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24526. Muhlenberg County High School: Kayte Hardison



Muhlenberg County High School Visual Arts

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24527. Muhlenberg County High School: Kaley Day



Muhlenberg County High School Visual Arts

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24528. Muhlenberg County High School: Sarah Dunning



Muhlenberg County High School Visual Arts

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24529. Muhlenberg County High School: Lauren Hunt



Muhlenberg County High School Visual Arts

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24530. Muhlenberg County High School: Mary Kate Alexander



Muhlenberg County High School Visual Arts

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24531. Muhlenberg County High School: Ashley Crim



Muhlenberg County High School Visual Arts

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24532. Vintage Children's Book: How Animals Sleep, illustrated by Jack Keats

I feel like a curmudgeon for saying this, but what is happening with girl's toys and play costumes? Everything is pink, glitter and bling. I understand many little girls of a certain age love the color pink and go through a princess stage. But it looks to me like a rather disproportionate number of girls toys are promoting limited ideals for girls: be a princess, rock star or a celebrity. 

Where is this all going? I don't know. It would take up too much time and space on this post and I'm sure you don't want to read it. But I do like books like this one illustrated by Jack Keats - How Animals Sleep. It's interesting and real life. There. Off my podium. Nuff said.










How Animals Sleep
By Millicent Selsam
Illustrated by Ezra Jack Keats
Scholastic Book Services, 1962

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24533. Muhlenberg County High School: Kattie Hensley



Muhlenberg County High School Visual Arts

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24534. Muhlenberg County High School: Katie Mayes



Muhlenberg County High School Visual Arts

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24535. Muhlenberg County High School: Beth Webb



Muhlenberg County High School Visual Arts

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24536. Moleskine Goes Public?

Yes, Moleskine, the European makers of those expensive little pocket sketchbooks and other diaries has gone public. Read about it in the Wall Street Journal.

                                   Here's a page from my little 3 1/2 x 5 1/2 inch sketchbook

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24537. The Many Definitions of Plot

PlottingAwhile ago I did an 8-part series on Plot to help me understand the differences between the terms: plot, story, and structure. (I’ve since revised some of my thoughts from that series when I did my grad lecture on story structure. More on that coming soon). But what I seem to find interesting is that no one seems to be able to agree on what plot is.

Sure, everyone sort of knows what plot is on a gut level, (and there’s plenty of overlap when writers discuss it), but there isn’t a concrete single definition. I think this is fascinating (and confusing), and oddly empowering. It means each of us gets to create our own personal definition of plot. We get to pick a definition that works for us!

I’ve begun to collect definitions of plot and I’ve shared my list below. Take a look through them and see if any resonate with you. Or maybe you’ll find you disagree with some (I sure do!). Perhaps some will confuse you, while others might help you consider plot in a whole new way! I’d love to know what you think.

As writers, we create our own philosophies about how we each define good writing and how the craft should be approached.  Coming up with our own personal definition of plot is an interesting part of that journey. I’ve never found two writers who articulate it exactly the same way.

Here’s what some of my craft books, friends, and teachers have to say about plot:

“Plot is how the events in a story directly impact the main character.”  - Martha Alderson 

Story is: “The king died and then the queen died.” Plot is: “The king died and then the queen died of grief.” - E.M. Forster

“Story is what happens; plot is the structure of what happens.”  - Cheryl Klein

“Plot is merely the mechanism by which your character is forced up against her deepest fears and desires.”  - Margaret Bechard 

“Plot is nothing more than the way you organize your story.”  - Nancy Lamb

Plot is “merely one way of telling a story, by connecting the happenings tightly, usually through causal chains.”  - Ursula Le Guin

“Story [is] what your novel is about. Plot [is] what happens within your story … Structure [is] how it’s organized.”  - Sheryl Scarborough

“Plot is the arrangement of events that make up a story…  Plot is the sequence of unfolding action. In examining plot we are concerned with causality, with how one action leads into or ties in with another.” – Chea Stephenson

“Plot is a system of actions.” – Susan Fletcher

Plot is “the under-the-surface weaving of various lines of action or sets of events so that the story builds steadily … It is a combination of what happens and how those events are revealed to the audience.” - John Truby

“Plot is not just what happens in a story. Rather, plot is a pattern of cause and effect or conflicts upsetting the equilibrium of a situation.” - Ron Layne and Rick Lewis

