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Results 16,176 - 16,200 of 237,559
16176. Caterpillar Shoes

Caterpiller-cover_AM

Happy World Poetry Day!  We’ve been busy working on our latest children’s picture book, Caterpillar Shoes.  This story is about a colorful caterpillar named Patches.  She’s an energetic caterpillar trying to decide what activities to do.  In the end, she doesn’t put any limits on herself and lives her life to the full.  This is our twelfth children’s book and we are so excited for it’s release.  Stay tuned here to learn about upcoming promotions for this book and others.

Th only limit to a paintbrush and a blank canvas is your imagination.

 


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16177. The Norma K Hemming Awards 2015: A Guest Post By Bill Wright

Compared with a lot of other science fiction awards the Norma K Hemmings are quite new, having only started in about 2010. This year's will be presented at Swancon in only a couple of weeks. I've posted this on the ASIM blog, but as a fan, thought it might be nice to make this guest post available here as well.

Take it away, Bill!


The Norma K Hemming Award sponsored by the Australian Science Fiction Foundation

Contributed by Bill Wright, ASFF awards administrator on 21 March 2015.

What is the Australian Science Fiction Foundation and what is it for?

The Foundation’s website at: www.asff.org.au says its main purpose is to sponsor and encourage the creation and appreciation of science fiction in Australia. 

It does that through the sponsorship and administration of writing workshops and short story competitions, seed loans to national conventions, and the publication of its newsletter, The Instrumentality. The Foundation has, since its inception, been a resource centre for everyone involved in science fiction in Australia. 

The Australian Science Fiction Foundation runs two jury awards, viz.

The A. Bertram Chandler Award for outstanding achievement in science fiction, established in 1992, where the winner is selected from eminent achievers nominated by Australian science fiction fans; and

The Norma K Hemming Award for excellence in the in the exploration of themes of race, gender, sexuality, class and disability:

What is the Norma K Hemming Award, why is it given, and who is Norma K Hemming?

Established at Aussiecon 4, the 68th World Science Fiction Convention in Melbourne in August 2010, the Norma K Hemming Award is given by the  ASFF for excellence in the in the exploration of themes of race, gender, sexuality, class and disability:
 - in the form of science fiction and fantasy or related artwork or media.
produced either in Australia or by Australian citizens.
- first published, released or presented in the calendar year preceding the year in which the award is given.
The Norma K Hemming Award is gaining in prestige. Its gestation was foreshadowed in the late 1990s when academic researchers Van Ikin, Russell Blackford, Sean McMullen and Paul Collins uncovered works by pioneer Australian feminist science fiction writer and playwright Norma Kathleen Hemming.

Norma wrote in the 1950s, throughout the decade  before her death from breast cancer in July 1960. She was 33 years young.

Her writing fizzes with potential. The science was not always sound but it was on a par with the majority of science fiction writers of her day. 

Most of her stories, but only two of her five plays, have survived. 

Readers can visit Norm’s Wikipedia entry at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norma_K._Hemming for her biography, her bibliography, and how to purchase a collection of her works by Dr Toby Burrows, Principal Librarian, Scholars' Centre, University of Western Australia Library (M209).

One of Norma’s plays, 'The Matriarchy of Renok’, in which a cast of formidable and at times vulnerable women wrest control of the galaxy from the depredations of alpha-males, was read over two successive Swancons (peak WA sf conventions) in the mid-noughties. 

The 'Matriarchy of Renok' was again performed at Aussiecon 4 (the 68th Worldcon) in Melbourne in August 2010) as a staged reading produced by Sean McMullen, with overhead space opera storyboard projections by Katoomba-based artist and digital image pioneer Lewis P Morley, 

Besides being a powerful drama with lots of interpersonal tension, the play is a work of unalloyed, rapturous joy – that is fun to read, fun to act in, and fun to watch. I can’t understand why an enterprising movie mogul hasnpt picked it up for global release. 

Given the patriarchal and, by today’s standards, sexist mores of the fifties, it was more than a tad courageous of Norma and her troupe, which she named The Acturians, to expose their parts to varying degrees of hostile response from science fiction fans. A notable  response was by male chauvinist denizens of the Sydney Futuran Society whe staged a mock auction where they sold her off to the highest bidder. Such was the excitement – if that’s the word for it – that they are rumoured to have accidentally set her hair on fire. She fared better in Melbourne, where she and her troupe were welcomed by members of the Melbourne  Science Fiction Club at their conventions.  

Gestation of the Norma K Hemming Award

The two Swancon readings were so popular that the Western Australian Science Fiction Foundation thought of instituting an award in Norma Hemming’s memory, However, they soon realised that her importance as the pioneer feminist science fiction writer in Australials post-WWII history demanded a national focus. So their spokesperson, Emma Hawkes, referred the proposed award to the Australian Science Fiction Foundation for implementation.

At the time, in mid-2007, I had just been appointed to the ASFF board, taking over the position of A. Bertram Chandler Award administrator from Julian Warner who was, and still is, a tireless effectuator across a wide range of activities in Melbourne’s science fiction community.

Needless to say, my job description was upgraded forthwith. With no experience in awards administration and no small press contacts (except from being part of the audience at panel discussions at science fiction conventions) I was thrown in at the  deep end and told to set up from scratch an ASFF-sponsored Norma K Hemming Award with a national focus.

I quickly discovered that an ASFF board member had access to a vast array of resources, most of them human, chief among whom was the Foundation’s academic representative Van1kin.

Van Ikin the Icon

Van Ikin is an academic and science fiction writer and editor. He was, until his retirement in 2015, a Professor in English at the University of Western Australia, where he acted as supervisor for a number of Australian writers completing their post-graduate degrees and doctorates. They include such literary luminaries as science fiction and fantasy writers Terry Dowling, Stephen Dedman and Dave Luckett. In 2000, he received the University of Western Australia's Excellence in Teaching Award for Postgraduate Research Supervision. 

He has reviewed science fiction and fantasy for The Sydney Morning Herald since 1984, but he is best known in the Australian science fiction community for his editorship of the long-running critical journal Science Fiction - A Review of Speculative Fiction.

Van was the inaugural winner of ASFF’s prestigious A. Bertram Chandler Award for outstanding achievement in science fiction in 1992.

With Van smoothing contacts in academia and my awesome title giving me the clout to negotiate program space with with peak State and National convention organisers, I spent the next three years hobnobbing with my intellectual betters in the academic streams of those conventions. Taking our cue from the feminist bias in Norma’s stories, Gender was an obvious criterion for the award. Universities being hotbeds of disputation on social issues, my academic collaborators sought to identify additional criteria in that milieu. 

The ‘Eureka’ moment came when I suggested they look for skify elements in their search. Being possessed of minds of power that, for all I knew, might have been stable at the third level of stress (ref. Gray Lensman by E. E. Smith Ph D. first published in book form in 1951 by Fantasy Press), albeit Van assures me that, academics, it ain’t necessarily so, they ascended into realms of abstraction inaccessible to mortals of lesser degree.

