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1. Interesting blog posts about writing – w/e October 31st 2014



Here’s my selection of interesting (and sometimes amusing) posts about writing from the last week:

There’s Power in the Public Domain (Art Holcomb)
http://storyfix.com/theres-power-public-domain-guest-post-art-holcomb

KAPOW!  Cutting Scenes Like a Superhero (Liz Michalski)
http://writerunboxed.com/2014/10/29/kapow-cutting-scenes-like-a-superhero/

Coming To Terms (Joe Moore)
http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/10/coming-to-terms.html

7 Reasons Twitter Isn’t Building Your Author Platform (And How to Fix It) (Marcy Kennedy)
http://janefriedman.com/2014/10/28/twitter-platform/

What Should Authors Blog About? (Jane Friedman)
http://janefriedman.com/2014/10/27/authors-blog/

Twitter Abuse (Janet Kobobel Grant)
www.booksandsuch.com/blog/twitter-abuse/

Bringing Out the Emotion in First Person POV (Janice Hardy)
http://blog.janicehardy.com/2014/10/real-life-diagnostics-bringing-out.html

Writing Unforgettable Villains (James Scott Bell)
http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/10/sympathy-for-devil-writing.html

Seven Deadly Sins (If You're a First Chapter) (Janice Hardy)
http://blog.janicehardy.com/2010/04/seven-deadly-sins-if-youre-first.html

Basic Formatting of Your Manuscript (Formatting 101) (Jodie Renner)
http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.com/2014/10/basic-formatting-of-your-manuscript.html


If you found these useful, you may also like my personal selection of the most interesting blog posts from 2013, and last week’s list.

If you have a particular favorite among these, please let the author know (and me too, if you have time).  Also, if you've a link to a great post that isn't here, feel free to share.

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2. Are You Dressing Up in a Literary-Themed Costume?

IMG_1322Are you dressing up in a costume today? If you’re still figuring things out, the internet has a plethora of ideas for bibliophiles.

We’ve shared several sources to spur up your imagination. Happy Halloween!

BuzzFeed articles: “21 Children’s Book Characters Born To Be Halloween Costumes” and “17 Awesome Literary Halloween Costumes.”

Imagination Soup articles: “60 Favorite Book Character Costumes” and “Picture Book Character Costumes for Halloween.”

Pinterest boards: “Cherry Hill Public Library’s Literary Costumes for Halloween” and “Wichita Public Library’s Literary Costumes.”

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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3. Alison Bechdel Creates Drawing For The Great Studio 360 Doodle Dare

The Great Studio 360 Doodle DareStudio 360 invites creatives to join in on a “Doodle Dare.” Fun Home author Alison Bechdel drew a doodle to serve as a start point. Participants should use Bechdel’s drawing (pictured on the left) to create a finished composition.

Artists “can use any image-manipulation software, or print it out and go old-school with pens and pencils. The more creative your scenario, the better.” A deadline has been set for November 10, 2014.

Follow this link to learn all the rules. Studio 360 has unveiled a few of the submissions in two posts. What do you think?

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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4. Gene Luen Yang Acts as an Editor For His Brother-in-Law’s First Comic

Gene YangWhat does it take to create comics? Award winning graphic novelist Gene Luen Yang has been collaborating with his brother-in-law Luke to help him create his first comic book.

Gene has been offering guidance, suggesting exercises, and essentially acting as an editor for Luke. The collaborators decided to chronicle the process on Gene’s blog “so other folks could see what the development of a comics creator looks like.”

Thus far, three episodes have been posted. Gene’s own editor Mark Siegel, the editorial director of First Second Books, chimed in with a tip in the comments section of the first post. We’ve collected three pieces of advice below so that other writers can glean from Gene’s wisdom.

(more…)

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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5. Happy Halloween



I guess this is officially the end of "#inktober" - sniff

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6. Poetry Friday - Thriller Rap

As if I could post anything else today ...

Rap from Thriller
by Rod Temperton

Darkness falls across the land
The midnight hour is close at hand
Creatures crawl in search of blood
To terrorize y'all's neighborhood
And whosoever shall be found
Without the soul for getting down
Must stand and face the hounds of hell
And rot inside a corpse's shell

The foulest stench is in the air
The funk of forty thousand years
And grizzly ghouls from every tomb
Are closing in to seal your doom
And though you fight to stay alive
Your body starts to shiver
For no mere mortal can resist
The evil of the thriller


If you have some time, here's the video of the song.


