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1. A Perfectly Messed Up Story

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2. Comics Friday: Beautiful Darkness by Fabien Vehlmann

From Goodreads:
Kerascoët’s and Fabien Vehlmann’s unsettling and gorgeous anti-fairy tale is a searing condemnation of our vast capacity for evil writ tiny. Join princess Aurora and her friends as they journey to civilization's heart of darkness in a bleak allegory about surviving the human experience.  The sweet faces and bright leaves of Kerascoët’s delicate watercolors serve to highlight the evil that dwells beneath Vehlmann's story as pettiness, greed, and jealousy take over.  Beautiful Darkness is a harrowing look behind the routine politeness and meaningless kindness of civilized society. 
It doesn't get much darker than this story of a group of tiny people who live inside the corpse of a dead little girl.  Until, that is, her corpse starts to decompose and they are forced into the woods where they are threatened by evils both internal and external.  It's horrifying enough when you consider it a grim fairy tale full of butchery and danger, but when you realize that it's a metaphor for the bleakness of life as a human and all its trials and tribulations, you'll just want to lay right down and die.

Except you won't because the art is so beautiful that it completely outweighs the horror of what you're seeing happen to these adorable tiny people.  Which, I suppose, is its own metaphor for the human experience.  Shockingly brutal, but also beautiful beyond words.  It demands to be reread once you get what the author is trying to convey and it's totally worth that reread.

It's certainly  not a book that I'd recommend across the board to everyone, even everyone interested in comics.  It's not for children and it's also not for those who will be appalled at the idea of a precious little race of tiny people being slaughtered by nature and by each other.  Have I mentioned that this is dark?

However, if you can stomach it, I think it's not only a pretty deep and interesting commentary on what it means to be human in our world, but it's also gorgeously illustrated.  I don't frequently reread, even graphic novels, so it's high praise that this one demanded a more thorough second read.  It's just beautifully done, on both a metaphoric and artistic level and I highly recommend trying it.

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3. "A Perfectly Messed-Up Story" book trailer

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4. Elizabeth Buzzelli's Cozy Reading Corner


As you can see by the photo, I've got to find a new favorite reading place pretty quick.  Another blizzard coming today so it's a great time to read.  Maybe the cat's chair will do.  




SNOOP TO NUTS, the second in the Nut House Series from Berkley is just out so I'm doing Blog Tours, but looking fondly at the Christmas stack of books.  SNOOP TO NUTS is written under my pen name: Elizabeth Lee.  The next book in the series comes out the end of 2015.  

You can find me on Facebook
My Website
Twitter  

--Elizabeth Buzzelli

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5. New Insurgent Trailer Unveiled

A new trailer has been unveiled for the Insurgent film adaptation. Deadline reports that this trailer for “the Summit Entertainment sequel will be one of the Hollywood studio ads showing during the Super Bowl this weekend.”

The video embedded above offers glimpses of Shailene Woodley and Kate Winslet reprising their roles as Beatrice “Tris” Prior and Jeanine Matthews. The movie c

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6. A Perfectly Messed-up Story ....a bookwrap










Happy Friday everyone!  Glad you are here because I have a fun, very creative book for you to enjoy today.  Let's unwrap it shall we?  I think you are going to be pleased.  I hope you will watch the book trailers below after you have read my review.  Ready?  




Unwrapping.........





Author and illustrator is Patrick McDonnell



Pulling the wrapping completely off to see what's inside....Let's do it....


















Happy little Louie is walking along, singing to himself and minding his own business. He is trying to get his story started when plop....a huge goop of jelly comes out of nowhere and splats on his book page.  Now where did that come from?  How rude!  Then almost immediately after, a big blob of peanut butter splatters...right on Louie's head! Yuk! It's the disgusting chunky kind (which happens to be my most favourite, but I do digress....sorry!)  