Coming down from on high, they evinced oracular abstractions in humorous dialogue concerning  literary allusions that were opaque to me. Venturing to intrude where Angels fear to tread, I sought to enter the conversation with an observation to the effect that their gestalt was passing strange. Suddenly I was in there, informed by past reading from Weird Tales and Face in the Abyss by A. E. Merritt and wrestling with concepts of the postmodern with the best of them.

Strange carved out of mind space by science fiction is acknowledged as its sovereign territory. Strange is the Key Word. Look for Strange in the human condition. Gender is strange, Sexuality is strange. Class differences are strange. The concept of Race as applied to human beings is very strange. Engulfed in a tide of memories long suppressed, I fought for stability on a mental plane of utter desolation contemplating the isolation of people in our midst whom many regard as strange.

Such was the gestation of the Norma K Hemming Award for race, class, gender and sexuality in speculative fiction  Disability was added as an additional category for the 2011 competition.

Establishment of the Norma K Hemming Award at Aussiecon 4

Despite its aforementioned careful gestation with inputs from the academic community at every turn, the inaugural Norma K 0Hemming Award presentation at Aussiecon 4 came at speculative fiction writers, editors and publishers from left field, so to speak. No other award encourages writers to have something worthwhile to say about all categories of otherness in the human condition. Isolated minorities have been have been ignored or characterised in negative stereotypes much too often in the past, and it is time to redress that.

Anyone who doubts the efficacy of having such an award to set standards for speculative fiction writers has only to read the 2013 winning entry, ‘Sea Hearts’ by Margo Lanagan, to be convinced that ASFF’s full on approach works. In her novel, Margo shines fresh light on what it is like to be a man, what it is like to be a woman, what it is like to be human.

Parallel initiatives on the way to establishing the Norma K Hemming Award

As mentioned earlier, In the late 1990s a small number of fannish scholars including Van Ikin, Russell Blackford, Sean McMullen and Paul Collins researched the life and times of pioneer Australian feminist sf author and playwright Norma Kathleen Hemming (September 1928 - July 1960) whom a few surviving oldies such as Doug Nicholson (Sydney) and Mervyn Binns (Melbourne) knew well. Among publications arising from that research was a biography of Norma K Hemming in ‘Strange Constellations : A History of Science Fiction’ by Russell Blackford, Van Ikin and Sean McMullen, published 1999 in the USA by Greenwood Press. 


Dr Helen Merrick is co-editor, with Tess Williams, of ‘Women of Other Worlds: Excursions through Science Fiction and Feminism’ (University of Western Australia Press, 1999) in which the contribution of the feminist fan community to science fiction is strongly acknowledged. This scholarly and informative publication makes the point that Australian SF fandom, in tandem with American fandom, has over the last 40 years moved to include issues of racial, sexual and cultural diversity and has contributed to major feminist fan movements such as slash fiction and the femmefan movement of the 1970s. 

In a contribution to the work, Helen recalls that trailblazing Canadian femmefan Susan Wood visited Australia in 1975 for the first Aussiecon, meeting with and being strongly influenced by principal Guest of Honour Ursula Le Guin who ran the seminal writers workshop at that first Australian Wordcon. A year later Susan ran the first identity-oriented panel at a SF convention, entitled ‘Women and Science Fiction’. The following year WisCon (the feminist Worldcon in Madison, Wisconsin) was established as an annual event.  Obviously, Australian fandom benefited from these influences. Today, women are involved in Australian science fiction as authors, editors, publishers and fans at all levels.

Interestingly, Helen Merrick’s co-author, Tess Williams, is one of the four distinguished permanent Jurors for the Norma K Hemming Award.

The 2015 Norma K Hemming Award

The 2015 Norma K Hemming Award will be presented to the winner at Swancon 40, the 54th Australian National Science Fiction Convention in Perth on 2-6 April 2015. The judges, writer and editor Russell Blackford; editor Sarah Endacott; writer, editor and publisher Rob Gerrand; and writer Tess Williams, have released their shortlist:

Collection: ‘The Female Factory’ by Lisa L Hannett and Angela Slatter published by Twelfth Planet Press in November 2014

Novel:         ‘Nil By Mouth’ by LynC published by Satalyte Publishing in June 2014

Novel:         ‘North Star Guide Me Home’ by Jo Spurrier published by
          HarperVoyager in May 2014

Novel:         ‘Razorhurst’ by Justine Larbalestier published by Allen and Unwin in
         July 2014

Novel:         ‘The Wonders’ by Paddy O’Reilly published by Affirm Press in July 2014

The Norma K Hemming Award has no cash prize because it is a fan award. Fan activity is much the same all over the world, conforming to traditions of the World Science Fiction Society, an unincorporated entity described in its Wikipedia entry at: : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worldcon#World_Science_Fiction_Society. 

Why there is no cash prize for the Norma K Hemming Awards

Fan activity includes convention running, encouraging sf small press enterprises, and writer and reader education at conventions, writing groups and workshops - all run on a not-for-profit basis  by volunteers drawn from, and trained within, our ranks. 

Within socially acceptable parameters of passion and dispassion, we capture the young and imprint them with a sense of wonder, respect for xcience and the scientific method, and an appreciation of good story telling in literature, art and theatre.  That community of interesta breeds talent.

It is why there is no cash prize for the Norma K Hemming Award, and why ASFF cannot afford to cover competition winners’ travel expenses.  It is also why we go out of our way at conventions to have high profile luminaries in Literature and the Arts ‘on tap’ to represent award winners when they can’t be present to receive their trophies.

In conclusion, I wish to make the observation that ASFS does  not have an exclusive patent on Norma Kathleen Hemming. She belongs to all of us. There is nothing to prevent any fannish institution, e.g. the Canberra Speculative Fiction Group (CSFG), setting up, say, the Norma K Hemming Medallion for Romance of Science in Science Fiction, under criteria that support respect for Science and the Scientific Method via storytelling.

Norma Hemming confronted gender issues head on. For its own purposes ASFF added additional categories of otherness in its award. Peak fannish institutions in each State may take different approaches.

It has been a privilege to have been entrusted with the development of the Norma K Hemming Award under the auspices of the Australian Science Fiction Foundation and it has been a  pleasure as its administrator to have developed the award to its present stature. 

Health issues in old age may force me to pass the baton to a younger administrator. Or ASFF might have a succession plan. In either event, having fought the good fight and won, I am content.

Bill Wright
ASFF awards administrator
21st March 2015

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16178. Cartoon Cheating

आजकल जिस तरह से परीक्षा के दिनों में नकल खुल कर चल रही है बेहद अफसोस जनक है और कोशिश यही होनी चाहिए कि बच्चों को नकल से दूर रहने की ही शिक्षा दें

The post Cartoon Cheating appeared first on Monica Gupta.

