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24526. The Five Biggest Challenges of Building a Film Museum

Every decade or so, there is talk of an animation museum in the United States, and while none has ever been built, two new museums on the horizon promise to be a pretty big deal for the film and animation communities.

The Lucas Cultural Arts Museum and the Academy Museum will hopefully be two huge steps forward in the preservation and public education of filmmaking. These forthcoming institutions also serve as a reminder that film museums present a set of wholly unique challenges for the curators, designers and developers involved.

To see the world’s most famous paintings and sculptures, you have to go to a museum. The world’s most famous films, however, can be seen at a movie theater. Therefore, any film or animation museum has to offer a richer experience that brings the audience closer to the filmmaking process. In doing this, five major challenges—aside from financial ones—arise for the film museum.


1. Exhibiting the Filmmaking Process

When was the last time you heard of a museum exhibition on the making of  the Mona Lisa? Or Michelangelo’s David? The processes behind the most famous paintings, drawings or sculptures are rarely revealed in museums. The curators, in fact, function under the assumption that patrons have a general understanding of how to paint and sculpt. A film, on the other hand, is created through the joint effort of hundreds of people, each with a specific job that isn’t necessarily understood by the general public. Directors, prop masters, animators, costumers, layout artists, grips—all of these roles must be defined by a film museum in such a way that anyone, from a child to an adult, could understand. This requires infinite amounts of primary research from curators, while producing a huge headache for exhibition designers.

It’s not as simple as hanging a few character model sheets onto a wall—film museums have to explain the jobs of character designers and visual development artists, and how they contribute to the final product. This explanation usually involves text, supporting photographs and film clips displayed on monitors. Creating this educational experience is worthwhile, but demands careful planning and coordination.


2. Ephemera

The products that result from making movies—costumes, props, masks, storyboards, paints, sketches, scripts—are not made to last. They are only made to survive the time it takes to produce the final cut of the film. If these objects even survive, which is often thanks to a sentimental crew member, they present major conservation challenges that are sometimes impossible to overcome. Background sketches, for example, are often created on newsprint, a non-archival paper that quickly yellows with time. Old reels of 35mm film are at risk of fading, molding or even catching fire. Yoda, a 30-year-old animatronic puppet, is notoriously known as the ultimate conservator’s nightmare. His latex body practically melts with time, degrading further with each instance he is moved from storage to display. With film ephemera, there isn’t much conservators can do besides wear white gloves, use temperature-controlled storage, and try their best to stave off deterioration.


3. Programming

The majority of museums dedicated to film have screening rooms, therefore they need thoughtful, exciting programming that pulls in a wide range of audiences. Typically, this is where animation gets the shaft; if shown, animation is often billed as a daytime family-oriented event. It is paramount for these museums to have the foresight of an adept curator who knows how to balance rare, niche screenings with crowd pleasers.


4. Going Digital

While leaving a film to deteriorate on 35mm stock is obviously a bad idea, digital transfers are temporary fixes. Discs, USB keys, and any device that stores data are ultimately not stable, at least not by a curation standard. As more filmmakers produce digital work, museums will struggle with concerns over proper storage and care. This is a universal problem at the moment, affecting any institution that collects digital formats. Fortunately, there are whole college majors devoted to the study and development of best practices for digital archiving.


5. Myth

It’s hard to imagine any visual art that must contend with as big of a unified myth as film. The lore of Hollywood is irrevocably intertwined with film, a relationship that affects the design and architecture of the museum itself.  The Academy Museum, for example, is building a multimedia exhibition that lets visitors “walk the red carpet.” While any film museum, especially one based in Los Angeles with connected donors, must pay homage to Hollywood, it’s easy for these institutions to get bogged down in all the related tropes: red velvet curtains, wall sconces that look like film reels, potted palm trees, and vintage movie signs. All these symbols are iconic and recognized by a mass audience, but museums have to know when to put on the brakes and let the art of filmmaking, not the nostalgia surrounding it, speak for itself.

Images in this post:

  1. Proposed rendering of the Academy Museum

  2. UPA Exhibit at MoMA, 1955
  3. Walt Disney Family Museum, permanent collection
  4. Barry McGee Show at Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston, 2013 (photo by Greg Cook)
  5. Stanley Kubrick Exhibit at LACMA, 2012-2013
  6. Tim Burton Exhibit at MoMA, 2010

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24527. splish splash!!

