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Results 7,951 - 7,975 of 205,652
7951. Writer Myths: Kill Your Darlings.

Hi folks, I'm continuing my series on writer myths and that is coming up, but first, I've got to mention some egg action. You may remember that once upon a time I chatted about eggs.  It's been a while since I've had an opportunity to mention this fun part of my blog. This week we are near the hatching phase of "egg-dom." So, news is to come!

Now, back to myths. Last week, I chatted about the myth of bad reviews. This week I'm moving on to the myth of "kill your darlings." Okay, it is true that you must often kill your darlings. I mean, most of us remember some relationship that just wasn't moving us forward, and it had to go. Sometimes, we write bland, flat drivel that needs to find the nearest circular file, and that's fine.

But there are times when you need to put down the murder weapon. I mean, killing some of those darlings is a crime or  at least a crying shame.

Here is my story. Once upon a time I was collaborating with another author on a project. I would write an awesome line, and the other author would love it too. Then a few days later, I'd get into slasher mode and ditch my awesome line. Delete.

My collaborator was unhappy with the slashing of "awesome" lines.

I answered, "I can always do better." But certain things slowly became clear. I can't aways do better.

My collaborator was like, "I think you are killing our story, and please stop it."

I learned something I love about writing in that moment. Every story is about a kind of collaboration. You and the reader are sitting by a fire. You are the spell maker; they are the mesmerized.  If you have created magic the first time, just let it be.

Sometimes you will get it right without trying. Don't second guess yourself. Never leave genius on the cutting room floor.

See you next week with more about writer myths, and perhaps a reason to throw a party!

And now for a mythical doodle. This one is called "Pixie."



Finally here is a quote.

I wake up to the sound of music
Mother Mary comes to me
Speaking words of wisdom, let it be
.

Paul McCartney




7 Comments on Writer Myths: Kill Your Darlings., last added: 10/13/2013
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7952. Short Story Collection Competition: Georgetown Review

Short Story Collection Contest

Ends on 9/30/2013

1. Entry fee: $25.
2. Prize: $1500 and publication of the manuscript.
3. Deadline: September 30, 2013.
4. If sending a hard copy, please make check or money order for the entry fee payable to Georgetown College, and mail the manuscript to:

Georgetown Review Press,
Short Story Collection Contest,
400 East College St., Box 227,
Georgetown, KY 40324

5. If submitting electronically, our online submissions manager is available here.
6. Submissions can include any of the following:
a) An unpublished manuscript of short stories.
b) One or more novellas (a novella may comprise a maximum of 120 double-spaced pages).
c) A combination of one or more novellas and short stories.
d) Novellas are only accepted as part of a larger collection.
7. Manuscripts must be between 150 and 300 typed pages. Manuscript pages must be numbered.
8. Please include a cover letter that includes the manuscript’s title and the author’s mailing address, email address, and telephone number.
9. Manuscripts may be under consideration elsewhere, but if a manuscript is accepted for publication, please notify Georgetown Review Press.
10. Writers may submit more than one manuscript at a time as long as one manuscript or a portion of it does not duplicate material submitted in another manuscript. The $25 entry fee must be paid for each manuscript submitted.
11. Prior publication of your manuscript as a whole in any format makes it ineligible. However, it is fine if individual stories have been published electronically or in magazines or chapbooks.

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7953. Player Profile: Eleanor Learmonth, author of No Mercy: True Stories of Disaster, Survival and Brutality

OFFICAL HEADSHOT Eleanor CompressedEleanor Learmonth, author of No Mercy: True Stories of Disaster, Survival and Brutality

 Tell us about your latest creation:

“No Mercy: True Stories of Disaster, Survival and Brutality” considers the fate of stranded, isolated groups from 134 BC to 2010 AD. What causes these small groups trapped in hostile and remote locations to turn on each other with catastrophic results? No Mercy outlines the physical and psychological changes that affect stranded disaster victims, and compares them to the rapid social implosion imagined in William Golding’s “Lord of the Flies”. Does reality support his dark, dystopian vision of an isolated micro-community? If anything, these historical groups descend deeper than even Golding pictured.

9781922147240Where are you from / where do you call home?:

I was born in Sydney, lived in Japan for a decade, then returned to my birthplace to have a family (just like a salmon).

When you were a kid, what did you want to become?  An author?:

Either a psychologist or a writer.