I do hope you'll take some time to check out all the wonderful poetic things being shared and collected today by Linda Baie at Teacher Dance. Happy poetry Friday friends! And Happy Halloween!

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7. ‘The Cat with Hands’ by Robert Morgan

A cat wants to become human.

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8. Happy Hallowe'en! Norman's A Scream!

Inline images 1
NORMAN VOL. 1
WRITER: Stan Silas
ARTIST: Stan Silas
FORMAT: 64pp – HC – FC - 8” x 11.1”
VOLUMES IN SERIES: 1 (of 4)
PUBLISHER: Titan Comics
PRICE: $10.99/$12.99 CAN/£9.99 UK
ISBN: 9781782762393
COMIC STORE RELEASE DATE: March 4, 2015

“I AM EIGHT YEARS OLD AND I KILL PEOPLE.” 

A Is For Arterial Spray! B Is For Blood-Soaked! C Is For Corpses!

Eight years old. Blonde-haired elementary school psychopath. Looks so cute while burying his eviscerated friends in the sandbox. With humor as black as dried blood, Norman looks set to join the padded-cell pantheon of murderous lunatics – and this time he’s bringing his lunch money!

Inspired by his horror movie heroes Freddy KruegerJason Vorhees & Michael Myers, Norman brings murder to the schoolyard in this black comedy horror from creator Stan Silas.

Norman Vol. 1 hits comic stores on March 4, 2015 and is available to pre-order now from your local comic store using Diamond order code: NOV141651

To pre-order via Amazon, visit

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9. What if Cats Had Starred in ‘Gone Girl’?

What would have happened if director David Fincher had casted cats for the Gone Girl adaptation? The feline fans that run the Pet Collective YouTube channel posted a “cute kitty version” of Gillian Flynn’s thriller story. We’ve embedded the full short film above—what do you think? (via Vanity Fair)

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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10. October Reflections

In October, I read 52 books.

Board books, picture books, early readers:

  1. The Midnight Library. Kazuno Kohara. 2014. Roaring Brook. 32 pages. [Source: Library] 
  2. Say Hello Like This! Mary Murphy. Candlewick. 32 pages. [Source: Review copy] 
  3. The Good-Pie Party. Elizabeth Garton Scanlon. Illustrated by Kady MacDonald Denton. 2014.Scholastic. 32 pages. [Source: Review copy] 
  4. My Pet Book. Bob Staake. 2014. Random House. 40 pages. [Source: Review copy] 
  5. A Bunny in the Ballet. Robert Beck. 2014. Scholastic. 40 pages. [Source: Review copy] 
  6. Frances Dean Who Loved To Dance and Dance. Birgitta Sif. 2014. Candlewick. 32 pages. [Source: Review copy]   
  7. Druthers. Matt Phelan. 2014. Candlewick. 32 pages. [Source: Review Copy]  
  8. Alexander, Who's Trying His Best To Be The Best Boy Ever. Judith Viorst. Illustrated by Isidre Mones. Simon & Schuster. 40 pages. [Source: Library] 
  9. The Way to the Zoo. John Burningham. 2014. Candlewick. 40 pages. [Source: Review copy] 
  10. The Mouse Who Ate The Moon. Petr Horacek. 2014. Candlewick. 32 pages. [Source: Review copy]    
  11. Can You Say It Too? Roar! Roar! Sebastien Braun. 2014. Candlewick. 10 pages. [Source: Review copy]  
  12. Can You Say It Too? Growl! Growl!  Sebastien Braun. 2014. Candlewick. 10 pages. [Source: Review copy]  
  13. Open Wide. Stephen Krensky. Illustrated by James Burks. 2014. Scholastic. 14 pages. [Source: Review copy] 
  14. Bizzy Bear's Big Building Book. Benji Davies. 2014. Candlewick. 8 pages. [Source: Review copy] 
Middle grade and young adult fiction and nonfiction:
  1. The Night Gardener. Jonathan Auxier. 2014. Abrams. 350 pages. [Source: Library]
  2. West of the Moon. Margi Preus. 2014. Abrams. 224 pages. [Source: Library]
  3. The Right Fight. Chris Lynch. 2014. Scholastic. 192 pages. [Source: Library]
  4. Gabriel Finley and the Raven's Riddle. George Hagen. 2014. Random House. 384 pages. [Source: Review Copy]
  5. Grave Mercy. Robin LaFevers. 2012. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 560 pages. [Source: Review copy]
  6. Sky Jumpers. Peggy Eddleman. 2013. Random House. 288 pages. [Source: Review copy]  
  7. Howl's Moving Castle. Diana Wynne Jones. 1986. 336 pages. [Source: Bought] 
  8. Sniffer Dogs: How Dogs (And Their Noses) Save The World. Nancy F. Castaldo. 2014. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 160 pages. [Source: Review copy]  
  9. The Case of the Stolen Sixpence. Holly Webb. Illustrated by Marion Lindsay. 2014. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 176 pages. [Source: Review copy] 
  10. The Only Thing To Fear. Caroline Tung Richmond. 2014. Scholastic. 288 pages. [Source: Review copy]
  11. The Forbidden Flats (Sky Jumpers #2) Peggy Eddleman. 2014. Random House. 288 pages. [Source: Review copy]
  12. A Creature of Moonlight. Rebecca Hahn. 2014. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 313 pages. [Source: Review copy]  
  13. The Madman of Piney Woods. Christopher Paul Curtis. 2014. Scholastic. 384 pages. [Source: Review copy]  
  14. The Magic Half. Annie Barrows. 2007. Bloomsbury. 212 pages. [Source: Library] 
  15. Magic in the Mix. Annie Barrows. 2014. Bloomsbury. 288 pages. [Source: Review copy]
  16. The Orphan and the Mouse. Martha Freeman. Illustrated by David McPhail. 2014. Holiday House. 220 pages. [Source: Library] 
  17. Thursdays with the Crown. (Castle Glower #3) Jessica Day George. 2014. Bloomsbury. 224 pages. 
Adult fiction and nonfiction:
  1. An Autobiography. Agatha Christie. 1977/1996. Berkley. 635 pages. [Source: Bought] 
  2. Children in the Holocaust: Their Secret Diaries. Laurel Holliday, ed. 1996. 432 pages. [Source: Library]  
  3. Silver Like Dust. Kimi Cunningham Grant. 2012. Pegasus. 288 pages. [Source: Library] 
  4. Frankenstein. Mary Shelley. 1818/1831. Oxford World's Classics. 250 pages. [Source: Bought] 
  5. Lady Susan, The Watsons, Sandition. Jane Austen. 1975. Penguin. 211 pages. [Source: Bought] 
  6. A Tale of Two Cities. Charles Dickens. 1854/2003. Bantam Classics. 382 pages. [Source: Bought]
  7. Dancers in Mourning. Margery Allingham. 1937. 337 pages. [Source: Bought]
  8. The Eye of the World (Wheel of Time #1) Robert Jordan. 1990. Tor. 814 pages. [Source: Bought] 
  9. All Clear. Connie Willis. 2010. Random House. 645 pages. [Source: Bought]
Christian fiction and nonfiction: 
  1. The Night Gardener. Jonathan Auxier. 2014. Abrams. 350 pages. [Source: Library]
  2. The Hiding Place. Corrie Ten Boom. With John and Elizabeth Sherrill. 1971/1984/1995. Chosen. 228 pages. [Source: Bought] 
  3. Evangelism and the Sovereignty of God. J.I. Packer. 1961/1991. IVP. 126 pages. [Source: Bought]
  4. The Wall Around Your Heart: How Jesus Heals You When Others Hurt You. Mary DeMuth. 2013. Thomas Nelson. 256 pages. [Source: Bought]  
  5. Key Words of the Christian Life. Warren W. Wiersbe. 2002. Baker Books. 130 pages. [Source: Bought]
  6. The Adventure of Christmas: Helping Children Find Jesus in Our Holiday Traditions. Lisa Whelchel. Illustrated by Jeannie Mooney. 2004. Multnomah Books. 72 pages. [Source: Library] 
  7. When Love Calls. (The Gregory Sisters #1) Lorna Seilstad. 2013. Revell. 338 pages. [Source: Bought] 
  8. While Love Stirs. Lorna Seilstad. 2014. Revell. 341 pages. [Source: Bought]  
  9. Loving Jesus More. Philip Graham Ryken. Crossway. 176 pages. [Source: Crossway.]  
  10. Rich Mullins: An Arrow Pointing to Heaven (A Devotional Biography). James Bryan Smith. 2000. B&H. 272 pages. [Source: Bought]
  11. Read the Bible for Life: Your Guide to Understanding and Living God's Word. George H. Guthrie. 2011. B&H Books. 338 pages. [Source: Bought]  
  12. A Bride in Store. Melissa Jagears. 2014. Bethany House. 363 pages. [Source: Review copy]
© 2014 Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

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11. Witch of Halloween


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12. Flogometer for Yvonne—are you compelled to turn the page?

