What is JacketFlap

  • JacketFlap connects you to the work of more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults. The site is updated daily with information about every book, author, illustrator, and publisher in the children's / young adult book industry. Members include published authors and illustrators, librarians, agents, editors, publicists, booksellers, publishers and fans.
    Join now (it's free).

Sort Blog Posts

Sort Posts by:

  • in
    from   

Suggest a Blog

Enter a Blog's Feed URL below and click Submit:

Most Commented Posts

In the past 7 days

Recent Posts

(from the Writer category)

Recent Comments

JacketFlap Sponsors

Spread the word about books.
Put this Widget on your blog!
  • Powered by JacketFlap.com

Are you a book Publisher?
Learn about Widgets now!

Advertise on JacketFlap

MyJacketFlap Blogs

  • Login or Register for free to create your own customized page of blog posts from your favorite blogs. You can also add blogs by clicking the "Add to MyJacketFlap" links next to the blog name in each post.

Writer Category Blogs

Blog Posts by Date

Click days in this calendar to see posts by day or month
<<August 2015>>
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
      01
02030405060708
09101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     
new posts in all blogs
Viewing: Blog Posts from the Writer category, Most Recent at Top [Help]
Results 16,176 - 16,200 of 225,847
16176. Things I Love Thursday


I love working on my porch in the summer.

 

0 Comments on Things I Love Thursday as of 6/26/2014 6:23:00 AM
Add a Comment
16177. Pretty shiny things: creating a book cover

Like all proper book nerds, I have a stash of books on my shelf that I’ve bought but haven’t got around to reading. No matter how many times I’ve told myself that there will be no new additions until the spine on ever last unread book has been cracked, the lure of shiny new books, with beautiful covers, is just too tempting. Who hasn’t picked a book up in a bookstore or library just because it has a stand-out cover? Something that catches your eye amid a sea of other rectangular paper objects, that you must have in your hand right now because OMG – THE COVER!

Ever wondered how a book cover comes into being? Who decides what a book will look like? This might surprise you, but usually, it’s not the author. Publishing houses have teams of very clever people who’s job it is to give your naked book the perfect outfit; to take all your words and package them in something that’s going to make it jump off the shelf screaming YOU MUST PICK ME UP AND READ ME!

Generally, this is what happens:

At some stage during the editing process – sometimes very early on – the very clever publishing team will have a chat about the direction that they think the cover should go. They’ll look at other books on the market in similar genres, and will brainstorm ideas, looking at the ‘mood’ that they want the cover to invoke. They’ll research type treatments and images that they think say something about the story. They’ll put all these ideas together into something called a cover brief, and will send this off to a designer or illustrator, along with either the text of the book, or a synopsis of the story. The designer has the very fun job of taking all those ideas and thoughts and instructions in the cover brief, and, using their own expertise, sending back some rough ideas with their own creative spin.

Cover roughs might look something like this:

Cinnamon Girl CVR directions 1

[For the month of June, I will be writer-in-resident at the fab Inside a Dog - you can read the rest of this post here]


Add a Comment
16178. 5 Surprising Ways Regret Can Deepen Your Hero’s Arc

Super pleased to welcome Writing Coach MJ Bush today. I am a huge fan of her blog, Writing Geekery…if you don’t yet have this site on your writing resource roster, make it happen! (Trust me, you don’t want to miss any of her articles because they contain unique and valuable insight into character arc and story structure.)

MJ’s tackling REGRET, which is key to a well developed character arc. Regret can destroy a person, but it can also motivate, spurring a character to take action when they reach the point where fears, missed opportunities and poor choices lead to unbearable fulfillment and dissatisfaction. Great stuff here on how to use it in your hero’s arc, so please read on!

Fleuron

Regret is a hard motive to wrangle. Shallowness creeps in because actions seem simplistic or pasted on if you don’t establish realism and reader empathy.

Even if your reader wouldn’t be able to tell you exactly why it doesn’t seem realistic now, they’ll know realism when you use it.

And boy, can you use regret to change your character’s life in interesting ways. PLUS I’ve got some tips on creating emotional realism. Read to the end for my gift, a free report on arcs born from regret.

regretFirst, let’s clarify what regret is.

It’s an indirect motivator. For example, it can fuel a desire to right wrongs, or a fear that the same thing will happen again.

It’s grieving for what could have been. Even if there was nothing you could have done.

But it also encompasses guilt, remorse, and contrition.

Basic regret is wishing things could have been another way, guilt is blaming yourself, remorse is wishing to make amends, and contrition is acting to make amends.

So, let’s look at five realistic ways regret can affect your character.

1. Looking Ahead Too Intently

Anticipated regret is stronger than the regret itself.

Your character might be disproportionately afraid of missing out, and realize later that it wasn’t so bad. The arc from fear to relief is an especially great option for supporting characters.

►► Avery had a ticket to leave on the next ship out, headed for one of the newly terraformed colonies, but he cut it too close and he can’t get everything ready in time. He transfered to a later launch, had more time to say goodbye, and realized that it was ultimately a good experience.

2. But It’s Not the Same!

This one applies when your character has missed an opportunity. The psychological phenomenon is called inaction inertia. One missed opportunity increases the likelihood of missing another, wishing it was as good as the first.

So make sure your character has a good strong push to take a second opportunity. Or let them pass up the second only to realize that they will really regret it if they miss a third.

…If you want them to take it.

►► Avery landed on his new planetary home and immediately found a great house, but decided to check out the possibilities. Nothing compared, but when he went back, it’d been sold. Later that week, he found another great place but he decided that the first house was his dream home and this other house just wouldn’t cut it.

Desperate after realizing that he should have taken it, he gave up and took the next livable place.

3. The Growth of Resilience (or Not)

Regrets can cause a distorted self-concept, the past reflecting on the self-worth.

It’s possible to learn to see the shame, the guilt, and the situations as trials intended to give you strength. And when your character learns to adopt this worldview, his entire outlook and self-concept will shift.

He will see himself as product of adversity, not the victim of it.

Or you can let one character wallow while another improves. I do like my foils.

►► Before moving to the stars, Avery always saw himself as a victim of his circumstances. His poor upbringing, the demeaning jobs, even the dead-end romantic relationships all fed the idea that the world was against him. When he started to realize that those things made him stronger, he started tackling bigger dreams and challenges.

Until, finally, he stepped on that ship.

4. Comparing Hurts Our Health

As this article states, social comparison is a coping mechanism for regret. And the interesting thing is that it can have an effect on the character’s health.

It’s not just artistic license that has characters getting sick when they compare themselves unfavorably with others. Who knew?

►► Avery’s best friend Daniel slowly wasted away on Earth, alternately railing against the world and castigating himself for not stepping up like Avery.

5. Aged Regret = Different Flavor

We’re likely to regret actions in the short term, but in the long term it’s the things we didn’t do that get us down.

This can make a nice foil, with a younger character regretting an action and an older character regretting an “omission.” Or you can have a character arc from one to the other in the space of the story.

►► Years later, Avery forgot the decision to pass up the second house. Instead, he regretted not encouraging Daniel to see his own strength.

Show It Better Than a Movie

There’s more to regret than arcs and motivations. It’s an emotion, and as an author you need to treat it like one.

You see yourself as having lost something, or the idea of something that is profoundly meaningful to you, and the experience is every bit as real as suffering after any kind of traumatic event.Suzanne Lachmann, Psy.D.

Your job is to show that grief. The resulting actions aren’t enough. Words spoken or thought aren’t enough.

You have to show a reaction to the pain.

Give it some screen time.

Let it sink in.

It’s Time to Give Your Characters the Depth They Deserve

You’ve got the tools to show your character’s regret, and to make it a realistically integral part of their actions and emotions. Especially if you have The Emotion Thesaurus.

MJYour pen is waiting.

Get to it.

HEADS UP! You can grab the free report Seven Arcs of Regret – ONLY AVAILABLE HERE – for more ideas and details. Download it now.

MJ Bush is The Analytical Creative. Her writing advice steps back to take in the whole picture, then dives in to grab the pearls of usable detail. She’s the founder of Writingeekery.com and a full time fiction coach, editor, and writer.