Louie is getting more and more angry and thinks enough is enough already.  But enough already it isn't.  Orange juice descends from above leaving a huge, orange stain on his page, followed by icky, sticky fingerprints and the pièce de résistance? .... crayon scribbles!!! Ok, that's really crossing the line now thinks Louie.  Get the paper towel reader, I've had it.  Louie lays down in utter exasperation and despair.  He gives himself a timeout. His story is ruined, his life is over, now no one will ever read his messy, grungy story....ever!!

But as Louie reflects on his dilemma he learns a very valuable life lesson. He goes on with his story and realizes it is good after all.  It is received well even with the blemishes imposed upon it.  He understands that like his book, life can get messed up and yet your story still can turn out pretty darn good if you keep on singing and moving forward even when difficulties rain down upon you .  

The illustrations are expressive and the word bubbles add so much richness to the storyline.  This interactive story is a perfect read-aloud bringing laughter to both young and old.  I highly recommend this book.






Patrick McDonnell is the creator of The Monsters' Monster, a New York Times bestseller; Me...Jane, a Caldecott Honor Book and a New York Times bestselling picture book biography of Dr. Jane Goodall; and the award-winning picture book Art. He is also the creator of the beloved, internationally syndicated comic strip Mutts, which features the characters that star in five of his previous picture books including Wag!, The Gift of NothingJust Like Heaven, Hug Time, and South.

Patrick sits on the board of directors of the Humane Society of the United States and has won numerous awards for both Mutts and his animal welfare work. He lives in New Jersey with his wife, Karen; their formerly feral cat, Not Ootie; and their adopted terrier, Amelie.


Praise For A Perfectly Messed-Up Story
* "Brilliant.... A playful, funny, and friendly treatment of anxiety and life's unpredictable messes."Kirkus Reviews, starred review

* "Louie's exaggerated reactions...will trigger laughs with every page turn....McDonnell... excels at reminding his characters--and readers--that it's possible to keep it together even when life has jelly all over it."Publishers Weekly, starred review

"The pleasures of watching a book depart from its conventions and address its sticky-fingered reader will tickle even the littlest postmodernist."New York Times Book Review

"Classic McDonnell pen, ink, and watercolor pastels blend with mixed-media and crayon messes to make this untidy tale a victory for unkempt books everywhere. Keep calm, and read on!"School Library Journal

"This [one] is a fun one-Kiddos who get messy with their books will likely giggle."Booklist



Read on and read always!

It's a wrap.

http://www.storywrapsblog@gmail.com

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7. Judicial resistance? War crime trials after World War I

There was a great change in peace settlements after World War I. Not only were the Central Powers supposed to pay reparations, cede territory, and submit to new rules concerning the citizenship of their former subjects, but they were also required to deliver nationals accused of violations of the laws and customs of war (or violations of the laws of humanity, in the case of the Ottoman Empire) to the Allies to stand trial.

This was the first time in European history that victor powers imposed such a demand following an international war. This was also the first time that regulations specified by the Geneva and Hague Conventions were enforced after a war ended. Previously, states used their own military tribunals to enforce the laws and customs of war (as well as regulations concerning espionage), but they typically granted amnesty for foreigners after a peace treaty was signed.

The Allies intended to create special combined military tribunals to prosecute individuals whose violations had affected persons from multiple countries. They demanded post-war trials for many reasons. Legal representatives to the Paris Peace Conference believed that “might makes right” should not supplant international law; therefore, the rules governing the treatment of civilians and prisoners-of-war must be enforced. They declared the war had created a modern sensibility that demanded legal innovations, such as prosecuting heads of state and holding officers responsible for the actions of subordinates. British and French leaders wanted to mollify domestic feelings of injury as well as propel an interpretation that the war had been a fight for “justice over barbarism,” rather than a colossal blood-letting. They also sought to use trials to exert pressure on post-war governments to pursue territorial and financial objectives.