What do you consider to be your best work? Why?:

I have to say “No Mercy” for the simple reason that the subject matter is so intriguing. The dark side of human nature is a creepy place to explore, but I find the permutations of a malfunctioning group to be endlessly fascinating. How thin is our layer of social conditioning? Paper thin. What lies beneath? Instinct, aggression and a sharp-focused will for self-preservation.

Describe your writing environment to us – your writing room, desk, etc.; is it ordered or chaotic?:

It’s a disgrace! My desk has paper everywhere and I have an almost fatal addiction to post-its. My worst nightmare? Hard-drive meltdown. The ideal workday is to have a head full of ideas and spend the entire day glued to the keyboard in my pyjamas and ugg boots. I also find swearing a lot very conducive to the creative process.

When you’re not writing, who/what do you like to read?:

Old historical journals, the New Yorker and the International Herald Tribune. (Also the occasional novel).

What was the defining book(s) of your childhood/schooling?:

The Narnia books, anything on archaeology, history or fish, “Catch 22″, and “Lord of the Flies”.

If you were a literary character, who would you be?:

My family says Lady Macbeth (Way Harsh!), but I think Beowulf. He never took ‘no’ for an answer, and never ran away from a fight.

Apart from books, what do you do in your spare time (surprise us!)?:

I like to snorkel – most of all with sharks, turtles or any members of the squid/octopus/cuttlefish family.

What is your favourite food and favourite drink?:

My dream dinner would be top quality sushi – sitting at the counter with the chef making me a perfect pair of uni (sea-urchin roe) sushi. I’m also very partial to a Cherry Ripe, as long as I don’t have to share it! My all-time favourite tipple would be a generous Moscow Mule made with freshly grated ginger, and garnished with a lychee.

Who is your hero? Why?:

Captain Thomas Musgrave, who kept himself and his men alive through the worst possible circumstances on a miserable sub-Antarctic island for 19 months following a shipwreck, and then facilitated the rescue of the entire group at great risk to his own life. He is an unsung hero, but they are the best kind.

Crystal ball time – what is the biggest challenge for the future of books and reading?:

It might be adapting to the digital age, and stopping the kind of piracy that has gutted the music industry.

Twitter URL: https://twitter.com/EKLearmonth

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7954.

LATEST NEWS

vfaz cover

A new children’s book by Artie will be out in late September!!!

View from a Zoo – Thea is a house-cat that seems to have it all… she has a warm home, plenty of food and a family that loves her. But something is missing in Thea’s life. Where is the excitement? Where is the adventure?

From children’s author Artie Knapp & illustrator Sunayana Nair Kanjilal, comes a new picture book that answers the question that kids everywhere like to ask… I am bored. What should I do?

FIND OUT THIS SEPTEMBER!

To read early reviews of the book, please click on the book’s cover above. Published by MightyBook Inc, Houston, TX.

More updates to come soon!!!

The North Carolina Press Foundation shared four of Artie’s serial stories to Newspapers in Education (NIE) newspapers across the United States. This year’s theme is Dig into Reading. To read the stories please click on the NC Press Foundation link listed above.

COPYRIGHT © 2013 ARTIE KNAPP

Use of any of the content on this website without permission is prohibited by federal law


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7955. Call for Poetry Submissions: Really System

Really System, a new journal of poetry and extensible poetics, will publish its first issue in January 2014.

We seek new, interesting writing that exhibits a keen awareness of the forms, patterns, and channels through which we find ourselves connected with other people, other things, other worlds. We are looking for vibrant poems inflected by our shared technocultural moment and the ways it envelops us, fascinates us, dances with us, ignores us, and fails us. We are open to poems of any length or form.

More information our magazine here.
 
Read our submission guidelines here.
 
Submissions for issue one are open until December 1, 2013.

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7956. Conference Round-Up: Novel Revision Retreat

The Mid-Atlantic chapter of SCBWI organized the Novel Revision Retreat in Shenandoah this month. In attendance was Alisha Niehaus, Editor at Dial Books for Young Readers (an imprint of Penguin Group, USA). Alisha’s publications/authors include: Savvy by Ingrid Law (2009 Newbery Honor); The Vast Fields of Ordinary by Nick Burd (2010 ALA Stonewall Winner); The Sky Is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson; The Total Tragedy of a Girl Named Hamlet by Erin Dionne. SCBWI member and writer Sue Corbett came out of this stellar event with plenty to share. If you have attended, or plan to attend a conference, please let us know. We'd love you to guest blog for us!
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 Comments on Conference Round-Up: Novel Revision Retreat, last added: 9/16/2013
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7957. A Personal Thank You Letter to J. D. Salinger

Picture

http://www.squidoo.com/book-quest-dear-jerry-salinger

Try it, you may like it. If you leave a comment, I'll be your BF...LOL...