The post 5 Surprising Ways Regret Can Deepen Your Hero’s Arc appeared first on WRITERS HELPING WRITERS.

0 Comments on 5 Surprising Ways Regret Can Deepen Your Hero’s Arc as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
16179. choose happiness

On the topic of happiness, two recent essays appeal.

The first is "Rhapsody in Realism," in which David Brooks reflects on Lydia Netzer's "15 Ways to Stay Married for 15 Years." The theory has to do with imperfection. Fessing up to it. Facing it. Living with it. I quote:

But Netzer’s piece is nicely based on the premise that we are crooked timber. We are, to varying degrees, foolish, weak, and often just plain inexplicable — and always will be. As Kant put it: “Out of the crooked timber of humanity no straight thing was ever made.”

People with a crooked timber mentality tend to see life as full of ironies. Intellectual life is ironic because really smart people often do the dumbest things precisely because they are carried away by their own brilliance. Politics is ironic because powerful people make themselves vulnerable because they think they can achieve more than they can. Marriage is ironic because you are trying to build a pure relationship out of people who are ramshackle and messy. There’s an awesome incongruity between the purity you glimpse in the love and the fact that he leaves used tissues around the house and it drives you crazy.
The second piece was part of my daily Linked-In feed, a story by Bernard Marr about happiness and how it might be found. Marr has five tips for us: Live a life true to yourself, don't work so hard, have the courage to express your feelings, stay in touch with your friends, let yourself be happier.

Let yourself be happier.

He explains:

Happiness, it turns out, doesn’t have that much to do with the car you drive or the job you have or even the person you spend your life with. Happiness is actually a choice.

It’s the difference between seeing an unexpected event as a setback or an adventure; the difference between being frustrated by a delay or relishing the time alone; the difference between resenting someone for who they aren’t and loving them for who they are.

We don’t have to repeat the mistakes of those who have gone before us. Our happiness, our success, nearly every detail of our lives comes down to choice, and we can choose to live the way we truly want to live, or spend our final days regretting the choices we didn’t make.
 We are all flawed people, that's a fact. But we still, thank goodness, have choices we can make. 

0 Comments on choose happiness as of 6/26/2014 7:47:00 AM
Add a Comment
16180. Marnie Lester Visits Write What Inspires You!

The connections are never ending through cyberspace and I'm delighted to welcome guest author, Marnie Lester to Write What Inspires You! Marnie's article is an inspirational piece that will have you viewing the world through different eyes… 

Lyrics, Prose, Life and Love
By Marnie Lester


Life inspires me, the beating of my heart, the flow of air in and around me. The very fibre of existence, what makes each of us unique and divine. The people I touch, the pain I feel, the joy that makes every day a blessing. This is what inspires me to write.

The words of a song or an aria that stirs my soul and lifts me to heights unimagined or plunges me to equal lows.

A poem that is music to my heart, a magical blending of language and sound that sing in my ears and in my soul.

It is a deep, abiding love that can only be felt by two souls connected over time and distance. When one person is your rock, your pride, your joy, your mentor and your best friend. It is the deep and maternal love I feel for the characters I create. The love of watching them grow and evolve as my story grows.

I am inspired by all that I see, that I feel and that I love. Sometimes a phrase catches my ear. Sometimes an image moves me in a deep and profound way that I cannot explain. Sometimes I wake in the night with my head full of thoughts and images. This is when I cannot wait to sit down at my computer again and see what flows from these thoughts.

Writing is a release, it is a means of understanding myself; it is food and air to me, I could not live without it.


Marnie Lester lives in rural Victoria with her partner, best friend and soulmate. She is an ex-nurse who always wanted to be a writer. Her novel Ariel’s Charm has recently been released. She is currently writing the sequel.

Learn more about Marnie's writing career at http://classic-jojo.com/authors/marnie-lester/.

Marnie, thanks for visiting today. It was a treat to host you! 



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Best wishes,
Donna M. McDine
Multiple Award-winning Children's Author

Ignite curiosity in your child through reading! 


Connect with

A Sandy Grave ~ January 2014 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ Story Monster Approved, Beach Book Festival Honorable Mention 2014, Reader's Favorite Five Star Review


Powder Monkey ~ May 2013 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ Reader's Favorite Five Star Review


Hockey Agony ~ January 2013 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ Reader's Farvorite Five Star Review


The Golden Pathway ~ August 2010 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc.
~ Literary Classics Silver Award and Seal of Approval, Readers Favorite 2012 International Book Awards Honorable Mention and Dan Poynter's Global e-Book Awards Finalist












0 Comments on Marnie Lester Visits Write What Inspires You! as of 6/26/2014 9:35:00 AM
Add a Comment
16181. Agent Survey Question: Some Answers

Again I don’t have time to work on a separate post for todays blog, so here is a slide with some of answers to a question I asked in the Agent Survey I conducted with 18 agents in the industry. No, I can’t share who said what.
query slide

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Filed under: Agent, Editor & Agent Info, need to know, Publishing Industry, submissions Tagged: Agent Queries, Agent Survey, Amount received in the last year, Slide Show, State of the Market Report

9 Comments on Agent Survey Question: Some Answers, last added: 6/26/2014
Display Comments Add a Comment
16182. Marnie Lester Visits Write What Inspires You!

The connections are never ending through cyberspace and I'm delighted to welcome guest author, Marnie Lester to Write What Inspires You! Marnie's article is an inspirational piece that will have you viewing the world through different eyes… 

Lyrics, Prose, Life and Love
By Marnie Lester


Life inspires me, the beating of my heart, the flow of air in and around me. The very fibre of existence, what makes each of us unique and divine. The people I touch, the pain I feel, the joy that makes every day a blessing. This is what inspires me to write.

The words of a song or an aria that stirs my soul and lifts me to heights unimagined or plunges me to equal lows.

A poem that is music to my heart, a magical blending of language and sound that sing in my ears and in my soul.

It is a deep, abiding love that can only be felt by two souls connected over time and distance. When one person is your rock, your pride, your joy, your mentor and your best friend. It is the deep and maternal love I feel for the characters I create. The love of watching them grow and evolve as my story grows.

I am inspired by all that I see, that I feel and that I love. Sometimes a phrase catches my ear. Sometimes an image moves me in a deep and profound way that I cannot explain. Sometimes I wake in the night with my head full of thoughts and images. This is when I cannot wait to sit down at my computer again and see what flows from these thoughts.

Writing is a release, it is a means of understanding myself; it is food and air to me, I could not live without it.


Marnie Lester lives in rural Victoria with her partner, best friend and soulmate. She is an ex-nurse who always wanted to be a writer. Her novel Ariel’s Charm has recently been released. She is currently writing the sequel.

Learn more about Marnie's writing career at http://classic-jojo.com/authors/marnie-lester/.

Marnie, thanks for visiting today. It was a treat to host you! 



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Best wishes,
Donna M. McDine
Multiple Award-winning Children's Author

Ignite curiosity in your child through reading! 


Connect with

A Sandy Grave ~ January 2014 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ Story Monster Approved, Beach Book Festival Honorable Mention 2014, Reader's Favorite Five Star Review


Powder Monkey ~ May 2013 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ Reader's Favorite Five Star Review


Hockey Agony ~ January 2013 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc. ~ Reader's Farvorite Five Star Review


The Golden Pathway ~ August 2010 ~ Guardian Angel Publishing, Inc.
~ Literary Classics Silver Award and Seal of Approval, Readers Favorite 2012 International Book Awards Honorable Mention and Dan Poynter's Global e-Book Awards Finalist












0 Comments on Marnie Lester Visits Write What Inspires You! as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
16183. Wednesday, I think?

ivycache

Huck has an infected finger. I’ll spare you the gory details. Suffice it to say they’re gory, and I’ve added a new and entirely unwanted skill (pus drainage) to my maternal repertoire. We spent much of yesterday at the doctor, he’s now on antibiotics, and, proving there’s lemonade to be made even from a festering lemon, the two of us got to sit cuddled up until midnight watching Minecraft videos together. If I’m a little punchy today, you’ll understand.