Submissions Needed. None in the queue for next week. If you’d like a fresh look at your opening chapter or prologue, please email your submission to me re the directions at the bottom of this post.


The Flogometer challenge: can you craft a first page that compels me to turn to the next page? Caveat: Please keep in mind that this is entirely subjective.

Note: all the Flogometer posts are here.

What's a first page in publishingland? In a properly formatted novel manuscript (double-spaced, 1-inch margins, 12-point type, etc.) there should be about 16 or 17 lines on the first page (first pages of chapters/prologues start about 1/3 of the way down the page). Directions for submissions are below—they include a request to post the rest of the chapter, but that’s optional.

A word about the line-editing in these posts: it’s “one-pass” editing, and I don’t try to address everything, which is why I appreciate the comments from the FtQ tribe. In a paid edit, I go through each manuscript three times.

Storytelling Checklist

Before you rip into today’s submission, consider this list of 6 vital storytelling ingredients from my book, Flogging the Quill, Crafting a Novel that Sells. While it's not a requirement that all of these elements must be on the first page, they can be, and I think you have the best chance of hooking a reader if they are.

Evaluate the submission—and your own first page—in terms of whether or not it includes each of these ingredients, and how well it executes them. The one vital ingredient not listed is professional-caliber writing because that is a must for every page, a given.

  • Story questions
  • Tension (in the reader, not just the characters)
  • Voice
  • Clarity
  • Scene-setting
  • Character

Yvonne sends a first chapter of Fugue The rest of the chapter follows the break.

Lakeview Neighborhood, Chicago

Even the rain was just a broken thing in her screwed up mind; Lake Michigan transmogrified into suicidal shards. The deluge coated her picture window at dawn, materializing in Viola Collier’s dream as syncopated percussion gone wrong. 

No!

The nightmare music had felt so real that Viola was certain she had been working still. She massaged her neck, cranked at an unnatural angle from sleeping in her chair as a bombastic measure of thunder rattled her studio apartment, assuring her she was awake now to deal with her real nightmare.

Ugly peg stubs. Nasty skin comb-over. Disgusting.

Viola surveyed her legs, never getting used to the fact that they ended at her knees now. Three years and she still woke each morning believing she was whole, phantom feet ready to bolt for a quick shower before rehearsal. But everything had ended with her accident: Her career, her ease of life, her bourgeoning relationship with Andrew… everything.

The train: She needed more from the horns to bring it to life. And the rhythm that had seemed so perfect last night was all wrong this morning. The rain had shown her that.

 Courtyard light cast shadows of fat raindrops onto her bedroom walls. The light was murky, as if coffee tracked down her windows in continuous rivulets, but it was just bright (snip)

Were you compelled to turn Yvonne's first page?

Very nice writing and voice, and you introduce a hugely sympathetic character. Yet there’s no story question raised, nothing happening other than waking up. If you can do without the dream reference and just get into something happening that raises a story question about what’s going to happen to her next, this would be a winner. I gave it an Almost tending to Yes. Notes:

Even the rain was just a broken thing in her screwed up mind; Lake Michigan transmogrified into suicidal shards. The deluge coated her picture window at dawn, materializing in Viola Collier’s dream as syncopated percussion gone wrong. 

No!

The nightmare music had felt so real that Viola was certain she had been working still. She massaged her neck, cranked at an unnatural angle from sleeping in her chair as a bombastic measure of thunder rattled her studio apartment, assuring her she was awake now to deal with her real nightmare.

Ugly peg stubs. Nasty skin comb-over. Disgusting. This briefly took me out of the story. Yes, the next line fills in the gap, but I still had to stop and think about it. I suggest you try preceding this paragraph with the first sentence of the next one, then return to the “three years…”

Viola surveyed her legs, never getting used to the fact that they ended at her knees now. Three years and she still woke each morning believing she was whole, phantom feet ready to bolt for a quick shower before rehearsal. But everything had ended with her accident: Her career, her ease of life, her bourgeoning relationship with Andrew… everything.