0 Comments on A Personal Thank You Letter to J. D. Salinger as of 9/14/2013 4:48:00 PM
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7958. Writerly gatherings

I feel like I’ve spent the last couple of weeks talking incessantly – I did my first ever radio interview, and then chatted to high school students for Book Week. I buzzed around at Melbourne Writers Festival, and shot up to Queensland for a whirlwind two days at Brisbane Writers Festival.

I’ve been meaning to write a wrap-up of the festivals ­– some words on the awesome writers I met, and the great panel discussions of all things YA, and on signing books for some fabulous young fans, and the giant crushes I’ve developed on, like, half a dozen brilliant authors who I shared the stage with (Randa Abdel-Fattah, I’m looking at you), and the weirdness of sitting in the hotel restaurant while reading a copy of Avengers Assemble, before realizing that its author, Marvel writer Kelly Sue DeConnick, was sitting at the table next to me. I don’t know what the etiquette is for fangirling while someone is trying to eat their breakfast. Potentially not awkwardly shoving their book into your bag and hurrying away before they catch sight of you reading it.

But truth be told, I’m sort of tired of talking about myself. I’ve had a blast over the past few weeks, but I am also really looking forward to curling up in my jammies with my manuscript. I’ve missed my characters. I can’t wait to be in their world again.

Oh, and also, during MWF week, this happened:

 LIFE IN OUTER SPACE IS ON THE INKY AWARDS SHORTLIST!

Needless to say, I was gobsmacked. And speechless. And so completely chuffed to be part of a list selected by young readers themselves. If you’re aged between 12 and 20, you can cast your vote here. Make sure to check out the rest of the shortlist as well. I’m honoured to be among such wonderful writers.

inky_with-website-vector-can-be-resized-to-A2


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7959. Writing Competition: American Literary Review

2013 LITERARY AWARDS

Contest Guidelines
American Literary Review announces its 2013 contests: Short Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, and Poetry.

Three prizes of $1,000 each and publication in the Spring 2014 online issue of the American Literary Review will be given for a poem, a short story, and an essay.

Please submit your work using our online Submission Manager. We do not accept submissions via snail mail or email.

Contest entries must be submitted between June 1 and October 1, 2013.

There is a $15.00 reading fee. Multiple entries are acceptable, but each entry must be accompanied by a reading fee. Entries without a reading fee will not be read or considered.

Please do not put any identifying information in the file itself; include the author’s name, title(s), address, e-mail address, and phone number in the boxes provided on Submittable.

Short Fiction: One work of fiction per entry ($15), limit 8,000 words per work.

Creative Nonfiction: One work per entry fee ($15), limit 6,500 words per work.

Poetry: Entry fee covers up to three poems (i.e. one to three poems would require an entry fee of $15; four to six poems would be $30, and so on).

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7960. Characters


Writing.

Sometimes it just works. Sometimes it doesn't.

I hadn't planned on a writing vacation, but took a little time away from it. I didn't stop thinking about writing. I had no interest in pursuing my story on the keyboard. I've been regular with my composing. Not precisely everyday, but I've felt good about the 15 or more hours I've put in per week.

The problem is a friend pointed out a reality issue with my story and thrown it off kilter. Same friend also had me thinking about characters and the best way to craft them. I’ve put a lot of thought into my people during this writing hiatus.

Experts say, give them a flaw, make them suffer, characters have to grow. And so on. How much this applies to a light-hearted middle grade story I’m not sure? I know, I know. That doesn't matter. The authorities laid out the format so the rules apply to from PB to YA. Publishers and readers are looking for character.

The stories we love have in your face characters, people stuck living in this world. People with relationship problems, people with self-doubt, people on a mission. The situations they are stuck with and the way they deal with them help us deal with our own. People like us, except the authors removed the boring stuff.