Did manage to squeeze in some fun yesterday before the unfortunate appendage went from alarming to horrific: a bit of geocaching with the younger three at a lovely park we don’t visit often. At least, the first cache was at the park; the second one was at the dead end of a neighborhood street a couple of blocks away, a somewhat grimier location than expected. To Huck’s disgruntlement I wouldn’t let him touch anything, which means Rilla got the fun of the cache grab. WB doesn’t care who makes the find as long as he gets his turn at holding the phone/compass.

Today was piano and repaired hearing-aid fetching (happy is its owner, who can hear again) and finger-soaking and general collapsing, and nary a book did we read. But if you need to know how to lure zombies into an iron golem trap, Huck and I are your man.

Add a Comment
16184. Pruett Carter's Palette


 

While I'm on the subject of American illustrator Pruett Carter (1891-1955), I thought I would share some notes about his palette and his use of light and color.


Here's his palette. Ernest Watson writes, "Note that the colors on the palette's edge follow the color circle of the spectrum—from ultramarine through the blues, greens, yellows and reds to alizarin and rose madder. The colors on the inside row are extra or additional pigments to be used for their particular color identity. The earth group—ochres and siennas—are kept by themselves at the top right of the palette."


In his early career, Carter, like Loomis, Lovell, Rockwell, and other contemporaries, worked within the confines of restricted color palettes. These two-color schemes were usually determined by the magazine, which could only afford black plus one other color of ink. This painting, for instance, would have been printed only in black and yellow, so all the cool colors had to come from grays. This discipline produced great colorists when the magazines made the full printer's palette available later on.

During the period that Carter worked exclusively from life, he would pose the models in a section of the studio where he could black out the ambient light and control the illumination with artificial lights only. However his painting area was under a skylight. Between the two parts of the studio, he drew a black curtain, opened just enough to see the models posing.

One other note: as Stuart Ng mentioned in the comments, Pruett Carter taught at Chouinard Art Institute, where one of his students was Mary Blair, a stylist for the Disney films, herself noted for her bold color designs. There's an exhibit of Mary Blair's work at the Disney Family Museum through September 7 which includes a Pruett Carter original.

0 Comments on Pruett Carter's Palette as of 6/26/2014 8:15:00 AM
Add a Comment
16185. My Thighs

My thighs were always way too fat
Back in my younger days.
It really wasn’t fair at all
Since minis were the craze.

But that was many years ago;
I’ve lost a bit of weight
And all of me is thin enough
So styles cooperate.

Except I never realized
When I thought that life was simpler
That older thighs, despite their size,
Are ugly, loose and dimpler!

0 Comments on My Thighs as of 6/26/2014 8:37:00 AM
Add a Comment
16186. BEN & ZIP: TWO SHORT FRIENDS - illustrated by Tom Goldsmith - Interview and Giveaway!


It’s no surprise that the latest book from Flashlight Press is awesome. Shari Dash Greenspan (publisher) has excellent taste, and I adore her books! The latest is no exception: BEN & ZIP, TWO SHORT FRIENDS written by Joanne Linden and illustrated by Tom Goldsmith. We’re lucky to have Tom here today to answer some questions…

Q. Hi Tom! Congratulations on BEN & ZIP! It’s absolutely adorable!
A.
Thanks so much. I have to say though that many hands are involved in pulling a book like this together. If Ben and Zip is a success, it has as much or more to do with Joanne Linden, the author and the leadership of Shari Dash Greenspan the editor at Flashlight Press, as it does me.

Q. I have to ask about the boardwalk, with the storm coming. Were you at all reminded of Hurricane Sandy when you were working on the book? (If so, was that an intentional reference?)
A.
Oh absolutely. As I watched the news and saw the devastating effects of Sandy on the boardwalks and amusement parks of New Jersey. I was struck by all the memories of good times that so many children and adults must have had at such a place. I wanted to celebrate those memories and pay homage to the way of life that was so devastatingly effected by the storm.

Q. I always tell my students to remember the point of view of their main characters, and boy, do you do a wonderful job with that! Ben is short, so all he sees is knees. (Or when he gets up a little higher - tummies.) Was that fun to play with? (It sure is fun to read!)

A.
In fact, those were the spreads that jumped out at me right away. As a humor illustrator at heart, I always gravitate to those images were I can play around and have some fun.

Q. The crowd scenes are so wonderfully full of stuff going on. Did those pieces take you forever to do?

A.
Yes, they take a while but they are always a treat to do. I love being able to tuck little things in here and there. For example, I’m a dog nut. I own three and each of them make an appearance in those beach scenes.

Q. What is your medium?
A.
I am hopelessly a traditionalist. I love the tactile nature of inks, quill pens and watercolours.

Q. Without giving away the book - there’s a twist from the cover to the end that I didn’t see coming and was delighted when I realized it. Did you awwwww as much as I did when you read the manuscript for the first time?
A.
Truthfully, my editor Shari Dash Greenspan discussed the “twist” with me before I had even received the manuscript. When I read it though it became clear how it could be cleverly accomplished in my illustrations.

Q. How did you break into the biz and how did you and Flashlight Press connect?
A.
I have done editorial illustration for books and magazine for years but I always had an eye towards picture books. They are a great vehicle for doing exactly what I love to do. I love developing a relationship with the characters and getting them involved in the story. A far cry from the quick turnaround, one-off nature of editorial humor illustrations.
      As for Flashlight and I getting together - it was as simple as Shari seeing my online portfolio at www.tomgoldsmithillustration and giving me a call. I’m glad she did. Working with an editor that thinks and talks in pictures makes an illustrators job so much easier. I learned a lot from Shari. My future work with Flashlight, or anyone else for that matter, will be better for knowing and working with her.

Q. I hope you have more children’s books in the works? Can you share?
A.
Sure, I have just completed all the images for a new Book by Scholastic Canada called “We’re All Friends Here”. This one is based around separate and opposing points of view of two boys. A unique and challenging job for an illustrator, but the finished illustrations are very rewarding.

Thanks so much for stopping by, Tom!

GIVEAWAY!
Tom has graciously agreed to send a free, signed and dedicated copy of BEN & ZIP to one of my lucky commenters. Must live in the US or Canada to win. Enter below.

0 Comments on BEN & ZIP: TWO SHORT FRIENDS - illustrated by Tom Goldsmith - Interview and Giveaway! as of 6/26/2014 9:55:00 AM
Add a Comment
16187. Tutorial Hijab Untuk Sehari-hari

Memakai Jilbab Segi Empat kreasi adalah memang salah satu teknik dalam memakai jilbab yang harus kita pelajari lebih lanjut agar kita pakai jilbab dengan secara modis dan enak dipandang oleh mata orang lain yang melihatnya. Saat ini jilbab menjadi tren d bagi para muslimah. Walaupun bagi penulis sendiri bahwa jilbab bukan trend saya tapi merupakan identitas muslim yang harus senantiasa digunakan sebagai hijab yakni menutup diri dari kemungkinan kejahatan di masyarakat.

Jilbab adalah berupa penutup kepala yang digunakan oleh kaum muslimah sebagai anjuran dalam Al-Qur’an untuk menutup anggota badan selain muka dan tangan bagi wanita muslimah. Cara Memakai Jilbab Segi Empat Kreasi sendiri bermacam-macam ya tergantung kita lah yang kemudian mengkreasikannya menjadi lebih baik lagi dalam pemakaiannya. Berikut tips singkatnya:

    Tutorial Hijab Sehari-hari
  1. pakailah jilbab sebagaimana biasanya. Ikat bagian ujung jilbab yang segi empat.
  2. setelah membentuk segi tertentu dikepala. Pilih bagian bawah jilbab untuk diikatkan pada leher Anda.
  3. ketika sudah demikian maka jangan lupa rapikan. Lihat wajah Anda di cermin dengan sentuhan jilbab Anda akan menjadi lebih anggun, lebih cantik dan lebih modis.
  4. pastikan ketika Anda pakai jilbab jangan pula memakai baju yang ketat karena akan memperlihatkan bentuk lekuk badan Anda yang ini membuat Anda percuma dalam pakai hijab tersebut.
  5. nah layaknya penulis sendiri yang memakai jilbab, saya terlihat anggun dan lebih cantik dan manis serta cute.
Demikianlah beberapa tips tentang Cara Memakai Jilbab Segi Empat Kreasi. Semoga tulisan singkat ini bermanfaat bagi Anda sekalian. Kami berharap Anda bisa memakai hijab ini agar Anda lebih muslimah dan identitas diri. Dengan Anda memakai pakaian terbuka berarti Anda sedang mengundang bahaya bagi Anda sendiri. Jadi kalau Anda ditimpa bahaya jangan salahkan orang lain. Karena ada sebab pasti ada akibatnya pula.



