.

If you’re coming to this page in search of details and commentary, you’ve come to the wrong place. I will be saying nothing about it other that I am real, real happy. And I’m sure Jack and his wife Roz, if they’re watching this from wherever they are, are real, real,real happy.

That’s either great fronting or a pretty solid indication that the Kirbys got what they were looking for. Since Evanier was intimately involved in the case, it’s probably legally all he can say. But if Mark thinks Jack is smiling, I’m smiling.

You can read all the petitions and briefs here. And you can bet a lot of people will be poring over these for a lot of reasons.

Charles Hatfield has a good round up of the ins and outs of the case itself, the many friend of the court briefs, and how the case grew in importance as more Hollywood vested interest signed on.

However, news of the cert petition reignited publicity over the case, and in May SCOTUS discussed the case in conference, after which the Court requested a response from Marvel. Then, in June, things started to happen: several important amici curiae briefs supporting the Kirbys’ petition brought high-profile attention to the case. One of these was filed on behalf of Kirby biographer Mark Evanier, Jack Kirby Collector publisher and editor John Morrow, and the PEN Center USA (a nonprofit representing diverse writers).

In addition, the California Society of Entertainment Lawyers filed a brief. Another brief that became very important for the press coverage of the  case was submitted by Bruce Lehman, former Assistant Secretary of Commerce and Director of the US Patent and Trademark Office, and an authority on intellectual property law. Lehman filed in collaboration with former US register of copyrights Ralph Oman, the Artists Rights Society, and the International Intellectual Property Institute; they were joined by the American Society of Illustrators, the National Cartoonists Society, the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists, and other organizations representing arts professionals—as well as scores of cartoonists and illustrators who also signed on.

Kurt Busiek has been debunking some common myths about the case in the Beat’s own comments, but perhaps because Beat commenters are just smarter or less pig-headed than the average commenter, he saved his masterpiece in the genre for this CBR thread where he debunks from all times that the Kirby heirs were just greedy and opportunistic. (Link via Tom Spurgeon) He also speculates about the outcome, just like Iim gonna do in a few paragraphs:

Based on that, it sure doesn’t look like Marvel’s throwing the Kirbys a few bucks to go away. If that’s what they wanted to do, they could have done that any time within the last few years. Whoever blinked, it was the side that had the most to lose if the case went to the Supreme Court and risked a ruling they didn’t like.

That wasn’t the Kirbys — they were already getting nothing, so the Supreme Court deciding against them wouldn’t hurt them any.

But Disney/Marvel has billions on the line. They don’t want to risk losing that. Not even with a pro-business Supreme Court likely to rule for them. Because they’re not sure the Court would rule for them. Not with a bunch of people on the other side who make IP contracts their life — including one of the guys who helped write the 1978 Copyright Law. If that guy is saying, “No, no, it doesn’t work that way,” there’s too much of a chance that the Court will listen.

So my prediction is: All the public changes you see coming out of this are going to be favorable to the Kirbys. Probably the first thing you see will be creator credits. And the family’s going to suddenly be financially secure, like their father/grandfather wanted them to be.

What the “greedy heirs” morons don’t get is that this was a case with very important principles set off by the Copyright Law of 1976 regarding what is work for hire. As Kevin Melrose reports of a Law.com article, many issues remains undecided by the settlement, and it’s entirely possible that these will crop up again and the Supreme Court may yet hear such a case:

The Kirby heirs insisted the artist was an independent contractor who worked from home, provided his own supplies and received no benefits. However, he Second Circuit, using its frequently criticized “instance and expense” test, found that because Marvel assigned and approved projects and paid a page rate, Kirby’s contributions were indeed “for hire.”

The Kirbys took aim at the Second Circuit’s definition of work for hire in their petition to the U.S. Supreme Court, which drew support from the likes of Hollywood guilds and a former director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, demonstrating the potentially far-reaching ramifications of the dispute. However, the 11th-hour settlement announcement arrived just ahead of a Supreme Court conference on Monday to determine whether to review the case — meaning the Second Circuit’s finding stands.

So the gray area surrounding work for hire before 1978 remains, although experts say given that 56-year window — or 35 years for copyrights transferred after 1979 — it’s only a matter time before another case, more likely to involve a musician/songwriter than a comics artist, makes its way to the Supreme Court, requiring the justices to weigh in.

As Kirby family attorney Marc Toberoff told Law.com, “At some point there will be another case like this.”