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16179. Walking West Philly with Lori Waselchuk and Writing ONE THING STOLEN, in this Sunday's Inquirer

Philadelphia Inquirer editor Kevin Ferris and I have been working together through many columns now, and I am always—always—grateful for his generosity. He has a huge heart. He allows me to write from mine. I'm neither a journalist nor an academic, and I'll never be famous. Kevin doesn't mind.

This month I wanted to celebrate West Philadelphia, where part of my new novel, One Thing Stolen (Chronicle Books), is rooted (much of the book also takes place in Philadelphia's sister city, Florence, Italy). I wanted to return to those images and places that inspired scenes in the book—and to Lori Waselchuk, a West Philadelphian who walked me through those streets two years ago to help me see them with insiderly eyes.

Lori is both a maker of art and a promoter of it. She is the force, for example, behind Ci-Lines, about which I wrote on this blog a few days ago.

To Kevin, who lets me love out loud, and to Lori, who gave me ideas that kept me writing forward, thank you. A note of thanks here, as well, to Hassen Saker, who offered kindness this week, and to Anna Badkhen, whose work inspired this blog a few days ago.

When the link to this story is live, I will post it here.

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16180. on being a late bloomer

This is the hashtag I used on Instagram -- #teachinghongkong2015 -- to document in photos my trip to Hong Kong this month. You can find photos of the trip there, and even more on Facebook, here, along with a few thoughts about teaching writing to students who are learning to be fluent in both English and Mandarin Chinese.

 We mainly focused on personal narrative and moments we could add color and flavor and texture to, characters we could create from those moments -- and how to make them come alive on the page -- and then we moved into fiction with them.

We used several mentor texts, including FREEDOM SUMMER, LOVE RUBY LAVENDER, and EACH LITTLE BIRD THAT SINGS.

I learned to write by reading like a writer, modeling my writing on what I admired, then making it mine, so that's how I teach. I turn my life into stories. I understand how I do it. I have broken it down to the foundations of how it works, and it's always a stretch and a pleasure to share it with young writers and their teachers.

I am a writer who teaches, and to that end, I will always be a writer first. I have developed my teaching over the past twenty years by teaching in classrooms, from K through college, and I know that what I have to offer is substantial, meaningful, useful, and offers a lasting toolbox partner for teachers and their young writers to use for years to come.

And yet.

I am thinking about who I am today, as Jim and I return home to spring in Atlanta -- we left in a February snowstorm. This ruminating always happens after I am thrust for a sustained time into an unfamiliar environment, where I am constantly thinking on my feet, meeting new people in new cultures, learning new customs and traditions (and food!) and discovering how people make meaning in their lives.

Traveling, especially internationally, invites me to rethink everything. Invites me to make meaning. It reminds me of my young life, when, as a teenager, I became a mother, and a wife to a boy I did not know, and moved to a place I did not understand, with no support, with people and customs I could not comprehend, and with fear and isolation so complete it would take me years to assimilate and integrate and create meaning from it.

So I am thinking.

I want to chronicle some of that thinking here on the blog. I'm going to play with short posts about what I'm discovering, and just see where it leads me. I can feel myself entering a time of change. I'm working on a sort of manifesto for my sixties. God. I grew up in the sixties, and now I *am* sixty. 61. Talk about a late bloomer.

I raised a family first. I was homeless first. I was lost, first. I had to find ways to stabilize my life and my children's lives, first. I had to live some, first. Make sense of some things. Find my way into my life. Do a whole lot of different things with my life and teach myself how to do... pretty much everything. It would take me time to learn how to help myself, so I could help someone else.. I taught myself how to write so I could tell my stories and find home, belonging, safety, meaning, love.

My first book was published the year I turned 48. I went back to school that year and got my credentials to teach -- I'd been teaching informally for years without them. I became suddenly single that year. My heart was broken. I wrote EACH LITTLE BIRD THAT SINGS in response to that loss.

By the time I turned fifty, I had lost not only the long-years marriage, but my mother and my father and my siblings and my home of 25 years and my hometown. My youngest of four graduated and left home for college. I moved to Atlanta. The dog died. My editor of 12 years was fired. My publishing house was decimated.

The bitter was tempered by the sweet. I had created a support system by that time, and my friends became my family. They held the space for me, held me up until I could stand on my feet again. I met my husband, Jim. We had a three year long-distance relationship, a three year Atlanta relationship, and then we married. My books did well in the world, even though my life was so chaotic for a time, I couldn't always appreciate it or participate in the book community that celebrated all of it. Much of my life was a blur.

Little by little, though, I came back from a devastating time of loss. My children grew up and began to blossom. I began to create a home, here in Atlanta, a family home, a home for friends, a home for my own heart to rest in once again.

It took me a long, long time to do this. I was scared, and once again lost, even in the midst of the sweetness. But I kept writing. I kept teaching. I kept on trying. I have been emerging from that difficult place, once again forging an identity and discovering who I am. Making meaning. It's a process. Life long.

I am happy to be here. I love my life. I know how lucky I am.

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16181. Free Banana

We stopped for gas; the mini-mart
Was advertising wares.
I wasn’t hungry, had no thirst
And so I thought, who cares?

But then a sign jumped out at me;
I wondered – is it true?
Just buy this brand of water
And we’ve got a gift for you –

A free banana! I said, Huh?
This seems a bit surreal.
But hey, I guess, to some at least,
There must be some appeal!

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16182. ‘Maggie’ Partners with USA Track and Field

It’s official! Maggie’s blog is a new affiliate site of the USA Track & Field (USATF) online store, which is a pretty big deal for friends and followers of storybook heroine, Maggie Steele. USATF is is the national governing body … Continue reading

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16183. Crappy first draft

The joy of a crappy first draft. Can there be joy in such a thing? According to the Publication Coach, Daphne Gray-Grant, there is.

In fact, she says, “producing one is exactly what will turn you into a professional writer.” As writers, we may abhor that crappy first draft. How could such garbage have come from our own fingers dancing on the keyboard? 

If that is you, Gray-Grant says to ask yourself some questions. Who else is going to see the yucky thing? More than likely, no one. If so, then what does it matter? It is called a rough draft, after all. No one does anything perfect the first time, so there is no need to beat yourself up for adhering to human nature.

She list several reasons why crappy first drafts are important to writers. It will help you write faster. One of the things I love about NaNoWriMo is that November is the one month a year I can turn off my internal editor. It is a freeing experience, writing without the agony of perfecting every word and sentence. This is a first draft, a beginning, a place for you to tell yourself the story. Throw up the words on the screen and clean up later. Gray-Grant says there is a momentum that builds by piling up words, and that allows more to flow at a quick pace. 

According to Kathleen Duey, a recent WIFYR instructor, real writing takes place in the rewrite. The best writers don’t necessarily have talent as much as they have a commitment to rewriting. How do you divide up your dedicated writing time? If you could dash out a crappy first draft, that would free up more time to come up with a good second draft and an even better third. 