Writing vacation is about over. Time to take all this advice and put it into practice.

(This article also posted at http://writetimeluck.blogspot.com)

0 Comments on Characters as of 9/15/2013 2:20:00 AM
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7961. Fiction Competition: Story Quarterly

Story Quarterly is currently accepting submissions to our Third Annual Fiction Contest. The winning story will receive $1000, the first runner-up will receive $300, and the second $200, including publication in StoryQuarterly46/47. The contest entry fee is $18.

This year's contest judge is fiction and nonfiction writer Jess Walter. Walter is the author of six novels and, most recently, the short story collection We Live in Water: Stories (2013).

Deadline for submissions is October 31st, 2013. Winners will be announced by February 1, 2014 and notified by email.

To submit, visit our website.

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7962. Self-Published ebook Competition

WD-SP-ebook_600px1

Writer’s Digest hosts the first-ever self-published ebook competition — the  Self-Published eBook Awards. This self-published competition spotlights today’s self-published works and honors self-published authors.Whether you’re a professional writer, a part-time freelancer or a self-starting student, here’s your chance to enter Writer’s Digest’s newest competition exclusively for self-published ebooks.

Deadline: October 1, 2013

Enter your book into one these categories:

  • Fiction (Includes but not limited to Mainstream/Literary Fiction, Children’s/Picture books, Genre Fiction, Middle-Grade/Young Adult books)
  • Nonfiction (Includes but not limited to Reference Books, Cookbooks, Life Stories)

One Grand Prize Winner will receive:

  • $2,000 cash
  • Interview with winner featured in Writer’s Digest magazine
  • Winner’s name on the cover of Writer’s Digest magazine (subscriber issues)
  • $200 worth of Writer’s Digest books
  • 30-minute platform & marketing consultation with Chuck Sambuchino, author of Create Your Writer Platform
  • Subscription to Writer’s Digest magazine

The First-Place Winner in each category will receive:

  • $500 in prize money
  • Recognition in Writer’s Digest magazine
  • $100 worth of Writer’s Digest Books
  • Subscription to Writer’s Digest magazine

The Second-Place Winner in each category will receive:

  • $250 in prize money
  • Recognition in Writer’s Digest magazine
  • $50 worth of Writer’s Digest Books
  • Subscription to Writer’s Digest magazine

Honorable Mention Winners will receive $50 worth of Writer’s Digest Books and be promoted on www.writersdigest.com.

All entrants will receive a brief commentary from the judges.

THE RULES:

1. The competition is open to all English-language self-published books for which the authors have paid the full cost of publication, or the cost of publication has been paid for by a grant or as part of a prize.

2. You must enter online. Acceptable file types include .epub, .mobi, .ipa, etc.

3. Entries will be evaluated on content, writing quality and overall quality of production and appearance.

4. All books published or revised between 2008 and 2013 are eligible. (Writer’s Digest may demand proof of eligibility of semifinalists.)

5. We accept check, money order or credit card payment for the required judging fee. Regular entry fees are $85 for the first entry, $60 for each additional entry Payment must be received before a title goes to the judges.

6. All Entries submitted must be postmarked by October 1, 2013. All winners will be notified by December 31, 2013.

7. Judges reserve the right to re-categorize entries.

8. Books which have previously won awards from Writers Digest are not eligible.

9. Employees of F+W Media, Inc. and their immediate families are not eligible. Books published by Abbott Press are not eligible to participate.

10. Writer’s Digest is not responsible for the loss, damage or return of any books submitted to the competition.

I know the fee to submit is high, but the rewards could be great. Good luck!

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Filed under: awards, Competition, Contest, opportunity, Places to sumit, Self-publishing Tagged: e-book contest, Writer's Digest e-book Awards

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7963. Literary Fellowship: Kenyon Review

In 2012, The Kenyon Review welcomed the first of its KR Fellows. This initiative was inspired by the great tradition of Kenyon Review literary fellowships awarded in the 1950s to writers such as Flannery O’Connor and W.S. Merwin in their formative years. These fellowships represent a significant fulfillment of one aspect of our continuing mission: to recognize, publish, and support extraordinary authors in the early stages of their careers. We believe that after two years, these KR Fellows will be more mature and sophisticated writers, teachers, and editors. As a result, they will be extremely attractive candidates for academic positions as well as for significant publishing opportunities.