 

While it seems unlikely from the outside that SCOTUS would ever have sided with the Kirby heirs, Marvel didn’t know, and a happy smiling settlement was vastly to everyone’s benefit.  And more to the point, there’s no such thing as secret in entertainment any more. As Joshua Riviera writes for EW:

One of the great things about modern pop culture isn’t just the wealth of content available, but the interest it has spurred in the creators behind it. Showrunners, once an invisible position in the broadcast era, are now at the forefront of fans’ minds when obsessing over TV. Similarly, the public perception of filmmakers has slowly evolved from the days of the monolithic studio system to accommodate directors and screenwriters and cinematographers and composers and VFX teams and crew. Comics have come a long way from the 60s, which saw Jack Kirby slowly become frustrated with the business that grew and endures to this day thanks in large part to his labors—now many comics are sold based on the strength of the people making them. But the way comics creators are credited in other media based on their work is often lacking.

Yet, things have changed a lot from the days when Marv Wolfman was barred credits of Blade, setting off a lawsuit he eventually lost and the current spate of copyright battles. Nowadays, one imagines, Marv would be saluted at the Hall H panel and trotted around to talk shows. While it’s pretty clear that you need to lawyer up to get your share of whatever pie — mini or maxi — may exist, Marvel/Disney has become more sensitive to the bad publicity of the starving creator railing against the corporation as he rolls around in his ratty sleeping bag from his stately cardboard box on the street.

And now some speculation from me. Given the fair-enough-to-shut-them-up treatment of Jim Starlin and the family of Bill Mantlo  over Guardians of the Galaxy, Disney and Marvel seem to be on a better path now. You can attribute that to the bad optics of the cardboard box creator, but I’m pretty sure most of the top brass at Marvel proper, including Dan Buckley, Joe Quesada and Axel Alonso, would wish to see creators fairly treated if it were within their powers. (The same was undoubtedly true of Paul Levitz and Jenette Kahn at DC.)

Given the huge, vocal and unending respect for the work of Jack Kirby by just about every creative type involved with all these “comic book movies,” I share the Busiek viewpoint that we’ll see more public inclusion of Kirby among the “Marvel founders.” Kirby always got acknowledgement in the credits of Marvel movies, but we could see more “created by” credits. Kirby could be inducted into the “Disney Legends” hall of fame type deal. Disney doesn’t do a ton to promote its actual creative people, but I’d expect to see Kirby enshrined as much as possible.

And now, here is my Torsten-like fantasy to end this. Maybe someday at Disneyland, as the Marvel character rides and characters and churros swirl, there could be a statue of Stan and Jack as they create the Marvel Universe as we first knew it. I’m not sure Jack would have really liked that, but the victors write history, and I’m pretty sure that Jack Kirby is a victor now.

seven things at disneyland that make d23s studio tour even more cool feat 1.1 Jack Kirby and Marvel Settle: what we know, what we dont

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15. nerosunero at Galerie Lauth (exhibition preview)

Exhibition:
Mario Sughi (nerosunero)
Short Stories
Ludwigshafen (Germany)
10 October 2014 - 1 November 2014

Read preview on
Likeyou (Zurich, Switzerland, 1 X 2014)

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16. Building Self-Respect through Dreamwork and Intuitive Meditation

What do I rely on to get respect?

Where Does Self-Respect Come From?

5 Signs You’re Not Respecting Yourself by Vironika Tugaleva  is a good article about the negative behaviors that can pull us down, indicating that our self-esteem is plummeting. If these behaviors become habitual patterns they can be very self-destructive and undermine our relationships with other people.

Usually these behaviors manifest because, for any number of reasons, we are not in touch with our true self, and so don’t respect who we are.  Dreamwork and accessing intuitive insight are great tools that can counteract any tendency to disrespect ourselves because the on-going practice of these exercises can lead to a healthy awareness of who we truly and uniquely are at the deepest emotional and spiritual levels. These exercises tap us into the root of our being and nourish us with information that gives the bigger picture, the grander vision and the substance of things. They can also give us specific answers to problems and concerns we may have. Instead of being buffeted around by the questionable and often enslaving pressures and opinions of those around us, we are fed by healing truths that are custom made for each of us in a way that meets the problem at hand while preserving our innate goodness and integrity.  The end result is that we can behave in a manner that is worthy of respect, both from others and from ourselves!

Example: When I start to feel jealous of someone’s life, thinking it is better than mine, I can ask for a dream will give me guidance on how I can get more out of my own life, being very specific in the questioning to indicate what makes me jealous of someone else and what I might need to fulfill my own life. Asking for a dream to help resolve an issue is called incubating a dream (Ask and You Shall Receive: Incubating a Dream), and it can become one way to work through an issue.