0 Comments on Tutorial Hijab Untuk Sehari-hari as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
16188. Dancing Differently 101-Giraffes Can’t Dance Book Review & Activity {Shannon Medisky}

Send to Kindle

 

Can you believe school is DONE?!!? Ack! Now everyone is kicking into “summer reading gear” and Jump Into a Book is no different.

This year I decided to “mix it up” a bit and invite some of the many amazing bloggers and reading/play advocates that  I know to stop by and share their knowledge and creativity with the JIAB readers. PLUS it will offer kids and parents some cool new reading ideas and activities for summer.

Summer reading programs are abundant after school ends. It’s our goal to not only create an ongoing summer reading booklist with activities option for parents, but also work to keep the focus on helping our young readers be Global Citizens. We would like to focus on books that will help our kiddos explore their world and keep our initiative of multicultural books for kids in the forefront of people’s minds too. To acheive this, I created the Discover Your World Summer Reading Extravaganza.

Discover Your World Summer Reading Extravaganza

This fun summer reading and activity event will run from June 1 to Sept 1 and we encourage your to keep stopping by Jump Into a Book during this time to view all of the booklists, book reviews, crafts, recipes and activities my guest bloggers will be sharing! Here is our first guest for the Discover Your World Summer Reading Extravaganza, Shannon Medisky of SCIKite.com

Dancing Differently 101

By Shannon Medisky

Maybe it’s the teacher in me. Yeah, I left the classroom, but my desire to make everything a learning opportunity certainly hasn’t gone poof! Summer provides the perfect opportunity for me to share this with my kids, and Giles Andreae’s book called Giraffes Can’t Dance provided the perfect platform for a new kind of lesson: how to dance differently than everyone else.

Giraffes Can't Dance

In the book, Gerald, a tall and clumsy giraffe, is an outsider. Surrounded by a wide variety of different jungle animals, everyone can dance beautifully-everyone, that is, except for Gerald. The ending of the book is no surprise: Gerald learns to dance in his own unique way.

But what is a surprise is just how enjoyable is to read this book aloud! Andreae is clearly adept at writing in rhyming prose, something that’s not easily done. And, as a result, this book is just as fun to read as it is to listen to. The words of the story literally glide off the tongue as kids are genuinely sucked into poor Gerald’s plight. Mid-way through the book, a tiny cricket speaks softly to Gerald at his lowest point. He
encourages Gerald to block out the negative words of all the other bullying animals, and instead listen to his own “different” song. In the end, this process enables Gerald to dance beautifully but differently as he embraces his own moves, his own way, instead of trying to copy everyone else. This is definitely a skill and a truth I want to impress upon my own kids, and fortunately I was able to create a number of fun activities to do just that. Though Gerald has an awful time at the annual “Jungle Dance,” it provides a perfect opportunity to get kids up and active while exposing them to a wide variety of different styles of music! I found 5 different pieces of music: a waltz, a rock and roll song, a tango, a cha-cha and a Scottish reel. And after we read the book aloud together, we listened-and danced-to the different styles of music. As both boys got caught up in the fun, they began to realize there was no “right” or “wrong” way to dance to the different types of music. Instead, they were too caught up in having fun with each other. Just like Gerald at the end of the book, my boys were realizing that everyone really can dance when they find music-their own music-that they love.

Like I shared earlier, once a teacher, always a teacher and so I couldn’t let this activity stop without bringing it to a thoughtful and thought-provoking close, too. I invited my now exhausted kiddos to take a seat and close their eyes, just like Gerald did in the story. I asked them to remember something that they struggled to do, something that was hard for them or something that they did differently than everyone else. Next, with their eyes still closed, I asked them to practice doing that same thing right now inside their head, only this time focus on
enjoying doing it and doing it their way.

Giraffes Can't Dance

Then, I had them continue to sit quietly, eyes still closed and listen to the sounds-the music-that was all around them right in that moment. It was a way to practice positive thinking, visualization and mindful relaxation, but only after I’d
physically worn them out first!

Shannon Medisky

Shannon Medisky is on a mission to inspire innovative thought in kids while simultaneously igniting a passion for science. In short, Shannon seeks to make science go BOOM! So children’s futures can take off, too.

A former classroom teacher and current writer, Shannon presents science concepts in fun, easy-to-understand ways, helping kids to understand that science isn’t just a “what” but “how” also. Additionally, she challenges kids to think critically, creatively and differently, encouraging an entrepreneurial approach to learning and failure along the way. The result is true education reform one child at a time, empowering kids to affect positive change in their own lives now while simultaneously equipping them for what lies ahead.

Her articles have been featured in many prominent magazines such as Exceptional Parents, Adoptive Families, Hybrid Mom, Mothering and Focus on the Family’s Thriving Family.

To learn more about Shannon, visit ShannonMedisky.com or connect with her on Facebook.

Send to Kindle

The post Dancing Differently 101-Giraffes Can’t Dance Book Review & Activity {Shannon Medisky} appeared first on Jump Into A Book.

Add a Comment
16189. The two cubs who’ve been hanging out in our backyard a...



The two cubs who’ve been hanging out in our backyard a lot. Their two big hobbies are charging at each other and climbing trees. (Photo by a neighbor.)



0 Comments on The two cubs who’ve been hanging out in our backyard a... as of 6/26/2014 12:41:00 AM
Add a Comment
16190. Painting with the girls

Some of my friends and I were talking about how easy it is for us to isolate ourselves as stay-at-home moms and artists. Even though most of us are empty-nesters now it seems there's always a laundry list of things that need to get done and the day just Wyses by without having seen anyone. It gets lonely. Yesterday we found a way to end her isolation and work at the same time which is absolutely wonderful. On a day that was kind of iffy in terms of the weather it was supposed to rain at about 1 o'clock and come down torrentially there is some apprehension about going outdoors to do some playing air painting. But being a daring women that we are we opted to head out anyway at about 1030 in the morning and met at a local park where there is a beautiful spring house and pond which is great fodder for outdoor painting. Not be much of a landscape artist myself it was a challenge for me and I have to admit not something internally interested me. But but I did enjoy and appreciate with the company and talent Of my three friends. Jeanne Hills from Wallingford Pennsylvania is an art historian the editor of my book Millicent and the faraway land and a very talented artist in her own right. She was working on watercolors and shows a nice shady spot for herself she managed to knock out two beautiful little paintings in the time we were there until about two at 2 PM. Mary and Kathy and I seem to cluster in the same spot Across from the Springhouse Maryann I concentrated on the Springhouse and the pond will Kathy was painting some trees and clearing two are right. Mary was working in acrylics she is a fiber artist by nature but also loves to paint and studied with Al Staszetsky in the past Kathy is a tremendous oil painter her sense of   Her sense of color and painterly brushstrokes and traditional style really take my breath away. It was really because of her that we were out there yesterday both because of our isolation but because she had been told by a painting instructor that she needed to get out more and try landscape as she is primarily a trompe l'oeil and portrait painter. Me you know what I do. As I said landscape is something that doesn't tremendously interest me to paint I have done it on occasion because I've been inspired by a beautiful place and somehow I think miraculously I'm going to become one of those amazing landscape painters who can capture the beauty that God created however that's not the case. Whenever I start to paint the fact that I am. Humble self-taught folk artist quickly emerges as I see my friends around me painting with reds and blues and yellows and oranges and a landscape that I mostly see you sheets green I really and up feeling inept. The other thing for me is that I've really fallen in love with pottery and the immediacy of it. i still love to paint but I'm not sure on the painter anymore. We have decided to do these painting sessions on a regular basis our next one is going to take place at a winery that has beautiful historic buildings and well yeah wine tehee. We can make a nice afternoon and early dinner evening out of it and do it on a regular basis to keep ourselves working for call and to limit our isolation

0 Comments on Painting with the girls as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
16191. The Summer I Saved the World...in 65 Days by Michele Weber Hurwitz

This summer, 13-year-old Nina is going to make the world a better place, one day (and one good deed) at a time.