General Information

This two-year post-graduate residential fellowship at Kenyon College offers qualified individuals time to develop as writers, teachers, and editors. Fellows will receive a $32,500 stipend, plus health benefits. Fellows are expected to:
  • Undertake a significant writing project and attend regular individual meetings with faculty mentors.
  • Teach one semester-long class per year in the English Department of Kenyon College, contingent upon departmental needs.
  • Spend approximately 15 hours per week in non-teaching semesters assisting in creative and editorial projects for The Kenyon Reviewand KROnline.
  • Participate in The Kenyon Review Summer Programs.
  • Participate in the cultural life of Kenyon College by regularly attending readings, lectures, presentations, and other campus activities.

Eligibility

Eligible candidates must meet the following requirements:
  • An MFA or PhD in creative writing, English literature, or comparative literature completed before October 1, 2013 but no earlier than January 1, 2008.
  • Teaching experience in creative writing and/or literature at the undergraduate level.

Application Details

Applications will be accepted electronically beginning September 1 and ending October 1, 2013, and should include the following:
  • A cover letter
  • A curriculum vitae
  • An 8-10 page writing sample
  • An unofficial transcript
  • Two letters of recommendation, one of which should directly address the applicant’s teaching ability
All application materials, including letters of recommendation, must be submitted by October 1st, 2013 for full consideration. There is no application fee.

Timeline

  • September 1st – October 1st, 2013 • Application Period
  • November, 2013 • Applicants notified about first round decisions
  • December, 2013 • Online interviews with semi-finalists
  • January, 2014 • Kenyon College campus visit for finalists
  • February, 2014 • Final decisions
  • August 15th, 2014 • Fellowship begins

Contact Information

For questions or more information please visit our Frequently Asked Questions page
Or contact:
Tory Weber
Associate Director of Programs and Fellowships
The Kenyon Review
Finn House
Gambier, OH 43022
740-427-5391
fellowships@kenyonreview.org

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7964. Penguin Cha-Cha Book Launch

Today was the Book Launch Party for PENGUIN CHA-CHA at my local Barnes & Noble. What a toe-tapping, knee-knocking, rocking good time!


My dashing penguin companion made sure all was ready.
A wonderful local bakery, Fresh Baked by Tracy, made the cakes with my illustrations on them.

The cakes turned out adorable.
The books were set up and ready for readers.

I signed my first Penguin Cha-Cha book. Yay!

The line formed.
The stand-up cut-outs were a hit. 
Turn yourself into a dancing penguin!

I read the book to the kids.
We learned the basic cha-cha-cha step.
Then we learned how to hold our hands to make them into pretty Latin dancing hands.

Put the steps and arm motions together to cha-cha! 
A sweet group of friends.

A darling dancer.
Thank you to all who came and helped my penguins to dance into the hands of readers!

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7965. Media Kits

It's easier to get publicity if you can give out a media kit. 

http://www.girl-who-reads.com/2013/08/author-media-kit-components.html

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7966. Poetry Competition: Anna Davidson Rosenberg Poetry Awards 2013

Poetica Magazine Presents:

The Anna Davidson Rosenberg Poetry Awards - 2013

The Anna Davidson Rosenberg Awards for Poems on the Jewish experience were established by Nedda Fratkin, Marvin Rosenberg and Violet Ginsburg in memory of their mother, Anna Rosenberg, née Davidson in 1987.

The 2013 annual poetry competition is sponsored by Poetica Magazine, Contemporary Jewish Writing.

Subject:
Jewish Experience (irrespective of author's ethnicity or religious affiliation)

Submission Deadline:
Postmarked by November 15, 2013

Fee:
No Entry fee
Supported by a grant from the Rosenberg Family

Awards:
Total prize money of $3,000.00 will be distributed between 1-3 places and honorable mentions

Format:
Submit 1-2, one page poems , single/double spacing.
Submit in quadruplicate hard copy (*no email submissions).
Contact information should appear on the cover page only.
Also, in the cover page, please list the title poem/s.
Please do not submit previously published poems.
All entries will be recycled - not returned.
Winning poems will be E-published.
*No special delivery/signature.
Notification by email.