So, embrace that crappy first draft. It is an unavoidable necessity that is part of the process. Get that first draft out of the way in order to have something to work with. As E.B. White has said, “The best writing is in the rewriting.” 

(This article also posted at http://writetimeluck.blogspot.com)


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16184. Glamourpuss by Sarah Weeks

Glamourpuss has it made, living with the Highhorsens who are gazillionaires. Her only job is to be glamorous and she's very good at it. Then her glamorous life is disturbed when Mr. Highhorsen's sister arrives from Texas with her dog, Bluebelle.

 Glamourpuss instantly dislikes Bluebelle, who ends up stealing all of Glamourpuss' thunder. No way can anyone else be more glamorous than Glamourpuss, but Bluebelle is always parading around in showstopping outfits. When Bluebelle chews up all of her own fancy clothes, Glamourpuss realizes that Bluebelle wants to be glamorous without the clothes, so Glamourpuss takes Bluebelle under her wing.

In the end, Glamourpuss realizes that when it comes to being glamorous, less is sometimes more, but when it comes to having friends, you can never have too many.

 This is a fun picture book with beautiful illustrations. Young readers might be captured by the glittery cover, but they'll find a nice tale that reminds us all that less is sometimes more.

 Age Range: 3 - 5 years
Grade Level: Preschool - Kindergarten
Hardcover: 40 pages
Publisher: Scholastic Press (February 24, 2015)
ISBN-10: 0545609542 ISBN-13: 978-0545609548

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16185. Lucky March: Write Your Verse

Hi folks, I'm a novelist as well as a picture book author. I am especially fortunate that way, lucky, if you will. I am half a century old and over the course of my journey, the nature of luck has been made clear to me. This month my series is Lucky March, where I'm exploring the wonder of luck in our lives.


Oh, March has brought waves of luck to my life. My book Plumb Crazy is almost ready to be released again as an ebook and in paper for the first time.  It will be under my alter ego name: Cece Barlow! I'm traveling to Washington state to visit with dear friends in April for a writing retreat marathon. I feel grateful and happy.  I am just glad to  be part of the verse.

This week I will respond to Walt Whitman's poem, "Oh, me! Oh, life!"  Go here to read his genius words. 

Here is truth to me. I don't really understand myself, and life is so far beyond me--like the stars to a speck of dirt. And yet I'm caught up with the mundane of my species. I see multitudes people gossiping, slandering, and back-stabbing. I live with folks who share knowledge to ends of the Earth and wonder: has it helped? Art has lost value, faith is fading except for the worst of it, and foolishness flows over the edges of every vision, in this  ad-driven, branded, socialized bumper sticker world. The sideshow prophets declare that written words are dying.

Don't think I'm not caught up in it all. I am in that multitude, my head turning toward the visual nonsense, the profane silliness, and the unholy devaluation, when I could spend this moment being so much more. Yes, I am just as faithless as the rest.

Here's the thing. I want light. I want meaning, I want purpose, but I am mired in empty useless years that I wasted for no good reason.  I did not open my eyes earlier, so I must open them now. I am woven in the fabric of my times. I am asking, shouting really at the great universe, struggling to not let the waves of sadness overcome me.

What good can I do?  I look out but those words fall on my beating heart. Life! What good can I do? My hands curl into fists,  and I shake like a leaf being ripped by a storm wind.

The answer comes to me, whispering, still, soft. A voice!  You are here, dear one.. You were born. You breathe. You are are. This is the great poem, and you are allowed to contribute one verse to it all. Write your verse. This is the gift of life.

Lucky me! Lucky you! I hope you think about the verse you are writing. I pray that you do the most with what you have to offer.  We all need you to do that. I will be back next week with more Lucky March.

NO doodle this week! But here is a sneak peek at my book cover for PLUMB CRAZY! I am so excited to share this with you!  I hope that you share it too!



Here is a an excerpt from PLUMB CRAZY for you to tuck in your pocket.

"The basic hidden thing that every Loser Girl knows—she has value, like every person, star, whale, rock, and slug. The whole universe has its share of risks. Slugs get stepped on, whales are hunted, stars explode, and people, well, people are fragile, easy to break. She was a secret unseen commodity, like di-lithium crystals found on planets that few would visit and even fewer could endure. Riches hid inside of her. No one had found them yet. But they would. It was just how the universe was put together."

                                

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16186. SPRING 2015 YA Scavenger Hunt Authors!

Hello Everyone!

I’m so excited to be part of the 2015 Scavenger Hunt and want to introduce the Spring 2015 YA Scavenger Hunt Authors!

We have eight outstanding teams this season. I am going to be a part of #TeamTeal! The Scavenger Hunt runs from April 2nd through April 5th beginning and ending at noon Pacific time on those days.

If you’ve never been a part of the hunt before you should give it a try. It runs like a giant blog hop, introducing you to new YA authors and books along the way. There are tons of prizes including a grand prize for each team. If you win one of the grand prizes you will get a book from each author on that team! For more information and to make sure you get hunt updates, sign up for news on the #YASH website.

Not only will I be hiding an exclusive never-before-revealed sneak peek of STRANGE SKIES, which doesn’t release until April 28th, but I’m giving away an extra cool prize on my blog: a paperback copy of BURN OUT and an advance hardcover of STRANGE SKIES! You don’t want to miss out on this fabulous and fun event, but play fast because the hunt is only live for three days.

And now, here are the teams! (Hint: If you click on the image you can get a close up)

Blue Team 1 Pink Team

Team Gold (2)

Team Green

Team Red 1

Team Teal (2)
Team Orange

Team Purple 1

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16187. Digital Painting experiment

di-pointillism02-full

Aboriginal Pointillism | I don’t know where this will go but it is really fun to do. Let me know if you like it.

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16188. SPRING 2015 YA Scavenger Hunt Authors!

Hello Everyone!

I’m so excited to be part of the 2015 Scavenger Hunt and want to introduce the Spring 2015 YA Scavenger Hunt Authors!

We have eight outstanding teams this season. I am going to be a part of #TeamTeal! The Scavenger Hunt runs from April 2nd through April 5th beginning and ending at noon Pacific time on those days.

If you’ve never been a part of the hunt before you should give it a try. It runs like a giant blog hop, introducing you to new YA authors and books along the way. There are tons of prizes including a grand prize for each team. If you win one of the grand prizes you will get a book from each author on that team! For more information and to make sure you get hunt updates, sign up for news on the #YASH website.

Not only will I be hiding an exclusive never-before-revealed sneak peek of STRANGE SKIES, which doesn’t release until April 28th, but I’m giving away an extra cool prize on my blog: a paperback copy of BURN OUT and an advance hardcover of STRANGE SKIES! You don’t want to miss out on this fabulous and fun event, but play fast because the hunt is only live for three days.