After looking around her neighborhood, Nina decides to help out her friends and neighbors - and maybe even her own family - in small but remarkable ways. She decides to do 65 anonymous good deeds, one for every day of summer vacation. While some of these activities and gifts are planned in advance, others are spur-of-the-moment, but all of them are based on what the people around her truly need. Sometimes, it's an item to make them smile, or something related to a household project; other times, it's simply a shoulder to lean on. Nina listens to people, and she listens to her heart, and she can tell when someone needs a pick-me-up or a helping hand.

Nina's own house could use some smiles, too. Nina cherishes her memories of her grandmother, who passed away a year ago, who taught her to value simple truths. Now, with her grandma gone, her two lawyer parents immersed in their current case, and her college-bound older brother barely ever home, Nina misses having real conversations with her family. Meanwhile, her best friend Jorie is flirting with boys and planning their dates for the homecoming dance, and Nina's not really into that yet. Even though she is kind of seeing her long-time friend Eli in a new light...

As the summer continues, some neighbors seem to appreciate the good deeds while others are grow suspicious, thinking they are pranks. Mostly, though, Nina's actions have the intended result: they brighten someone's day and serve as a reminder than somebody cares. As her "little efforts" rub off on others, Nina realizes that "doing good is contagious," and she continues to practice random acts of kindness, just because she likes helping others.

The transition from middle school to high school can be all sorts of things -- overwhelming, intimidating, exciting, nerve-wracking, eye-opening -- all at once. This book captures that transition very well, and moves through the summer with a naturally flowing narrative fueled by a thoughtful, selfless protagonist. Nina is a truly good person, without a hidden agenda, and this novel is filled with moments that are poignant and uplifting without ever being preachy or cloying. As the story develops, Nina's resolve and voice grows stronger, and she never once is tempted to brag about her good deeds. She is refreshing and inspiring.

Hurwitz does a wonderful job of examining the strangeness and sadness that comes when friendships are tested, when you feel like you are growing apart from someone you've known for so long. Many books and films showcase the end of a friendship, often with the old friend burning or blowing off the protagonist. But not all friendships end in a big blow-up. Not all friendships end. They change, just like (as) people change. The bond between Jorie and Nina stretches like taffy throughout the book, stretching and straining as their priorities change:

In first grade, when Jorie moved into the cul-de-sac, we had playdates and did the things first-grade girls do. That was enough back then. But now? Jorie and I are in between two places. Like an intermission between the first and second acts of a play. I'm not sure how things are going to end up. - Pages 9-10

I miss the girl who couldn't glue, brought me the towel after we jumped into the water, made sure I was okay. The girl I knew. - Page 114

This is just one example of the connections Nina makes. Hurwitz masterfully creates distinctive characters and allows her leading lady to have clear relationships and storylines with different people, including her brother, Matt; her workaholic parents; Eli, who is literally the boy next door; Eli's adorable little brother, Thomas, who fancies himself a superhero; Sariah, a new friend in her summer art class; and the others on her street, ranging from high-strung Mrs. Millman, bossing around her dog and her husband, to the extremely pregnant Mrs. Cantaloni and her energetic three young sons, to quiet Mrs. Chung, to the elusive Mr. Dembrowski. Oh, and a fox.

In short: The Summer I Saved the World...in 65 Days by Michele Weber Hurwitz is delightful. Pick it up, and pay it forward.

Favorite supporting character: Thomas.

Favorite (and unexpected) scene: Running. (Another favorite moment: The swings.)

This is Michele's second novel for tweens. If you liked Nina's story, make sure to pick up the author's first book, Calli Be Gold!

Related booklists:
Transition Times
Middle School Must-Haves

Add a Comment
16192. FOODFIC: Please Welcome St. John Karp, Author of Radium Baby

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17852853-radium-baby



My favorite ice-breaker on a first date is, "If you could travel back in time to any period, when would you go?" You can tell a lot about a person by how they answer. A lot of people seem to want to meet Jesus, which is legit, although they conveniently forget to set aside time to learn Aramaic first. My own choice would be the 1920s. They were in the middle of a post-war cultural revolution — it was the golden age of the silver screen, Dadaism was turning into Surrealism, you couldn't sneeze without hitting ten radioactive consumer products, and they spoke English. The sheer amount of cool stuff going down made it a great place to set Radium Baby. The only problem for an aspiring alcoholic like me is that it's also boom-smack in the middle of the American Prohibition.


But the characters in Radium Baby don't let that stop them. You could always throw a fuzz junket on bathtub moonshine, or else get a bit squiffy on giggle water at the blind tiger. My favorite Prohibition-era cocktail has to be the Sidecar — an intoxicating mix of two parts Cognac, one part Cointreau, and one part lemon juice, served with sugar on the rim. I drank at least four of these (I lost count) as research for this article, and I can confirm that by the end of the night I'd completely forgotten that it wasn't actually 1927.


The Sidecar may have been a bit frou-frou for Prohibition tastes, though, especially as it was a European cocktail and all those fancy brandies were hard to come by. Herbie Wise would have liked them, I think, because he has a taste for the finer things in life. What really fuels a public drunk like Adrian Ember, though, is gin. This makes the Martini the cocktail of choice for the adults in Radium Baby. You take your vermouth, shake it up in the cocktail shaker enough to coat the ice, then pour it out. Then you pour in your gin, shake it again, and pour. Garnish with green olives. I have a passionate love for salt, so the dirtier the Martini the better. Also, don't let any unlicked rube tell you it's one part vermouth to six parts gin — too much vermouth is the quickest way to ruin a perfectly good Martini. Winston Churchill said the best way to add vermouth to your Martini was simply to raise your glass in the direction of France.


While Ember and Wise like a tipple, Mrs. Cholmondeley is a die-hard teetotaler. Even she, however, seems to have her own unwitting crutch in the form of June Kennedy's Prune Remedy. This Prune Remedy was inspired by a few real health tonics from the time, but particularly Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound. Pinkham's Compound contained a good wallop of "medicinal" alcohol, which garnered it an unexpected level of popularity in the Prohibition. There are endless testimonies in Mrs. Pinkham's advertising from housewives whose kids are driving them nuts, but after a bottle or nine of Vegetable Compound they feel right as rain. Pinkham's Compound still turns up in pop culture from time to time, in songs like "Lily the Pink", or as Ephraim's Extract in a recent episode of Quick Draw.


If your blood runs more towards the healthy side of things (and if it does, I can't think why you're reading anything I've written), then your 1920s self might have downed a few radioactive health tonics. Yes, people in the '20s were drinking radioactive water, often every day under the misapprehension that it would cure them of wambling trot or the strong fives. In Radium Baby Gloria drinks from a Revigator — a household radioactive tank which you'd fill with water to be steeped in healthy radioactive rays. For good measure these things would also leech arsenic, lead, and uranium into the water. Over three years one man in real life drank 1,400 bottles of a radioactive tonic called Radithor, and he swore it did wonders for his health right up until the day his face fell off. He had to be buried in a lead coffin.


Valerie and Alexander Pepperpot also partake of a goodly dose of radium in the form of a radioactive duck. The dish is a party piece that, when prepared properly, will create a chemical reaction that expels air through the duck's throat and makes it quack as it's being carved. There was a little truth-bending here on my part, but the recipe is real — only the recipe was medieval and the secret ingredient was mercury instead of radium. As far as I know there aren't any records of people dying from eating these mercury birds, but then I don't imagine they fared much better than the Pepperpots did.


For those who want to throw their own radium-themed wingding, I'd recommend against irradiating the local poultry. Instead, let me take this back to where it began — booze. A great radium-themed drink is the Grasshopper, a mix of one part cream, one part Crème de menthe, and one part white Crème de cacao. You wind up with a lurid green cocktail that is absolutely delicious. Here's mud in your eye, fly-boy.


Thanks for stopping by to share your food for thought, St. John!



Connect with the author here:





 

0 Comments on FOODFIC: Please Welcome St. John Karp, Author of Radium Baby as of 6/26/2014 10:57:00 AM
Add a Comment
16193. Happy endings not (always) required - Cavan Scott

"Oooh, that's a bit bleak..."