“Plots engage our capacity to understand motives and thus the logic of action.” - Roger Seamon

How do you define plot? I’d love to hear your personal definitions, thoughts, and ideas!

writing

The above quotes come from the following sources:

Alderson, Martha. The Plot Whisperer: Secrets of Story Structure Any Writer Can Master. Avon, MA: Adams Media, 2011. Print.
Bechard, Margaret. Small Workshop Plot Handout. Vermont College of Fine Arts. 2012.
Chea, Stephenson. “What’s the Difference Between Plot and Structure.” Associated Content. 16 Feb. 2010. Web. 7 May 2010. 
Forster, E.M. Aspects of the Novel. 1927. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1985. Print.
Klein, Cheryl. “The Essentials of Plot.” CherylKlein.com. Web. Nov. 2012.
Fletcher, Susan. Structure as Genesis. Faculty Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts. 2012.
Lamb, Nancy. The Writer’s Guide to Crafting Stories for Children. Cincinnati, OH: Writer’s Digest Books, 2001. Print. 
Layne, Ron and Rick Lewis. “Plot, Theme, the Narrative Arc, and Narrative Patterns.” English and Humanities Department. Sandhill Community College. 11 Sept, 2009. Web.  7 May 2010. 
Le Guin, Ursula K. Steering the Craft: Exercises and Discussions on Story Writing for the Lone Navigator or the Mutinous Crew. Portland, OR: Eighth Mountain Press, 1998. Print.
Scarborough, Sheryl. “Re: Laura’s (Way Late) Lecture Thread.” MFA Student Forum. Vermont College of Fine Arts. Web. Nov. 2012.
Seamon, Roger. “The Price of Plot in Aristotle’s Poetics.” The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 64:2, Spring 2006. Ebsco Host. Web. 10 May 2011.
Truby, John. The Anatomy of Story: 22 Steps to Becoming a Master Storyteller. 2007. New York: Faber and Faber, 2008. Print.

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24538. Katherine Paterson Prize for Young Adult and Children’s Writing

What is the Katherine Paterson Prize for YA and Children’s Writing?

An annual prize for Young Adult and Children’s Literature. A chance for your YA and Children’s Lit to be read by Hunger Mountain editors and guest judges!

What will the winner receive?

One overall first place winner receives $1,000 and publication! Three category winners receive $100 each and publication. The categories are

  • Young Adult (YA)
  • Middle Grade (MG)
  • Picture Book or Writing for Young Children

Who can enter the contest?

Anyone! Everyone!

Is there a fee to enter?

Yes, the fee is $20.

Do you have a word limit on what you submit?

Yes, it is 10,000 words. Your entry may be a short story or a novel excerpt, but if it’s a novel excerpt it should really stand alone.

Who is this year’s judge?

The 2013 judge is Rebecca Stead, author of Liar and Spy and When You Reach Me, which won the Newbery Medal in 2010.

When is the deadline?

The postmark deadline is June 30th

Where is last year’s winning entry?

The 2012 first place winner, “Crabcake Charlie,” a Middle Grade story by Sally Derby was published in Hunger Mountain 17: Labyrinths. (Order a copy here).

Other winners:

  • In Your Head by ZP Heller, selected by Kathi Appelt, winner of YA category, 2012
  • The Flood, by Kathleen Forrester, winner of MG category, 2012
  • Sybilla Under the Bones by Barbara Lowell, winner of PB/writing for younger children category, 2012
  • Him by Heather Smith Meloche, selected by Kimberly Willis Holt, overall winner, 2011
  • Forty Thieves and a Green-Eyed Girl by Christy Lenzi, winner of MG category, 2011
  • Cesar by Betty Yee, winner of the Picture Book/Writing for Young Children category, 2011
  • Steve by Jaramy Conners, overall winner 2010, chosen by Holly Black.
  • Chasing Shadows by S.E. Sinkhorn, winner of YA category, 2010
  • The Ugliest Dog in the World by Marcia Popp, winner of the MG category, 2010
  •  Something at the Hill by Jane Kohuth, winner of the Picture Book/Writing for Young Children category, 2010
  • Crazy Cat by Liz Cook, overall winner2009, chosen by Katherine Paterson
  • Tornado by Susan Hill Long, winner of the MG category, 2009
  • No Mistake by Tricia Springstubb,winner of the Picture Book/Writing for Young Children category, 2009

Does Hunger Mountain accept electronic entries?