And now, here are the teams! (Hint: If you click on the image you can get a close up)

Blue Team 1 Pink Team

Team Gold (2)

Team Green

Team Red 1

Team Teal (2)
Team Orange

Team Purple 1

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16189. Kajal Nishad … Versatile Actress

बहुमुखी प्रतिभा की धनी है काजल निषाद एक गृहणी, एक कलाकार, एक परम शिव भक्त, एक कवयित्री, एक नेता, एक समाजसेवी ढेरों गुणों की खान है काजल निषाद. इन सब के इलावा एक खूबी काजल जी में और भी है कि उनमें अभिनेत्री होने का घमंड जरा भी नही है. बेहद सीधी सादी और भोली […]

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16190. Glamourpuss by Sarah Weeks

Glamourpuss has it made, living with the Highhorsens who are gazillionaires. Her only job is to be glamorous and she's very good at it. Then her glamorous life is disturbed when Mr. Highhorsen's sister arrives from Texas with her dog, Bluebelle.

 Glamourpuss instantly dislikes Bluebelle, who ends up stealing all of Glamourpuss' thunder. No way can anyone else be more glamorous than Glamourpuss, but Bluebelle is always parading around in showstopping outfits. When Bluebelle chews up all of her own fancy clothes, Glamourpuss realizes that Bluebelle wants to be glamorous without the clothes, so Glamourpuss takes Bluebelle under her wing.

In the end, Glamourpuss realizes that when it comes to being glamorous, less is sometimes more, but when it comes to having friends, you can never have too many.

 This is a fun picture book with beautiful illustrations. Young readers might be captured by the glittery cover, but they'll find a nice tale that reminds us all that less is sometimes more.

 Age Range: 3 - 5 years
Grade Level: Preschool - Kindergarten
Hardcover: 40 pages
Publisher: Scholastic Press (February 24, 2015)
ISBN-10: 0545609542 ISBN-13: 978-0545609548

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16191. The Ditmar Awards 2015 - The Short List!

Good grief, how did I forget to post this?

Listed below are this year's shortlisted books for the Ditmar Awards. Unlike the Aurealises, these are nominated and voted for by readers. For readers outside Australia, the Ditmars are our answer to the Hugo Awards. I read on Twitter this morning that the biting period has been extended by a week, so if you're a member of this year's Natcon or have a voting membership, you still have a few days to send your vote. There is a voting form here:  


There's an interesting analysis of the list on Michelle Goldsmith's web site, here:


While assuring her readers that this is a reader thing and they have nominated stuff they love, she points out, as a bookseller, that it's more likely to end up on the shortlist if a lot of people had the chance to read it, so distribution...

Anyway, have a look and do vote if you can.

Best Novel

The Lascar's Dagger, Glenda Larke (Hachette)
Bound (Alex Caine 1), Alan Baxter (Voyager)
Clariel, Garth Nix (HarperCollins)
Thief's Magic (Millennium's Rule 1), Trudi Canavan (Hachette Australia)
The Godless (Children 1), Ben Peek (Tor UK)

Best Novella or Novelette

"The Ghost of Hephaestus", Charlotte Nash, in Phantazein (FableCroft Publishing)
"The Legend Trap", Sean Williams, in Kaleidoscope (Twelfth Planet Press)
"The Darkness in Clara", Alan Baxter, in SQ Mag 14 (IFWG Publishing Australia)
"St Dymphna's School for Poison Girls", Angela Slatter, in Review of Australian Fiction, Volume 9, Issue 3 (Review of Australian Fiction)
"The Female Factory", Lisa L. Hannett and Angela Slatter, in The Female Factory (Twelfth Planet Press)
"Escapement", Stephanie Gunn, in Kisses by Clockwork (Ticonderoga Publications)


Best Short Story

"Bahamut", Thoraiya Dyer, in Phantazein (FableCroft Publishing)
"Vanilla", Dirk Flinthart, in Kaleidoscope (Twelfth Planet Press)
"Cookie Cutter Superhero", Tansy Rayner Roberts, in Kaleidoscope (Twelfth Planet Press)
"The Seventh Relic", Cat Sparks, in Phantazein (FableCroft Publishing)
"Signature", Faith Mudge, in Kaleidoscope (Twelfth Planet Press)


Best Collected Work

Kaleidoscope, Alisa Krasnostein and Julia Rios (Twelfth Planet Press)
The Year's Best Australian Fantasy and Horror 2013, Liz Grzyb and Talie Helene (Ticonderoga Publications)
Phantazein, Tehani Wessely (FableCroft Publishing)


Best Artwork

Illustrations, Kathleen Jennings, in Black-Winged Angels (Ticonderoga Publications)
Cover art, Kathleen Jennings, of Phantazein (FableCroft Publishing)
Illustrations, Kathleen Jennings, in The Bitterwood Bible and Other Recountings (Tartarus Press)

Kethleen Jennings is a terrific artist, but I have to admit to being disappointed, here, that the wonderful Eleanor Clarke cover for ASIM 60 didn't make it to the shortlist. 


Best Fan Writer

Tansy Rayner Roberts, for body of work
Tsana Dolichva, for body of work
Bruce Gillespie, for body of work
Katharine Stubbs, for body of work
Alexandra Pierce for body of work
Grant Watson, for body of work
Sean Wright, for body of work

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16192. Diner Wisdom


"I don't pay much attention to the weather. I just wake up and deal with what happens."

.
1. Quick pencil lay-in and overall warm wash.
2. Knock in a few areas of browns and blues.
3. Darker accents and definition with the 1/2 inch flat brush.
-----
Previously: Diner Counter

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16193. WEEKEND LINKS: What Would YOU do with 100K Books?

Last week Facebook was all a’buzz over a story of a Alameda County library who threw over 100,000 children’s books into a dumpster. Residents were enraged when they found out many of the books were only a few years old and he thought of such wastefulness did not sit well with the community. The library defended it’s decision, but the result was a pretty interesting dialogue nationwide.

discarded books

Read the full story HERE.

So what would YOU have done with those 100,000 books? We asked that question to our moms/authors/bloggers in our Multicultural Children’s Book Day Group and the ideas and discussion did not disappoint. Here are some of the highlights:

100k1

100k3

There were other perspectives as well…and good ones too:

100k2

What would you have done with those 100K books? Here are some ideas on book swapping and donating that Jump Into a Book has enjoyed in the past:

1. Save for Book or Treat!

Grab our free Book or Treat Community Kit here.

2. Utilize Events like International Book Giving Day and others to get books into the hands of kids.

3. Donate to important organizations like women’s shelters,schools or  Books for Africa.

4. Create a “Friends of the Library” chapter in your community. These chapters work to sell the unwanted books through community book sales and the money goes back into buying new books. Friends of the LibraryWhat ideas do you have?

 

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16194. Moriah McStay, author of EVERYTHING THAT MAKES YOU, on throwing yourself into something new

What was your inspiration for writing EVERYTHING THAT MAKES YOU?

When I was little, I was in an accident that left me blind in one eye. You can’t notice much now, but at the time it felt significant. People could tell. I got lots of questions, couldn’t play sports, had to wear big glasses. Later on—in high school and college—I began to wonder which parts of my personality that accident shaped. If it never happened, who would I be? And what about my brother and sister? My parents? How did the accident shape their lives?