The same can be done by an intuitive meditation such as the Inspired Heart™ Meditation. Prior to doing the meditation I can ask for insight to come. During the meditation I observe the breath and quiet the mind. I then make a heart connection, and receive the insight that comes.

No matter if I work with a dream or in a meditation, the occasion may become a turning point in my life that encourages me to face my feelings, and work towards resolving my issues based on information I have received from a profound inner source and not someone’s opinion or outside pressure. With regular practice I will find that such empowerment will lead to a healthy self-respect. I will come to experience that I am a Child of God, fed and cared for by divine sources, and placed on this earth for an important purpose that only I can serve.  What better basis for self-respect can there be?


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17. An open letter to the self-published author feeling dissed, from Roger Sutton

http://www.hbook.com/2014/09/blogs/read-roger/open-letter-self-published-author-feeling-dissed/






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18. 2014 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Guidelines

In one month, we’ll begin another November PAD (Poem-A-Day) Chapbook Challenge. While I’ve always considered the April challenge as a free-for-all; November is when I try (though don’t always succeed) to write around a specific theme.

It’s not a requirement for other poets, but that’s how I usually roll with it. By the way, I have to give credit to years of completing this chapbook challenges for helping me finally put together my first book of poems, Solving the World’s Problems, which was published last year by Press 53. So even when you’re not a “winner,” you can still be a winner in terms of development.

The November challenge is a little different than the one in April. The guidelines in this post should help guide you through the month.

Here are the basics of the November PAD Chapbook Challenge:

  • Beginning on November 1 (Atlanta, Georgia time), I will share a prompt and poem each day of November on this blog.
  • Poets are then challenged to write a poem each day (no matter where you live on the planet) within 24 hours (or so) from when the prompt is posted. Don’t worry: If you fall behind or start late, you CAN play catch up.
  • Poets do NOT have to register anywhere to participate. In fact, poets don’t even need to post to this blog to be considered participants.
  • The Challenge will unofficially conclude around 24 hours after the final prompt is posted. That said…
  • This Challenge is unique, because I expect poets to take all the material they’ve written in November and create a chapbook manuscript during the month of December. (Yes, you can revise material, and yes, the chapbook should be composed mostly of poems written for the challenge–I’m using the honor system.)
  • Poets have until 11:59 p.m. (Atlanta, GA time) on January 7, 2015, to submit a manuscript that can be 10-20 pages in length (not including table of contents, title page, etc.) with no more than one poem per page. So if you wrote 50 poems in November, you have to narrow them down to the best 20 (or even fewer). Submit manuscripts to robert.brewer@fwcommunity.com with the subject line: 2014 November PAD Chapbook Challenge. (The subject line is very important, because I have a very busy inbox.)
  • The goal will be to announce a winning manuscript by Groundhog Day 2015. February 2, 2015, for those of you unfamiliar with that particular holiday.

*****

Win $1,000 for Your Poetry!

Writer’s Digest is offering a contest strictly for poets with a top prize of $1,000, publication in Writer’s Digest magazine, and a copy of the 2015 Poet’s Market. There are cash prizes for Second ($250) and Third ($100) Prizes, as well as prizes for the Top 25 poems.

The deadline is October 31.

Click here to learn more.

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What do poets get out of this challenge?

If nothing else, they get several new poems, but I’ve heard plenty of success stories over the years from poets who have gone on to publish individual poems from these challenges and even complete collections (mostly inspired by the challenges).

Plus, the winner gets recognized on this blog, along with many honorable mentions. That’s a good thing.

Regarding comments, this blog has a history with commenting problems, which why I don’t make it mandatory for poets to post on the blog to participate. However, I think poets who do comment get a lot out of it by sharing their work and creating a community on the blog. Just make sure you save all your work elsewhere too–like in a notebook or Word doc. It’s good to have backups.

If you have any additional questions, shoot them to me in the comments.

I can’t wait to see everyone in November.

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roberttwitterimageRobert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). He edits Poet’s Market, Writer’s Market, and Guide to Self-Publishing, in addition to writing a free weekly WritersMarket.com newsletter and poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine.

This will be his seventh year of hosting and participating in the November PAD (Poem-A-Day) Chapbook Challenge. As much as he loves the hustle and bustle of the April PAD Challenges, November is nice for a few reasons, including the focus on creating a chapbook and just the laid back feel. Some of his favorite poems have come out of the November challenges, and he can’t wait to get started again.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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Find other poetic posts here:

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19. National Book Foundation Unveils 5 Under 35 Honorees

279-300x300From the Memoirs of a Non-Enemy Combatant author Alex Gilvarry, Faces in the Crowd author Valeria Luiselli, Panic in a Suitcase author Yelena Akhtiorskaya, Redeployment author Phil Klay, and Night at the Fiestas: Stories author Kirstin Valdez Quade have been named this year’s 5 under 35 authors at the National Book Awards.