Yes! Please enter your original, unpublished piece under 10,000 words. Your entry may be a short story or a novel excerpt, but if it’s a novel excerpt it should really stand alone. Feel free to include a brief synopsis if your entry is a novel excerpt. Your name and address should not appear on the story; we read contest entries blind. Click the link below to access our online submission system. Once in the submission manager, you’ll need to choose “Katherine Paterson Prize” (scroll all the way to the bottom to find it!) Pay the $20.00 entry fee and upload your entry. Please include a cover letter in the comments section, letting us know what age group your piece is intended for: Enter the Katherine Paterson Prize

Does Hunger Mountain still accept Snail Mail entries?

Yes! Please send one original, unpublished piece under 10,000 words. Your entry may be a short story or a novel excerpt, but if it’s a novel excerpt it should stand on its own. Feel free to include a brief synopsis along with your novel excerpt. Include a $20 entry fee. Make checks payable to “Vermont College of Fine Arts.” Entries should be postmarked by June 30th. Your name or address should not appear anywhere on the story itself (we read entries blind.) Instead, enclose an index card with story title, intended age group (YA? MG?), your name, address, phone number, and email address. You may also enclose an SASE (self addressed stamped envelope)  for notification of winners. Entries should be typed, and on one side of the paper only. No staples please! Send entries to:

KPP Hunger Mountain Vermont College of Fine Arts 36 College Street Montpelier, VT 05602

May I include illustrations with my Picture Book manuscript?

Yes. This year for the first time, we’re allowing illustrations along with picture book manuscripts. These should be copies/pdfs only. PLEASE DO NOT SEND ORIGINAL ART! We’ll consider illustrated and unillustrated text for picture book entries.

If you submit by mail, send copies of art only. If you submit through Submittable, your entry should be a pdf.

Will my entry be considered for general publication as  as well as for the Katherine Paterson Prize?

Yes, it will. Several stories we publish have come from the Katherine Paterson Prize entries.

May I enter more than one story in this prize?

Yes. Enter as many as you like! But each entry needs its own entry fee.

Are simultaneous submissions okay?

Yes,  but please let us know right away if your work is accepted elsewhere. And unfortunately we can’t refund entry fees if the work is accepted somewhere else.

I’m a child or a teenager. May I enter this prize?

You may. But your work will be evaluated alongside adult work. If you’re a serious writer, it’s okay with us if you enter the prize, just know this prize isn’t intended for teenagers or for children.

What if I have questions that aren’t answered here?

Email us at hungermtn@vcfa.edu


Enter the Katherine Paterson Prize by clicking here

Maybe this is the year your manuscript will be ready to enter. If so, Good Luck!

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Filed under: children writing, Competition, Contests, Middle Grade Novels, opportunity, picture books, Places to sumit, Young Adult Novel Tagged: $1000 prize and publication, Hunger Mountain, Katherine Paterson Prize

2 Comments on Katherine Paterson Prize for Young Adult and Children’s Writing, last added: 5/21/2013
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24539. Muhlenberg County High School: Chelsea Janow



Muhlenberg County High School Visual Arts

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24540. Hurricane Sandy, Giagantor tornados.....

Often when I'm working, I listen to This American Life. This week's show turned out to be a foreshadowing of today's huge tornado in Oklahoma. This is SO worth a listen, please listen. 

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24541. The Many Definitions of Plot

PlottingAwhile ago I did an 8-part series on Plot to help me understand the differences between the terms: plot, story, and structure. (I’ve since revised some of my thoughts from that series when I did my grad lecture on story structure. More on that coming soon). But what I seem to find interesting is that no one seems to be able to agree on what plot is.

Sure, everyone sort of knows what plot is on a gut level, (and there’s plenty of overlap when writers discuss it), but there isn’t a concrete single definition. I think this is fascinating (and confusing), and oddly empowering. It means each of us gets to create our own personal definition of plot. We get to pick a definition that works for us!

I’ve begun to collect definitions of plot and I’ve shared my list below. Take a look through them and see if any resonate with you. Or maybe you’ll find you disagree with some (I sure do!). Perhaps some will confuse you, while others might help you consider plot in a whole new way! I’d love to know what you think.