I’d throw out the idea to friends, and everyone had some moment, some significant thing that changes their direction. One friend’s father died when she was young. A girl got cancer when she was ten. Someone moved and changed schools in twelfth grade. I had a boyfriend that wasn’t great for me—we dated almost two years. What other choices might I have made in that same time span?

There are so many “what ifs”--we all have them. I thought it would be an interesting question to explore.

What book or books would most resonate with readers who love your book--or visa versa?

I could talk books for days. I wouldn’t dare put myself in the same category as these writers, but I love Hilary Smith’s WILD AWAKE, Jandy’s Nelson’s I’LL GIVE YOU THE SUN & THE SKY IS EVERYWHERE. I’m a big fan of Gayle Forman, Maggie Stiefvater, Laurie Halse Anderson and e. lockhart. Readers can’t go wrong there!

How long did you work on EVERYTHING THAT MAKES YOU?

I sat on the idea for fifteen years. When I finally started drafting, it took about a year before I had a draft to submit to agents. My agent Steven Chudney didn’t ask for significant changes, so it was submitted to editors pretty much as-is. It took about four months between signing my agent’s contract and signing my editor's.

How long or hard was your road to publication? How many books did you write before this one, and how many never got published?

I wrote two, terrible novels before ETMY, both of which I thought were amazing and submitted to agents. Though I cringe that I ever let people read them, the process was critical. I learned necessary lessons, and I’m a better writer for it. Sometimes I go back to those earlier ideas, when I’m working on setting or character.

The submission process is a long one, so I started new projects while waiting to hear from agents. I did the same while submitting ETMY, and that bare-bones effort was the spring board for my second novel, which I’m revising now.

What's your writing ritual like? Do you listen to music? Work at home or at a coffee shop or the library, etc?

I have a home office now, but I didn’t while writing ETMY. Most of that was written at a coffee shop—Otherlands, which is featured in the book. Now, I mainly write at home,  either on my treadmill desk, standing at the kitchen counter, or sitting on the floor. Music is always blaring.

What advice would you most like to pass along to other writers?

Going back to my comments on submission, I’d say the "Keep Writing" coping mechanism was the most helpful for me. While you’re waiting to hear from agents or editors on your current manuscript, throw yourself into something new. Not only will it keep you too busy to refresh your inbox 80 million times a day, but if bad news comes in, you’ll be excited and focused on a new project. It helps takes out some of the sting.

What are you working on now?

I’m revising my second book for Katherine Tegen. It’s been a long road, but I’m pleased with the direction the book’s taken. I’m not sure when it’ll release, but it will be another standalone, contemporary YA.

ABOUT THE BOOK

Everything That Makes Youby Moriah McStayHardcover
Katherine Tegen Books
Released 3/17/2015

One girl. Two stories. Meet Fiona Doyle. The thick ridges of scar tissue on her face are from an accident twelve years ago. Fiona has notebooks full of songs she’s written about her frustrations, her dreams, and about her massive crush on beautiful uber-jock Trent McKinnon. If she can’t even find the courage to look Trent straight in his beautiful blue eyes, she sure isn’t brave enough to play or sing any of her songs in public. But something’s changing in Fiona. She can’t be defined by her scars anymore.

And what if there hadn’t been an accident? Meet Fi Doyle. Fi is the top-rated female high school lacrosse player in the state, heading straight to Northwestern on a full ride. She’s got more important things to deal with than her best friend Trent McKinnon, who’s been different ever since the kiss. When her luck goes south, even lacrosse can’t define her anymore. When you’ve always been the best at something, one dumb move can screw everything up. Can Fi fight back?

Hasn’t everyone wondered what if? In this daring debut novel, Moriah McStay gives us the rare opportunity to see what might have happened if things were different. Maybe luck determines our paths. But maybe it’s who we are that determines our luck.

Purchase Everything That Makes You at Amazon
Purchase Everything That Makes You at IndieBound
View Everything That Makes You on Goodreads

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Moriah McStayMoriah McStay grew up in Memphis, TN, where she acquired a come-and-go drawl and a lifelong love of cowboy boots and fried pickles. She attended Northwestern University and the University of Chicago. Two graduate degrees and seven jobs later, she finally figured out what she wants to be when she grows up. EVERYTHING THAT MAKES YOU is her first novel, and she's probably at home right now working on another one.

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16195. N. K. Traver, author of DUPLICITY, on fun side projects

We're delighted to have N. K. Traver here today with her debut novel DUPLICITY.

N. K. , how long did you work on DUPLICITY?

I’m not entirely sure, to be honest. When the idea for DUPLICITY struck me, I had just finished a major round of edits on what was supposed to be my “real book” – a YA fantasy I was certain I would debut with. DUPLICITY was the fun side project I was going to write just for me. I wrote two-thirds of it in a month, over the Christmas holidays (I still want to go back to my past self and yell, HOW DID YOU DO THIS?), then I went back to the “real book” for more edits. It would be 10 more months before I returned to DUPLICITY, rewrote the opening, and finished it. I then worked on revising it with my critique partners for about five months before it caught my agent’s eye. Considering the edits I did with her, and my editor, I think that’s a really long way of saying 9-10 months?


What did this book teach you about writing or about yourself?

Writing DUPLICITY was really freeing. Because it started as a fun side project, I didn’t worry about what my family/friends might think or whether everything I was writing was perfect. I had recently finished Patrick Ness’s phenomenal CHAOS WALKING series, which had me thinking a lot about voice and how to infuse it into my own work. So I played around with that, too. I switched DUPLICITY from third person multiple to first point of view, and suddenly I had a character that sounded unlike anything I’d ever written.


Was there an AHA! moment along your road to publication where something suddenly sank in and you felt you had the key to writing a novel? What was it?

If someone finds this key, please, please let me know because I’m still looking. Each book I’ve written so far has had its own challenges, and each involved a drastically different level of planning and revision. HEY WAIT. I think I just found it! It’s a pretty brass thing and on the side it says, DON’T GIVE UP.


ABOUT THE BOOK

Duplicityby N. K. Traver
Hardcover
Thomas Dunne Books
Released 3/17/2015

A computer-hacking teen. The girl who wants to save him. And a rogue mirror reflection that might be the death of them both. 

In private, seventeen-year-old Brandon hacks bank accounts just for the thrill of it. In public, he looks like any other tattooed bad boy with a fast car and devil-may-care attitude. He should know: he’s worked hard to maintain that façade. With inattentive parents who move constantly from city to city, he’s learned not to get tangled up in things like friends and relationships. So he’ll just keep living like a machine, all gears and wires.

 Then two things shatter his carefully-built image: Emma, the kind, stubborn girl who insists on looking beneath the surface – and the small matter of a mirror reflection that starts moving by itself. Not only does Brandon’s reflection have a mind of its own, but it seems to be grooming him for something—washing the dye from his hair, yanking out his piercings, swapping his black shirts for … pastels. Then it tells him: it thinks it can live his life better, and it’s preparing to trade places.