School has begun! Lilla Rogers Make Art That Sells is in full swing. Started our first assignment. I am excited and nervous all at the same time!?!?! Hang on, it's gonna be a wild ride!

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24528. House of Hades Cover unveiled

The cover for House of Hades, fourth installment of the Bestselling series, Heroes of Olympus by Rick Riordan has finally been revealed. Rick and I had a long discussion about this one, and when he sent me the manuscript I knew this cover would have to be the “Percabeth” cover. I can’t say much more about it, as you have to read it yourself, but please enjoy some art in the meantime. Below is the full cover that will wrap around the jacket, and also you can see the interior painting for a very special edition of the House of Hades that will be released sometime in October as well.

cover_final_full4 HOH_interior01

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24529. It was time...



Over the last few weeks I have been rereading the posts. The beginnings were mostly surf reports and sketches from books I was working on. In those days I was struggling to find enough illustration work to make a consistent living. Now I have almost the opposite problem...I have had so much work over that I only had a few days off in 2012 and this year, I haven't had one off yet. 

You may have noticed, this blog is missing over 1,400 posts, beginning from 2005. A number of months ago, I made the decision to  copy the content and eventually, delete the older posts- almost all of them. 





The reasons I did this range from not wanting to have so much personal information here to wanting to revamp the blog and my website for the next stage of my career.

So far on my plate for this next year are completing the first book that I will have written and illustrated (a BIG deal for me), beginning a new book series, continuing with the Princess Posey series and re-learning French. 



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24530. Pigeon Fabrics are ready!

A little bird has told me that the new Pigeon Fabrics  from Cloud Nine have shipped. I've got a few samples, and they're awesome! They come in 9 Pigeon-tastic designs (check them out here). Frenzied Chorus Line Word Bubbles Stripe Feathers | White Hexagons | Yellow I Have Dreams Cheater Print (36" x 42"repeat) Project Panel

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24531. June News 2013

I’ve just completed my first summer e-market mailing for my illustration work! Will soon be contacting boutiques and galleries for my fine art and jewelry, which is available here:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/TheButtonBird

Stay tuned for a great deal more illustration work being added to the oil portfolio. I’m researching famous fairy tales and nursery rhymes for a new series!

 

 

The post June News 2013 appeared first on Scribble Chicken.

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24532. Music Monday - Seven Bridges.. (and bees!)

Enjoyed this performance of the Swon Brothers on The Voice this past week:

(usually I like to have some musical segue to other posted pictures, but in this case, I got nothin'....)

 Visited a friend today to check out his backyard beehives

 He showed  us his set up, and we got a peek inside some of the frames-

 It was fascinating seeing them building comb and laying in honey...

...and the hundreds of workers flying in and out over our heads. :-)


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24533. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

A beautiful sunny sunday , and we decided to trek to the Alameda Point Antiques Fair. It's the first sunday of every month, out on the old navy base runway in Alameda, CA. Yes, on the airplane runway, which is right on the bay and has an amazing view of SF. There was a lot to see...

 Someone had taken old wood strips, and made them into a 'painting', above. Kinda cool...

 Lots of old stuff, painted bright colors... hmm, maybe not.

 Symbols that light up? No thanks.

 Pillows and upholstery made from old linens... I like the look, but scratchy, and very expensive...


Some rusty barbed wire, or an old rocking horse? Honestly, I don't know what people will do with some of this stuff. After a while I can't decide what is a great deal and what is awful. The prices have definitely gone up since the last time I was here.

 How about a child-sized mannequin?

 This old trunk was the one thing I saw that I really liked,  I don't know if was a real or fake antique, but I loved the painting on it.

It's always good to have two heads when making these big purchasing decisions!
All we bought was a pretzel, but we had fun looking.

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24534. greetings

All the roughs are now finished for my children's picture book and are with my lovely publisher. While I wait for feedback, I have been busy working on some greetings card ideas. Here is one of them:




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24535. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

A beautiful sunny sunday , and we decided to trek to the Alameda Point Antiques Fair. It's the first sunday of every month, out on the old navy base runway in Alameda, CA. Yes, on the airplane runway, which is right on the bay and has an amazing view of SF. There was a lot to see...