As writers, we create our own philosophies about how we each define good writing and how the craft should be approached.  Coming up with our own personal definition of plot is an interesting part of that journey. I’ve never found two writers who articulate it exactly the same way.

Here’s what some of my craft books, friends, and teachers have to say about plot:

“Plot is how the events in a story directly impact the main character.”  - Martha Alderson 

Story is: “The king died and then the queen died.” Plot is: “The king died and then the queen died of grief.” - E.M. Forster

“Story is what happens; plot is the structure of what happens.”  - Cheryl Klein

“Plot is merely the mechanism by which your character is forced up against her deepest fears and desires.”  - Margaret Bechard 

“Plot is nothing more than the way you organize your story.”  - Nancy Lamb

Plot is “merely one way of telling a story, by connecting the happenings tightly, usually through causal chains.”  - Ursula Le Guin

“Story [is] what your novel is about. Plot [is] what happens within your story … Structure [is] how it’s organized.”  - Sheryl Scarborough

“Plot is the arrangement of events that make up a story…  Plot is the sequence of unfolding action. In examining plot we are concerned with causality, with how one action leads into or ties in with another.” – Chea Stephenson

“Plot is a system of actions.” – Susan Fletcher

Plot is “the under-the-surface weaving of various lines of action or sets of events so that the story builds steadily … It is a combination of what happens and how those events are revealed to the audience.” - John Truby

“Plot is not just what happens in a story. Rather, plot is a pattern of cause and effect or conflicts upsetting the equilibrium of a situation.” - Ron Layne and Rick Lewis

“Plots engage our capacity to understand motives and thus the logic of action.” - Roger Seamon

How do you define plot? I’d love to hear your personal definitions, thoughts, and ideas!

writing

The above quotes come from the following sources:

Alderson, Martha. The Plot Whisperer: Secrets of Story Structure Any Writer Can Master. Avon, MA: Adams Media, 2011. Print.
Bechard, Margaret. Small Workshop Plot Handout. Vermont College of Fine Arts. 2012.
Chea, Stephenson. “What’s the Difference Between Plot and Structure.” Associated Content. 16 Feb. 2010. Web. 7 May 2010. 
Forster, E.M. Aspects of the Novel. 1927. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1985. Print.
Klein, Cheryl. “The Essentials of Plot.” CherylKlein.com. Web. Nov. 2012.
Fletcher, Susan. Structure as Genesis. Faculty Lecture. Vermont College of Fine Arts. 2012.
Lamb, Nancy. The Writer’s Guide to Crafting Stories for Children. Cincinnati, OH: Writer’s Digest Books, 2001. Print. 
Layne, Ron and Rick Lewis. “Plot, Theme, the Narrative Arc, and Narrative Patterns.” English and Humanities Department. Sandhill Community College. 11 Sept, 2009. Web.  7 May 2010. 
Le Guin, Ursula K. Steering the Craft: Exercises and Discussions on Story Writing for the Lone Navigator or the Mutinous Crew. Portland, OR: Eighth Mountain Press, 1998. Print.
Scarborough, Sheryl. “Re: Laura’s (Way Late) Lecture Thread.” MFA Student Forum. Vermont College of Fine Arts. Web. Nov. 2012.
Seamon, Roger. “The Price of Plot in Aristotle’s Poetics.” The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 64:2, Spring 2006. Ebsco Host. Web. 10 May 2011.
Truby, John. The Anatomy of Story: 22 Steps to Becoming a Master Storyteller. 2007. New York: Faber and Faber, 2008. Print.

2 Comments on The Many Definitions of Plot, last added: 5/22/2013
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24542. Muhlenberg County High School: Summer Oldham



Muhlenberg County High School Visual Arts

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24543. terra


terra, originalmente cargada por elffz_jvs.

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24544. Muhlenberg County High School: Sarah McDonald



Muhlenberg County High School Visual Arts

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24545. Muhlenberg County High School: Jacob Bruce



Muhlenberg County High School Visual Arts

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24546. Inspiration: Faith Ringgold and mother's day

 Faith Ringgold is one of my favorites. She is most well known for her storyquilts. And her children's books. Here's the cover of her first kids' book, Tar Beach, below, which won the Coretta Scott King award for illustration. She has written seventeen kids' books!