 And when it pulls Brandon through the looking-glass, not only will he need all his ill-gotten hacking skills to escape, but he’s going to have to face some hard truths about who he’s become. Otherwise he’ll be stuck in a digital hell until he’s old and gray, and no one will even know he's gone. 

Huffington Post lists N.K. Traver's Duplicity as part of one of the great YA book trends to look for in 2015!
Purchase Duplicity at Amazon
Purchase Duplicity at IndieBound
View Duplicity on Goodreads

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

As a freshman at the University of Colorado, N.K. Traver decided to pursue Information Technology because classmates said "no one could make a living" with an English degree. It wasn’t too many years later Traver realized it didn’t matter what the job paid—nothing would ever be as fulfilling as writing. Programmer by day, writer by night, it was only a matter of time before the two overlapped. Traver's debut, DUPLICITY, a cyberthriller pitched as BREAKING BAD meets THE MATRIX for teens, releases from Thomas Dunne Books on 3/17/15.

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16196. Elisa Ludwig, author of PRETTY WANTED, on always learning and growing

What scene of PRETTY WANTED was really hard for you to write and why, and is that the one of which you are most proud? Or is there another scene you particularly love?

The hardest scene was the climax of the book. Without giving too much away, I knew Willa had to face a lot of danger, more danger than in any other previous scene in the trilogy, and let's face it—girlfriend is always getting into dangerous situations! I also needed to make the threats feel more intense and personal to her. That scene required at least three rewrites as I went back and forth with my amazing editors at HarperCollins and each time they pushed me to make it more intense and more satisfying for my readers.

What did this book teach you about writing or about yourself?

This book taught me that the deeper you feel about your characters, the more deeply your readers will respond. After having spent so much time with Willa, Aidan, Tre et al, my affection for them has only grown deeper, and it has been rewarding to see that many of my readers feel the same way!

What advice would you most like to pass along to other writers?

There's never a time when you get to be an "expert" but don't let that get you down. Unlike many other activities, there's no one right way to go about it. Honor the fact that writing is a lifelong pursuit, and you're always learning and growing—that's really the beauty of it!

ABOUT THE BOOK

Pretty Wanted
by Elisa Ludwig
Hardcover
Katherine Tegen Books
Released 3/17/2015

Pretty Wanted is Elisa Ludwig’s rollicking finale to the Pretty Crooked trilogy, a series filled with moxie, romance, and heart that’s perfect for fans of Ally Carter or Sara Shepard.

When Willa skipped probation and hit the California highway to find her mom, she discovered a dark family secret: Joanne Fox is not who she says she is—and neither is Willa. Now Willa and her hot partner in crime, Aidan, must race to St. Louis, Missouri, where they hope to find answers about Willa’s past. But uncovering the truth requires solving a decades-old murder case. Unfortunately, the perps are still out there . . . and willing to do whatever it takes to keep the case cold.

Willa’s only hope is to find the truth before it finds her first.

Purchase Pretty Wanted at Amazon
Purchase Pretty Wanted at IndieBound
View Pretty Wanted on Goodreads

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Elisa Ludwig studied writing at Vassar College and Temple University, but she wanted to be a writer long before all of that. Technically since she started writing, editing and publishing The Elisa Bulletin which she printed out on a dot matrix printer and sold for ten cents a pop.

In the intervening years she has worked as a freelance writer, covering the following topics: hot dogs, insurance, cyber theft, penny-pinching, drug development, weddings, other people’s books, music, movies, restaurants, mental health issues, diets, engineering, whiskey, furniture, real estate and travel. But writing about teenagers is her favorite subject.

She has been pick-pocketed twice, and once caught someone mid-pocket. Other than occasional jaywalking, she’s a law-abiding citizen. She lives in Philadelphia with her husband and her cat Beau. PRETTY CROOKED is her first novel, and will be followed by PRETTY SLY in 2013, and PRETTY WANTED in 2014. You can visit her online at www.elisaludwig.com.


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16197. The Sunday Post and Stacking the Shelves–It’s Spring!

The Sunday Post is hosted by Kimba of The Caffeinated Book Reviewer.  This is a weekly meme where we can share news of the week and highlight new books received.

Well, it may be spring, but it still doesn’t quite feel like it here in Michigan.  With highs in the 30s and lows in the teens, I worry about all of those flowers that are beginning to stir.  The grass is still brown, and our trees still don’t have any leaf activity.  I check every day!  Come on, Mother Nature, give us some green!  St Paddy’s day wasn’t enough.

I spent most of yesterday reading (zombies!), and I plan on doing the same today, after my Sunday morning trip to the barn.  What are you doing today?

Check out my current contests!  See the Contest Widget on the Sidebar to enter!

Stacking the Shelves is a weekly meme hosted by Tynga’s Reviews to share new additions to our library.  Click here to learn more about it.

New Arrivals at the Café:

A Secret in Her Kiss (.99 for Kindle)

The Truth about Hope

Expressly Yours, Samantha

Overruled

Bits & Pieces (SQUEEEEE!!! I have to catch up on the series now!)

Taking Chances

Still the One

Nothing Like a Cowboy

Four Nights with a Duke

Disciple of the Wind

In Bed with the Bachelor

Getting Lucky

A great big thanks to the publishers for their continued support!

What did you get? Please leave links and share!

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16198. Lisa Freeman, author of HONEY GIRL, on Tragedy, Hawaii, and Writing

What was your inspiration for writing HONEY GIRL?

Although I never lived in Hawaii, my father’s business took us there so frequently that it felt like my home away from home. I learned to hula, listened to Hawaii calls, and played a ukulele. When I was 16, my father died after several heart attacks. It was an inconceivable loss. My whole world turned upside down and Hawaii was erased off the map. Although my family didn’t live on Oahu, it was the place I felt most at home. I confidently fit in with my dark hair, eyes, and skin from spending day after day in the tropical sun. Where I grew up in Southern California, the beach was dominated by blonde-haired, blue-eyed locals. My journey of learning to assimilate while coping with the loss of my father was the inspiration behind Honey Girl and what makes this novel semi-autobiographical.

What scene was really hard for you to write and why, and is that the one of which you are most proud? Or is there another scene you particularly love?

In the early drafts of Honey Girl, Nani’s father died toward the end of the book. Writing the scene was impossible, and I finally remedied the whole situation by having him die before the book starts. One of my favorite scenes is in Chapter 26 when Rox starts actually ingesting food. Don’t want to be a spoiler, so excuse my generality.

What's your writing ritual like? Do you listen to music? Work at home or at a coffee shop or the library, etc?