 Someone had taken old wood strips, and made them into a 'painting', above. Kinda cool...

 Lots of old stuff, painted bright colors... hmm, maybe not.

 Symbols that light up? No thanks.

 Pillows and upholstery made from old linens... I like the look, but scratchy, and very expensive...


Some rusty barbed wire, or an old rocking horse? Honestly, I don't know what people will do with some of this stuff. After a while I can't decide what is a great deal and what is awful. The prices have definitely gone up since the last time I was here.

 How about a child-sized mannequin?

 This old trunk was the one thing I saw that I really liked,  I don't know if was a real or fake antique, but I loved the painting on it.

It's always good to have two heads when making these big purchasing decisions!
All we bought was a pretzel, but we had fun looking.

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24536. dresses and cakes

Some more card ideas:








1 Comments on dresses and cakes, last added: 6/7/2013
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24537. hello baby!

More card ideas!




2 Comments on hello baby!, last added: 6/6/2013
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24538. pre final poster...

Here is a peek at the pre final of the poster, we needed to a make a small change and add more guys and cars for a party atmosphere.
I guess this is where it comes out that I don't like crowds :)

so far so good...

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24539. Latest pic. :D



This is the latest picture I've worked on though it doesn't have a title. It does go with a short story for my short stories collection but I'm have to find a title I like for the story. ~ JD

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24540. New motive for BIC


I have been silent because I bought a tiny piece of land on a remote Scottish island and put this hut on it. The site and garden are still in progress: the hut has to be attached to the ground or it will blow away: it's that windy here!

I still can’t quite believe it’s mine....owning a house (if the hut can count as a house!) and having a garden are deeply satisfying--so satisfying that it's hard to see how people have both ever do anything but garden and decorate. I have been planning and imagining this hut for MONTHS and  love it even more than I thought I would.Here it is outside from all four angles (still a bit messy: the piles of dirt will go into my flower beds, herb garden, and lettuce patch; the solar power wires underground).

The little stone byre is mine, too, and holds all the things the hut can not -- even the solar panel. It is my dream to make it into a little house with a big bathroom, open fireplace right in the center of the room, galley kitchen, and sleeping loft. But for now:

 Bed with big storage drawers underneath-- it's high both for more storage and so I can kneel on it and look out the fanlight to the sea. There are houses out that way, too, so I wanted privacy AND the ocean view. (I'll post the views out all the windows as a separate post.)



 The wood stove and the kitchen behind it, work space and eating table to the right. The big box is for storage and slides out of sight.
Working here is hard--not only because of the charms of decorating and gardening, but because of how much fun  it is to chat with people. For DAYS before I actually started writing, I tried -- and attached signs to both gates saying

"Writing -- please, no visitors."

I felt like a fraud since I wasn't writing; but as someone kindly said when I admitted that,
"Putting up the sign is the first step."

Not that it always worked--someone else (someone I was glad to see, I am not complaining!) knocked on the door and said with a smile:
"I saw you moving around so I knew you weren't writing."

But, finally, I AM writing-- something just clicked into place and I'm back in the novel, rewriting it for what I hope will be the last time before it goes back to my agent.

And knowing that people can see when I'm not writing is actually really good. As Jane Yolen advised Jarret in a hilarious video he made about the writing life,
"Jarret. It's very simple: BIC. Butt in chair."

The sign may be the first step, but that is definitely the second.

8 Comments on New motive for BIC, last added: 6/16/2013
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24541. From the sketchbook


© copyright Alicia Padrón

Just playing around with PS. :o)



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24542. Conflict – No Pain, No Gain

Back in April I had two posts Titled What is a Story Architect’s at Paper Lantern, followed by an article from their writing toolbox about building chapters. Today I bring you another terrific article from Paper Lantern’s Toolbox. You know the information has to be good, when Lexa Hillyer and Lauren Oliver are the ones behind the scenes.

Here are the two links, in case you missed them in April.

http://kathytemean.wordpress.com/2013/04/22/what-is-a-story-architect/
http://kathytemean.wordpress.com/2013/04/23/building-chapters-tips/

toolbox

In life, most of us avoid conflict. We want to get along and we want everything to go smoothly. However we also know that other people’s conflicts are fantastically interesting. We watch shows called “Desperate Housewives, not “Happy Functional Women.”