The train: She needed more from the horns to bring it to life. And the rhythm that had seemed so perfect last night was all wrong this morning. The rain had shown her that.

Courtyard light cast shadows of fat raindrops onto her bedroom walls. The light was murky, as if coffee tracked down her windows in continuous rivulets, but it was just bright (snip) I would cut these two lines to get the reader more imbedded into what’s going on by going directly to this from the next page:

She needed to hurry before the lines of the last movement dissipated into smoke. The distorted rhythm of her dreams presented her with what was lacking: The adagio was too harsh. A softer reticence to act as portent, that’s what Viola needed.

 Comments, please?

For what it’s worth.

Ray

Submitting to the Flogometer:

Email the following in an attachment (.doc, .docx, or .rtf preferred, no PDFs):

  1. your title
  2. your complete 1st chapter or prologue plus 1st chapter
  3. Please include in your email permission to post it on FtQ.
  4. Note: I’m adding a copyright notice for the writer at the end of the post. I’ll use just the first name unless I’m told I can use the full name.
  5. Also, please tell me if it’s okay to post the rest of the chapter so people can turn the page.
  6. And, optionally, include your permission to use it as an example in a book on writing craft if that's okay.
  7. If you’re in a hurry, I’ve done “private floggings,” $50 for a first chapter.
  8. If you rewrite while you wait for your turn, it’s okay with me to update the submission.

Flogging the Quill © 2014 Ray Rhamey, story © 2014 Yvonne

 

(contined)

enough for her to work.  She needed to hurry before the lines of the last movement dissipated into smoke. The distorted rhythm of her dreams presented her with what was lacking: The adagio was too harsh. A softer reticence to act as portent, that’s what Viola needed. 

Time to summon Andrew back to her.

Viola inhaled a deep breath, taking in the same air that Andrew too breathed somewhere else in the city. It was the only connection they shared now, across neighborhoods and skyscrapers and trains and Chicago’s thriving pulse that continued to beat without her, somewhere he breathed her air. Loving a ghost is what it was.  His absence was present in every note but her music returned him to her too, an irony she could never explain:  The slight hollow beneath his cheek bones commissioned by the spot light, the wild halo his hair formed in mid-pirouette, the soft rage emanating from him when he danced, when he approached her. These were her worst moments, when Andrew was so real again. They created her most inspired work.

They say you’re Balanchine’s grandson. Is it true?

The pen was still in her hand, a relic from last night’s furious pace. Her fingers ached when she stretched them.  Wheeling herself to the back corner where the wall met the window, Viola allowed a cool draft gusting through the closed window to dry her sweaty face. Wall space was running out and soon she would need to shimmy to the floor to work from there.  But for now, she remained seated, last night’s work pleading with her to be completed. Again, she lost herself to her music.

More intensity. Impending ruin…grinding. Just more. The wall as her pallet was no longer before her.  Viola waited at the Diversey Street Station now, standing on the platform with ichor and blood running through her legs, the hinge of her ankles neatly propelling her upright. She smiled into the warm air of the arriving El train as it blew back her hair on the day she was going to rehearse with Andrew, but instead, never saw him again.

Outside, the wind blew and the courtyard trees danced a tribal dance and the sky boiled in the dark, but Viola was elsewhere as the room sobbed and sobbed and sobbed around her.

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13. 10 Places I Want to Visit After Reading About Them in a Book

By Kit #1. Outer Space - Across the Universe by Beth Revis Because it's outer space.  And I want to be immersed in stars.  And Beth Revis' descriptions of the stars were phenomenal.  #2. Paris - Die for Me by Amy Plum and Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins I mean come on.  It's Paris.  But both of these books did such a fantastic job describing Paris in a way that was

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14. I.N.J. Culbard: ‘I do take the story apart and reconstruct it again…’

I.N.J CulbardHave you ever written a scary story? In honor of the Halloween season, we are interviewing horror writers to learn about the craft of scaring readers.