Notification:
April 2014 during Poetry Month

Please submit to:

Poetica Magazine/ADRAward
P.O. Box 11014
Norfolk, VA 23517

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7967. New Books And Rereads On My Shelves And IPad

Well, I finished the delightful new Neil Gaiman book, which will get its review very soon, and by the way, the father who has all those adventures going out for a carton of milk is definitely drawn as the author! More anon.

My birthday brought me one book from my nephew David. It's a biography of Steve Jobs, written on request by the subject, while he was already dying. He didn't require to be shown the manuscript before publication or to have control over it. He just wanted it written.

I admit it wasn't a book I would have bought for myself, although I quite like biographies, depending on the subject - usually a historical bio of someone dead for a few hundred years, though I have read quite a few of Tolkien and C.S Lewis. But I began reading it yesterday and got through 100 pages. It's a fascinating story. Did you know he was born the same year as Bill Gates? Well, I didn't, and it's a nice way to be able to compare. I hadn't realised he was adopted either, or that he refused ever to meet his biological father, considering his adoptive parents as his real and only ones. Which is nice to know, because he gave them a lot of troubles in his childhood and teens. He wasn't a nice man, but a nice man couldn't have achieved what he did. The nice man he worked with wouldn't have gotten those wonderful computers past the hobbyists. I have left it at my mother's place,to be read in bed while I'm there, as it's a thick, heavy hardcover I can't carry in the train.

And early yesterday morning, when I couldn't sleep, I discovered, to my delight, that Poul Anderson and Gordy Dickson's Hoka stories were available on ebook. If you haven't read them, go get them NOW! The Hokas are a loveable race of ursinoids(think giant teddy bears). They simply adore Earth history and literature and enjoy playing with them. In fact, they live them. A Hoka delegation on Earth are charmed by Don Giovanni and take on all the roles, nearly causing disaster. Another bunch of Hokas become the Space Patrol of a popular children's series. On the planet itself, there are Hoka versions of everything from the French Foreign Legion to Victorian England, including a Hoka Sherlock Holmes. It's all seen from the viewpoint of Alex Jones, a young man given the job of Plenipotentiary, who keeps getting caught up in various Hoka adventures. The one I downloaded first was Earthman's Burden, but I mean to buy the others, Star Prince Charlie and Hoka! 

Star Prince Charlie has a Hoka in it, but isn't set on the Hoka homeworld. A young man, Charlie, and his Hoka tutor, who is playing the role of an Oxford don,  visit a world with a situation similar to Scotland in the time of Bonnie Prince Charlie and this inspires the Hoka to become a Scottish clansman, with his charge as Bonnie Prince Charlie. Delightful!

Time to arise, eat, clean and prepare classes. Sigh!

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7968. Self-Published ebook Competition

WD-SP-ebook_600px1

Writer’s Digest hosts the first-ever self-published ebook competition — the  Self-Published eBook Awards. This self-published competition spotlights today’s self-published works and honors self-published authors.Whether you’re a professional writer, a part-time freelancer or a self-starting student, here’s your chance to enter Writer’s Digest’s newest competition exclusively for self-published ebooks.

Deadline: October 1, 2013

Enter your book into one these categories:

  • Fiction (Includes but not limited to Mainstream/Literary Fiction, Children’s/Picture books, Genre Fiction, Middle-Grade/Young Adult books)
  • Nonfiction (Includes but not limited to Reference Books, Cookbooks, Life Stories)

One Grand Prize Winner will receive:

  • $2,000 cash
  • Interview with winner featured in Writer’s Digest magazine
  • Winner’s name on the cover of Writer’s Digest magazine (subscriber issues)
  • $200 worth of Writer’s Digest books
  • 30-minute platform & marketing consultation with Chuck Sambuchino, author of Create Your Writer Platform
  • Subscription to Writer’s Digest magazine

The First-Place Winner in each category will receive:

  • $500 in prize money
  • Recognition in Writer’s Digest magazine
  • $100 worth of Writer’s Digest Books
  • Subscription to Writer’s Digest magazine

The Second-Place Winner in each category will receive:

  • $250 in prize money
  • Recognition in Writer’s Digest magazine
  • $50 worth of Writer’s Digest Books
  • Subscription to Writer’s Digest magazine

Honorable Mention Winners will receive $50 worth of Writer’s Digest Books and be promoted on www.writersdigest.com.

All entrants will receive a brief commentary from the judges.

THE RULES:

1. The competition is open to all English-language self-published books for which the authors have paid the full cost of publication, or the cost of publication has been paid for by a grant or as part of a prize.