This doesn’t make us sadists… it makes us story-lovers. We don’t go to brunch on Sunday to hear about how calm everyone’s Saturday night was—we go to find out about scandals, secrets, surprises, and spectacles. Conflict requires action, and inspires triumph.

Pin this over your desk: NO PAIN, NO GAIN. Both in life and in narrative.

As a fiction-writer, CONFLICT IS YOUR BEST FRIEND. Does this mean your characters should always be throwing half-finished martinis on each other’s dresses, staging battles, or balling their fists and shouting to the heavens? No, of course not.

The whole notion of conflict is to give characters an issue to resolve, aka, to give them a trajectory, a goal, a forward motion of some kind.

CONFLICT => TENSION => ENERGY => DIRECTION => NARRATIVE.

Why is this such a big deal? Too often, our early drafts of novels are boring !!!!

Ever secretly worry that your story is only interesting to YOU? Well conflict is your cure. As readers, we’re compulsive about conflict—we love it, and the more we get, the more we hungrily read along. “How the heck is she going to get out of this one?!” we exclaim, eagerly flipping the pages.

Though of course there are always exceptions to a rule, most people would prefer to read a completely unoriginal story with great narrative drive than read a fantastically inventive, beautifully written book with no direction or point. How do you ensure your novel is the conflict-filled, compulsively readable kind?

First, examine your novel chapter by chapter. How many beats make things harder for the main character? More specifically, does it get more difficult for the character to achieve her established goal? If not, try out PLL’s five tried and true conflict tricks:

 1) ADD STRANGE FRUIT TO FRUITLESS SEARCHES. First draft: Character A asks around for information but comes up with no answers. Change to: Character A does a search and comes up with utterly surprising results that set her on a new course.

(Throw in a curveball that even YOU weren’t expecting!) For instance, a girl searches files for information on her adoptive family. She discovers—gasp—her parents were part of a magical circus. OR she discovers—gasp—her parents are the parents of the boy she loves. She’s in love with her own brother! As you can see, these reveals can pull the plot in extremely different directions

2) ESCAPE ISN’T SO EASY. First draft: Character A narrowly escapes harm. Change to: Character A gets injured, captured, or forced down an unexpected path.

-How can this lead to new plot potential? How will the character get better, what will the injury require him to do next or prevent him from being able to do next? How will he break out of captivity or what will he learn from being held? Where will the unexpected route lead him? Who will he run into there

3) HOLD GRUDGES! First draft: Two characters argue, but come to reconcile their views or agree to disagree. Change to: two characters argue. The disagreement becomes explosive, leading to violence, a drastic measure, or swearing allegiance to a third party.

-How can this open new possibilities for the story? Force the characters to work through the conflict by making more mistakes and truly grappling through the book rather than resolving quickly and cleanly.

4) WE LIKE BIG BUTS AND WE CANNOT LIE. When in doubt, insert a BUT. She tried to sneak in undetected, BUT… She planned to kill him, BUT… She asked him to the dance, BUT.

5) MAKE MISTAKES. Are all the character’s difficulties coming from external forces (bad timing, storms, coincidences, society, other characters’ evil machinations/ villainy) or internal forces/ character-agency (making mistakes, overreacting, wanting something too much, essentially making a dangerous, risky or bad choice)?

-When in doubt, try to use more character-agency to create hurdles. The most interesting problems to solve are the ones we’ve in some way created ourselves!

-A few storms and bad guys are often necessary for good story-telling too, though. :)

So go ahead, awaken the Inner Demon/Diva/Desperate housewife. Don’t worry—you’ll get to save your characters in the end… Just don’t let them off the hook before then!


If you are attending the New Jersey SCBWI Conference this weekend, make sure you look for both Lexa and Lauren. They will be there. Since I will be there too, I will report back next week hoping to share some of the information so no one feels left out.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Filed under: Advice, article, demystify, How to, need to know, revisions, Tips, Young Adult Novel Tagged: Adding Conflict in your writing, Inner Demon, Lauren Oliver, Lexa Hillyer

2 Comments on Conflict – No Pain, No Gain, last added: 6/4/2013
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24543.