The German, Ottoman, and Bulgarian governments resisted extradition demands and foreign trials, yet staged their own prosecutions. Each fulfilled a variety of goals by doing so. The Weimar government in Germany was initially forced to sign the Versailles Treaty with its extradition demands, then negotiated to hold its own trials before its Supreme Court in Leipzig because the German military, plus right-wing political parties, refused the extradition of German officers. The Weimar government, led by the Social Democratic party, needed the military’s support to suppress communist revolutions. The Leipzig trials, held 1921-27, only covered a small number of cases, serving to deflect responsibility for the most serious German violations, such as the massacre of approximately 6,500 civilians in Belgium and deportation of civilians to work in Germany. The limited scope of the trials did not purge the German military as the Allies had hoped. Yet the trials presented an opportunity for German prosecutors to take international charges and frame them in German law. Although the Allies were disturbed by the small number of convictions, this was the first time that a European country had agreed to try its own after a major war.

General Stenger. Public domain via the French National Archive. http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b53063910x.r=Stenger.langEN
General Stenger. Public domain via the French National Archive.

The Ottoman imperial government first destroyed the archives of the “Special Organization,” a secret group of Turkish nationalists who deported Greeks from the Aegean region in 1914 and planned and executed the massacre of Armenians in 1915. But in late 1918, a new Ottoman imperial government formed a commission to investigate parliamentary deputies and former government ministers from the Turkish nationalist party, the Committee of Union and Progress, which had planned the attacks. It also sought to prosecute Committee members who had been responsible for the Ottoman Empire’s entrance into the war. The government then held a series of military trials of its own accord in 1919 to prosecute actual perpetrators of the massacres, as well as purge the government of Committee members, as these were opponents of the imperial system. It also wanted to quash the British government’s efforts to prosecute Turks with British military tribunals. Yet after the British occupied Istanbul, the nationalist movement under Mustafa Kemal retaliated by arresting British officers. Ultimately, the Kemalists gained control of the country, ended all Turkish military prosecutions for the massacres, and nullified guilty verdicts.

Like the German and Ottoman situations, Bulgaria began a rocky governmental and social transformation after the war. The initial post-war government signed an armistice with the Allies to avoid the occupation of the capital, Sofia. It then passed a law granting amnesty for persons accused of violating the laws and customs of war. However, a new government came to power in 1919, representing a coalition of the Agrarian Union, a pro-peasant party, and right-wing parties. The government arrested former ministers and generals and prosecuted them with special civilian courts in order to purge them; they were blamed for Bulgaria’s entrance into the war. Some were prosecuted because they lead groups of refugees from Macedonia in a terrorist organization, the Internal Macedonian Revolutionary Organization. Suppressing Macedonian terrorism was an important condition for Bulgaria to improve its relationship with its neighbor, the Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes. In 1923, however, Aleksandar Stambuliski, the leader of the Agrarian Union, was assassinated in a military coup, leading to new problems in Bulgaria.

We could ask a counter-factual question: What if the Allies had managed to hold mixed military tribunals for war-time violations instead of allowing the defeated states to stage their own trials? If an Allied tribunal for Germany was run fairly and political posturing was suppressed, it might have established important legal precedents, such as establishing individual criminal liability for violations of the laws of war and the responsibility of officers and political leaders for ordering violations. On the other hand, guilty verdicts might have given Germany’s nationalist parties new heroes in their quest to overturn the Versailles order.

An Allied tribunal for the Armenian massacres would have established the concept that a sovereign government’s ministers and police apparatus could be held criminally responsible under international law for actions undertaken against their fellow nationals. It might also have created a new historical source about this highly contested episode in Ottoman and Turkish history. Yet it is speculative whether the Allies would have been able to compel the post-war Turkish government to pay reparations to Armenian survivors and return stolen property.

Finally, an Allied tribunal for alleged Bulgarian war criminals, if constructed impartially, might have resolved the intense feelings of recrimination that several of the Balkan nations harbored toward each other after World War I. It might also have helped the Agrarian Union survive against its military and terrorist enemies. However, a trial concentrating only on Bulgarian crimes would not have dealt with crimes committed by Serbian, Greek, and Bulgarian forces and paramilitaries during the Balkan Wars of 1912-13, so a selective tribunal after World War I may not have healed all wounds.