2. You must enter online. Acceptable file types include .epub, .mobi, .ipa, etc.

3. Entries will be evaluated on content, writing quality and overall quality of production and appearance.

4. All books published or revised between 2008 and 2013 are eligible. (Writer’s Digest may demand proof of eligibility of semifinalists.)

5. We accept check, money order or credit card payment for the required judging fee. Regular entry fees are $85 for the first entry, $60 for each additional entry Payment must be received before a title goes to the judges.

6. All Entries submitted must be postmarked by October 1, 2013. All winners will be notified by December 31, 2013.

7. Judges reserve the right to re-categorize entries.

8. Books which have previously won awards from Writers Digest are not eligible.

9. Employees of F+W Media, Inc. and their immediate families are not eligible. Books published by Abbott Press are not eligible to participate.

10. Writer’s Digest is not responsible for the loss, damage or return of any books submitted to the competition.

I know the fee to submit is high, but the rewards could be great. Good luck!

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Filed under: awards, Competition, Contest, opportunity, Places to sumit, Self-publishing Tagged: e-book contest, Writer's Digest e-book Awards

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7969. Creative Nonfiction Competition: 2013 Wabash Prize

The 2013 Wabash Prize for Nonfiction is now open! Sycamore Review is accepting previously unpublished essays and nonfiction works of 7,500 words or fewer for consideration in the second annual contest. This year's prizewinning piece will be selected by acclaimed author Cheryl Strayed, and will be awarded a $1,000 prize and publication in Sycamore Review.


Submissions are due October 15 and are accepted via the online submission manager only. Entry fee is $15 and $5 for each additional story. Entrants receive a one-year subscription to Sycamore Review. 

All entries are considered for publication.
 
For more information and to submit your work, please visit our website

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7970. Slushing For ASIM



  • For the few of you who have no idea what ASIM is, or think it's short for Asimov, it's Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine, which I have mentioned in previous posts. I'm a second-wave member of the ASIM team - not the original bunch, but one of the next lot to join. People have come and gone over the years, but we still have quite a few who have been with the team since nearly the beginning and a few who have been there since the start. And somehow, we've kept it going and it's now up to issue 58. Mine, issue 60, will be out early next year and I'm proud to say that I have five first sales, including one poet and one story writer who had previously self published(well, most poetry has to be self published these days, so it was lovely for the author to finally be paid!)

    All but one of my stories I found in slush - and that one I asked to look at because I was short of submissions in that genre, and it turned out to be only a second sale. The author is herself a slush reader, though for a different publication. And here's where I am going to get to my point: we're a popular market. There are some Hugo and Nebula nominees out there who sold us their first stories. We're so popular that our slush wrangler, Lucy Zinkiewicz, is currently short of slush readers. I have agreed to take on more stories per week, but that really isn't enough.

    This is a volunteer thing. There's no money in it. But if you're a writer who wants to see the slushpile from the other side or an editor who currently has no work and wants to keep their hand in or just a reader who would like to read new stories, this is a good place to come. It's fun. My sister does one story a week, because she has done the Holmesglen writing and editing course and wants to keep her hand in.

    You don't have to be a professional. You don't have to live in Australia, everything is done by email. You just need to love speculative fiction. You can volunteer for as little as one story a week or as many as suit you. It's a real eye opener and if you are a writer yourself, you will have a better idea of what happens on the other side of the slushpile and maybe grumble a bit less when your masterpiece comes back. Or maybe, after having seen some of the submissions we get, you will appreciate why a story might be rejected, apart from the readers being philistines. ;-) In fact, we have a wide variety of readers, from the ASIM members, who are all writers themselves, to those who are just keen readers and think what they would and wouldn't be willing to pay for in a magazine.

    If interested, contact Lucy at asimsubmissions@gmail.com.

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7971. What Are Your Impressions of Caroline by line?

I've been blogging since September 2009 -- a solid four years -- and I think it's time for some feedback from you, my readers.

If you'd be so kind as to fill out this brief survey, I'd very much appreciate it. I'll be giving away a signed copy of MAY B. to one participant randomly selected at the end of September.

Thank you to all who've stopped by this space in the last four years. Here's to many more conversations together!

Having trouble leaving a comment? Click on Caroline by line and try again.