I'd just told a friend of mine the plot of a short story I am about to pitch to a reluctant reader publisher. And he was right. The ending isn't just a bit bleak - it's abysmally bleak. A real kick you in the stomach-type affair.

But I don't think I could tell it any other way. The story needs to ends with a sucker punch. If everything turns out fine and dandy, it would lose all of its meaning.

It has made me think though. This week, I received copies of my latest reluctant readers from Badger Learning - Billy Button and Pest Control. Both of them end with the protagonist in deep water. Come to think of it, my last two books for Badger were pretty bleak too.

It's probably because they've been conjured up from the same part of my brain that used to enjoy late-night Amicus portmanteau movies such as Vault of Horror and From Beyond the Grave. In fact, what am I saying - I still enjoy them today. Horrible things happening to horrible people - and even sometimes nice people as well. The 70s and 80s were full of horrid little morality tales like these, from the wonderfully macabre Tales of the Unexpected to excesses of Hammer House of Horror.

I guess my recent run of reluctant reader books have come from the same stable. Stories to unsettle and to chill.

And why not? Children like to be scared. It stimulates a different part of their imagination and teaches them valuable lessons - that darkness is just as much a part of life as light. And where better than to experience these emotions than safely curled up reading a book.

Indeed, according to Kevin Brooks, recently crowned winner of the Carnegie medal, books should actively show children that life doesn't always include happy endings. He wasn't talking about the cheap scares of 70s horror movies of course, but novels that deal with the harsher sides of life, subject matter that is sometimes difficult to write about, let alone to read.

Quoted in the Telegraph, Brooks says:

“There is a school of thought that no matter how dark or difficult a novel is, it should contain at least an element of hope.
"As readers, children – and teens in particular – don’t need to be cossetted with artificial hope that there will always be a happy ending. They want to be immersed in all aspects of life, not just the easy stuff. They’re not babies, they don’t need to be told not to worry, that everything will be all right in the end, because they’re perfectly aware that in real life things aren’t always all right in the end."

He concludes by saying:

“To be patronizing, condescending towards the reader is, to me, the worst thing a Young Adult fiction author can do.”

I found myself applauding as I read Brooks' words. It's not to say that I never write happy endings - hey, I can do heartwarming as well as bleak - but being over-cautious will just kill your writing dead. And children will see through it anyway. They know all too well what real life is like. 

_________________

Cavan Scott is the author of over 60 books and audio dramas including the Sunday Times Bestseller, Who-ology: The Official Doctor Who Miscellany, co-written with Mark Wright.

He's written for Doctor WhoSkylandersJudge Dredd, Angry Birds and Warhammer 40,000 among others. He also writes Roger the Dodger and Bananaman for The Beano as well as books for reluctant readers of all ages.

Cavan's website
Cavan's facebook fanpage
Cavan's twitterings

0 Comments on Happy endings not (always) required - Cavan Scott as of 6/26/2014 3:05:00 AM
Add a Comment
16194. Lou Bunin’s Alice in Wonderland

Lou Bunin did a fabulous stop motion Alice in Wonderland film in 1949.  I’ve heard so much about it, but seeing it in total seems to be elusive. (Evidently Disney had a hand in this, wanting his version to be the movie version.) The clip below gives you a taste of why we Carrollians are so eager to get our hands on it. ( This young woman found a French subtitled version — scroll down to see it— that, she indicates, is not complete.)


2 Comments on Lou Bunin’s Alice in Wonderland, last added: 6/27/2014
Display Comments Add a Comment
16195. the manchester sea monkey invasion!

Wow, Manchester Children's Book Festival has gone mad for Sea Monkeys! And it's culminating in a glorious Sea Monkey explosion this weekend! Check out all the stuff happening at this Saturday's Family Fun Day.



They put out a call for knitted Sea Monkeys (knitting pattern created by Deadly Knitshade, here on my website)...



And the Super Monkey Shout-out resulted in lots of super monkeys!



If you're anywhere near Manchester this Saturday, don't miss drawing a Sea Monkey and taking part in the Grand Seawigs Parade at 1:30. (Just grab anything you can find and stick it on your head; that's what the Rambling Isles do.) Then join us at 2:00 for Oliver and the Seawigs fun! (Booking details here.)



But back to those wonderfully cheeky Sea Monkeys, I just can't get enough of them.



My co-author Philip Reeve and I will be visiting Manchester Children's Hospital with a great charity called Readwell, who supply books to children in hospital. They even raise money to buy fresh, new books for children in isolation units, who aren't allowed to touch regular library books that have been handled by other people.



Hopefully the Sea Monkeys can bring some good cheer. It looks like they're bringing it already!



Philip and I will also be stopping in for a signing at Bramhall indie bookseller Simply Books at 9:30am on Friday, and then to Lady Barn House School for more Seawigs shenanigans. Which the Sea Monkeys have been busy organising!



What could possibly go wrong?



WHAT? A ZOMBIE SEA MONKEY???



They have MEETINGS.



And they love drawing pictures of themselves.



Oo, look, one of them's making a Seawig!



And they've been going on outings! I wonder how good their driving skills are.



Oh dear, a Sea Monkey and a police bike might not be a good combination. Look out for further monkey mayhem.



If you want to see more Sea Monkeys or find out about the festival, check out their website, their blog, and follow them on Twitter at @MCBF2014, Sea Monkey wrangler Ann Lam @apytown and hospital children's book charity @ReadWellUK.

Add a Comment
16196. A Box of Scent

I came home the recently to find this at my doorstep.

 

image

 

I know!  This is an outrage!

It may seem innocuous initially with its flowery packaging and appealing colors, but read between the lines.  Oh, can’t see it clearly? This, my good readers, is a box of scent.  Why is that a big deal, you might ask?  Because, consider the implications of someone giving you a scent meant to cover your current odor. That’s right! Somebody thinks I stink!

Where did this come from? What dastardly knave would leave such a foul gesture on the front step of another?

I know my wife didn’t order something so frivolous when she already has an olfactory sensation in me! I’m like a bed of roses, just ask me.

Did the UPS guy drop it off, and if I so, what does he think of me now?

Is there a scent fairy that didn’t make it into the legend books or that movie where they all teamed up?  A Santa Clause for the nose, as it were.

Why does a box of fragrance smell an awful lot like cardboard? What kind of rip-off is that?

These were the questions I asked myself as I sat beside my box, my anger growing every minute. I began plotting how I would discover the origin of this unwanted gift. I figured it had to be one of my neighbors. We have two that come to mind when anything suspect happens on our street. Two doors down on either side are families that each have their own quirks. We all have those neighbors, so I won’t detail their eccentricities. Suffice it to say that when the media shows up at my door because the police are leading them off in chains, I will NOT say, “Oh, they were normal folks. I can’t believe they found eleven bodies in their yard.”

Since I couldn’t be positive it was either of them, I spent the better part of the afternoon parading up and down the street holding the conspicuous box in my arms so all could see. I watched the eyes of everyone I met – it’s all in the eyes. Each neighbor I encountered looked at the box suspiciously as we engaged in meaningless small-talk, but I never ran across the guilty expression that would pin-point the offender. All-in-all, it was a wasted effort and most likely branded me as neighborhood weirdo number three (if I don’t already wear that label).

When I arrived back at home, I expected the usual June Cleaver welcome. I did not receive anything so grand, my wife was more focused on the box in my arms. For all the attention I got, I may as well have been the UPS delivery guy – whose opinion of me is now as questionable as my odor must be.

“Oh good, the plug-ins are here. Every one in the house has run out,” she said as she took the box and repaired to another room with nary a kind word for me.

What kind of marriage of deception is this? For twenty-two years I lived under the delusion that I was responsible for the lovely smells around here only to discover that in the opinion of my beloved, I stink.

Oh well, even though I now know it isn’t me, I do like the smell of Warm Vanilla Sugar wafting from every outlet in the house…

 

 


Filed under: It Made Me Laugh

5 Comments on A Box of Scent, last added: 6/27/2014
Display Comments Add a Comment
16197. Entangled Bliss: Naughty and Nice Tour and Giveaway

Taming the Country Star by Margo Bond Collins

Book Synopsis: He’ll do anything to win her heart. She’ll do anything to keep him away.