According to the press release, each honoree will receive a $1,000 cash prize. The National Book Foundation will celebrate these authors at an event at Brooklyn’s powerHouse Arena on November 17, 2014.

Musician and author Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson will play the host. The New Yorker editor Ben Greenman will jump behind the turntables to serve as DJ. Memoir writer Rosie Schaap will handle the drinks and shakers as the guest bartender for the evening. (via BuzzFeed)

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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20. BOBBEE BEE: I CAN, I MUST, I WILL!!!

Unhappiness is not knowing what we want and killing ourselves to get it-Don Harold

By Iyanla Vanzant

Can I continue to live in lack and limitation, denying myself the abundant goodness of the world?

Or can I make a plan, a follow a dream; do what I can, where I am, with what I have?

Can I? Can I? Can I?

Can I continue to buy into the belief that there is not enough, I am not enough, settling for whatever I can get?

Or can I do my best in every situation, expecting the best from every situation, recognizing that what I put out must come back to me tenfold?

Can I? Can I? Can I continue to live in fear, complaining about what I do not have, cannot do, criticizing myself and others?

Or can I take a chance, find an opportunity and know in my heart what I want to do is possible?

Can I?

Can I?




Can I blame the world, hate my enemy, and feel sorry for myself as an excuse not to do what I desire to do? Or can I raise my consciousness, pour love into every situation and take responsibility for myself?

Can I? Can you?
If you like what you are learning on this site, send your comments to lbiass34@yahoo.com

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21. Inspirational Artists: Victoria Ying and Mike Yamada

Husband and wife duo, Mike Yamada and Victoria Ying, are both tremendously talented Visual Development artists in Animation. They share some life experiences and give advice for those interested in making art as a career. Their film credits include Disney’s Frozen, Big Hero 6, Dreamworks’ Kung Fu Panda and How to Train Your Dragon.

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22. Tibbar, Tibbar!

Rabbit Dress-Up Detail, © 2011 by Lisa Firke.

Rabbit Dress-Up Detail, © 2011 by Lisa Firke.

"Tibbar, Tibbar" is what you say if you don't manage to say "Rabbit, Rabbit" first thing on the first day of the month.

For the first time since I started my newsletter, I didn't send one out on the first. Nothing momentous happened to prevent me, just an accumulation of small things. Since I was already under the weather, I decided to cut myself a break and not force things. I'll catch everyone up on studio news in a few days. Wishing you all vast quantities of rabbit luck and creative karma, despite my tardiness. Tibbar, Tibbar!


 

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23. ‘Snap Judgment’ Storytelling Show is on Kickstarter

Glynn Washington, the host of NPR‘s Snap Judgment, hopes to raise $150,000 on Kickstarter.

The funds will be used to cover the cost of producing the storytelling radio show’s sixth season. We’ve embedded a video about the project above. Here’s more from the Kickstarter page:

“Snap was born of love, and we have balanced on a razor’s edge since the very beginning. Your contribution goes directly toward making the most amazing season of Snap the world has ever known. Together, we’ve surmounted the obstacles before, and created the first five seasons of Snap. Let’s do it again.”

(more…)

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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24. New Job Openings at Google Doodles, Gumball, Moonbot, Moving Colour and Nick

Are you hunting for a great animation job? The Cartoon Brew Job Board is the ideal place to look for your next gig,

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25. The Orphan and the Mouse (2014)

The Orphan and the Mouse. Martha Freeman. Illustrated by David McPhail. 2014. Holiday House. 220 pages. [Source: Library]

I definitely enjoyed reading Martha Freeman's The Orphan and the Mouse, a fantasy novel inspired by E.B. White's Stuart Little. The book is set in 1949. (Note: I haven't read Stuart Little, but, this novel tempts me to seek it out.) This fantasy is told through multiple perspectives: a few mice, one cat who loves to hunt mice, a couple of orphans, and a practically evil orphanage director. It is illustrated by David McPhail.

I liked this one. I liked the setting. It took some time for me to get hooked on the actual story, but, no time at all to get hooked on the premise of the story. I liked the characters. Mary, the mouse heroine, was a great narrator. I also came to care for Caro, one of the orphans living at the Cherry Street Children's Home. The book offers some suspense and mystery, though often the reader knows much more than the characters in the book. Readers get to watch the characters put it all together and possibly maybe save the day.

I also really appreciated the length of the chapters!

© 2014 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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