 

Image Credit: Château de Versailles Hall of Mirrors Ceiling. Photo by Dennis JarvisCC BY-SA 2.0 via Flickr.

The post Judicial resistance? War crime trials after World War I appeared first on OUPblog.

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8. Notable (Poetry) Books for a Global Society 2015

Just this week the IRA (now ILA) committee (for CL/R) announced it's latest list of "Notable Books for a Global Society." I was so pleased that they included 8 poetry books on their list of 25 titles published in 2014. Let's see which ones they highlighted, shall we?

Caminar
Harlem Hellfighters
Silver People
Voices from the March
Brown Girl Dreaming
Like Water on Stone
The Red Pencil
A Time to Dance

The pdf of the annotated list complete with book covers here:

I noticed that these are all novels in verse (except Harlem Hellfighters)! Which is lovely, but where are the anthologies that reflect global world views and connections? That's the next challenge for us! But each of these books is truly distinctive, beautifully written and offers a fascinating window into a culturally rich story. Don't miss them!

Here's complete bibliographic info for these 8 titles:

Brown, Skila. 2014. Caminar.Somerville, MA: Candlewick.
Engle, Margarita. 2014. Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.
Lewis, J. Patrick. 2014. Harlem Hellfighters. Mankato, MN: Creative Editions.
Lewis, J. Patrick and Lyon, George Ella. 2014. Voices from the March: Washington, D.C., 1963. Honesdale, PA: Wordsong/Boyds Mills Press.
Pinkney, Andrea Davis. The Red Pencil.  New York: Little, Brown.

Venkatraman, Padma. 2014. A Time to Dance. New York: Penguin.
Walrath, Dana. 2014. Like Water on Stone. New York: Delacorte.
Woodson, Jacqueline. 2014. Brown Girl Dreaming. New York: Penguin.

If you want more information about this SIG (Special Interest Group) and the history of the Notables list, here's a nugget from their website:

"The Children's Literature and Reading Special Interest Group of the International Reading Association formed the Notable Books for a Global Society Committee in 1995. Under the guidance of Yvonne Siu-Runyan, who originated and spearheaded the project, the committee undertook to identify outstanding trade books that it felt would help promote understanding across lines of culture, race, sexual orientation, values, and ethnicity.

The Notable Books for a Global Society (NBGS) list was developed to help students, teachers, and families identify books that promote understanding of and appreciation for the world's full range of diverse cultures and ethnic and racial groups. Although advances in technology allow us to communicate quickly with people around the world and the growth of world trade brings us increasingly into contact with far-flung members of the "global village," today's society is rife with tension, conflict and ignorance of others different from us. If we hope to meet the many challenges that face us in the 21st century, we must recognize the similarities and celebrate the differences among all races, cultures, religions, and sexual orientations, and appreciate that people can hold a wide range of equally legitimate values.

Each year, the Committee selects twenty-five outstanding books for grades K-12 that reflect a pluralistic view of world society. These twenty-five titles represent the year’s best in fiction, nonfiction and poetry."


Plus criteria for selection are there as well as all the lists since 2010.

Well done, Chair Janet Wong and committee members!

I'm heading to the Midwinter conference of the American Library Association where more big (Newbery, Caldecott, etc.) awards will be announced on Monday (Feb. 2). I'll be sure to post news about any poetry titles that are included! Stay tuned. 

Meanwhile, where is the Poetry Friday party today? Over at These Four Corners. Thanks for hosting, Paul!  

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9. My tweets

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10. WAMC Public Radio Interview



Yesterday in Albany, New York, I visited our public radio station WAMC and had a 20 minute conversation with my favorite radio guy, Joe Donahue. Link to audio interview.

They'll be giving away sets of my art instruction DVDs as a pledge premium during the fund drive next week.