We sat down with comics creator I.N.J. Culbard to discuss his new graphic novel, The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath. Culbard adapted the story from H.P. Lovecraft’s novel. Check out the highlights from our interview below…

Q: How did you land your first book deal?
A: Back in 2004 I was enrolled in The New Recruits programme set up by Dark Horse comics. I had two stories appear in an anthology there and a short while after that, 2000AD publisher Rebellion published a short strip of mine called “Monsters in The Megazine.” Following the work I did there I got in contact with artist D’Israeli, who put me in contact with a long time collaborator of his, Ian Edginton.

(more…)

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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15. Happy Halloween!

 

http://youtu.be/Tkbz2RdltjY


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16. Artist of the Day: Juanjo Guarnido

Today we look at the work of Juanjo Guarnido, Cartoon Brew's Artist of the Day!

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17. 10 Books I Loved This Week

10 Books I Loved This Week 


So, as an avid reader, I go through about 5 books a week and love it. Maybe it's an obsession, or maybe it's a passion, but whatever it is it's working. Needless to say, I have quite an extensive list of books to share, most of which are YA. So here they are, 10 books I loved this week and highly recommend! 

1. Atlantia, by Ally Condie 



2. The Selection, by Kiera Cass 



3. Uninvited, by Sophie Jordan 



4. The Matched Trilogy, by Ally Condie 




5. The Rules, by Stacey Kade 



6. Cinder, by Marissa Meyer 



7. Made for You, by Melissa Marr



8. Wither, by Lauren Destefano 



9. Panic, by Lauren Oliver 


10. Black Ice, by Becca Fitzpatrick 




And there you have it folks! 10 YA books that I loved this week and you should go read right now. Seriously, you won't get anything done all week, they're that fantastically gripping. 

Best wishes and happy reading,

-Ashley Dawson 

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18. Nick Cartoons Headed to Hulu

Hulu and Nickelodeon's parent company Viacom announced earlier this week a deal that will bring the Nicktoons library to the online streaming service.

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19. Michelle Aielli Moves to Hachette Books

Hachette LogoMichelle Aielli has been named executive director of publicity at Hachette Books. She will report to publisher Mauro DiPreta.

In new new role, Aielli will oversee the publicity for both the division’s brand and the titles on its list. The start date for her new position has been set for November 17th.

For the past 10 years, Aielli has worked in the Little, Brown PR team. She launched and managed campaigns for James Patterson, J.K. Rowling, Donna Tartt, Keith Richards, Elin Hilderbrand, Jonathan Safran Foer, and more.

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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20. ‘Sesame Street’ Team Parodies ‘Harry Potter’

The Sesame Street gang stars in a Harry Potter parody called “Furry Potter and The Goblet of Cookies.” Cookie Monster plays the title role; he is guided by the wise Professor Crumblemore.

We’ve embedded the funny clip above–what do you think? In the past, the team behind Sesame Street has created parodies inspired by The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, Les Miserables, and the Lord of the Rings trilogy. (via Bustle)

New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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21. From the Toy Box, Ltd Gallery  I’m so excited to announce...



From the Toy Box, Ltd Gallery 

I’m so excited to announce that I’ll be participating in Ltd Art Gallery Seattle’s show “From the Toy Box”. It’s my first piece in a gallery and I was lucky enough for Ltd to choose my illustration for the poster representing some really, really, REALLY awesome talent! I’m so honoured to be in this show amongst these fantastic artists. You can see the event here:http://www.facebook.com/events/769836919741028 and if you’re in Seattle and happen to go, I’d love to hear about it!



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22. Disney Employees Go All-Out For Halloween

Some Disney employees who work in Imagineering got an early jump on Pixar's next film "Inside Out" and dressed up as the film's main characters.

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23. Vampire Etiquette

Vampires in the movies
Seem to very neatly suck.
If blood is to be seen, it’s on
The necks of those they’ve struck.

Yet every costumed Dracula
Has “blood” dripped on his face,
A situation vampires would
Perceive as a disgrace.

Tonight, as the undead come out
To honor Halloween,
Observe their faces – not a one
Will be blood-free and clean!

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24. ~HaPpY HaLlOwEeN~

"moonstruck"
©the enchanted easel 2014
love, sally...and her beloved kitty companion
xxx

{PRINTS AND SUCH FOUND HERE:

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25. Software for a book containing artwork

Hi everyone, I am just beginning to write an astrology book and I want to have lots of pics etc. in it. Is there a free software program available to

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