Country star Cole Grayson is in town, and Kylie Andrews is less than thrilled. As if months of changing the radio station and tearing down his posters weren’t bad enough, now she has to deal with a town of fans swarming toward the man who deceived her the year before. But when Kylie’s eyes meet Cole’s again, she can’t deny the electric chemistry that drew her to him the first time around.

Cole Grayson is on a mission. Ever since Kylie left him, he hasn’t been able to forget her sweet country smile. After writing a song just for her, he sets off for her hometown to prove he’s not the player she thinks he is. But as much as Cole can’t forget her, Kylie wonders if she can forgive him…

Buy Links:Goodreads * Amazon *Barnes & Noble *iTunes * Entangled

Author Bio – Margo Bond Collins

Margo Bond Collins currently teaches college English courses online, but writing fiction is her first love. After a decade of moving all around the country (Los Angeles, New York, and Atlanta are a few of the places she’s lived), she has settled in her native Texas. Margo lives near Fort Worth with her husband, her daughter, and several very spoiled cats, and she spends most of her free time daydreaming about heroes, monsters, cowboys, and villains, and the strong women who love them. She currently writes for Entangled Bliss

Website * Blog * Twitter * Facebook * Goodreads

 

Making Waves by Ophelia London

Book Synopsis: She’s in over her head and he’s in hot water…

Visiting her friends Ellie and Charlie in Hawaii was supposed to be a much-needed vacation for journalist Justine Simms. But when she learns the notoriously reclusive pro-surfer Chase Ryder is coming out of retirement for a competition, she knows she’s found the perfect exclusive to save her career. Of course, then she learns he’s the gorgeous, secretly nerdy guy who broke her heart a year ago.

Will Davenport—aka Chase Ryder—doesn’t do interviews. He keeps his real name out of the papers and doesn’t mix his public life with his private. That is, until the still-heartbroken Justine blackmails him into giving her an exclusive. Seeing Justine, stunningly beautiful as ever, brings back all the feelings he had before. But despite their smoldering attraction, nothing has changed since he had to leave her the first time.

Buy Links: Goodreads *Amazon* Barnes & Noble *iTunes *Entangled

Author Bio:

Ophelia London was born and raised among the redwood trees in beautiful northern California. Once she was fully educated, she decided to settle in Florida, but her car broke down in Texas and she’s lived in Dallas ever since. A cupcake and treadmill aficionado (obviously those things are connected), she spends her time watching art-house movies and impossibly trashy TV, while living vicariously through the characters in the books she writes. Ophelia is the author of ABBY ROAD; the Perfect Kisses series including: PLAYING AT LOVE, SPEAKING OF LOVE, and FALLING FOR HER SOLDIER, and the new adult DEFINITELY, MAYBE IN LOVE.

Twitter * Website * Facebook * Goodreads * Entangled

Entangled Bliss:

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/BlissImprint

Twitter: @RomanceIsBliss  Steals and Deals

Schedule: http://sizzlingpr.com/tour-naughty-nice-bliss-tour/

Giveaway Info: $20 Amazon gift card from Margo Bond Collins

iPod Shuffle with the Making Waves playlist from Ophelia London

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The post Entangled Bliss: Naughty and Nice Tour and Giveaway appeared first on Manga Maniac Cafe.

Add a Comment
16198. Latest News

My book View from a Zoo was released in a flash-animated video through Animatus Studio on June 3rd. To watch the video, please click on the link below.

Living Green: A Turtle’s Quest for a Cleaner Planet is being published as a series in Jabberblabber Magazine. Based in Memphis, Tennessee, Jabberblabber is a print and online Earth Friendly magazine for kids available at all Walgreens in the Tri State area, as well as various other locations throughout the Mid-South. To read parts 1-5 in the June issue, please click on the illustration below. Parts 1-5 are featured on pages 31-33. Look for part 6 in the July issue of Jabberblabber Magazine.

LG Cover

The Southern Newspapers Publishers Association is offering several of my children’s stories to newspapers across the United States. The latest is my story titled The Hummingbird Who Chewed Bubblegum.  To read the stories, please click on the illustration below.

The Hummingbird Who Chewed Bubblegum

 

Use of any of the content on this website without permission is prohibited by federal law 

COPYRIGHT © 2014 ARTIE KNAPP

0 Comments on Latest News as of 6/26/2014 12:29:00 PM
Add a Comment
16199. A Box of Scent

I came home the recently to find this at my doorstep.

 

image

 

I know!  This is an outrage!

It may seem innocuous initially with its flowery packaging and appealing colors, but read between the lines.  Oh, can’t see it clearly? This, my good readers, is a box of scent.  Why is that a big deal, you might ask?  Because, consider the implications of someone giving you a scent meant to cover your current odor. That’s right! Somebody thinks I stink!

Where did this come from? What dastardly knave would leave such a foul gesture on the front step of another?

I know my wife didn’t order something so frivolous when she already has an olfactory sensation in me! I’m like a bed of roses, just ask me.

Did the UPS guy drop it off, and if I so, what does he think of me now?

Is there a scent fairy that didn’t make it into the legend books or that movie where they all teamed up?  A Santa Clause for the nose, as it were.

Why does a box of fragrance smell an awful lot like cardboard? What kind of rip-off is that?

These were the questions I asked myself as I sat beside my box, my anger growing every minute. I began plotting how I would discover the origin of this unwanted gift. I figured it had to be one of my neighbors. We have two that come to mind when anything suspect happens on our street. Two doors down on either side are families that each have their own quirks. We all have those neighbors, so I won’t detail their eccentricities. Suffice it to say that when the media shows up at my door because the police are leading them off in chains, I will NOT say, “Oh, they were normal folks. I can’t believe they found eleven bodies in their yard.”

Since I couldn’t be positive it was either of them, I spent the better part of the afternoon parading up and down the street holding the conspicuous box in my arms so all could see. I watched the eyes of everyone I met – it’s all in the eyes. Each neighbor I encountered looked at the box suspiciously as we engaged in meaningless small-talk, but I never ran across the guilty expression that would pin-point the offender. All-in-all, it was a wasted effort and most likely branded me as neighborhood weirdo number three (if I don’t already wear that label).

When I arrived back at home, I expected the usual June Cleaver welcome. I did not receive anything so grand, my wife was more focused on the box in my arms. For all the attention I got, I may as well have been the UPS delivery guy – whose opinion of me is now as questionable as my odor must be.

“Oh good, the plug-ins are here. Every one in the house has run out,” she said as she took the box and repaired to another room with nary a kind word for me.

What kind of marriage of deception is this? For twenty-two years I lived under the delusion that I was responsible for the lovely smells around here only to discover that in the opinion of my beloved, I stink.

Oh well, even though I now know it isn’t me, I do like the smell of Warm Vanilla Sugar wafting from every outlet in the house…

 

 


Filed under: It Made Me Laugh

0 Comments on A Box of Scent as of 1/1/1900
Add a Comment
16200. Author Interview with Christopher Greyson

Its Author Interview Thursday and I have some bad, good and great news.Christopher Greyson - Mystery Writer The bad news is that this will be the last Author Interview Thursday I do for a while. The good news is that I’ll be back in September with more awesome author interviews. The great news is that we have a very, very special guest on the hot seat whose going to close out this season in some style. Earlier this year at the London Book Fair, I had a chat with best-selling Cozy Mystery writer Stephanie Bond who assured me that one did not need to have a judicial, criminal or law enforcement background to write mystery books. If you can write a story she said, then you can write in any genre. This was very liberating for me as I’ve always liked Mystery/Crime thrillers but never felt I had the chops to execute. With Stephanie’s words ringing in my ears, I started devouring Mystery thrillers like an unemployed circus elephant at an all-you-can-eat buffet. Sometime in April, I came across this book – Girl Jacked while looking through the Mystery category on Amazon. The cover caught my eye and hinted at a story I wanted to know more about. I downloaded it and I wasn’t disappointed. That book now has more than 300 reviews on Amazon and you can read my review about it here. I just had to get to know the author behind it. I started following him on Twitter. Then I discovered him on Facebook and sent him a friend request which he accepted. The second book in his Jack Stratton Mystery series was recently in the Top 50 on the Amazon store. In the little time I’ve gotten to know him, I have been inspired by his generosity, humour and strong work ethic. I see big things on the horizon for him and I’m truly honoured he’s chosen to be my special guest today. Please buckle your seat belts for what’s going to be and epic ride and let’s welcome Christopher Greyson.