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11. Poetry Friday with a review of The Alphabet from A to Y with Bonus Letter Z

One of the reasons why I love my work is because I love words and language. In today's picture book children will encounter a delicious collection of words and wonderful rhymes, which are presented in a clever alphabet book type format.

The Alphabet from A to Y with Bonus Letter ZThe Alphabet from A to Y with Bonus Letter Z
Steve Martin
Illustrated by Roz Chast
Poetry Picture Book
For ages 5 to 8
Flying Dolphin Press, 2007   ISBN: 978-0385516624
Alphabet books are more varied today than they have ever been. Some are straightforward ABC books that use pictures and single words to help children to learn their alphabet. Others are packed with information about a variety of subjects. In this unique title the author and illustrator have chosen to entertain their audience while they show them that there is a wonderful world of words out there.
   For every letter of the alphabet Steve Martin has created a funny nonsense rhyming couplet in which he introduces some characters who are doing things that are amusing, downright outrageous, or deliciously naughty. In each line of verse Martin uses plenty of words beginning with the letter of the alphabet that is features on that page. On the H page for example we meet Henrietta the hare who "wore a habit in heaven" and who had a "hairdo" which "hid hunchbacks: one hundred and seven."
   Readers will laugh at loud when they read the descriptive couplets, and they will also discover that the accompanying illustrations are packed with things whose names begin with the letter being featured. Thus, on the L page we not only read that Lovely Lorraine is discovering that long Louie has Larry's locket, but in the artwork we see, among other things, a lamppost, a boy licking a lollipop, a loudhailer, and a lawyer.
   As they turn the pages, children will have a wonderful time reading the rhymes out loud and searching the illustrations for hidden objects and words.

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12. Poetry Friday: Of so divine a loss by Emily Dickinson

Of so divine a loss
We enter but the gain,
Indemnity for loneliness
That such a bliss has been.
- Emily Dickinson

View all posts tagged as Poetry Friday at Bildungsroman.

View the roundup schedule at A Year of Reading.

Learn more about Poetry Friday.

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13. this ORQ – Perfect Picture Book Friday

Title: this ORQ (he cave boy.) Written by: David Elliott Illustrated by: Lori Nichols Published by: Boyds Mills Press, 2014 Themes/Topics: pets, cave boys, cave moms, wooly mammoths Suitable for ages: preschoolers Opening:  This Orq. He live in cave. He carry club. He cave boy. … Continue reading

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14. Crooked Man


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15. A LIterary Apprecitation of Dragons 2015 – Part 4 of 4

Far too soon, we've come to the end of the Third Annual Bugs and Bunnies Literary Appreciation of Dragons Series. Anyone needing some backstory, or a refresher, can click on the link in the first sentence and get caught up quite nicely. But don't forget to come back here to catch this last literary dragon post for the 2015 series.

Drawing courtesy of Chez Wheedleton's resident Dragon Expert: Lovely Girl

So far, we've read our way through three Fridays of dragon book fun:



and



And for today's post, we've got something really fun:

Drawing Dragons

That's right! We here at Bugs and Bunnies were delighted to find this little collection of books, so we could learn how to draw the dragons we love to read about! We hope you enjoy them, too:



1-2-3 Draw: Knights, Castles, and Dragons: A step by step guide
By Freddie Levin
Ages 5 - 10

This one is great for the beginner level artists out there. It starts with a list of very basic tools you will need - all things you probably already have around the house. The book is separated into several sections, starting with drawing basic shapes. As you move through the book, these basic shapes are used to guide you through drawing a variety of medieval-type things, starting with a basic person, and moving through to specific ones (king, queen, prince, princess). There are sections for drawing castles, heraldry, knights, and of course dragons. And there are other sections, too, each related to knights, castles, and dragons, plus an index.