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7972. Coming Soon!

Picture


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7973. SET MOVE-IN. From Garage to stage.

Today the sets went from my garage to the stage. For the first time the actors got to rehearse with the major set pieces. (there's more to come.)  Scroll to see the sets coming together and then becoming the back drop to this great cast. I designed the sets so that most pieces turn around to become something else. Lots of fun to watch!
The set's home for four months- my garage

The "kitchen" gets packed up.

Part of the large panel- the Italian Market.

Luckily we don't live far from the theater. WIDE load.

Everything is put on rolling platforms.

Refrigerator in place. (Mike made that refrig- Scott built the kitchen.)

It opens!

Classroom. ( the reverse of the Market).

Cast warming up.

Burger Shop is reverse of Kitchen. (signs to come)

Kim and Grandma in "Town".

Grandma visits the classroom.

"Listen up, class."

"I come from a Royal Family, you know!"
(Thank you to my set construction team- Mike, Bob, Scott and Steve- and Jeremy my intern!...And husband Eric, the expert mover! I could not have done it with you!!!)...PS- Wait till you see the BUS!  Hope to see you there!- Maryann

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7974. Life is a Balancing Act


I wrote part of this on Facebook and it flew away before I was able to click post. After finishing this I tried to make some changes , it wouldn't lets me. I tried three times and the post disappear. This is my last try.

The Arkansas Ozarks hills are filled with numerous creative artists. Thursday, I attended the Area Art Club at Hill Country Gallery on the Mountain Home square.

I enjoyed our member Margie Payton’ presentation on Collage Art; Margie and Jeanie Roth have an art show at the gallery. Last night I dropped in to see Dana Johnson’s beautiful painting exhibit at the Palette Art Gallery in Yellville.

 

Saturday, September 21, Free verse Poets CD “Driftwood” will be released

and I am looking forward to listening to 16 poets read two poems each. I enjoyed their first CD “Expressions.” I didn’t read on the first one, but I was honored to read two on the second recording.

 

I am putting together all my finished writings in different genres, editing and filing

with guidelines of different publishers and magazines to submit, one at a time. If this is supposed to be I’ll be published, if not, another road will open up for me to travel.

 

It is difficult balancing everything. Just finished laundry, lunch, and there are a few more projects to do before a busy week ahead. The main thing to get behind me is workman from Hopper’s coming Tuesday and Wednesday to spray wash the house and deck, clean gutters, repair and stain the deck. If this works out there are a few more small jobs need to be done outside and inside the house before winter.

 

I have the greatest artist who paints the sky encouraging and directing me. Without Him, I am nothing.
 

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7975. Writer Myths: Kill Your Darlings.

Hi folks, I'm continuing my series on writer myths and that is coming up, but first, I've got to mention some egg action. You may remember that once upon a time I chatted about eggs.  It's been a while since I've had an opportunity to mention this fun part of my blog. This week we are near the hatching phase of "egg-dom." So, news is to come!

Now, back to myths. Last week, I chatted about the myth of bad reviews. This week I'm moving on to the myth of "kill your darlings." Okay, it is true that you must often kill your darlings. I mean, most of us remember some relationship that just wasn't moving us forward, and it had to go. Sometimes, we write bland, flat drivel that needs to find the nearest circular file, and that's fine.

But there are times when you need to put down the murder weapon. I mean, killing some of those darlings is a crime or  at least a crying shame.

Here is my story. Once upon a time I was collaborating with another author on a project. I would write an awesome line, and the other author would love it too. Then a few days later, I'd get into slasher mode and ditch my awesome line. Delete.

My collaborator was unhappy with the slashing of "awesome" lines.

I answered, "I can always do better." But certain things slowly became clear. I can't aways do better.

My collaborator was like, "I think you are killing our story, and please stop it."

I learned something I love about writing in that moment. Every story is about a kind of collaboration. You and the reader are sitting by a fire. You are the spell maker; they are the mesmerized.  If you have created magic the first time, just let it be.

Sometimes you will get it right without trying. Don't second guess yourself. Never leave genius on the cutting room floor.

See you next week with more about writer myths, and perhaps a reason to throw a party!

And now for a mythical doodle. This one is called "Pixie."



Finally here is a quote.

I wake up to the sound of music
Mother Mary comes to me
Speaking words of wisdom, let it be
.

Paul McCartney




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