My writing ritual is very simple. When I have time, I do it without apology. I work in a studio split between one very bright room under a 100-year-old pepper tree, and a dark room with one small window, which my family has fondly nicknamed “The Cave.” That’s where I write. Every morning I go into The Cave, sit down at my desk with blank white paper and a pen, and turn on music without lyrics or in another language to help me focus. When I was working on Honey Girl, I watched surf movies and hula competitions such as the Merrie Monarch Festivals to remind me of the place I love most in the world: Hawaii.

What advice would you most like to pass along to other writers?

Write every day, even if it’s only a sentence.

What are you working on now?

Currently, I am working on a paranormal romance called Prove It.

Was there an AHA! moment along your road to publication where something suddenly sank in and you felt you had the key to writing a novel? What was it?

My AHA! moment was when I finally agreed with what every publisher was telling me. Honey Girl was YA.

ABOUT THE BOOK

Honey Girl
by Lisa Freeman
Hardcover
Sky Pony Press
Released 3/17/2015

How to survive California's hottest surf spot: Never go anywhere without a bathing suit. Never cut your hair. Never let them see you panic.

The year is 1972. Fifteen-year-old Haunani “Nani” Grace Nuuhiwa is transplanted from her home in Hawaii to Santa Monica, California after her father’s fatal heart attack. Now the proverbial fish-out-of-water, Nani struggles to adjust to her new life with her alcoholic white (haole) mother and the lineup of mean girls who rule State Beach.

Following “The Rules”—an unspoken list of dos and don’ts—Nani makes contact with Rox, the leader of the lineup. Through a harrowing series of initiations, Nani not only gets accepted into the lineup, she gains the attention of surf god, Nigel McBride. But maintaining stardom is harder than achieving it. Nani is keeping several secrets that, if revealed, could ruin everything she’s worked so hard to achieve. Secret #1: She’s stolen her dad’s ashes and hidden them from her mom. Secret #2: In order to get in with Rox and her crew, she spied on them and now knows far more than they could ever let her get away with. And most deadly of all, Secret #3: She likes girls, and may very well be in love with Rox.

Purchase Honey Girl at Amazon
Purchase Honey Girl at B&N
View Honey Girl on Goodreads

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Lisa Freeman started her work as an actor and has been in numerous TV productions and films (Mr. Mom and Back to the Future I & II to name a few). She performed at the Comedy Store, which led to her writing career in radio and spoken word. Freeman has a BA in liberal studies and creative writing, an MFA in fiction, and a certificate in pedagogy in writing from Antioch University. Inspired by the LA region and semiautobiographical, Honey Girl reminds Freeman of a time when she was the color of tan-before-sunscreen, when she drank Tab by the six-pack and smoked Lark 100s, and when girls were not allowed to surf. Honey Girl is her debut novel.


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16199. Care…

बहुत दिनों के बाद मणि का बेटा दो दिन के लिए घर आया. नाश्ते के बाद बेटे ने अपना बैग खोला और बोला आखॆ बंद करो आपके लिए कुछ है. फिर मणि के हाथ कुछ पकडा दिया. हाथ मे लेते ही मणि चौंक गई और आखें खोलती हुई बोली अरे !!! Mouth organ !! इतने […]

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16200. Jenn Marie Thorne, author of THE WRONG SIDE OF RIGHT, on driving the story in a visceral way

What scene in THE WRONG SIDE OF RIGHT was really hard for you to write and why, and is that the one of which you are most proud? Or is there another scene you particularly love?

Without giving away any spoilers, there's a scene late in the book when Kate is sitting in her room with her stepmother, Meg, basically hashing out all of the things that have gone wrong over the course of the story. She's really raw and vulnerable in that scene--the trick was to find the right balance of Kate being strong and needing answers and also being young and lost and apologetic. There were a lot of scenes that hurt my heart to write, but that one just had so much tension without any easy answers or resolutions.

How long did you work on THE WRONG SIDE OF RIGHT?

I wrote the first draft of TWSoR during NaNo, after spending that October prepping, researching and outlining extensively. Then I did a quick December revision and sent it to some beta readers. I did two more revisions before sending it to agents. Then another revision before it went out to editors. And then, of course, an unbelievable number of revision rounds with my editor. This is something I don't think many pre-pubbed authors realize--once you get a book deal, your work is just beginning.

What did this book teach you about writing or about yourself?

I learned a ton from working with my editor. You get a really clear picture of your writer tics and habits that you didn't even know you had. One big adjustment I've made to my writing is that I used to put in quick exposition sections, in order to, I thought, pick up the pace in the story. My incredible editor quite rightly pointed out that they were "tune out" moments for the reader, doing the opposite of what I'd intended for them to do. Now, when I catch myself cheating by writing those sort of bridge sequences, I hit delete and replace them with action-dialogue scenes that get the information across and drive the story in a more visceral way.

Was there an AHA! moment along your road to publication where something suddenly sank in and you felt you had the key to writing a novel? What was it?

At some point, working on the novel I wrote before THE WRONG SIDE OF RIGHT, I realized that I personally needed to write every single day, so that it became a constant habit. Some days I only wrote one sentence--but it was enough to keep my mind whirring, so that everything reminded me of my book. I would think about my book while I was driving, in the shower, walking the dog. I was constantly working, even if I wasn't sitting at that keyboard. But if I skipped a day, my brain turned itself off. So now, when I'm drafting or doing a big revision, I make sure to at least open the document and type one thing before I'm allowed to go to bed each night.

ABOUT THE BOOK



The Wrong Side of Right
by Jenn Marie Thorne
Hardcover
Dial Books
Released 3/17/2015

Fans of Sarah Dessen and Huntley Fitzpatrick will enjoy this smart debut young adult novel, equal parts My Life Next Door and The Princess Diaries—plus a dash of Aaron Sorkin.

Kate Quinn’s mom died last year, leaving Kate parentless and reeling. So when the unexpected shows up in her living room, Kate must confront another reality she never thought possible—or thought of at all. Kate does have a father. He’s a powerful politician. And he’s running for U.S. President. Suddenly, Kate’s moving in with a family she never knew she had, joining a campaign in support of a man she hardly knows, and falling for a rebellious boy who may not have the purest motives. This is Kate’s new life. But who is Kate? When what she truly believes flies in the face of the campaign’s talking points, she must decide. Does she turn to the family she barely knows, the boy she knows but doesn’t necessarily trust, or face a third, even scarier option?

Set against a backdrop of politics, family, and first love, this is a story of personal responsibility, complicated romance, and trying to discover who you are even as everyone tells you who you should be.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

At Solar by CaitlynJenn Marie Thorne writes YA fiction from her home in beautiful Gulfport, Florida, alongside her dashing husband, her two daring toddlers, and her trusty hound Molly. An NYU-Tisch grad with a BFA in Drama, Jenn still enjoys making a fool of herself on at least a weekly basis. Other hobbies include writing about herself in the third-person, studying classical voice, learning languages, and traveling the world with her family.

Her debut novel, THE WRONG SIDE OF RIGHT, is coming March 17, 2015 from Dial Books for Young Readers (Penguin).

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