How to Draw Dragons (Drawing Fantasy Art)
By Jim Hansen and John Burns
Ages 9 and up

This one is great for those who want to both learn a little about dragons as well as draw them. The Introduction section explains the equipment you may want to have on hand before you begin. (Some of the supplies listed are more advanced equipment, but you will still be able to use this book with just the basics - pencil, paper, eraser.) Then there's a short lesson on Perspective. And then there's the instruction, separated into types: Western Dragon, Eastern Dragon, and North American Dragon. The book also contains a glossary of art-related terms, as well as a section on suggestions for further reading. The instructions start basic and work up to the details fairly quickly, so this book will be most helpful to those who already have a good base of drawing skills.

 
Draw! Medieval Fantasies: A Step by Step Guide
By Damon J. Reinagle
Ages 8 - 14

This one starts with a list of basic drawing tools, and a few "Common Sense Drawing Rules" to get you started. It is for those who are a little more advanced in drawing skill, yet still starts with Basic Shapes, then moves on to sections showing you steps for how to draw Rods and Joints, Dragons, Castles, and Heroes and Villains. Then there is a section on adding Textures and Patterns to your drawings, and finally, one on Putting It All Together.



Ralph Masiello's Dragon Drawing Book: Become an artist step-by-step
By Ralph Masiello
Ages 8 - 12

As with the others, this one also starts with a section on the drawing tools you may want to use. It is also for those who know a little about drawing already. There are step-by-step instructions for drawing eleven different types of dragons, from all over the world. For each dragon, you'll be shown one detailed step at a time, using just the drawings to guide you - no text instructions. You can easily tell which is the new line to add for each step, because it is shown in red.

Once you've been guided in drawing the dragon, the next page for each one shows what the fully-complete drawing could look like, with all color and pattern added, as well as some information about the type of dragon you just drew, and hints for how to create the patterns you see in the finished drawing example. At the end, you'll find a section on Resources for you to learn even more about dragons, as well as a Pronunciation Guide, so you'll know how to pronounce the names of the dragons you've just learned how to draw.


* * *

And so, we've reached the end of our series for this year. We hope you enjoyed this Third Annual Bugs and Bunnies Literary Appreciation of Dragons Series as much as we did, and we hope you'll come back again next year to celebrate a whole new bunch of fabulous dragon books with us!

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16. Book Trailer Unveiled For Dear White People

A book trailer for Dear White People: A Guide to Inter-Racial Harmony in a “Post-Racial” America has been unveiled. The video embedded above has drawn more than 38,000 views on Facebook—what do you think?

This project was inspired by the 2014 crowdfunded film which shares the same title. Justin Simien, the director and screenwriter behind the movie, wrote the book and Ian O’Phelan created the illustrations.

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17. Yolanda the Yeti Yogi

Screen Shot 2015-01-30 at 7.40.19 AMThis is  work-in-progress. I am developing a yeti character (abominable snowman) for a "contest" Chronicle Books is having.  I wrote a little rhyme to go with Yolanda. As you can see the face still needs rendering. One leg and one arm still need work too.

       

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18. The One Thing Stolen Teacher Guide

Jaime Wong of Chronicle Books masterminded one heck of a wonderful teacher guide to One Thing Stolen, the new novel which yesterday received its first official review, the Kirkus. The guide is now (as of this very minute) available online, here.

With thanks to Jaime and to the designer who made this guide look so lovely — and to the programmer who made it available.

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19. Classic Readalong Discussion: Tuck Everlasting

Welcome to The Midnight Garden discussion of Tuck Everlasting, which is posted to coincide with the 40th Anniversary Blog Tour. This book has been a special favorite of mine since one of my best friends pressed it into my hands in 5th grade. At the tender age of 10 fiction suddenly posed me with the question: “What if you could live forever?” There is such  a unique relationship with stories you loved specifically as a child. I’m so glad I read this at the age of 11 when the magic of the book couldn’t escape me. But we certainly hope to hear all of manner of opinions about this book! We’re also so excited to be giving away a beautiful hardcover of the special anniversary edition, which includes a foreward by Gregory Maguire. Did you know that this book has never been out of print in all that time? Let’s discuss why... Read more »

The post Classic Readalong Discussion: Tuck Everlasting appeared first on The Midnight Garden.