Arrrrrgggghhhh There Mates Thank you so much for your sweet and kind comments. I read all of them and I am so grateful that you fabulous people still take time out of your busy day to come a visit and leave such kind words and encouragement!!! This Pirate is up to she skivvies in work! Will be back soon. Arrrggghhh!

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24544. The Grimm Road

This year celebrates the 200th anniversary of the publication of the Grimm Brother's Household Tales. To commemorate, here's my latest editorial cut from the regular series of monthly illustrations I draw for ANA's in-flight magazine Wingspan.

It's in the June issue, but you have to fly on one of ANA's international flights to find the magazine!

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24545. “Metegol” Trailer by Oscar-Winning Director Juan Jose Campanella

The final trailer (in Spanish) was released today for the Argentinian/Spanish animated feature Metegol (Foosball). The US$21 million film may be most interesting for its unconventional director, Juan José Campanella, whose last film El secreto de sus ojos (The Secret in Their Eyes) won the Academy Award for best foreign language film. He is also a veteran director of American TV series like House M.D., Law & Order and 30 Rock.

As of mid-May, the film’s producers were still negotiating for an American theatrical release, but Metegol is set to open this summer and fall in Argentina, Peru, Spain, Russia, Turkey, the Middle East and Brazil, among other territories. For more, visit the film’s official website or its Facebook page.

0 Comments on “Metegol” Trailer by Oscar-Winning Director Juan Jose Campanella as of 6/4/2013 2:05:00 AM
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24546.


Arrrrrgggghhhh There Mates Thank you so much for your sweet and kind comments. I read all of them and I am so grateful that you fabulous people still take time out of your busy day to come a visit and leave such kind words and encouragement!!! This Pirate is up to she skivvies in work! Will be back soon. Arrrggghhh!

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24547. June News 2013

I’ve just completed my first summer e-market mailing for my illustration work! Will soon be contacting boutiques and galleries for my fine art and jewelry, which is available here:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/TheButtonBird

Stay tuned for a great deal more illustration work being added to the oil portfolio. I’m researching famous fairy tales and nursery rhymes for a new series!

 

 

The post June News 2013 appeared first on Scribble Kids.

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24548. A Handbook of California Design, 1930-1965

handbook of california design

A Handbook of California Design, 1930-1965 is the latest title from LACMA curator Bobbye Tigerman and profiles 140 of the most significant design figures from the mid-twentieth-century. As a companion to the catalog California Design: Living in a Modern Way and the exhibition of the same name, the book features Grain Edit faves such as Saul Bass and Alvin Lustig, as well as many lesser known but influential practitioners. Also included is an extended reading list, images of the exhibition installation and sources for further research.

Designed by the award winning designer Irma Boom, the book is a beautifully crafted object in its own right. The layout is restrained in its approach, but shines within the subtle details. I especially appreciate her “Connections and Collaborations” diagram which takes on a pattern-like quality that possibly emulates some of the textile work of the era.

You can pick up a copy at the LACMA shop as well as Amazon. The exhibition, which recently wrapped up in Tokyo, makes its next stop at the Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand on July 7th of this year.


handbook of california design

handbook of california design

handbook of california design

handbook of california design

——————–

Also worth viewing…
Alvin Lustig Book
Saul Bass Book
Saul Bass children’s book

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24549. Artist of the Day: Genevieve Tsai

Genevieve Tsai

Genevieve Tsai is a character designer and concept artist who has primarily worked on video game productions.

Genevieve Tsai

Genevieve Tsai

Genevieve’s blog and Tumblr show off recent development work that she created for the latest Sly Cooper game, Thieves in Time, which include these detailed layout drawings of a chunk of 3D game space and ideas for character movement (see them larger on her own site):

Genevieve Tsai

Genevieve Tsai

You can see move of Genevieve’s character concepts and illustrations on her website, Charicreatures.com.

Genevieve Tsai

Genevieve Tsai

Genevieve Tsai

Genevieve Tsai

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24550. Español and Sketching

I just finished my first Spanish TV interview. Thank you to Sara Palacios for helping me practice my spanish while we went sketching on location.

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