 I first saw her work at the UC Art Museum here in Berkeley, way back in the 1990s, when I went to hear her lecture about her art. She's a fabulous storyteller, and incredibly funny. She had been painting on canvas for years, but was having trouble getting her work into galleries. After seeing an exhibit of Tibetan Thangkas, paintings on fabric, she decided to try painting on fabric, making quilted borders or frames around the paintings. She had learned to sew from her mother, a fashion designer. Faith wrote stories to go with her paintings. Easy to roll up and mail cheaply, she started getting exhibits around the country, first at university galleries, then larger venues.

And the rest is history. I love to show my students a film about her work. She tells of having an art teacher in college who told her her work was lousy. She got mad and worked harder than ever. She sings a little rap about how anyone can DO IT if they try.
Great words to hear from a very successful artist!
You can read more about her at her website:

and some youtube videos of her below:


Here's my Mother's Day bouquet below, which I meant to show you LAST week. Oops.

And breakfast in bed... my daughter calls this 'breakfast salad.' YUM!

I learned to sew from my mother, as Faith had. And so much more from her. Thanks Mom!
Hope all you moms out there had a wonderful day!

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24547. Monday Music - Lime in the Coconut

Just got back from a *fabulous* weekend in Kansas City attending Spectrum Live (a full report will follow soon). Have been trying to think of a sufficiently celebratory song for the lingering elation... This isn't *quite* that, but close (and one of my favorite scenes from Practical Magic):

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24548. Vintage Children's Book: How Animals Sleep, illustrated by Jack Keats

I feel like a curmudgeon for saying this, but what is happening with girl's toys and play costumes? Everything is pink, glitter and bling. I understand many little girls of a certain age love the color pink and go through a princess stage. But it looks to me like a rather disproportionate number of girls toys are promoting limited ideals for girls: be a princess, rock star or a celebrity. 

Where is this all going? I don't know. It would take up too much time and space on this post and I'm sure you don't want to read it. But I do like books like this one illustrated by Jack Keats - How Animals Sleep. It's interesting and real life. There. Off my podium. Nuff said.










How Animals Sleep
By Millicent Selsam
Illustrated by Ezra Jack Keats
Scholastic Book Services, 1962

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24549. Spring Semester Left overs


Here are some of my left over drawings from ILL 699 Character Design for Children's Book Class (and scary slasher one from Eli Harris' Clothed Figure Class). They are all about 10 minute poses.

I loved teaching the course, and can't wait till the next term. I'll post up some of the best work from the students on the AAU Children's Book blog soon.







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24550. A Blurb

Lots of news and more art!  Josh and I found out that we are having a baby boy just last week, I started a new book project with a new company (that for the time being is still top secret- although I was given the ok to post an occasional work-in-progress image so long as I blur any text and don't give too much away), and I still have final images to create for Fadenrot!

Phew!

I wish so much that I could post the entire PDF of my storyboards for this story as it is very funny... and I'm pretty happy with the images.  I tried to be a lot more loose and a little more "cartoony" with the figures... I think it just fit the story more.  So far, this has been a fun project!

I'm also well into the second trimester of the pregnancy and the morning sickness is truly behind me.  That was SO hard.  Four months of being sick as a dog, and sometimes for the entire day (!!), and just in a total haze... I missed feeling normal... but as I said, I am back, and working hard!  :)  This has been already pretty crazy but at the same time, I'm sure things have yet to change... hee hee... lucky for me I have plenty of girl friends who have just gone through or are going through this at the same time.  I'm sure having a little guy to draw will be very fun, too, and hopefully, we can draw together in the future, my little bean and I... ;)

Fadenrot is always going to be my favorite client... I describe the way we work together to other artists and it is always the "ideal" situation/relationship... I get a theme (and these themes are always wonderfully inspiring and something I would LOVE to draw) and then I sketch like crazy these things that come to mind and my client picks and chooses what she likes... I do some revising, some fine-tuning, and then there it is!!  A new image for her to print and show the world!  It's the best... especially because sketching always inspires some really great ideas for me... :)  It's also just kind of cool to see your art on clothing!  :)

I'm just feeling very grateful, I suppose, and had to share... :)
So here are images to reflect what I am writing here...

First, our Benjamin Lee Yoshimitsu at 5 months:


Second, a single spread of my storyboards for this new project:

I already posted the sketches I made for Fadenrot so I will wait to post the final images when they are finished.

:)
Cheers!


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