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20. Famous Writer Flowchart: INFOGRAPHIC

Electric LiteratureDo you aspire to become as recognized and powerful as J.K. Rowling? The Electric Lit team has created an infographic to help people try to answer this question: “Am I a Famous Writer Yet?

Those who go through this flowchart will encounter scenarios such as “I have many followers on social media” and “sobbing uncontrollably in a bathroom.” We’ve embedded the full infographic below for you to explore further—what do you think?

famous writer

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21. Flash Fiction Contest this weekend!

 

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To celebrate the imminent publication of Loretta Ross's debut novel DEATH AND THE REDHEADED WOMAN, it's time for a flash fiction contest!

Winner receives a copy of the book! Trust me, you WANT this book. I loved Loretta's voice the minute I read her query and I could not be happier that you all will now get to enjoy her work too. 

The usual rules apply:

1. Write a story using 100 words or fewer.

2. Use these words in the story:
death
red
show
me
state


3. You must use the whole word, but that whole word can be part of a larger word. The entire word must appear intact if it's part of a longer word:
red/redhead is ok. 
red/ready is not


4. Post the entry in the comment column of THIS blog post.

5. One entry per person. If you need a mulligan (a do-over) erase your entry and post again.  It helps to work out your entry first and then post.

6. International entries are allowed, but prizes may vary for international addresses.

7. Titles count as part of the word count (you don't need a title)

8. Contest opens: Saturday 1/31/15 at 10am

9. Contest closes: Sunday 2/1/15 at 10am

Questions? Tweet to me @Janet_Reid

Ready? SET?
 
NOT YET! Contest opens on 1/31 at 10am.
 

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22. Angry Birds Maker to Publish YA Novels

Finnish app maker Rovio, the company behind Angry Birds, is getting into book publishing with a series of YA novels.

The company has signed author Mintie Das and will publish her novel The Sinking World later on this year. The novel is part of a series of YA books set to come out called Storm Sisters. The book follows  action-filled adventures on the high seas disguised as ‘girl pirates’ in the late 18th century. A second novel titled The Frozen Seas is set to follow. Here is more from the publisher’s site:

After the tragic events of what has become known as the Day of Destruction – a day when they were intended to die along with their families – Charlie, Sadie, Liu, Raquel and Ingela sail the high seas all alone. In the 1780s, in a world filled with pirates, hurricanes and disbelievers, that’s not an easy task. What’s more important: Survival or truth?

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23. Why We Read

DSC_0661

[D]on’t ever apologize to an author for buying something in paperback, or taking it out from a library (that’s what they’re there for. Use your library). Don’t apologize to this author for buying books second hand, or getting them from bookcrossing or borrowing a friend’s copy. What’s important to me is that people read the books and enjoy them, and that, at some point in there, the book was bought by someone. And that people who like things, tell other people. The most important thing is that people read…
—Neil Gaiman

The post Why We Read appeared first on Caroline Starr Rose.

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24.

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25. Friday Linky List - January 30, 2015

From The Telegraph: Most authors break through in middle-age

From Brain Pickings (via PW): Peanuts and the Quiet Pain of Childhood: How Charles Shulz Made an Art of Difficult Emotions

From Digital Synopsis: 27 Funny Posters and Charts That Graphic Designer Will Relate To (NSFW)

At The Guardian (via PW): A response to terror by Chris Riddell and Neil Gaiman - in pictures

At Huff Post (via PW): 20 New Classics Every Child Should Own

At Freelancers Union: 10 Reasons why freelancing is like dating

From Salon: "Sponsored" by my husband: Why it's a problem that writers never talk about where their money comes from

At The Atlantic: From Annihilation to Acceptance: A Writer's Surreal Journey - The author agreed to publish three novels in one year - and then things got weird.

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