 

Can you tell us a little bit about yourself and something most people don’t know about Christopher Greyson? 

I have a bit of an eclectic background. I grew up watching old Elvis movies where Elvis was always 5 different things and a singer. I think I tried to emulate that. I have degrees in computer science and communications. I’m an actor, I have my own video production company, I’m a martial artist, and I’m a writer. I love learning new things.

As far as something most people don’t know about me… I fed a Siberian Tiger by hand. That was a really cool experience.

 

Tell us about the first time someone complemented you on something you had written? Girl Jacked

I actually just blogged about my first review! When I first published Girl Jacked, I was so excited waiting to get my first review, I kept checking Amazon using my phone. Finally, I saw that I had gotten my first review. I closed my eyes and prayed that it was a good one. With trembling hands, my fingers clutched my phone and I read:

 “This book is a quick read with characters that suck”

WHAT!?!? NO!!! I was so devastated I just stood there and read the words over and over again. “Characters that suck.” “SUCK.”

Well, I set my jaw, straightened up and decided to read the rest of the review. In any endeavor, you need to have thick skin and I was determined to read on and see what this person thought. I clicked on the review and saw the WHOLE review:

“This book is a quick read with characters that suck you in.”

WHAT!?!?!  My phone cut the sentence off. YEAH!!! SUCK YOU IN. The reviewer said SUCK YOU IN not just SUCK. YEAH!!!! Stupid smart phone!

Honestly, for a first review it was at first a kick in the head. I’m human. I hurt, bleed and cry. It’s funny how quickly I jumped on the oh-no-we’re-screwed train. I wanted to share the story to encourage you to not punch that ticket.

The other lesson I learned from my first review? God has a sense of humour… I laughed like crazy once I started breathing again and I laugh every time I think of it.

 

I have to say your book covers and titles are evocative and memorable. Can you tell us the process in creating your book covers and its place in the successful marketing of a book? Jacks are Wild

Well, my Mother is an Artist and being raised in that kind of environment, gave me a firm basis in a lot of different mediums. I used those skills and started a graphics company so designing the covers were an extension of that.

I approach covers from an artistic angle and my wife, who is also a writer, comes at them from the practical side— like can you read them. Together, we do a great job because you really need both. You need a cover that catches the eye but lets the reader know what you have to offer. I feel the cover is very important to the success of a book and if you keep those two things in mind, you can’t go wrong.

 

You have currently published three books in the ‘Jack Stratton’ series. Was it a conscious decision to write a series and what led you to do it? 

I didn’t start out with a series in mind. It all started with Jack. I come at writing from a story tellers perspective. I start with the character, Jack. Who is he? It seems like such a simple question but it’s not. No one is simple. Everyone is complex and that is what makes each and every person special and have their own story. I don’t look at it like creating Jack’s story. I’m retelling it. I pictured Jack. I knew I wanted him to be a cop and a soldier. From there his history just took off. The troubled childhood, Aunt Haddie’s etc… Once his back-story was done, I set him down in his apartment and just watched what happened. It’s the reason I love writing this series. Jack and Replacement just pop for me. Once I put them in the situation, I sit back and write about HOW they react.

 

What key ingredients should a good crime/mystery book possess? Young Christopher Greyson

LOVE. You need to care about any story. If you don’t care about something it means nothing to you. That’s why I want people to LOVE the characters. I want you to LOVE Michelle and desperately want to find her too. I want people to LOVE Replacement and if I do that… then you care about the crime. If you love Jack, you’ll die if you don’t find out the mystery. (I might have taken that a little too far with the ‘die’ but you get my point.)

On top of that, sprinkle: A dash of Humour, a pinch of Romance, add a cup of Action and bake at 750 degrees and serve smoking hot!

 

I think one of the major factors that makes your books such a success is the dialogue. What in your opinion makes great dialogue?

People will tell you to only include dialogue that is pertinent to the story and cut everything else out and I say pfffftttt. (That’s the universal sound of a raspberry!) Do you know what you get when you cut all of the fat off of a nice cut of beef? A dry hunk of meat. Fat adds juices to the steak. Pour on the butter and keep it real!

Again I come from an actor’s background so I just try to keep it real. What do people really say? How do they sound? If you don’t know, go listen to people! Really listen. Care for them. Put yourself in their shoes.

 

What three things should writers avoid when writing dialogue?

  1. Writing for writing’s sake! – Don’t try to fill your word count or add some plot point. Focus on the character.
  2. Not saying it out loud. – Does anyone talk like that? Put it through the sound test? Have someone else say it.
  3. Not acting it out. – Pretend. Be the character for a minute. Go into the closet and shout – scream – cry – be flat – be full but be!

 

What book or film has the best dialogue that inspires you to be a better writer and why? Christopher Greyson and His Chevy Impala

The Seven Samurai. I don’t speak Japanese but dialogue isn’t just the spoken word. It’s communication. Faces. Gestures. Everything. On top of that, Toshiro Mifune just rocks.

 

What have you found to be a great way to market your books in such a competitive genre filled with established and well-known authors? 

Write more books. Seriously. I had Girl Jacked and it was very, very hard to get out there. The more books you have, the more flags you can raise.

Say ‘hi!’ There are so many writers out there! You aren’t alone. Connect. Go to Goodreads. Check out blogs. Konrath and Howey have some wonderful resources. Will Wilson of the Indie Book Show is another great resource. http://www.blogtalkradio.com/indiebooks.

 

Breaking Bad or Homeland? 

Breaking Bad.

 

The next book in the Jack Stratton series is titled ‘Jack the Giant Slayer.’ Can you tell us a bit about what happens in this episode? Jack Knifed by Christopher gREYSON

Replacement finds these three magic beans… Just kidding! Actually, we pick up only a couple of months after Jacks are Wild. Jack is no longer on the police force and that’s a challenge for him. Another adjustment is with his and Replacement’s relationship. They are living together, in separate bedrooms, but now they’re dating. As with anything to do with Replacement—it gets complicated.

Added into that mix is a new case. Replacement gets involved in finding the owner of a lost dog. You’ll also get to learn about Replacement’s back story but I better slow down…. 

 

What should a first time visitor to your home town do? 

Run! Sorry, I’m kidding. I grew up in a wonderful town on the New England coast. The first place they should go is World’s End. Mostly because of the name. It sounds like a place where there is an adventure just waiting to happen!

 

How can readers connect with you? 

www.ChristopherGreyson.Com.  I plan in the next coming months to add free content including side stories and vignettes involving the characters from the series. On my website, you can sign-up for my mailing list and receive periodic updates and new book release dates.

 

Any advice for authors out there who are either just starting out or getting frustrated with the industry?Christopher Greyson 

Keep at it and don’t listen to anyone! That’s a hard one. I’m a firm believer in advice and counsel but everyone needs to make up their own mind. A wise man listens to counsel but there are a lot of people who will try to drag you down. Their reasons can be different. I have met some real jerks who just want to knock you down because they’re jerks but sometimes, well meaning people can pull you under too.

So… fight. Listen to people but not too much! Elvis was told he couldn’t sing. There was a review of “The Wizard of OZ” that called it a ‘cute little film with no lasting power!’ HA! HA! 

Fight. Pray. Fight some more. Dare to dream and dream BIG!

 

Thanks for being with us today Chris. That was such a wonderful way to end the interview. If there’s one thing I truly grasp from listening to you, it’s that your success has been no fluke. You’ve worked hard to get where you’re at and I know big things are coming your way. Chris and I would love to hear any questions or comments you may have. I’d also encourage everyone to hop on to Chris’ website at www.ChristopherGreyson.Com and sign up to his newsletter. You can grab a copy of one or all of Chris’ books by clicking the link below

Christopher Greyson books on Amazon

2 Comments on Author Interview with Christopher Greyson, last added: 6/27/2014
Display Comments Add a Comment

View Next 25 Posts